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A COMPILATION S A M A N T H A A LT I E R I


/ A Compilation / This portfolio catalogues a range of projects completed in my undergraduate and graduates studies, as well as my personal design endeavors and professional work. As someone who is particularly interested in the rigorous process that reveals itself as a result of making, I have tried to include not just the final artifacts and efforts, but a representation of the entire process. For the past few years, working steadily in a cross-discipline manner has transformed the way I see the world of design and has allowed me to push boundaries and develop these areas of overlap. I’m eager to see how each of these adjacent disciplines shape my future career path.


01

Urban Community

02

4D: A Gaze at the Performative

03

Inter / Rhythm

04

Immersion

05

Aspiring Architects

06

Bigger than a Breadbox, Smaller than a Building

07

Sign Shop

08

Selected Works

Sweet Home Chicago Mews


01

Urban Community Mission Hill, Boston, MA Spring 2012 / Professor Herman Zinter The objective for this project was to work within our studio to cohesively design a master plan for the community of Mission Hill. At the same time, we each individually proposed our own mixed use urban design, which involved housing, retail and community spaces. After completing an urban analysis and investigating design concepts as well as methods of sustainability, we were asked to become familiar with issues of cultural diversity, community, and social responsibility. Continual collaboration, communication and team work led to a successful master plan and design, which was eventually presented to the current residents of Mission Hill.


Our team aspired to create a diversified and inviting atmosphere, welcoming the Alice Taylor residents to share the amenities of the new community space. The sculptural bike garden on the northern part of the plot, adjacent to the Alice Taylor apartments, provides seating, bike racks, and plenty of vegetation.

< Final Wood Model Built Collectively by Studio Class

Entire Studio Masterplan >


01 ^ Building Elevations


LEGEND Green Space Vehicular Traffic Pedestrian Traffic ^ Floor Plans (Ground, Level 1/3, Level 2/4)

Retail Intersecting Strands


01 The courtyard unit residences are arranged in an eastwest orientation, providing views to the soccer field and toward Halleck Place, a heavily used pedestrian strip. Each unit includes an enclosed central courtyard with a unique sculptural stair, as well as a place for a writing, composing or studying. This central core is full of light and life, and is a mediator between the areas of living and dining. The interior walls include efficient built-in storage, allowing the rest of the floor plan to be flexible and free of clutter. The design welcomes its residents home and establish a retreat and a departure from the surrounding busy urban context.

^ Section Through Courtyard Unit

^ Courtyard Unit Model


^ Floor Plans of Courtyard Unit (Level 1, Level 2)


02

4D: A Gaze at the Performative Prague, Czech Republic Graduate Thesis 2012-2013 / Professor Marc Neveu This thesis project explores architecture as performance, provoking a discussion that shifts the conversation from what architecture is to what architecture does. It aims to reveal the often overlooked temporal qualities of place. Temporality constructs differences in how we view or understand the same objects, places, and spaces at different times. This constant shifting within the environment provokes a discussion about temporality that raises the question, How can architecture not only construct an atmosphere, but also frame particular moments in time?

^ Circulation Study of Old Town Square


The world’s oldest working medieval astronomical clock, Prague Orloj, is located within the extents of the Old Town Square [Staromestské Námestí] in Prague, Czech Republic. Each hour, the clock performs for a short time, both aurally and visually, introducing figures that parade out of the window. During this hourly ritual, crowds of tourists and city-dwellers gather around the tower to see the performance, celebrating with applause. This thesis project intervenes adjacent to the town hall in the Old Town Square, providing various ways of arriving at the viewing platform at the top of the clock tower.

Daytime Ancient Czech time Present day time

Sunrise Daybreak

Star time [siderial time]

Twilight Mean revolutions of moon

Start/end of ancient day

Astronomical night 24 hour clock [12+12]

^ Prague Orloj


02 The five elevators that compose the project are tied to a shared central machine collectively establishing a rhythm and heartbeat, yet each maintains a separate rhythm and pace. Each platform is oriented in a particular direction, focuses on a particular view, operates at a particular speed, and connects to a particular amount of platforms. The system encourages an array of paces: meandering, lingering, pausing, glancing, speeding, and rushing.

^ Initial Mixed Media Diagrams

The 5 Elevator Systems >


02 Each elevator tells a different story but all of them run concurrently on cyclic time. The first platform rises and falls within the span of a minute, the next within an hour, the third within a day, the forth within a month, and the fifth within year. May 7th is the day where all five of the platforms align, embracing two different times: one, the historical time of Prague, commemorating the wing that was bombed and the 27 people that lost their lives, and two, the present time in which all elevators (minute, hour, day, month, and year) align, a ritual that occurs only once per year. This syncopation results in a new ritual for the city.

^ View toward Old Town Square

Mixed Media Drawing Transferred to Canvas >


02 To conclude our thesis studies, our class designed and curated an exhibition which displayed our cumulative investigations over the course of the year. The final six artifacts produced for my thesis were digitally drawn, printed and then transferred onto canvas using a wet and dry method that took 48 hours to complete. Each of the elevator canvases were suspended from an assembly with an Arduino-based script tied to a rolling mechanism. The drawings rose and fell, in accordance with their particular set of specifcations, over the course of the five hours.

^ Final Exhibition


^ Detail of Drawings on Canvas

^ Rubbing Technique Used to Transfer Drawings


03

Inter / Rhythm Rockport, MA Summer 2013 / Artforming Inter/Rhythm was the result of SummerBuild, an experiential learning opportunity for students and working professionals of art and design. It was an intensive two-phase workshop that considered the relationships between art, architecture and landscape through a combination of emerging technologies and engagement with materials and assemblies. Phase One involved collaborative design explored through one-to-one scale experimentation combined with sensitivity toward site conditions. Phase Two involved translating design thinking into built form and resulted in a temporary site-specific installation.

^ Early Schematic Design Process


^ Team Brainstorming


03 The project took 14 days to design and build, with four of those days entirely devoted to construction. Most of the building was completed off site so as not to disturb the area residents. As one of four partipants in SummerBuild, I was able to dramatically strengthen my collaboration and design thinking skills. The condensed timeline of the program urged us to make decisions quickly and enthusiastically, despite the long nights and hours worked. I helped create the 3D model using Rhino and Grasshopper, I generated the material take-off list with nested dimensions to eliminate waste, created efficient strategies for a streamlined fabrication process, and worked side by side with both my peers as well as the coordinators of the program.


On-site Installation at Lumber Wharf


03 The final project found its inspiration in the natural and man-made forces present in the physical, historical, and social dimensions of its location. The materials and form were a response to the cycles and rhythms present on site, such as activity change, mean solar time, as well as the lunar and tidal cycles. Inter/Rhythm aimed to augment its visitorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; time and awareness of the visible and audible phenomena by creating both contemplative and social gathering spaces, directing views out to the ocean as well as toward the town of Rockport.

^ Site Plan

Final Installation at Dusk >


03 Construction was completed just in time to provide ample seating and standing spaces to observe the townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first-ever public fireworks show in August. LED lights were incorporated in the design to illuminate the structure at night, making it a visible artifact from across the wharf.

^ Opening Night Fireworks Show


^ Inter/Rhythm Illuminated on Lumber Wharf


04

Immersion Seaport District, Boston, MA Fall 2012 / Professor Rob Trumbour The work was the product of a collaboration between me and 11 other graduate students in response to a 10day travel component at the start of the semester. The trip included visits to New York City, the landscape of Big Bend National Park, Texas and to Marfa, Texas to see the work of artist Donald Judd. The scalelessness of Big Bendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s landscape helped us to understand time more clearly, allowing the self to become the unit of analysis. As modern distractions were disregarded and the present moment was emphasized, the landscape invited us back in the center while the environment became the periphery. After returning home to Boston, we worked in a highly collaborative setting to translate these findings into a design for a project that would later be fabricated. Exhibited as an installation in the Seaport District, this project utilizes a field of PVC pipes to depict immersion through density.

Lighting Plan Ground Lighting 18 Count Mid-ConenctionLighting 22 Count

^ Site Plan


Steel Conduit Pipe ^ System Assembly and Components

6â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Triangulated Grid

Steel Banding

Top Bracket

Top Triangulated Grid


04 The installation was comprised of approximately 960 13-foot vertical members of 1/2 in. x 10 ft. PVC piping. The members were assembled with 10 foot PVC pipe attached to an additional 3 feet of piping with 1 in. PVC coupling. The members were connected in modules of three and assembled at three connection points; one at grade, one at 10 feet, and another in the middle with a flexible vertical range.

13’

1/2” x 3’ Vertical PVC Vertical Member 1/2” x 3’ PVC Member

Metallic Two-HoleStrap Strap Metallic Two-Hole (Fastened with 5/16” Galvanized (Fastened w/ 5/16” Galvanized Steel Carriage Bolt) Steel Carriage Bolt) 10’

1/2”PVC x 10’ Vertical PVC Vertical Member 1/2” x 10’ Member

Molded Resin Light Molded Resin Light Housing 20 Watt Halogen Bulb Housing 20w Halogen Bulb ConduitPipe Pipe Steel Steel Conduit (Flattened Ends) (Flattened Ends)

3/4” .020 Type 304 3/4” .020 304 Stainless SteelType Strapping

5’

Stainless Steel Strapping

Metallic Two-Hole Metallic Two-Hole Strap Strap

x 1-1/4” Galvanized 5/16” x 1-1/4”5/16” Galvanized Steel Steel Carriage Bolt Carriage Bolt

1/2” x 10’ PVC 1/2” x 10’ PVC Vertical Member Vertical Member

6”

x 20” Steel 7/8”7/8” x 20” Steel Thinwall Conduit Pipe Thinwall Conduit Pipe

^ Exploded Axon of Connection Detail

0’ -12”

AXON ^ Exploded Axon of EXPLODED Assembly

View into Expansive Field >


04 Throughout the semester, we learned an extraordinary amount about working with our client, Boston Properties and the Boston Society of Architects, managing budgets, and establishing a streamlined process for efficient fabrication and design. Although the project was not able to be built, we created a Go Fund Me fundraising page to raise money as a class in order to buy materials and fabricate mock-ups of the system. My role in this project varied day to day, but my main responsibilities included drafting a proposal and set of detailed construction drawings for our client, working one-on-one with another classmate to create and manage an efficient project schedule, as well as collaborating with my team to establish a numbering system to maintain a high level of organization throughout fabrication.

^ Installing the Mock-Up

^ Prototyping Connections


^ View to the Sky

^ Triangulated Grid Above


05

Aspiring Architects Brookline, MA Summer 2013 / The Park School I led 4 counselors and 12 campers, grades 3-7, at a design/build summer camp hosted by the organization, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Summer at Park,â&#x20AC;? called Aspiring Architects. I created the rigorous two-week curriculum and designed both inside and outside workshop spaces at the Park School in Brookline, MA. Over the course of the two weeks, I taught campers about construction, tool use, attachment methods, as well as basic design principles, and then guided their design/build strategies toward the creation of three lightweight structures. Video: https://vimeo.com/70910397

^ Campers and Counselors


^ Outdoor Workspace


05 The completed structures made use of building materials such as wood strapping, bamboo, PVC, corrugated plastic, and colored trash bags. Connections were executed through the use of zip-ties, jute, and nails. The campers learned how to operate saws, screwdrivers, and accurately measure and dimension the building materials. At the conclusion of the two week program, we hosted a small opening exhibition to showcase the collaborative work efforts and invited other campers at the Park School as well as family and friends.


BSA Space, Boston, MA Summer 2015 / Khôra

Wall 12

This project was a collaboration between Rob Trumbour and Aaron Willette of the design/research practice Khôra. The exhibition depicted the power of architectural installations by featuring works by an array of Boston-based and international designers and architects. The exhibition content was collected from our call for entries on an architectural competition hosted on the website, Bustler. The winning entries were selected by a jury, and the final exhibition at the BSA Space presented over 30 projects and more than 10 physical examples of installation.

Wall 1

Wall 11

3’1”

15’6”

Wall 3

4’9-7/8”

5’2-5/8”

Wall 2

Wall 13

Wall 9

Wall 10

6’6”

Wa

ll 6

27’

l8

-11”

W al

06

Bigger than a Breadbox, Smaller than a Building

10’9-1/2”

’-0

27

Wall 4

Wa

ll 7

Wall 5

14’-

0”

Layout i

Intro

Intro

Teaching

Intro

History

Competition

Practice

Supergraphic

Theory

Wall Elevation

^ Axon and Plan of Exhibition Layout BSA Space


^ Matrix Diagram


06 ^ Graphic Identity

^ Timeline of Art, Architecture and Installation


06 As a co-curator and designer for this exhibition, I was involved in all facets of design, from the early stages on our collective drawing table through to the opening night. I established the graphic identity for the exhibition and produced a portion of the highquality graphics and diagrams that catalogued the showcased projects. I helped with the procuring of materials and the final layout of exhibits. On opening night, I welcomed visitors and gave small tours to groups.


07

Sign Shop Braintree, MA Fall 2013-Present / Taylor & Burns Architects The Sign Shop is a 26,000 square foot one-story building for the Massachusetts Department of Transportation. Program includes 3 sign production areas including material storage, a fabrication shop, and a finishing shop for digital screen printing, painting, laminating, and assembly in a dust-free environment. Supplementary amenities include a loading dock, a gantry for hoisting within the production areas, indoor parking for 3 vehicles, as well as support spaces such as offices, a conference room and a break room. The project is currently in the bid phase.

^ Front Elevation with Colored Rainscreen Panels


5/8" INTERIOR GWB, PTD.

12" STEEL STUDS @ 16" O.C.

CONT. ATTACHMENT SYSTEM AT EACH PANEL SIDE JOINT (36" O.C.) VERTICALLY AND FASTENED INTO FRAMING MEMBER HORIZONTALLY

B2

B3

VERTICAL SUBFRAMING AND AIR CAVITY(36" O.C.)

CONT. ATTACHMENT SYSTEM AT EACH PANEL SIDE JOINT (36" O.C.) VERTICALLY AND FASTENED INTO CLOSED PANEL END FRAMING MEMBER HORIZONTALLY W14 POST,SUBFRAMING SEE STR. DWGS VERTICAL AND AIR CAVITY(36" O.C.)

B4 B2

FLUSH PANEL CLIP

5/8" INTERIOR GWB, PTD. FLUSH PANEL CLIP

B1

INSULATED BACK-UP PANEL, R-21 B4 B2

B3 B1

CONT. ATTACHMENT SYSTEM RAINSCREEN PANEL TYPE B AT EACH PANEL SIDE JOINT (36" O.C.) VERTICALLY AND FASTENED INTO FRAMING MEMBER HORIZONTALLY

B4

RAINSCREEN PANEL TYPE B LEGEND B1 B2 B3 B4

12" STEEL STUDS @ 16" O.C. R-21 INSULATED BACK-UP PANEL,

B1

RAINSCREEN PANEL TYPE B

B2

PARAPET, TYP

RAINSCREEN PANEL WITH X1 COLOR* RAINSCREEN PANEL WITH X2 COLOR* PROJECTED PANEL COURSE WITH Y1 COLOR* FLUSH PANEL COURSE WITH Y2 COLOR*

B3 B2

B4

*SEE SPECIFICATION SECTION 074213 METAL RAINSCREEN WALL PANELS FOR SELECTED COLORS

B1

1

VERTICAL AND AIR RAINSCREEN PANEL SUBFRAMING TYPE B LEGEND CAVITY(36" O.C.) B1 B2 B3 B4

RAINSCREEN PANEL WITH X1 COLOR* FLUSH PANEL CLIP RAINSCREEN PANEL WITH X2 COLOR* PROJECTED PANEL COURSE WITH Y1 COLOR* INSULATED BACK-UP PANEL, R-21 FLUSH PANEL COURSE WITH Y2 COLOR*

RAINSCREEN PANEL TYPE B *SEE SPECIFICATION SECTION 074213 METAL RAINSCREEN WALL PANELS FOR SELECTED COLORS

B1

METAL RAINSCREEN TYPE B

SCREEN TYPE B

SCREEN TYPE A

5/8" INTERIOR GWB, PTD.

B1

12" STEEL STUDS @ 16" O.C.

B3

AXONOMETRIC - METAL RAINSCREEN TYPE B 1" = 20'-0"

B2

RAINSCREEN PANEL TYPE B LEGEND B1 B2 B3 B4

RAINSCREEN PANEL WITH X1 COLOR* RAINSCREEN PANEL WITH X2 COLOR* PROJECTED PANEL COURSE WITH Y1 COLOR* FLUSH PANEL COURSE WITH Y2 COLOR*

*SEE SPECIFICATION SECTION 074213 METAL RAINSCREEN WALL PANELS FOR SELECTED COLORS

1

W14 POST, SEE STR. DWGS 5/8" INTERIOR GWB, PTD.

AXONOMETRIC - METAL RAINSCREEN TYPE B 1" = 20'-0"

W14 POST, SEE STR. DWGS 5/8" INTERIOR GWB, PTD.

12" STEEL STUDS @ 16" O.C. 12" STEEL STUDS @ 16" O.C.

CANOPY, TYP

CONT. ATTACHMENT SYSTEM AT EACH PANEL SIDE JOINT (36" O.C.) VERTICALLY AND FASTENED INTO FRAMING MEMBER HORIZONTALLY

CONT. ATTACHMENT SYSTEM AT EACH PANEL SIDE JOINT (36" O.C.) VERTICALLY AND FASTENED INTO FRAMING MEMBER HORIZONTALLY

VERTICAL SUBFRAMING AND AIR CAVITY (36" O.C.) INSULATED BACK-UP PANEL, R-21

VERTICAL AND AIR W14 POST,SUBFRAMING SEE STR. DWGS CAVITY (36" O.C.) 5/8" INTERIOR GWB, PTD. INSULATED BACK-UP PANEL, R-21

METAL RAINSCREEN TYPE A

FLUSH PANEL CLIP

12" STEEL STUDS FLUSH PANEL CLIP@ 16" O.C.

RAINSCREEN PANEL TYPE A

CONT. ATTACHMENT SYSTEM RAINSCREEN PANEL TYPE A AT EACH PANEL SIDE JOINT (36" O.C.) VERTICALLY AND FASTENED INTO FRAMING MEMBER HORIZONTALLY VERTICAL SUBFRAMING AND AIR CAVITY (36" O.C.) 4' PERIMETER CONCRETE FOUNDATION WALL

INSULATED BACK-UP PANEL, R-21 FLUSH PANEL CLIP RAINSCREEN PANEL TYPE A

3

AXONOMETRIC SECTION - BUILDING ENVELOPE WITH CANOPY, TYP. 1" = 40'-0"

^ Axonometric of Typical Building Envelope

4

AXONOMETRIC SECTION - BUILDING AXONOMETRIC - METAL RAINSCREEN TYPE A 1" = 40'-0" ^ Axonometric

2

2

1" = 20'-0"

AXONOMETRIC - METAL RAINSCREEN TYPE A 1" = 20'-0"

of Rainscreen Panel Types

3

AXONOMETRIC SECTIO

3

AXONOMETRIC SECTIO

1" = 40'-0"

1" = 40'-0"


07 As project manager for the Sign Shop, I was responsible for all phases of design, including preliminary site studies, schematic design, design development, as well as construction documents. I wrote specification language and helped to select building products and materials. Additionally, I delegated tasks to my team and I took responsibility for ensuring that the project was completed on schedule. I remained in constant communication with our sub-consultants in order to coordinate civil, architectural, structural and MEP/FP building systems. The project was drafted and modeled in Revit, allowing our design team to efficiently create a comprehensive and coordinated set of drawings.

^ 3D View of Revit Model


1'-8 3/8"

5.7 1'-1 5/8"

10'-11 7/8" 1'-1 5/8"

D1

2 1 A4-07 A4-07

C1

B1

D

1'-1 1/4"

D.2

DR

A6-05 1

01B 4'-4"

G

1 5/8"

01C 1'-9 3/8"

ENTRY 01 212 SF RF-1

7'-7 1/4"

DR

7'-5"

1 A4-06

1 A2-03

2'-10"

1'-3 5/8"

1 A3-04

5.3

5.2

2'-5 5/8"

2 3 4 5 A4-06 A4-06 A4-06 A4-06

1'-4"

1'-5 1/4"

A1

2'-5 5/8"

1'-9 5/8"

01A

4'-0"

6'-11 7/8"

1'-4"

5 A4-07

D.6 D.7

2 A3-04

RECESSED WALKOFF MAT SURROUNDED BY RESILIENT FLOORING, SEE STR. DWGS FOR SLAB DEPRESSION

DR

2 A2-03

3

^ Detailed Plan of Entry

ENLARGED PLAN - ENTRY 1/4" = 1'-0"

^ Laser Cut Model; Basswood and Plexiglas


08

Sweet Homes Chicago Mews Bronzeville, Chicago, IL January 2016 / Taylor & Burns Architects This project was a two week long design charette submitted for the Tiny Homes competition for AIA Chicago. The competition prompted us to investigate the emerging typology of microliving and submit a proposal for new solutions to affordable housing for young homeless individuals in Chicagoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s historic Bronzeville neighborhood. The site required 10 housing units (350 SF each) with a generous communal space for social gatherings, meetings and storage. We had to comply with accessibility requirements as well as the City of Chicago building and zoning codes. Our proposal created a community with homes that shaped the shared outdoor space, known as the mews. To make construction affordable, we proposed prefabricated modular units that have a tiny service core for utilities, with each unit costing less than $30,000. The units contain a front and back porch, light-infused dining, study and kitchen spaces, as well as ample storage. Our communal building includes a large garage door which opens to allow functions to spill out into the mews during warmer months. The outdoor mews is complimented by a designed streetwall and a public front yard with trees, flowers and a community garden.

^ Site Plan


^ Aerial View of Prefabricated Modular Assembly


08 Throughout the two week design process, I was a contributor to critiques, pin-ups, and design discussions. As a team, we created a thorough project schedule and initiated meetings at the conclusion of each work day to ensure that we stayed on track. As the deadline arrived, I was responsible for the coordination of drawings and the assemblage of the final presentation board for submission.

^ Sectional Perspective: North / South

^ Floor Plan of Housing Module


^ View into Mews from Porch


Collaborations and Credits: 01 | Urban Community Kev Conant, Casey Galante, Steven Hien, Bao Nguyen, Sam Partington, Jennalyn Plouffe, Brad Taris, Chelsea Vollmer 02 | 4D: A Gaze at the Performative Marc Neveu (Primary Advisor), Rob Trumbour (Secondary Advisor), Carol Burns, Mike Webb, Joe Jazwicz, Jon Delgado 03 | Inter / Rhythm Co-Participants: Steven Hien, Bao Nguyen, Valerie Maccarone Coordinators: Rob Trumbour, Aaron Willette, Alex Cabral, Jared Steinmark, Stephanie Rogowski, Tony Sanchez

04 | Immersion Viviana Bernal, Erblin Bucaliu, Kate Bujalski, Alex Cabral (Wood Shop Technician), Brittany Carey, Kristen Giannone, Ryan Kahen, Mark Morin, Bao Nguyen, Samantha Partington, Charlie Simmons, Liem Than, Rob Trumbour (instructor) 05 | Aspiring Architects Miles Camp, Nick Gelos, Alison Mykles 06 | Bigger than a Breadbox, Smaller than a Building Rob Trumbour, Aaron Willette, Rith Ean

07 | Sign Shop Taylor & Burns Architects design team: Robert Taylor, Carol Burns, Jake Bienkiewicz, and Patrick Brady 08 | Sweet Home Chicago Mews Taylor & Burns Architects design team: Robert Taylor, Carol Burns, Jake Bienkiewicz, Patrick Brady and Vien Nguyen

Samantha Altieri Design Portfolio  

Samantha Altieri Portfolio: A compilation of selected projects completed at Wentworth Institute of Technology, Khora, Artforming, and Taylor...

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