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We saw some other Christian memes and we just thought wouldn’t it be fun if we had our own memes for our crowd – for pastors, church leaders, people who have to deal with the same stuff that we deal with.

In terms  of  communicating  the  Christian  faith,  Piepho  is  keen  that  believers  shouldn’t   take  themselves  so  seriously  all  the  time.  Comedy,  absurdity  and  other  expressions  of   joy,  he  argues,  are  a  necessary  counterpoint  against  the  ‘weighty,  heavy’  subject  the   church  has  a  responsibility  to  communicate.  His  full  interview  is  recorded  in  Appendix  9.   The death of Christ, the Resurrection, the spiritual matters, Creator of the cosmos… It’s so weighty that we sometimes forget who put joy in the heart. Joy is a fruit of the Spirit. That isn’t to say that all humour produces joy, or that joy is merely a product of humour. But too often we deal with these weighty things and forget that we can laugh, it is OK to be humorous, it is OK to poke fun at ourselves, to not take ourselves so seriously all the time. Yeah, I think that’s a really important facet of Christianity. At our church even, we have this thing we call the FIASCO – it’s an acronym that reminds us what kind of personality we should have when doing ministry. And F stands for Fun. We reach primarily a group of people in poverty. There’s a study by Ruby Payne, Framework for Understanding Poverty. She talks in there that if you can’t find humour, if you can’t laugh at yourself, people in poverty tend not to listen to you as well.

Cognisant of  the  potential  for  conflict,  Pope  Benedict  addressed  issues  of  divisiveness   in  his  address  for  the  47th  World  Communications  Day  in  2013.  Speaking  of  the  need   for  discernment  and  wisdom,  he  referenced  the  Bible  passage  in  1  Kings  19  which  tells   of  God  being  heard  not  in  the  dramatic,  but  in  the  quiet.     For those who have accepted the gift of faith with an open heart, the most radical response to mankind’s questions about love, truth and the meaning of life – questions certainly not absent from social networks – are found in the person of Jesus Christ. It is natural for those who have faith to desire to share it, respectfully and tactfully, with those they meet in the digital forum. Ultimately, however, if our efforts to share the Gospel bring forth good fruit, it is always because of the power of the word of God itself to touch hearts, prior to any of our own efforts. Trust in the power of God’s work must always be greater than any confidence we place in human means. In the digital environment, too, where it is easy for heated and divisive voices to be raised and where sensationalism can at times prevail, we are called to attentive discernment. Let us recall in this regard that Elijah recognized the voice of God not in the great and strong wind, not in the earthquake or the fire, but in ‘a still, small voice’.

It  may  not  be  immediately  obvious  what  the  social  media  equivalent  of  that  ‘still,  small   voice’  may  be,  but  seeking  some  form  of  juxtaposed  quietness  when  met  with  a  social   media  ‘storm’  would  appear  to  be  adroit.  

Putting Your  Faith  in  Social  Media  

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Putting Your Faith in Social Media  

Research findings regarding the social media expression of people of faith. By David Giles, Web and Social Media Manager at The Salvation Ar...

Putting Your Faith in Social Media  

Research findings regarding the social media expression of people of faith. By David Giles, Web and Social Media Manager at The Salvation Ar...