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Risk Management Strategy


Risk Management Strategy

CONTENTS Section 1:

Introduction

Section 2:

The Risk Management Process

Section 3:

The Types of Risks Faced by SALSC Strategic Risks Compliance Risks Financial Risks Operational Risks

Section 4:

How to Evaluate Risks

Section 5:

Use Preventative Measures for Business Continuity

Section 6:

The Risk Assessment Process Step 1: Identify the Hazards Step 2: Decide Who Might be Harmed and How Step 3: Evaluate the Risks and Decide on Precautions Step 4: Record Your Findings and Implement Them Step 5: Review Your Assessment and Update if Necessary

Section 7:

Risk Assessment Plan

Forms:

Management of Risk Assessment Record Measuring Risk Risk Assessment Awareness Risk Assessment Form Risk Awareness Record Sheet Risk Assessment Form Risk Rating

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SECTION 1: INTRODUCTION 1.1 Every day SALSC faces risks that could present threats to its success. Risk is presented as the probability of an event and its consequences. Risk management is the practice of using processes, methods and tools for managing these risks. 1.2 Risk management focuses on identifying what could go wrong, evaluating which risks should be dealt with and implementing strategies to deal with those risks. Businesses that have identified the risks will be better prepared and have a more cost-effective way of dealing with them. This document sets out how to identify the risks that SALSC may face. It also looks at how to implement an effective risk management policy and programme which can increase SALSC‟s chances of success and reduce the possibility of failure. 1.3 This strategy aims to help SALSC and its Board of Directors (hereafter referred to as “the Board”) assess all risks involved in meeting the association‟s objectives: (i) (ii) (iii) (iv)

To be the voice for and maximise the potential of local sports councils and associate organisations; To promote participation in sport, physical recreation, health and fitness at a local and national level; To promote and create partnership opportunities with other national agencies with similar aims; To promote and develop links with other countries committed to the ideology of sport for all and to develop international relationships and opportunities with like minded organisations.

1.4 A risk assessment is an important step in protecting SALSC and its Board as well as complying with the law. It helps focus on the risks that really matter – the ones with the potential to cause real harm. In many instances, straightforward measures can readily control risks, for example ensuring spillages are cleaned up promptly so people do not slip, or cupboard drawers are kept closed to ensure people do not trip. For most, that means simple, cheap and effective measures to ensure SALSC is protected. 1.5 The law does not expect you to eliminate all risk, but you are required to protect people as far as „reasonably practicable‟. This strategy tells you how to achieve that with a minimum of fuss. This is not the only way to do a risk assessment, there are other methods that work well, particularly for more complex risks and circumstances. However, SALSC believes this method is the most straightforward for our association and volunteers.

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SECTION 2: THE RISK MANAGEMENT PROCESS 2.1 Associations face many risks; therefore risk management should be a central part of any associations' strategic management. Risk management helps you to identify and address the risks facing your association and in doing so increase the likelihood of successfully achieving your objectives. 2.2

A risk management process involves: (a) Methodically identifying the risks surrounding activities; (b) Assessing the likelihood of an event occurring; (c) Identifying events and eliminate the risk of harm; (d) Understanding how to respond to these events; (e) Putting systems in place to deal with potential risks; (f) Monitoring the effectiveness of your risk management approaches and controls.

2.3

As a result, the process of risk management: (a) Improves decision-making, planning and prioritisation; (b) Helps allocate capital and resources more efficiently; (c) Allows SALSC to anticipate what may go wrong, minimising the amount of fire-fighting that would be required or, in a worst-case scenario, prevents a disaster or serious financial loss; (d) Significantly improves the probability that SALSC will deliver its business plan on time and to budget.

2.4 Risk management becomes even more important if your business decides to try something new, for example launch a new service for members.

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SECTION 3: THE TYPES OF RISKS FACED BY SALSC 3.1

The main categories of risk to consider are: (a) Strategic, for example a competitor coming on to the market (b) Business Compliance, for example the introduction of new health and safety legislation (c) Financial, for example a decrease in membership therefore a decrease in income received from fees (d) Operational, for example the loss of a key member of staff

3.2 These categories are not rigid and some parts of SALSC business may fall into more than one category. The risks attached to data protection, for example, could be considered when reviewing SALSC operations or business compliance. 3.3

Other risks include: (a) Environmental risks, including natural disasters; (b) Employee risk management, such as maintaining sufficient staff numbers and cover, employee safety and a continuous updating of skills; (c) Political and economic instability in markets; (d) Health and safety risks.

Strategic Risks 3.4 Strategic risks are those risks associated with operating in a particular industry. They include risks arising from: (a) Merger and service level agreements; (b) Changes among membership or in demand for services; (c) Leisure Industry changes; (d) Development activities. 3.5 Where there's a strong possibility of this happening, you should prepare some sort of response. Compliance Risk

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3.6 Compliance risks are those associated with the need to comply with laws and regulations. They also apply to the need to act in a manner which members and potential sponsors expect, for example, by ensuring proper corporate governance. 3.7 You may need to consider whether employment, health and safety or child protection legislation could add to overheads or force changes in established ways of working. SALSC may wish to consider legislative risks to the associationâ€&#x;s business. SALSC should ask whether the Protection of Vulnerable Groups legislation could affect services provided. Financial Risks 3.8 Financial risks are associated with the financial structure of the association, the transactions the association makes and the financial systems already in place. 3.9 Identifying financial risk involves examining your daily financial operations, especially cashflow. 3.10

SALSC might examine: (a) The way fees are collected (b) Who owes SALSC money? (c) The steps SALSC can take to recover it (d) A SALSC investment policy

3.11 Financial risk should take into account external factors such as interest rates and foreign exchange rates. Operational Risks 3.12 Operational risks are associated with SALSCâ€&#x;s operational and administrative procedures. These include: (a) Recruitment (b) Supply (c) Accounting controls (d) ICT systems (e) Regulations (f) Board and committee composition 3.13 SALSC will examine these operations in turn, prioritise the risks and make provisions for such a risk happening. For example, if there is a heavy reliance on one committee chairman for a Page 6 of 24 Ratified at 26/01/10 Management Board Meeting


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key service consideration should be given to what could happen if that chairman became no longer available. 3.14 IT risk and data protection are increasingly important to associations. If hackers break into ICT systems, they could steal valuable data and even money from your bank account which at best would be embarrassing and at worst could put you out of business. A secure ICT system employing encryption will safeguard commercial and customer information.

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SECTION 4: HOW TO EVALUATE RISKS 4.1 Risk evaluation allows SALSC to determine the significance of risks to the association and decide to accept the specific risk or take action to prevent or minimise it. 4.2 To evaluate risks, it is worthwhile ranking these risks once you have identified them. This can be done by considering the consequence and probability of each risk. Many associations find that assessing consequence and probability as high, medium or low is adequate for their needs. These can then be compared to the business plan - to determine which risks may affect the objectives - and evaluated in the light of legal requirements, costs and memberâ€&#x;s concerns. In some cases, the cost of mitigating a potential risk may be so high that doing nothing makes more business sense. 4.3 There are some tools you can use to help evaluate risks. You can plot on a risk map the significance and likelihood of the risk occurring. Each risk is rated on a scale of one to ten. If a risk is rated ten this means it is of major importance to the company. One is the least significant. The map allows you to visualise risks in relation to each other, gauge their extent and plan what type of controls should be implemented to mitigate the risks. 4.4 Prioritising risks, however you do this, allows you to direct time and money toward the most important risks. You can put systems and controls in place to deal with the consequences of an event. This could involve defining a decision process and procedures that SALSC would follow if an event occurred. SECTION 5: USE PREVENTATIVE MEASURES FOR BUSINESS CONTINUITY 5.1 Risk management involves putting processes, methods and tools in place to deal with the consequences of events you have identified as significant threats to SALSC. This could be something as simple as setting aside financial reserves to ease cashflow problems if they arise or ensuring effective computer backup and ICT support procedures for dealing with a systems failure. 5.2 Programmes which deal with threats identified during risk assessment are often referred to as business continuity plans. These set out what you should do if a certain event happens, for example, if a fire destroys your office. You can't avoid all risk, but business continuity plans can minimise the disruption to your business. 5.3 Risk assessments will change as the association grows or as a result of internal or external changes. This means that the processes you have put in place to manage risks should be regularly reviewed. Such reviews will identify improvements to the processes and equally they can indicate when a process is no longer necessary.

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SECTION 6: THE RISK MANAGEMENT PROCESS 6.1 A risk assessment is simply a careful examination of what, in your work, could cause harm to people, so that you can weigh up whether you have taken enough precautions or should do more to prevent harm. Staff and others have a right to be protected from harm caused by a failure to take reasonable control measures. 6.2 Accidents and ill health can ruin lives and affect SALSC‟s business too if output is lost, machinery is damaged, insurance costs increase or you have to go to court. SALSC and its Board of Directors are legally required to assess the risks in the SALSC office or any other location where work is carried out so that you put in place a plan to control the risks. 6.3

To carry out a successful risk assessment, follow the five steps listed below: Step 1: Identify the Hazards Step 2: Decide Who Might be Harmed and How Step 3: Evaluate the Risks and Decide on Precautions Step 4: Record your Findings and Implement Them Step 5: Review your Assessment and Update if Necessary

6.4 Don‟t overcomplicate the process. In many associations, the risks are well known and the necessary control measures are easy to apply. You probably already know whether, for example, you have employees who move heavy loads and so could harm their backs, or where people are most likely to slip or trip. If so, check that you have taken reasonable precautions to avoid injury. 6.5 You don‟t have to be a health and safety expert to carry out a risk assessment. If the assessor is not confident, it is possible to get help from someone who is competent. In all cases staff should be involved in the process. They will have useful information about how the work is done that will make your assessment of the risk more thorough and effective. But remember, SALSC are responsible for seeing that the assessment is carried out properly. 6.6

When thinking about any risk assessment, remember: (a) A hazard is anything that may cause harm, such as chemicals, electricity, working from ladders, an open drawer etc; (b) The risk is the chance, high or low, that somebody could be harmed by these and other hazards, together with an indication of how serious the harm could be.

Step 1: Identify the Hazards 6.7 First the assessor needs to work out how people could be harmed. When you work in a place every day it is easy to overlook some hazards, so here are some tips to help you identify the ones that matter: (a) Walk around your office or workplace and look at what could reasonably be expected to cause harm. Page 9 of 24 Ratified at 26/01/10 Management Board Meeting


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(b) Ask staff what they think. They may have noticed things that are not immediately obvious to the assessor. (c) Visit the HSE website (www.hse.gov.uk). HSE publishes practical guidance on where hazards occur and how to control them. There is much information here on the hazards that might affect your business. (d) Alternatively, call HSE Infoline (Tel: 0845 345 0055), who will identify publications that can help you, or contact Workplace Health Connect (Tel: 0845 609 6006), a free service for managers and staff of small and medium-sized enterprises providing practical advice on workplace health and safety. (e) Check manufacturers‟ instructions or data sheets for chemicals and equipment as they can be very helpful in spelling out the hazards and putting them in their true perspective. (f) Have a look back at your accident and ill-health records – these often help to identify the less obvious hazards. (g) Remember to think about long-term hazards to health (e.g. high levels of noise or exposure to harmful substances) as well as safety hazards. Step 2: Decide Who Might be Harmed and How 6.8 For each hazard you need to be clear about who might be harmed; it will help the assessor identify the best way of managing the risk. That doesn‟t mean listing everyone by name, but rather identifying groups of people (e.g. „people working in the storeroom‟ or „passers-by‟). 6.9 In each case, identify how they might be harmed, i.e. what type of injury or ill health might occur. For example, „computer operators may suffer back injury from poor office equipment‟. Remember: (a) Some workers have particular requirements, e.g. new and young workers, new or expectant mothers and people with disabilities may be at particular risk. Extra thought will be needed for some hazards; (b) Cleaners, visitors, contractors, maintenance workers etc, who may not be in the office all the time; (c) Members of the public, if they could be hurt by your activities; (d) If you share common space, you will need to think about how your work affects others present, as well as how their work affects your staff – talk to them; and (e) Ask your staff if they can think of anyone you may have missed. Step 3: Evaluate the Risks and Decide on Precautions 6.10 Having spotted the hazards, SALSC then have to decide what to do about them. The law requires you to do everything „reasonably practicable‟ to protect people from harm. You can work this out for yourself, but the easiest way is to compare what you are doing with good practice. Page 10 of 24 Ratified at 26/01/10 Management Board Meeting


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6.11 So first, look at what you‟re already doing, think about what controls you have in place and how the work is organised. Then compare this with the good practice and see if there‟s more you should be doing to bring yourself up to standard. In asking yourself this, consider: (a) Can I get rid of the hazard altogether? (b) If not, how can I control the risks so that harm is unlikely? 6.12

When controlling risks, apply the principles below, if possible in the following order: (a) Try a less risky option (e.g. switch to using a less hazardous chemical); (b) Prevent access to the hazard (e.g. by guarding); (c) Organise work to reduce exposure to the hazard (e.g. put barriers between pedestrians and traffic); (d) Issue personal protective equipment (e.g. clothing, footwear, goggles etc); and (e) Provide welfare facilities (e.g. first aid and washing facilities for removal of contamination).

6.13 Improving health and safety need not cost a lot. For instance, placing a mirror on a dangerous blind corner to help prevent vehicle accidents is a low-cost precaution considering the risks. Failure to take simple precautions can cost you a lot more if an accident does happen. 6.14 Involve staff, so that you can be sure that what you propose to do will work in practice and won‟t introduce any new hazards. Step 4: Record Your Findings and Implement Them 6.15 Putting the results of any risk assessment into practice will make a difference when looking after people and the association. 6.16 Writing down the results of the risk assessment, and sharing them with staff, encourages you to do this. If you have fewer than five employees you do not have to write anything down, though it is useful so that you can review it at a later date if, for example, something changes. 6.17 When writing down the results, keep it simple, for example „Tripping over rubbish: bins provided, staff instructed, weekly housekeeping checks‟, or „Fume from welding: local exhaust ventilation used and regularly checked‟. 6.18 A risk assessment is not expected to be perfect, but it must be suitable and sufficient. You need to be able to show that: (a) A proper check was made; (b) You asked who might be affected;

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(c) You dealt with all the significant hazards, taking into account the number of people who could be involved; (d) The precautions are reasonable, and the remaining risk is low; and (e) Staff were involved in the process. 6.19 If, like many associations, you find that there are quite a lot of improvements that you could make, big and small, don‟t try to do everything at once. Make a plan of action to deal with the most important things first. Health and safety inspectors acknowledge the efforts of associations that are clearly trying to make improvements. 6.20

A good plan of action often includes a mixture of different things such as: (a) A few cheap or easy improvements that can be done quickly, perhaps as a temporary solution until more reliable controls are in place; (b) Long-term solutions to those risks most likely to cause accidents or ill health; (c) Long-term solutions to those risks with the worst potential consequences; (d) Arrangements for training employees on the main risks that remain and how they are to be controlled; (e) Regular checks to make sure that the control measures stay in place; and (f) Clear responsibilities – who will lead on what action, and by when.

6.21 Remember, prioritise and tackle the most important things first. As you complete each action, tick it off your plan. Step 5: Review Your Risk Assessment and Update if Necessary 6.22 Few workplaces stay the same. Sooner or later, you will bring in new equipment, substances and procedures that could lead to new hazards. It makes sense, therefore, to review what you are doing on an ongoing basis. Every year or so formally review where you are, to make sure you are still improving, or at least not sliding back. 6.23 Look at risk assessments again. Have there been any changes? Are there improvements you still need to make? Has your staff spotted any problems? Have SALSC learnt anything from accidents or near misses? Make sure risk assessments stay up to date. 6.24 When running an association it‟s all too easy to forget about reviewing risk assessments – until something has gone wrong and it‟s too late. SALSC needs to set a review date for risk assessment now. Write it down and note it in your diary as an annual event. 6.25 During the year, if there is a significant change, don‟t wait. Check any risk assessment and, where necessary, amend it. If possible, it is best to think about the risk assessment when you‟re planning your change – that way you leave yourself more flexibility.

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SECTION 7: RISK ASSESMENT PLAN 7.1

After a full consultation it was agreed to carry out the following risk assessments: (a) SALSC Policy Director and Administrator re health and safety (b) SALSC Employee management (c) SALSC Finances (d) Protection of Vulnerable Group and other legislation (e) ICT hardware and software (f) Storage of SALSC equipment

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MANAGEMENT OF RISK ASSESSMENT RECORD RISK ASSESSMENT NUMBER:

SALSC/

DATE OF RISK ASSESSMENT:

STEP 1

What are the hazards?

Spot hazards by:  walking around the workplace  asking members of staff / volunteers what they think  complaints made to SALSC  visit the HSE website or call HSE infoline  checking manufacturers‟ instructions Don‟t forget long-term health hazards.

STEP 2

Who might be harmed and how?

Identify groups of people including:  members of staff (some may have particular needs)  SALSC committee members visiting SALSC‟s Policy Director & Administrator  partners visiting SALSC‟s Policy Director & Administrator  if you share your workplace think about how your work affects others present Say how the hazard could cause harm.

STEP 3

What are you already doing?

List what is already in place to reduce the likelihood of harm or make any harm less serious

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You need to make sure that you have reduced risks „so far as is reasonably practicable.‟ An easy way of doing this is to compare what you are already doing with good practice. If there is a difference, list what needs to be done

STEP 4

How will you put the assessment into action?

Remember to prioritise – deal with those hazards that are high-risk and have serious consequences first.

Action by whom

STEP 5

Action when

Done

Review date

 Review your assessment to make sure you are still improving, or at least not sliding back  If there is a significant change in the office, remember to check your risk assessment and where necessary, amend it

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MEASURING RISK Risk Description 1. Name of Risk 2. Scope of Risk 3. Nature of Risk 4. Stakeholders 5. Quantification of Risk 6. Risk Tolerance

7. Risk Treatment & Control Mechanisms

8.Potential Action of Improvement 9. Strategy and Policy Developments

Qualitative description of the events, their size, type, number and dependencies e.g. strategic, operations, financial, knowledge or compliance Stakeholders and their expectations Significance and Probability Loss potential and financial impact of risk Value at risk Probability and size of potential losses/gains Objective(s) for control of the risk and desired level of performance Primary means by which the risk is currently managed Levels of confidence in existing control Identification of protocols for monitoring and review Recommendations to reduce risk Identification of function responsible or developing strategy and policy

Consequences – Both Threats and Opportunities High

Medium

Low

Financial impact on the association is likely to exceed £2000 Significant impact on the association‟s strategy or operation activities Significant stakeholder concern Financial impact of the association likely to be between £200 and £2000 Moderate impact on the association‟s strategy or operational activities Moderate stakeholder concern Financial impact on the association likely to be less than £200 Low impact on the association‟s strategy or operational activities Low stakeholder concern

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Risk Management Strategy

Probability of Occurrence - Threats Estimation High (probable)

Description Likely to occur each year or more than 25% chance of occurrence

Medium (possible)

Likely to occur in a ten year time period or less than 25% chance of occurrence

Low (remote)

Not likely to occur in a ten year period or less than 2% chance of occurrence

Indicators Potential of it occurring several times within the time period (for example – ten years). Has occurred recently Could occur more than once within the time period (for example – ten years). Could be difficult to control due to some external influences. Is there a history of occurrence. Has not occurred Unlikely to occur

Probability of Occurrence - Opportunities Estimation High (probable)

Description Favourable outcome is likely to be achieved in one year or better than 75% chance of occurrence

Medium (possible)

Reasonable prospects of favourable results in one year of 25% to 75% chance of occurrence

Low (remote)

Some chance of favourable outcome in the medium term or less than 25% chance of occurrence

Indicators Clear opportunity which can be relied on with reasonable certainty, to be achieved in the short term based on current management processes Opportunities which may be achievable but which require careful management. Opportunity which may arise over and above the plan Possible opportunity which has yet to be fully investigated by management. Opportunity for which the likelihood of success is low on the basis of management resources currently being applied

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RISK ASSESSMENT AWARENESS In order to create a safe environment, the association must carry out regular risk assessments. These assessments are necessary to identify and remove any hazards and therefore reduce the risk of harm or injury to its members. Some definitions may be helpful: A HAZARD

defined as anything with the potential to cause harm.

RISK

the chance that someone will be harmed by the hazard.

RISK ASSESSMENT

a formal and recorded process to weigh up the suitability and safety of any activity by identifying the hazards that could potentially cause harm and taking the appropriate precautions or actions required to prevent harm or injury.

The risk assessment helps you to: Identify an unsafe condition Decide what corrective action is required Determine who is responsible for correcting it Follow up to ensure that it was corrected properly

The frequency of assessment will be determined by a number of factors e.g. nature of the group, experience of staff, location or weather. Therefore risk assessments should be an ongoing process. The risk assessment should be undertaken by a „competentâ€&#x; person,. Ask other association officials or committee members what they think as they may have noticed things which are not immediately obvious. Make an inventory Of SALSC activities and tasks Identify the hazards For each of these activities, on and off site and decide if the hazards are minor or significant. Evaluate the risks Decide whether the existing precautions are adequate or whether more should be done. Decide if the risk is acceptable and prioritise the significant hazards Identify whether the risk is high, medium or low by deciding which could result in serious harm or affect several people. See Risk Ratings schedule when prioritising risks. Select method of control Check that all reasonable precautions have been taken to reduce the risk and avoid injury, however be aware that even after all precautions have been taken, some risk usually remains Record the findings Page 18 of 24 Ratified at 26/01/10 Management Board Meeting


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Keep the written record for future reference as it can help if you become involved in any action for civil liability. It can also remind you to keep an eye on particular hazards and precautions. Implement measures To reduce the risks Monitor Ensure that the standards are maintained. Regularly review It is good practice to review your assessment to make sure that the precautions are still working effectively. Risk Ratings Having completed the risk assessment, you should be able to clearly identify the risk rating i.e. the danger associated with each risk on a scale from Minimal to Intolerable, and prioritise the risks depending on how harmful the risks are, who may be harmed, to what extent, how likely etc. This is illustrated in the Risk Ratings schedule. Improving health and safety need not cost a lot. For instance, placing a mirror on a dangerous blind corner to help prevent vehicle accidents, or putting some non-slip material on slippery steps, are inexpensive precautions considering the risks that are involved. Failure to take simple precautions can cost you a lot more if an accident does happen.

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RISK ASSESSMENT FORM SALSC SITE/ LOCATION: ............................................................................................................... ASSESSORS NAME: .......................................................................................................................... ASSESSORS SIGNATURE: .............................................................................................................. ASSESSMENT DATE: ....................................................................................................................... ASSESSENT REVIEW DATE: ......................................................................................................... ACTIVITY: ......................................................................................................................................... HEAD COACH/ LEADER: ................................................................................................................ QUALIFICATION: .............................................................................................................................

PROCEDURES: 1. Identify potential hazards which could reasonably be expected to result in significant harm 2. Identify who might be harmed 3. Consider existing controls - is the risk of significant harm low/ unlikely, medium/ possible or high/ probable 4. Where the risk is identified as medium or high, identify the action required 5. If the risk is low, further precautions are optional and the activity may proceed 6. Where the risk is medium, it is desirable that further precautions are taken before the activity proceeds 7. If the risk is high, it is essential that the activity does not proceed until the risk has been significantly reduced Page 20 of 24 Ratified at 26/01/10 Management Board Meeting


Risk Management Strategy

TASKS UNDERTAKEN: activity/ area assessed

HAZARDS IDENTIFIED: NB: Any serious or imminent danger will need a procedure

RISK: PERSON(S) Low/ AT RISK: Medium/ i.e. coach, High players, adults with special needs

EXISTING CONTROLS:

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ADDITIONAL CONTROL MEASURES REQUIRED:

TARGET DATE: for action by

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COMPLETED ON: date and initial


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RISK ASSESSMENT FORM The Scottish Association of Local Sports Councils (SALSC) Venue: Name and position of person doing check: Date of check: Activity Area Check that the area and surroundings are safe and free from obstacles. Is the area fit and appropriate for activity? Yes ❒ No ❒ (e.g. check floor, roof leaks, lighting, heating, security and welfare arrangements.) If no, please outline the hazard, who may be at risk and corrective action taken, if any. Equipment Check that all equipment is fit and sound for activity and suitable for age group/ability. Is the equipment safe and appropriate for activity? Yes ❒ No ❒ (e.g. check there is no equipment left from other activities or obstructions left in the sporting area.) If no, please outline unsafe equipment, who may be at risk and corrective action taken, if any. Participants Check that the attendance register is up to date, that there is a first aider in attendance complete with the clubs parental consent forms. Check that participants are appropriately attired for the activity. Is/are the register(s) in order? Yes ❒ No If no, please outline current state and corrective action taken, if any.

Are performers appropriately attired and safe for activity? Yes ❒ No ❒ If no, please outline unsafe equipment/attire and corrective action taken, if any. Emergency Points Check that emergency vehicles can access facilities, and that a working telephone is available with access to emergency numbers. Are emergency access points checked and operational? Yes ❒ No If no, please outline the issues and corrective action taken, if any. Is a working telephone available? Yes ❒ No If no, please outline the issues and corrective action taken, if any. Page 22 of 24 Ratified at 26/01/10 Management Board Meeting

❒ ❒


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Safety Information Check that evacuation procedures are published and posted somewhere for all to see. Ensure that volunteers and staff have access to information relating to health and safety. Are emergency procedures published and accessible to those with responsibility for sessions? Yes â?’ No â?’ If no, please outline what information is missing and corrective action taken, if any. Is there a need to take any further action? If yes, please specify.

SIGNED:

DATE:

PRINT NAME:

NB

A new risk assessment form must be completed regularly (to ensure you are covered should the incident happen again) and any resultant changes made to the code of conduct.

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RISK RATING Having completed the risk assessment, you should be able to clearly identify the risk rating i.e. minimal – intolerable and prioritise them depending on how harmful the risks are, who may be harmed, to what extent, how likely etc. RISK RATING = Severity of Harm X Likelihood of Occurrence

NB. Tolerable here means that risk has been reduced to the lowest level that is reasonably practicable.

ACTION PRIORITY: (ranking risks in priority order) Risk Level

Action/ Priority

Timescale

Minimal (low)

No immediate action is required and no documentary Review annually records need to be kept.

Tolerable (medium)

No additional controls required. Cost effective solutions should be considered. Monitoring and auditing is 3 - 12 months required to ensure that the controls are maintained.

Moderate (medium)

Activity should NOT be started or continued until the 1 - 3 months risk has been evaluated and controls implemented.

Substantial (high)

Activity should NOT be started until the risk has been reduced. Considerable resources may have to be 1 - 4 weeks allocated to reduce the risk.

Intolerable (High)

Activity should NOT be started or continued until risk has been reduced. If it is not possible to reduce the risk, Immediate even with unlimited resources, activity has to be prohibited.

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/SALSC_Risk_Management_Strategy  

http://www.salsc.org.uk/htdocs/pdf/Policies%20and%20Procedures/SALSC_Risk_Management_Strategy.pdf

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