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African-Australian News Magazine.

Welcome to our first edition!

Australia, meet Africa Inside this issue Zita Ngor doorknocks her way into the history books Kilburn Chicks kick Aussie Rules goals It’s not about being black or white Concern over jobless levels among African-Australians

Plus

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Marrakech Restaurant head chef shares his lamb tagine recipe!

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SDA membership: 28,000 workers in retail, fast food & DCs won’t go to work without it!

The SDA is the union that looks after 200,000 members across Australia and 28,000 retail, fast food and warehouse workers in South Australia.

We do all the hard work for SDA members when it comes to wage rises and better workplace conditions. For more information or to join the SDA, contact us on (08) 8139 1000 69 Fullarton Road, Kent Town SA 5067

SDA membership: Don't go to work without it! 2/

JOIN NOW! sda.com.au A F RICA N -AU ST R A L I A N N EW S MAG A Z I N E


A MESSAGE FROM JAY WEATHERILL

Welcome to the first edition of SALT Magazine As Premier of South Australia, I am delighted to have been invited to officially welcome readers to this magazine. I believe that social harmony is born when diverse parts come together to form a pleasing whole. It is important to encourage Australians from different backgrounds to come together so we can make our country an even better place to live, work and raise a family.

We have a diverse population – and our future will to a large extent be defined by the successful fusion of these varied experiences, backgrounds and talents.

The emerging economies in Africa bring the promise of important opportunities for Australian companies. In South Australia, our Government is working to enhance our international relationships by building a broad based economic, institutional and cultural engagement.

As Premier of South Australia, I would like to promote the positive contribution that Australians of African origin are making to South Australia. SALT Magazine will give voice to the many emerging

I hope that this magazine will help promote the

African-Australian communities in Australia. It will

beauty of the respective African cultures, and can

also provide an avenue through which your stories can

assist members of the community express their sense

be shared and possibilities can be explored.

of joy obvious to anyone familiar with the different

South Australia has throughout its history benefited greatly from the many cultural groups that have contributed to the State’s ongoing development.

magazine now available online!

www.saltmagazine.org Facebook “f ” Logo

CMYK / .ai

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FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK

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forms of African music, dance and sport. Magazines such as SALT provide an important platform from which the African-Australian communities can express the strength and vitality of the many African cultures.

Want to contribute?

SALT Magazine is all about the community so we are always looking for contributors for future issues. Perhaps you have a story idea or a passion for writing? Get in touch at hello@saltmagazine.org and we’ll contact you.

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Contributors Sidique Bah - PUBLISHER Sidique came to Australia in 2001 after fleeing a civil war in his homeland of Sierra Leone. He studied journalism at Fourah Bay College in Sierra Leone and worked as a reporter for the Statesman Newspaper. He studied a Bachelor of Arts specialising in Multimedia Studies at the University of South Australia.

Jariatu Gbla Jariatu sought refuge with her mother and sister in Gambia from civil war before coming to Australia at age 9. Jariatu is about to complete a double degree of Commerce and Business at Flinders University.

Amadu Wurie Barrie Amadu has worked for various newspapers in Africa. He has completed a Bachelor degree in Information Systems in Australia. He will be keeping us up to date with African-related issues in Canberra.

Sulaiman Forna Sulaiman currently holds a BA degree in

Inside this issue

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Africa, meet Australia

Sierra Leone born Jariatu Gbla talks about her first trip home since arriving in Australia.

kick Aussie 6/ Chicks Rules goals African-Australian girls prove footy is not just for Aussie males.

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Zita doorknocks her way into the history books

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African-Australian parent discusses education

Meet Australia’s first female African-Australian to stand for Federal Parliament - and now she’s aiming for State politics.

Get involved in your child’s education, urges African-born Amadu Barrie.

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Concern over jobless levels among African-Australians

The harsh reality of African-Australian unemployment figures.

Anthropology and Asia Pacific Community Development and is doing his Masters in International and Community Development. He will be keeping us up to date with African-related issues in Cairns.

TANJA RUDD Tanja is currently living in Namibia with her husband and family. Over the next 12 months SALT Magazine readers will share the Rudd family’s experiences as Australians in Africa.

Credits

Editorial Sidique Bah, Jariatu Gbla, Amadu Barrie, Sulaiman Fornah, Tanja Rudd, Joan Atkinson, Bob Dixon-Short PHOTOGRAPHY Ben Searcy, Prue Kidd, Peter Schlenk DESIGN Inadifs Productions PRINTING Replica Press

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Cover

Jariatu Gbla pictured in Adelaide City Photo: Ben Searcy


Editorial

a little salt is good for all of us... By Sidique Bah

SALT Magazine is a celebration for over 17,000 members of the strong African community in South Australia, who bring their rich cultural history, traditions and food from 44 countries. Producing this magazine is the realisation of a dream for me. I came to Australia as part of a group of fellow journalists seeking refuge from war ravaged Sierra Leone. Australia was not our first choice of destination, but it was the best kind of fate, karma, luck, or good fortune which brought us here.

satisfaction of finding a new, safe home. I also want the mainstream, wider public to gain a better understanding of US - their new neighbours. This magazine will act as a platform for each and every member of the African community to voice their views, spread their humour, promote their activities - and share their journeys. Salt is a common ingredient amongst communities throughout the world. It remains a valuable trade commodity and was once a means of payment in ancient times. So too do I want this new born magazine to be commonly found among all Australian communities.

I want it to be, in just a small way, a means by which we can repay this country’s hospitality.

Since my arrival in 2001, having overcome many challenges while adjusting to this new and strange country, and almost being overwhelmed with responsibilities during that period, my thoughts of journalism were cast aside. Over time I realised there is a need for an African-Australian magazine here. What I hope to do with SALT Magazine is to shine a bright light on our African communities, to explore from all angles the settlement challenges we face, the adjusting processes we endure and the ultimate

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I want SALT magazine to be on kitchen tables, in restaurants, cafes and reading rooms around the country. I want it to be a valuable means of spreading our message, to open the paths of communication, to tell fellow Australians who we are, why we’re here and what we do. I want it to be, in just a small way, a means by which we can repay this country’s hospitality. SALT Magazine is here, and I thank you for your support.

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Africa, meet Australia By Jariatu Gbla

The time has finally come for me to take a trip back to Africa. I arrived in Australia over 12 years ago, on June the 9th 2001. I celebrated my 10th birthday the next month.

So I am confident that I will not face problems of communications. I am hoping to add a bit more accent to my Krio, as I have been told it lacks an accent, and I believe that is where the beauty of our language comes from.

I remember my flight to Australia; I could not eat anything much the airline offered. The food all tasted foreign and strange so I could only have fruit, cereal and orange juice. Our flight lasted four days, and on all those days I did not eat rice which I really love so it was a herculean effort on my part. My diet has evolved and changed since then and I have gained a real appreciation for Australia’s multicultural cuisine.

I have a large extended family: 14 siblings from my mum’s side and 10 from my dad’s and countless cousins to visit and connect with. I am especially very grateful for the opportunity to visit my only surviving grandparent. I have been warned that as a ‘JC’, (Krio slang that means ‘just come from overseas’) I will not be able to cope with life in the rural villages. I am adamant that I can, and also improve my Temne, the language spoken by my tribal ancestors.

I remember arriving in Australia and all I felt was wonderment, awe and gratitude at the opportunity to grow, study and live in such a safe and beautiful country. I remember coming out of the airport and looking outside at taxis, people coming in and out while we were waiting to be picked up. On our drive to our house, I looked and looked, and then I pinched myself to check it was real. I have so many more memories but now I look forward to going back to the place I was born. I am going back to Sierra Leone this summer, and the excitement and adrenaline is kicking in.

I am fortunate to have been afforded the opportunity to be an Australian and call Australia home but I still feel the need and desire to give back to Sierra Leone as a child of the land so I will volunteer at a local school or community project while I’m there. I look forward to being around Sierra Leoneans, our humour, passion for life and hospitality warm my heart. I will also shop ‘til I drop and will buy Africanas, the traditional African print clothes. I am determined to navigate the capital Freetown without getting lost.

I came to Australia as an African and now I go back to Sierra Leone as an African-Australian. I came to Australia as an African and now I go back to Sierra Leone as an African-Australian. I am the product of both cultures and I go back with a unique perspective. I have great hopes of reconnecting with my heritage and culture and meeting all my family members, most of whom I have never met. I am fortunate to speak fluent Krio, the lingua Franca of Sierra Leone that is spoken by 98% of the population.

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I will visit our beautiful beaches and enjoy the natural beauty of the Lion Mountains. I hope to come back to Australia with more than just great memories; I want to return with a strengthened identity of who I am as an African and an Australian and a greater understanding of how my unique identity can be used to bless those less fortunate than myself.


PHOTO: Ben Searcy

I hope to come back to Australia with more than just great memories; I want to return from my trip with a strengthened identity of who I am as an African and an Australian. Jariatu Gbla

See the next issue

azine to of SALT Mag riatu’s trip catch up on Ja ra Leone. home to Sier ISSUE ON E

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Coach Mal Thiel briefing the team before the match

PHOTOS: Peter Schlenk

LOOK OUT

These chicks can kick! As far as most African-Australian families living in South Australia were concerned, the game of footy was consigned to the eccentric world of big hefty guys and TV coverage. But all that changed recently because a group of young and enthusiastic Sudanese girls from the Kilburn Community are challenging the footy stereotype and displaying their prowess in the Kilburn Girls U16 Footy Team - The Chicks, so called because Kilburn was known as ‘Little Chicago’ in the 1920s. After a few games and a bit of practice, the Chicks are ready for next season’s tournament. The girls are keen, the coach is impressed and the Kilburn

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Kilburn Chicks warming up before playing at AAMI stadium as a curtain raiser to the Port vs Collingwood game in the AFLs Womens Round

community is fired up to support them.....and it’s all happening because of the relentless enthusiasm and effort of the coach, Malcolm Thiel, who lives and breathes footy. SALT Magazine went along to a fundraiser at Kilburn Football Club, to meet some of the girls and their coach and to get a feel of how this game is impacting the lives of both the girls and the community. The Kilburn Football club canteen was jam packed when we arrived, with two AfricanAustralian girls at the counter, selling pies, sausages and drinks. With a bright smile one of them run off to fetch their coach for the interview. Malcolm soon turned up, and happily gave us his time. He became involved he says, because there had been some concern about antisocial behaviour among youngsters in the Kilburn community, which prompted the local authorities to look for ways to better engage with them. Power Community Limited, which is associated with the Port Adelaide Football Club, came to the rescue by setting up a ‘mixed’ footy team to encourage more integration of African youth into the mainstream Kilburn community.


Some of the African players from the Kilburn Chicks

Following his experience coaching youngsters in Vanuatu, Malcolm was the perfect choice to do the same for African kids: “I’ve done cross cultural coaching before, and I believe in this game so much that I just saw it as a perfect opportunity”.

The African community has breathed new life into the club Ben Bryan President Of The Kilburn Junior Colts

Against the odds, the team came out swinging, finishing third in this year’s competition.

girl stuff,” he said. “But one by one, they became enthusiastic and started to ask questions about kicking, running and handballing…. I thought ‘I’ve got you…I’ve got you’ and it was a really good feeling.” The Kilburn Chicks have broken the ice between the African community and the wider Kilburn community. According to Ben Bryan, President of the Kilburn Junior Colts, “They’ve breathed new life into the club. We have new skills and new faces and yes, even new challenges.” For this bunch of girls, playing footy has been an eye-opening experience, they’ve even discovered the fun in getting muddy and catching and kicking a funny shaped ball.

Malcolm tackled concerns of parents who saw sport as a distraction for their daughter’s education by pointing out that some players were getting better grades since joining the team. He also had other distractions to sort out.

Player Josefine Alei, 14, describes the team as one big family: “We’re all very close and love being part of it all. I used to get angry a lot in school, you know with bullies and everything but football has taught me self-control and I have been really happy about how my behaviour has changed this term.”

“At the start, some of the girls were more interested in catching up and using training as an excuse to get away from home and talking about their hair and

Malcolm says it’s now time for African boys to follow the girls, and start playing Aussie Rules.

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ZITA NGOR

Aiming to make a change! A strong determination to succeed has placed Zita Ngor in the history books of Australian politics as the first female AfricanAustralian to stand as a candidate for the Federal Senate.

Zita was born in Sudan and migrated to Australia as a five year old. Based in Adelaide, she is a qualified lawyer, and is currently the Director of Women’s Legal Services in South Australia. While her bid to enter Federal Parliament was unsuccessful (this time), participating in the election has strengthened her resolve to win public office and help to shape the policies that she believes in. Zita is now considering nominating for the Legislative Council, in the South Australian election in March 2014.

Nigerian Igbos in Adelaide celebrate Iri Ji ceremony The Iri Ji ‘New Yam’ Ceremony and Festival is an annual event celebrated by the Igbo people in August at the end of the West African rainy season. Yam is a staple food in the Nigerian diet and the Ceremony is steeped in very cultural traditions, tying individual Igbo communities together in a symbolic celebration of the abundant produce of the land. This year, the Igbo community in Adelaide held a very successful celebration in the Denson Centre at Mawson Lakes.

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Zita is very calm, composed and firm in her belief that diversity is not adequately represented in the political arena. That’s why she ran in the Federal Election: “I felt that it was important that somebody puts up their hand and at least have a go,” she said. For the past few years, Zita has been involved in delivering leadership programs for young women throughout Australia, programs which particularly cover Australia’s political system. One of the issues consistently raised by participants is the absence of females of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) backgrounds, especially of African origin, in the media and in political life. Zita says she felt that to honour her work of encouraging their active participation.... “I needed to put my money where my mouth was, and by putting up my hand it’s demonstrating to those young women that you can always have a shot.” As to whether she was confident of winning in such a competitive environment, Zita says that she knew there were many challenges to overcome, but she considered her attempt as a ‘foundation building exercise.’ Youth unemployment, affordable housing, home ownership and juvenile delinquency are some of the issues that Zita would have tackled if she had been successful in her campaign. She strongly believes that even though she did not win, she has opened the door to encourage members of her community and


Zita Ngor

people from new and emerging communities to be involved in politics. Overall her aim was to see Australia develop a policy regarding the recognition, acknowledgment and appreciation of diversity within our society, creating avenues for communities to be able to inform and engage with governments about issues that affect them. She especially considers that a Bill of Rights is something from which all Australians can benefit. Zita is hopeful that with the support of the Australian public and the African-Australian community, she will eventually have the opportunity to address the issues that she is passionate about. She has learned that early preparation is the key, and that talking with and engaging members of the community is essential.

One of the things you can be sure of is that I will keep knocking until I get in. Running her campaign also gave Zita a greater appreciation for the amount of work that politicians actually do. ‘Until you’ve gone through this process, you never fully understand how much work goes into running for an election … it does take a lot out of you, ‘ she says.

Her advice to aspiring politicians is to ensure they have the support of family and friends because the task is just too great to ‘go it alone.’ “Once the decision is made you have to devote and entirely commit yourself to the process... and you can’t be afraid to knock on doors,” she said. We are sure of one thing after talking with Zita - she will keep knocking on doors until she succeeds. So, when she knocks on your door, listen to what she has to say, tell her about the things that concern you - and you never know- one day soon she may be in a position to tackle those issues!

Afrikarts Australia is an organisation that unites people through the art and music of Africa. We are currently looking for artists (painters, sculptors, cartoonists etc) to work with on our future projects. If you've got the talent, please send a CV and sample images of your work to afrikartsaustralia@gmail.com or contact Phil Allan on 0431 213 409 to arrange a meeting.

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STORIES FROM NAMIBIA - AN AUSSIE’S EXPERIENCE

I t’s n o t a b o u t being black o r w h i t e…. By Tanja Rudd

Beneath the armor of skin and bone and mind, most of our colours are amazingly the same.

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Aberjhani proverb


Adelaide’s Rudd family – Tanja and Matthew and children Lua Bela, 3, and Vida, almost 1 – are in Namibia for a year while Matthew pursues his dream to volunteer on an international community development project. They will be sharing their experiences with SALT magazine... After deciding to move to Africa, Namibia to be more precise, my husband and our two daughters were able to spend 6 weeks in Johannesburg as part of our in-country orientation program.....it was during our stay there, that we were able to learn of the amazing and difficult history of South Africa and draw inspiration from the story of one of the most famous leaders of all time, Nelson Mandela. We were part of a group of 8 volunteers, all sent here as part of the Australian Volunteers for International Development Program. We were the only family in this group…everyone thought we were crazy for deciding to move to Africa with two small children.

It suddenly hit us that we were in Africa. Amazing! And now we were the odd ones out. One day, instead of spending it with the group, we decided to do a family activity and search for a playground for our girls. On the way we stepped into a shopping centre to get something to eat. It was huge and soooo busy. Wherever we walked it was obvious people were talking about us.....I thought it was because of our three-year-old, who has bright red curly hair….so we were used to having people pointing, smiling and talking to her. A little while later we realised it wasn’t just our daughter who was attracting all this attention - it

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was all of us! I looked at my clothes and checked my hair in the reflection of a shop window. No, I don’t have any stains or something on my face and my hair looked just fine. Only then did I start to actually look back at people, observe everyone around us and I realised that for the whole hour we spent there we didn’t spot one single white person. Ha! It suddenly hit us that we were in Africa! Amazing! And now we were the odd ones out. We did not feel afraid or intimated but there is no doubt that being stared at is an unnerving sensation. It brings out a sense of feeling uneasy, paranoid maybe, uncomfortable certainly, and I have no doubt that this happens just as much in Australia. People stare, observe and follow your movements, but I think that most of the time it’s not about being black or white….it’s just about being DIFFERENT! This feeling of insecurity was unlike anything I had felt before, and being by ourselves and not knowing anyone, made us feel incredibly lonely and unsure of ourselves and our actions. It’s amazing how looking different can make you feel but when we did talk to people in shops and on elevators, we found them all to be very friendly and welcoming. Now I understand a little better, just how difficult it must be for people who ‘look a bit different’ when they arrive in Australia. Having felt the discomfort of being different in a strange place, as well as knowing the joy of being accepted, we just ask Australians of all colours, origins and backgrounds to remember embrace the difference and take the first step to make newcomers feel welcome, I’m sure you FOLLOW will be pleasantly rewarded online to for taking the effort. u head Make sure yo azine.org www.saltmag e with dat to keep up to ces! n ie their exper

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African

Twilight Market

AFRICAN TWILIGHT MARKET IS BACK!

Come and be a part of a vibrant and energetic celebration of African culture! EVERY Friday evening during Daylight Saving months from 6pm – 9.30pm at Prospect Plaza on Prospect Road (between Prospect Council Chambers & Cibo’s) Contact David for more information on 0427 002 568 or email malindad@dodo.com.au

Government of South Australia

Rotary Club Prospect Sunrise

Community Benefit SA

Proudly supported by Lutheran Community Care, Prospect City Council and funded by Community Benefit SA (SA Government) and the Department of Immigration and Citizenship.

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African Communities Organisation of SA President and African Twilight Market Coordinator David Malinda pictured with stall holder Sumi Mondol

Welcoming the African Twilight Market for 2013 Daylight Saving has started and that means one thing to us - the African Twilight Market is back on! Running every Friday evening during the Daylight Saving months it’s a great way to start your weekend. This open air market offers you a taste of Africa, selling a diverse range of African products, including:

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African arts and crafts African jewellery and accessories African food and drinks African clothing and material African instruments African hair products Henna painting with traditional African designs

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DON’T MISS THESE AFRICAN TWILIGHT MARKET STALL HOLDERS: Sleepy Giraffe Sleepy Giraffe is a homewares and accessories brand, which specialises in products made from traditional African fabric.

Team Vista Team Vista is a Not for Profit organisation that supports a community in Tanzania, East Africa. They sell products made by their Women’s Empowerment groups in Tanzania, such as handmade bags, skirts and jewellery. 100% of the profits go back to the community in Tanzania to provide education and health care to children most in need.

Saba Tewolde Saba Tewolde is from Eritrea and sells clothing, baskets, bags and other items from Africa and the Middle East

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My business doesn’t only target Africans...it targets everyone. AIMÈ MUGICHO

African Pride Superstore owner Aimè Mugicho hard at work, with client Jay Salimu

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AFRICAN SMALL BUSINESSES

On the rise despite the challenges As the number of African-Australians increases, more and more specialty shops are springing up, selling the products people used to buy back in Africa. And while many of these shops now supply a huge range of goods across Adelaide, many AfricanAustralians are now facing up to the challenges and risks of operating a small business. SALT Magazine visited Aimè Mugicho, an upcoming African entrepreneur in Adelaide to talk about his shop African Pride Superstore in Woodville Park. Aimè arrived in Australia in 2001 from The Congo and is married with three children. He arrived with a Master’s Degree in Economics, but, as is the case with so many other qualified new comers, the degree wasn’t recognised here. So Aimè had to revise his plans. He worked a while, saved some money, then used his economics background to do something he was passionate about - starting a business. The door to the Kilkenny Road shop opens with a welcoming chime. Rows of shelves are stacked with a variety of goods sourced from Africa - including Palm Oil, Pounded Cassava, Yams, Kenda, Eegusi, to name just a few - popular ingredients and condiments for the African community, especially those from West Africa. Customers come and go and Aimè serves every one of them with a smile, while his wife is busy at the far end of the shop braiding a client’s hair.

At the moment, Aimè works another job to help finance his growing business, which he hopes will one day create job opportunities for those who find it hard to get mainstream employment. Although he and his wife have to work ‘swap shifts’ in the shop, they are happy to face the challenge head on and are positive the business will continue to grow. His customers are from varied backgrounds; Australians, Africans, Indians and many other nationalities drawn to buy from one of the four departments - cosmetics, hair products, grocery and clothing, or to get beautified in the hairdressing salon. Aimè welcomes the competition from other African shops. “It’s all good,“ he says, “my business doesn’t only target Africans, it targets everyone. I love Australians because they love to taste different foods from different countries... so I am getting a lot of Australians. The more Africans opening businesses, the better. Competition is good.” On a more serious note, Aimè faces many challenges including increased electricity costs, taxes and acrossthe-board rises in the cost of doing business. He says State and Federal governments need to be more supportive of small business, particularly those in new and emerging communities which have the potential to create employment. For those who want to follow in his footsteps, Aimè’s advice is “Know what you are doing, have some knowledge of business, and prepare to work hard”.

CONTACT

re de Supersto African Pri lle oad, Woodvi 15 Kilkenny R LAIDE Park, ADE 52 (08) 8445 15

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Students at the School of St Jude’s in Tanzania hard at work

iss Don’t spM irational

Miles apart... but so close to home They may be miles apart but a special bond binds Australia and Tanzania. It started when Gemma Sisia, a countrywoman from New South Wales, decided to build a school in Arusha. The School of St Jude would be for children from impoverished backgrounds, who had the academic potential to make a big impact on their country. What started with three students and one teacher has blossomed to more than 1,650 students, three campuses and boarding facilities for over 1000 students. The school is completely free and offers a standard of education that is on par to international, private schools. However, the ties go deeper. Each year, hundreds of sponsors from Australia and overseas donate funds and resources so St Jude’s students can have

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St Jude’s in his Mollel during speaker Felix a. of East Afric first trip out ons head to To see locati fstjude.org www.schoolo

uniforms, nutritious food, high quality teachers and buses to transport them to and from school. At the backbone of St Jude’s, is the school’s tireless staff which includes more than 450 Tanzanian employees and 40 international volunteers, the majority from Australia. Most of the Tanzanian staff are permanently employed and work in all areas of the school including teaching, IT, cleaning, maintenance, gardening and in the Visitor Team. Inspirational Tanzanian Felix Mollel works at St Jude’s and is taking his first trip outside of East Africa to Australia this October to share the achievements of the school. “I love my job at St Jude’s because I am able to provide for my family and ensure my daughters can have a good education,” says Felix. He’ll be travelling with the St Jude’s Director of International Relations Kim Saville and they’ll be visiting major cities across Australia including Melbourne, Brisbane and Perth.


PHOTO: Prue Kidd

Amadu Barrie helping his children (l-r) Iraellah, 7, Chernor Ma’arju, 5 and Fanta, 9, with their homework.

Our children are the future, and Australian schools are there to shape that future.

THOUGHTS OF AN African-Australian PARENT

Our role in our childrens’ education By Amadu Barrie, Canberra

There’s an African saying that “Only a parent would wish their child to be better than them in every nicety that life has to offer - beauty, intelligence, education, security, wealth and health.”

My attitude towards my own kids’ education changed positively after reading an article by the school chaplain in their school’s weekly newsletter, which encouraged parents to become involved and interested in their education - outlining such simple questions like “How was school?”

Parents, rich or poor and of any nationality and background, want their children to succeed. In this country, education is more than just a child’s right - it is compulsory, with penalties for those who do not ensure their children receive the standard of education that the law requires.

That article made me a fan of the school’s newsletter, and I became a Parent & Citizen (P&C) Representative on the school board. I’m proud to say I participate in as many of the school’s activities as I can.

How then can we best help our children when many, if not most, of African heritage come from nonEnglish speaking homes, and may require some form of extra support with their schooling? As an African-Australian parent, I am grateful for the opportunities this country offers, and, like many others, I am keen too see my children succeed.

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When I became involved my kids appreciated my efforts and it lifted their confidence - making them proud to be part of the school community. You can all do the same - the first step is the hardest - but I’m sure you will find everyone will benefit, and remember, our children are the future, and Australian schools are there to shape that future.

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Africairns Zulus poised to clinch Multicultural Gala Trophy Cairns-based African youth co-ordinator Sulaiman Fornah tells how the game of soccer is helping local African youth and the wider community in Cairns.

With 49 Goals in 11 matches, there seems to be no stopping the mighty Africairns Zulus from winning the Cairns Annual Multicultural Soccer Tournament this year. Bigger Australian cities such as Sydney, Melbourne and Perth have much larger African community groups compared to Cairns. Here, the total number of Africans is just under 500, mostly from Sierra Leone, Sudan, Burundi, Zimbabwe, Rwanda, Congo, and Ethiopia, and children and youths constitute a large proportion of this community. Soccer had been growing in popularity among young African boys over the years, but it had been quite difficult to establish an African soccer club. This was due to lack of basic resources and setbacks when they competed in local football tournaments and galas. I called all the boys together and with community support established a training routine and a plan to develop our game spirit. We played ‘friendly’ matches against other teams including the Hmong, Bhutanese, Japanese and Chinese community. We participated in the Cairns annual Multicultural gala in September 2012 and secured fourth position. After that excellent finish, we started to take the game seriously. Regular training sessions were fully attended, the coach’s word became law and team discipline and spirit improved rapidly. Finally, our determination was rewarded. We won our first-ever tournament in a gala organised by the Hmong community in December 2012. We won the trophy and a small purse, but more importantly, the boys realised the change in their own attitudes and their own approach to the game had brought about this success.

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This increased their determination to excel even further. Unfortunately, I found out this year that we are still not able to register our team in a division of the Cairns league because of the small size of our community and our lack of resources. Instead I have encouraged some of the boys to register in other premier division clubs to enhance their capability, and this has paid off very well. We did, however, register our team in the Cairns Multicultural Soccer Tournament which is currently being held over a three-month period. At the moment we lead the tournament table by a huge margin. The teams we now beat with ease were teams we struggled against when we started early last year. With some luck and without any huge unforeseen events, we are very confident of winning this tournament as we have an unbeaten record. Everyone involved is looking forward to that wonderful day when the proud and mighty Africairns Zulus will, at last, be crowned the community soccer champions of the Far North Cairns region.

Bravo Africairns Zulus!

A cross section of players from the Africairns Zulu team


Unemployment issues for AfricanAustralians in South Australia By Mwalusi

The issue of high unemployment rates among Australians of African descent has remained largely hidden, mainly because statistics of these numerically smaller populations are distorted when combined with larger and more established regional groups in most government reports. Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) data for July 2013, reflect a South Australian jobless rate of 7.1%, however, unemployment rates for people of African backgrounds, remain much higher than for the general population - 18.5 % for those of sub-Saharan origins, and 16.2% for North Africa. Even then these statistics do not reveal the rate of ‘under-employment’ in these groups - that is, being employed but at a level far below their professional, technical or trade, qualifications and skills. Accordingly it is timely to seek solutions in the employment policy of the new Liberal/National coalition government. Essentially, its employment policy is based on a philosophy that job creation (along with investment, higher wages, and better standards of living) depends on productivity and competitiveness. In fact, somewhat unimaginatively, the policy is called the Policy to Create Jobs by Boosting Productivity, which is then tied into the second leg of the philosophy, by claiming that competition provides the initiative to boost productivity.

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The policy sets out 20 priorities which will be pursued to achieve this intended outcome. These include - abolishing both the carbon tax and the minerals resource rent tax; providing personal and corporate tax cuts; review of Australia’s competition laws (which from a conservative government usually results in loss of consumers’ protections); review and ‘improvement’ of Fair Work laws ( refer previous but substitute employees’ protections); child care and parental leave schemes; better planning of infrastructure. As is apparent, increased employment and job creation are considered to be by-products of these priorities. Direct action on job creation appears to be limited to a plan to boost employment participation for older unemployed Australians by introducing a Seniors Employment Incentive payment to encourage employers to take on job seekers over the age of 50. In the absence of any other specific announcements, this policy does not offer or contain any immediate relief for the unemployed of non-English speaking backgrounds. Equally as unfortunate for this group, the new Government appears not to have a specific multicultural policy, certainly there is no inner cabinet multicultural portfolio. It therefore remains to be seen whether there will be a shift away from a real focus on Australian multiculturalism, and if so, what measures, if any, will be taken to improve the prospects of AfricanAustralian job seekers.

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MARRAKECH RESTAURANT

Food with soul When looking for somewhere pleasantly comfortable but distinctly exotic to dine in Adelaide, Marrakech Restaurant at 66 King William Street, Hyde Park ticks all the boxes. Marrakech is a Moroccan retreat, an escape from the city of churches to an atmosphere evocative of the Casbah - in turn bustling with Mohamed Bartaouch activity then providing drifting serenity against a background of tinkling music and the murmur of happy diners. The staff are friendly, the service they provide is unique to Marrakech - sometimes choosing for you what they think you will enjoy more - and together complementing the succulent, spicy and aromatic choices of food on offer. Mohamed Bartaouch is chef, owner and life and soul of Marrakech. He is proud of what he has achieved with his restaurant, and happily spoke to SALT Magazine about his journey from the heat and deserts of North Africa to a quiet, Adelaide suburb. ‘I have always loved cooking ever since I was a kid helping my mother prepare food for her catering business’ he said, ‘and when I moved to Australia I couldn’t resist the idea of starting up my own food business to do something I really wanted to do.’ This was despite his qualification as an engineer - ‘I guess I liked the idea of cooking more,’ he explained.

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A F RICA N -AU ST R A L I A N N EW S MAG A Z I N E

After working in several restaurants across Adelaide, on weekends he started catering for small functions. Word spread and he was asked to cater for hundreds at a time. “People started asking me why I didn’t have a restaurant and the rest is history,” he says. He enrolled in a TAFE course to learn food hygiene, handling, preparation and presentation - and opened Marrakech about 4 years ago. It’s now a hotspot for those with a taste for something different. His dishes are all tasty, filling and beautifully presented, and are usually accompanied by Moroccan mint tea served in the traditional style. Having a chat with Mohamed is a charming experience as he is very polite and soft spoken, but passionate about his restaurant, his signature dishes and the extra ingredients that makes each one unique - the patience and care which he adds to each. His most famous and sought after dish is the tender Lamb Tagine, which is slow-cooked with cinnamon, honey, prunes, and roasted almonds, and sprinkled with sesame seeds. So why not give Marrakech a try next time you eat out? Alternatively, book his catering service which is still available. Meanwhile, enjoy Mohamed’s Lamb Tagine recipe.... ingredients can be brought from the ‘Taste of Marrakech’ shop at the Central Market.

MARRAKECH Restaurant Location 66 King William Street, Hyde Park Open 6pm – Late every day except Monday Bookings Essential Phone 8299 9901 Web www.marrakechrestaurant.com.au


RECI

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Lamb Afrah Tagine Serves 3 -4

INGREDIENTS 4 tbsp olive oil 1 onion, chopped 900g lean leg or shoulder of lamb, diced Salt and freshly ground pepper 1/2 tsp ground coriander 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon 1 cinnamon stick 1/2 tsp ground cumin 1 tsp ground ginger Pinch of saffron threads, soaked in 1 tbsp water 12 prunes, soaked in warm water 4 tbsp clear honey Almonds, sesame seeds, 1 tsp orange flower water METHOD 1. Heat two tablespoons of olive oil in tagine or a large lidded pan. Add the onion and lamb and cook until the meat is brown on all sides. 2. Pour enough water over the meat to cover. Add a further two tablespoons of olive oil, salt, black pepper and spices to the meat and bring to the boil. 3. Turn the heat down, put the lid on and allow the meat to simmer for about two hours. 4. Add the soaked prunes and leave to simmer for a further 20 minutes. 5. Stir in the honey and sprinkle the tagine with orange flower water, almonds and a scatter of sesame seeds.

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African-Australian News Magazine.

Like salt adds flavour to food, African culture adds colour to Australia. www.saltmagazine.org Salt Magazine is an African-Australian News Magazine created to act as a platform for the voice of the new and emerging African-Australian communities, providing an African perspective to Australian topics.

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Interested in advertising? Email us hello@saltmagazine.org Printed by Replica Press, 4a Visor Court, Holden Hill

A F RICA N -AU ST R A L I A N N EW S MAG A Z I N E

Salt Magazine Issue One Oct 2013  

SALT MAGAZINE IS A FREE AFRICAN-AUSTRALIAN COMMUNITY NEWS MAGAZINE, CREATED TO PROVIDE PRINT AND ONLINE NEWS AND INFORMATION ON A BROAD RANG...

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