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This annual report on the State of the Sailing Industry in North America is produced by The Sailing Company, a division of Bonnier Corporation, which publishes Cruising World and Sailing World Magazines. Copyright 2011 The Sailing Company. For More Information Contact: Sally Helme - Publisher 55 Hammarlund Way Middletown, RI 02842 401-845-5100 sally.helme@bonniercorp.com

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2009 results showed the biggest declines since the beginning of this annual study in 1988:

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Looking Back, 2010 Wasn’t Great Either

The Market was up!

Jobs were down!

…….Blah, Blah, Blah; and lots of other problems 4


Let’s Look to TheBy Sailing for Inspiration Comforted TheBards Sailing Bards For Inspiration “Men go back to the mountains, as they go back to sailing ships at sea, because in the mountains and on the sea they must face up.” -Henry David Thoreau

…Sailing’s been around since time began and it is here to stay. 5


After the Storm; the Turn-A-Round Has Begun

Given the givens, here’s how things shook out for the Sailing Industry in 2010 6


Agenda  2010 Bareboat Charter Industry Study  2010 North American Import Sailboat Report  2010 North American Sailing Industry Study

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2010 Bareboat Charter Industry Study 15th Annual Survey


Methodology  Study conducted by independent supplier: Rick Walter Market Research Associates  Results reflect September 2009 - August 2010 activity  Mail/Phone/Email Survey • 66 active Bareboat Charter companies from our database • 72% response rate including all market leaders

Source: 2010 Bareboat Charter Industry Study; Note: minor adjustments were made to 2009 results to account for companies participating in ‘10 but not the year before 9


Basic Facts & Figures About Bareboat Chartering  Number of Boats:

2010 2009 2008 2007

2,672 2,710 2,864 3,020

- 38 units since 2009

 Fleet size continues to inch downward in search of maximum efficiency – down 12% since 2007  Multihulls constitute 22% of the boats reported

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Source: 2010 Bareboat Charter Industry Study


Percentage of Bareboat Fleet That is Multihull

ď ś Multihulls have increased significantly in the bareboat fleet since 2006 11

Source: 2010 North American Sailing Industry Study


Bareboat Chartering Sails Calmer Seas in 2010, -6% Year to Year Since ‘09 -1,256 Weeks

 After a tumultuous -21% decline in ’09 during the depths of a continuing recession, bareboat charters fell just below the 20K week mark in 2010 12

Source: 2010 Bareboat Charter Industry Study


First Half of the Season Was More Affected Than the Second Half

(000) Weeks

2009‐10 Fall/Winter ‐10%

2010 Spring/Summer ‐4%

 Bareboat chartering showed better performance as the year progressed and the economy improved 13

Source: 2010 Bareboat Charter Industry Study


North Americans Cruising to “Far-A-Way” Places Has Diminished Significantly With Only a Third of the Business Booked in 2005 (000) Weeks

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

‘09-’10 %Chg

Caribbean

15.3

15.5

16.5

16.3

12.5

12.1

-3%

USA/Canada

9.1

8.7

7.8

7.4

6.4

5.9

-8%

Other

2.9

2.7

2.1

1.9

1.3

1.0

-23%

 Both Caribbean and North American locations were down only single digit percentages; however, both are significantly below their mid decade highs 14

Source: 2010 Bareboat Charter Industry Study; Caribbean includes Bahamas


Market Share for Major Destinations Was Flat in 2010; The Caribbean Commanded 63% of the Business (%) Destination Market Share

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

‘09-’10 % Chg

Caribbean

56

58

62

63

62

63

+1 pt.

USA/Canada

33

32

30

29

32

31

-1 pt.

Other

11

10

8

8

6

6

NC

 North American destinations maintained their five year average of 31%

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Source: 2010 Bareboat Charter Industry Study; Caribbean includes Bahamas


Bareboat Charter Weeks & Market Share by Region in 2010

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2010

% of Total

Northeast/other North America

380

2

Chesapeake & NC

611

3

Great & Inland Lakes

1005

5

Pacific NW & CA

3401

18

FL & Gulf Coast

499

3

Pacific Islands/Australia/New Zealand/Indian Ocean

310

2

Bahamas

522

2

Virgin Islands & PR

9499

50

Leeward Islands

936

5

Windward Islands

1231

6

Mediterranean

354

2

Mexico/Other

281

2

Source: 2010 Bareboat Charter Industry Study


Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico Were Down -4%; the Other Islands Held their Own in 2010 Windward/Leeward And Bahamas (000) NC

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Source: 2010 Bareboat Charter Industry Study

VI & Puerto Rico (000)

-4%


North American Locations Were Hit Hardest in the Pacific Northwest & California, -10% compared to 2009 Pacific Northwest & CA (000)

-10%

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Source: 2010 Bareboat Charter Industry Study

The Rest Of North America (000)

-4%


Estimated Value of Bareboat Charter Fees for 2010

# of Charter Weeks x Average Price / Week = 2010 Market Value 19,029 Weeks x $3,000 = $57,000,000

ď ś $57 million dollars in basic Bareboat fees in 2010 compare to $60 million a year ago

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Source: 2010 Bareboat Charter Industry Study


Key Findings  After a tumultuous -21% decline in ’09, bareboat charter weeks were down only -6% in 2010,  Bareboat chartering showed better performance as the year progressed and the economy improved  While Caribbean and North American locations were down only single digit percentages, both are significantly below their mid decade highs  Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico were down -4% in 2010, while the Leeward, Windward and Bahamas as a group were flat with the previous year  North American locations were hit hardest in the Pacific Northwest & California, -10% compared to 2009 20

Source: 2010 Bareboat Charter Industry Study


5 Minute Marketing Keys Some insight into how your customers might be thinking

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GREEK

The Futures Company

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A.C. Nielsen; AOL


Smart Company, AU

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2010 North American Import Sailboat Report 11th Annual Survey


Survey of Imported Sailboats to North America

* Also includes importers who did not import any sailboats in 2010 but reported importing sailboats in the2009

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Source: 2010 North American Import Sailboat Report


Last Year, Importers Were Optimistic About 2010

Imports 20’ and over Forecast Prediction Year - to-Year Change

2009 Actuals

2010 Forecast

240

335 +95 units

……….didn’t happen!

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Source: 2010 North American Import Sailboat Report


Imports Into North America Declined Again, -21% In 2010 Sailboats 20 feet and over - 50 Units

 Complicated by a lack of custom orders and inherently longer lag times, disappointing credit markets and a dose of economic upheaval in respective ports of origin, overseas builders took another “time out” in 2010 31

Source: 2010 North American Import Sailboat Report


Despite Gains, Small Cruisers Under 36’ Accounted for Only 1 in 8 Boats Imported Into North America for 2010

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

% Change vs. ‘09

20’- 35’

41

59

64

35

22

24

+9%

36’- 45’

217

281

258

214

143

107

-25%

46’ or more

129

100

99

109

75

59

-21%

Units

 Compared to the hay days of 2006 - ’07, imports of larger cruisers have retrenched significantly, down -49% compared to 2008

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Source: 2010 North American Import Sailboat Report


After Saving The Day In 2009 Imported Multihulls Declined Dramatically In 2010, -44% Multihulls 20 feet and over (Units)

ď ś After being propped up by new models in ‘09, Multihull imports fell back in line in 2010; accounting for one-third of all cruiser imports in 2010, compared to nearly 50% in 2009! 33

Source: 2010 North American Import Sailboat Report


Importers Forecast a Much More Positive Scenario in 2011 Predicting a Substantial Increase of +134 Sailboats for 2010 2011 Forecast

Unit Change

20' - 35'

71

+47 units

36‘ - 45’

141

+34 units

46' or more

112

+53 units

Total

324

+134 units

 Very optimistic expectations for 2011 by are driven by significant percentage increases across the board; and notably cruisers under 36’ which have been out of the “importing equation” in recent years 34

Source: 2010 North American Import Sailboat Report


Study Observations  Complicated by a lack of custom orders and inherently longer lag times, overseas builders imported -21% fewer sailboats of 20’ or more in length in 2010  Small cruisers under 36’ increased +9% but accounted for only 1 in 8 boats imported into North America in 2010.  Imports of larger cruisers to North America have retrenched significantly in 2010, -24% versus a year ago and -49% compared to 2008.  After holding course in 2009, Multihulls declined significantly in 2010, off -45%.  Very optimistic forecasts for 2011 by are driven by significant increases across the board, especially cruisers under 36’. 35

Source: 2010 North American Sailing Industry Study


2010 North American Sailing Industry Study 22th Annual Survey


Methodology & History  Mail/Phone/Email Survey 1988 – 1993

International Marine

1994 – 1997 Produced by The Sailing Company, Research by The New York Times Magazine Group 1998 – 2010 Produced by The Sailing Company, Research by Rick Walter MarketResearch Associates, Hilton Head, SC  111 out of 119 North American Builders responded and provided their production data; including all the market leaders; 93% response rate

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Source: 2010 North American Sailing Industry Study


Number of North American Sailboat Builders in the Study

ď ś NA Builders have declined by -25% since 2002/03; most notably smaller companies with 25 or fewer employees. 38

Source: 2010 North American Sailing Industry Study


Full Time Sailing Production Workforce +3% in 2010 Estimated number of full time employees Involved in sailboat production

• 2010: 1,680 • 2009: 1,632

Company Size:

• 81% have 25 or less employees • 19% have more than 25 employees

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Source: 2010 North American Sailing Industry Study


Number of Fulltime Employees in North American Sailboat Production

ď ś Technology, efficiency, out-sourcing and recession have all combined to dramatically shrink the sailboat production employee force since the beginning of the decade 40

Source: 2010 North American Sailing Industry Study; estimates are rounded to the nearest hundred


Last Year Builders Forecast on the Plus Side for 2010

Total Production

Forecast Prediction

Year - to-Year Change

2009 Actuals

2010 Forecast

7,076

8,301

+1,225 units

…….Some were right and some were wrong

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Source: 2010 North American Import Sailboat Report


Aggregate Sailboat Production Down Single Digits in 2010, -8%

-584 Sailboats

ď ś Total North American sailboat production was down -8% in 2010, as compared to -38% in 2009 during the deepest valley of the worldwide recession. 42

Source: 2010 North American Sailing Industry Study


Sailboats Under 20’ Declined -12% Overall; the 12’-19’ Segment Was Affected the Least, -3% Small Sailboats

2008

2009

2010

’09-’10 % Chg

12,601 11,592 11,255

9,160

6,055

5,329

-12%

11‘ and under

4,449

3,212

3,538

3,052

2,457

1,844

-25%

12' - 19'

8,152

8,380

7,717

6,108

3,598

3,485

-3%

Boats under 20’

2005

2006

2007

 A course correction for last year’s steep dive in the 12’-19’ segment, illustrates the cyclical nature of the boat building business  The small boat category accounted for 82% of all production compared to 85% last year! 43

Source: 2010 North American Sailing Industry Study


Cruiser Production Sailed Forward in 2010, +14% vs. Last Year Sailboats 20 feet and over +142 units

 After a tumultuous -55% plunge last year, builders began to update and replenish inventories in order to stay “a float” 44

Source: 2010 North American Sailing Industry Study


Long Overdue, the 20’-29’ Segment Was +19% in 2010 Driving a +14% Increase for Cruisers Under 36’ Sailboats Under 36’ ’09 – ‘10 20 - 29 Feet

’09 – ‘10 30 - 35 Feet

+19%

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Source: 2008 North American Sailing Industry Study

+2%


Cruisers 36’-45’ Led the Way in 2010, +19%

Cruisers

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

’09 -’10 % Chg

36‘ – 45’

978

1,137

852

695

303

360

+19%

46‘ or more

142

145

249

206

91

89

-2%

 New models, a response to the huge decline in the previous year and, perhaps, reflective of a more “mindful” luxury consumer, cruisers 36’-45’ were up +19% in 2010  The largest cruiser segment was flat in contrast to their “heady” days before the big “R;” but the “bleeding” appears to have stopped 46

Source: 2010 North American Sailing Industry Study


Total Multihulls Were Down -14% for 2010 and are Relying More on Overseas Builders to Meet Consumer Needs

ď ś American made Multihulls account for 16% of total production, with the great majority coming from the under 20’ recreational market segment.

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Source: 2010 North American Sailing Industry Study


Estimated Value of 2010 North American Sailboat Production is $272 Million, Up +6% from 2009 Category

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Est. Value

Source: 2010 North American Sailing Industry Study

# of Boats

$ Millions


Builders Are Optimistic That the Worst is Over; Predicting +26% Growth in 2011 and +35% Gains for Bigger Cruisers 2010 Actual

2011 Forecast

% Change

0' - 19'

5,329

6,756

+27%

20' - 35'

714

786

+2%

36' or more

449

604

+35%

6,492

8,146

+26%

Total

ď ś Better days for sure with 1,654 more sailboats in 2011; almost sounds like that wild exuberance we saw in the ’90s

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Source: 2010 North American Sailing Industry Study


Study Observations  Total North American sailboat production was down -8% in 2010, as compared to -38% in 2009 during the deepest valley of the worldwide recession.  Sailboats 12’-19 were relatively flat, -3% in 2010 vs. -48% a year ago; Overall the under 20’ category was off -12%, accounting for 82% of total sailboat production.  Updating and replenishing inventories, cruiser production sailed forward in 2010, +14%, after a tumultuous -55% plunge in 2009.

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Source: 2010 North American Sailing Industry Study


Study Observations  Long overdue, the pocket cruiser segment increased +19% driving increases in production of +14% for cruisers under 36’ in length  Smaller “bigger cruiser's” led the way in 2010, with an increase of +19% among units 36-45,’ while the biggest segment of 46’ and over was down marginally, -2% versus 2009  Builders are optimistic that the worst is over; predicting +26% growth in 2011 and a +35% gain in the 36’ and over segment

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Source: 2010 North American Sailing Industry Study


Looking to Next Year

Getting ready for the recovery


2011 Sailing Outlook – Signs Look Promising  Durable Goods were up +23% in the 4th quarter  2011 Luxury spending forecast is up +7%  Builders and Importers are “on board” reporting very positive forecasts for 2011  Consumer confidence has been steadily building  Beware of “inflation creep”

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After the Storm; Let’s Make the Turn-A-Round Continue

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Take Pride in Sailing’s Rich Heritage - Spread the Word “It is not the ship so much as the skillful sailing that assure the prosperous journey.” - George William Curtis

…Sailing will be here forever 57


This annual report on the State of the Sailing Industry in North America is produced by The Sailing Company, a division of Bonnier Corporation, which publishes Cruising World and Sailing World Magazines. Copyright 2011 The Sailing Company. For More Information Contact: Sally Helme - Publisher 55 Hammarlund Way Middletown, RI 02842 401-845-5100 sally.helme@bonniercorp.com

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2011 Sailboat Study