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Nonprofit Organization U.S. Postage

Good Works

PAID Asheville, NC Permit No. 518

Suite 1600, The BB&T Bldg. One West Pack Square P.O. Box 1888 Asheville, NC 28802

To receive future newsletters electronically and to subscribe to CFWNC E-News, please send an email with “subscribe” in the subject line to Semadeni@cfwnc.org.

FA L L 2 0 1 0 / W I N T E R 2 0 1 1

H O M E G R OW N P H I L A N T H R O PY FO R E V E R GRANT ANNOUNCEMENT

$900,000 Awarded to Help Human Service Nonprofits

Confirmed in Compliance with National Standards for U.S. Community Foundations

CFWNC Phone: 828-254-4960 Fax: 828-251-2258 www.cfwnc.org

Officers Marla Adams, Chair Ernest E. Ferguson, Vice-Chair Terry Van Duyn, Secretary William N. Lewin, Treasurer

Our Affiliates Black Mountain Community Endowment Fund Cashiers Community Fund The Fund for Haywood County Highlands Community Foundation The McDowell Foundation Foundation for Mitchell County Rutherford County Foundation Transylvania Endowment Yancey Foundation

Calendar

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Board of Directors 2010-2011

Board Members Louise W. Baker Gene Bell J. Wilson Bowman, Ph.D. David S. Dimling Jennie Eblen Thomas Lee Finger John N. Fleming Harry Jarrett

Please visit www.cfwnc.org for a complete list including scholarship deadlines.

John G. Kelso Virginia Litzenberger T. Wood Lovell Tina McGuire Janet Smith Moore Ramona C. Rowe George W. Saenger Anna S. (Candy) Shivers James W. Stickney, IV Jerry Stone G. Edward Towson, II Kate Vogel Laura A. Webb Laurence Weiss John G. Winkenwerder

Executive Staff Elizabeth Brazas, President Sheryl Aikman, Vice President, Development Graham Keever, Vice President, Finance and Administration Bob Wagner, Vice President, Programs

Newsletter Editor Lindsay Hearn, Communications Director

Jennifer Buffet to Speak at the 7th Annual Power of the Purse MONDAY, MAY 23, 2011, CROWNE PLAZA RESORT ASHEVILLE

October

For Nonprofits 1 The Ramble Charitable Fund Grant Application Deadline 1 Biltmore Lake Charitable Fund Grant Application Deadline For Women for Women Members 5 Women for Women Social event 5–7pm; Gallery Minerva, 8 Biltmore Avenue, Asheville; RSVP to Jacqui Friedrich, 684-2600 or jacquifriedrich@yahoo.com

12 Women for Women Fall Membership meeting 4:30–6:30pm; Zealandia Castle, Asheville; email butler@cfwnc.org to register

For Nonprofits 19 2010 Leadership Forum 3:30-7:00pm; visit www.nonprofitpathways.org to register

November

For Nonprofits 12 Women for Women Grant Letter of Intent Deadline 25 & 26 CFWNC Closed for the Thanksgiving holiday

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December

24 CFWNC Closed for the Christmas holiday

January 3 CFWNC Closed for the New Year’s holiday 17 CFWNC Closed for Martin Luther King Jr. holiday

January Deadlines for Scholarship Seekers 5 Asheville Young Woman Leadership Award 10 Irving Jacob Reuter Award 14 All programs listed on the Common Scholarship Application 14 Far West Scholarship 21 Mike Davis Team Spirit Award 21 Cal and Carol Peddy Scholarship 25 Johneen Roth Epstein Scholarship Unless otherwise noted, grant applications must be received by 5 p.m.

Philanthropist and community leader Jennifer Buffet is the keynote speaker for the 2011 Power of the Purse Luncheon taking place Monday, May 23, in Asheville. Buffett is co-chair and president of the NoVo Foundation, a philanthropic organization focused on creating a more just and balanced world based on cooperation and compassion, primarily through the empowerment of girls and women. The foundation invests in long-term strategic initiatives that lead to systemic change, specifically ending violence against girls and women, unlocking the potential of adolescent girls and advancing social and emotional learning. NoVo is a major philanthropic partner with the Nike Foundation, fueling “The Girl Effect”—the social and economic change brought about when every girl has the power to participate equally in her community. In September 2008, Jennifer and her husband Peter received the Clinton Global Citizen Award for their “visionary leadership and sustainable, scalable work in solving pressing global challenges.” In December 2009, they were named among Barron’s top 25 most effective philanthropists. In 2010, Jennifer was chosen by President Clinton to be a founding member of Clinton Global Initiative’s young global leaders cohort, “CGI LEAD.” Buffet’s work in philanthropy began in 1997 when Peter’s parents, Susan and Warren Buffett, bequeathed Jennifer and Peter a small charitable fund. Proceeds from the Power of the Purse benefit The Women’s Fund, a permanent endowment created at CFWNC to support the unmet needs of women and girls in our mountain region. If you are interested in sponsorship opportunities, contact Becky Davis at bdavis@cfwnc.org or 828-254-4960.

hanks to the Melvin R. Lane Fund of The Community Foundation, six social service nonprofits serving Western North Carolina will receive $150,000 each over three years to improve operations, become more collaborative and secure their futures. The multi-year grants are made possible through the Melvin R. Lane Fund, created by Melvin and Georgianna Lane, longtime residents of Henderson County. The 2010-2012 grant recipients are: All Souls Counseling Center; Boys and Girls Club of Transylvania County; Literacy Council of Buncombe County; Our Voice, Inc.; Pisgah Legal Services; and Youth Empowerment. Each has plans to use the funds to implement changes or add capacity that will enable the organization to operate more effectively and meet more needs.

Melanie Jones, executive director of the Boys and Girls Club of Transylvania County, reports that she has witnessed a 20% increase in membership and a significant decrease in funding over the past 18 months. Her organization will use the funds to increase fundraising by strengthening systems and transition their part-time Director of Resource Development & Community Outreach Gardening is an integral part of the summer program for 11-year-olds to a full-time position. at the Boys and Girls Club of Transylvania County with much of the The grant will enable the produce being put to use in the Club’s kitchen. Here Ana Adame hoes and weeds while Danielle Troyer harvests onions. Club to raise additional funds for operating help retire capital debt, eliminate an expenses, which have annual interest expense and begin a grown substantially over the last planned giving/endowment program. six years, and will support work to Continued on page 5

P R E S I D E N T ’ S M E SSAG E

Letter to the Community from Elizabeth Brazas

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his fall The Community Foundation will embark on a strategic planning process to evaluate our activities, programs and ways of working. We will emerge from this process with a plan that will guide our thinking and serve as the basis for our decisions and work in the communities we serve. The analysis and focus that are a part of this process are valuable in many ways and especially timely for The Community Foundation. Strategic planning often takes place after a leadership transition, a significant shift in the economy or a clear change in industry best practices. Your Community Foundation is functioning in a new environment that includes all three of these factors. With consultants and an internal project team, we will examine all departments; interview stakeholders on our role as philanthropic advisor, funder and community leader; analyze industry best practices for foundations of a similar size and geographic diversity; determine and prioritize needs across the 18-county service area; frame a plan; and determine what is implementable. I expect

that we will learn from what is working well and will also have to make some difficult decisions. Through this planning process, we are preparing to hold ourselves accountable to the same standards that we expect from our grantees. We need to focus our resources so that we can make a Elizabeth Brazas CFWNC President measurable impact across Western North Carolina. We owe it to our donors to invest their money wisely and to be able to outline a strategy, identify benchmarks and report concrete results. In the last few months, we have seen the markets continue to fluctuate. While the Foundation’s assets have recovered to nearly $150 million, there is widespread agreement that economic recovery will be erratic. What Continued on page 2


GIVING BACK

Giving in a Time of Tax Uncertainty L ast month, a survey released by Fidelity of more than 500 financial advisors to affluent people found that 87 percent expect these clients to be subject to higher income taxes in the coming year. You can support your favorite organization and reduce your tax bill, and The Community Foundation of Western North Carolina can help. IRA conversion If you’ve started the process to convert your traditional IRA to a tax-favored Roth IRA, making charitable gifts may offset all or part of the related taxable income. In future years, the reduced value of deductions may make a Roth conversion combined with additional gifts less advantageous. Retirement withdrawals and appreciated stock Make a taxable withdrawal from an IRA or a qualified retirement plan or give appreciated shares

in 2010 before the predicted rise in tax rates. Your charitable deduction for this year can reduce or even eliminate the tax cost of the withdrawal. When you give appreciated shares, no capital gains tax is incurred, and the full market value is deductible. Create a donor advised fund with your gift and you can distribute grants to charities whenever you wish.

Life insurance A life insurance policy that you no longer need – when it has a cash value – can be an excellent asset for giving. If you’ve reassessed your life insurance needs recently and have a policy you no longer need, you have a charitable asset that is waiting to be put to good use. Estate tax changes If Congress fails to act on the estate tax, 2011 also means that estates valued at $1 million or more will probably owe taxes. Making

Grant Announcement continued from page 1

substantial gifts now can provide a current charitable deduction and reduce future taxes on your estate. An alternative to a private foundation You can create a fund that allows you to give to specific organizations, make gifts over time, recognize you and your family and grow your charitable dollars through investment without the administrative burden and expense of a private foundation. We’re here to help you give wisely and well. Whether you want to simplify your personal giving, involve your family or plan your legacy, the Foundation can help. We work in concert with your vision, your unique circumstances and your advisors. Contact Sheryl Aikman or Becky Davis for a confidential conversation about your giving plans.

President’s Message continued from page 1

does that mean for the Foundation? It means that we must continue to be deliberate and thoughtful in how we use our resources while we set a new course for the future. The Foundation’s unbiased role in the region allows us to bring people, organizations and resources together to solve problems. Much of the Foundation’s strength lies in the permanence of our funds and our ability to connect donors to community needs. Through the expertise of our staff, we were recently able to introduce two promising programs in need of funding to a donor with the capacity to give and the desire to support initiatives that benefit children. With funding from this CFWNC donor, both programs have been implemented and are serving children in the region right now. I think this is a crucial function of the Foundation and that we can do more to use our knowledge of nonprofits to serve as true philanthropic advisors to our donors. Of the assets in our care, only a fraction is completely discretionary. Most of our grants, approximately 60%, are made through donor-advised funds and reflect the interests and desires of those who created them. Through strategic planning, it is my hope that more of the Foundation’s resources, unrestricted and donor advised, will be devoted to focus areas that together we determine represent the most pressing needs facing our region. The Community Foundation remains committed, as always, to supporting our broad nonprofit sector. We continue to provide significant support to WNC Nonprofit Pathways and have seen this initiative step up to the challenge of the last two years by working with organizations to address the impact of the recession. During the spring of 2010, Pathways conducted its own outside evaluation to gauge the effectiveness of its work and, as a result, program delivery will be adjusted so that the region’s nonprofit sector can continue to be strong, effective and responsive. I will have been at the Foundation for a year in November. I have experienced a wonderful welcome to this special region. I have met many people who have embraced philanthropy and are helping others as a way to enrich their own lives, and just as many who work tirelessly at nonprofits stressed by the economy to meet the ever-changing needs of Western North Carolina. I am grateful for the opportunity to be of service to this Foundation and to be inspired by the good work happening across these mountains. I look forward to The Community Foundation’s process of determining our “what’s next” and hope that you will join us on our journey.

The Women for Women giving circle made a $100,000 twoyear grant to OnTrack Financial Education and Counseling for the Women’s Financial Empowerment Center. “The Center has been a dream of OnTrack’s since we made the first presentation at a Women for Women education session in 2005,” said Celeste Collins, OnTrack’s executive director. “Thanks to this amazing grant the dream has become a reality and OnTrack is positioned to provide knowledge, skills, support and encouragement that women need to feel empowered in their journey toward their financial goals.” Nonprofits interested in applying for funding from Women for Women can read more about the program on our website www.cfwnc.org. Letters of intent are due November 12, 2010. OnTrack Board President Vicki Banks cut the ribbon at the opening celebration for the Women’s Financial Empowerment Center in August.

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“The need for safe, affordable youth development programs is great, as many of our Club families are facing extreme economic hardships,” said Jones. “This grant will help us become a more sustainable organization. The children of Transylvania County are the true recipients of this grant.” Lyn Fozzard, daughter of Melvin R. Lane, oversees the fund with her husband Harry and members of the Advisory Board. “We are proud to be making these grants during a period of economic recovery when building capacity and increasing effectiveness of social service nonprofits remains critical,” said Fozzard. “During the recession, many nonprofits were focused on surviving and providing services to people in need. Many did not have the resources to work on their internal systems and to plan for the long term.”

This year, those invited to submit a full application to the Melvin R. Lane Fund took part in an organizational assessment through WNC Nonprofit Pathways. “Every finalist, whether awarded a grant or not, went through the assessment process to help identify strengths and challenges,” said Bob Wagner, CFWNC vice president for programs. “This is the first cycle that included the organizational assessment. It allowed us to use the expertise of WNC Nonprofit Pathways to provide a more in-depth analysis and better direct grant funds toward the most pressing organizational issues.” According to Tina Owen at PLS, the value of the assessment was highlighted through the dialogue created between PLS staff and board members. “The results were pretty spot on but the greater value to us came from the facilitated discussions. Going through the process has provided us with some new ways of thinking and a spirit of openness for both the board and staff,” she said. “The assessment helped us prioritize. We felt empowered to make changes that we could implement immediately even before we knew we had been awarded the grant.”

Pisgah Legal Services, Inc. (PLS), a regional nonprofit providing legal assistance to vulnerable populations in Western North Carolina and helping more than 10,000 people annually, is the only nonprofit to have received two grants Fozzard and her advisory board from the Melvin R. Lane recognize the importance of Fund. Between 2000 and a timely assessment and are Marie Messer, a retired widow for whom PLS helped to prevent 2003, a grant from the conducting a similar analysis foreclosure and secured a loan modification, cutting her mortgage Melvin R. Lane Fund helped of their own operation. In an payments in half, with photographer Michael Muller. Michael PLS increase services in effort to stimulate their own volunteers for PLS after the organization helped save his mother’s home from foreclosure. Henderson County and learning, improvement and grow fundraising capacity, wise decision making, the MRL which ultimately laid the Fund is embarking on a threegroundwork for a permanent Henderson County office year, fund-focused evaluation. The study will be directed and a successful capital campaign. The organization has by Dr. Doug Easterling of Wake Forest University with recently set the goal of doubling the number of people the results made public and used to guide future grant served within the next 10 to 15 years. cycles. With help from the Melvin R. Lane program, PLS plans to hire a volunteer coordinator to enable them to increase the number and improve coordination of non-attorney volunteers. The organization will also focus on staff and board development and retention. “We have been through a period of sustained growth in staff and services that led us to a place where we could double our programs and strengthen our impact,” reported Tina Owen, capital campaign manager for PLS. “Having just finished a significant (and our only) capital campaign, we have a great opportunity and asset in the goodwill of the people in our community who want to work with us. We don’t have a volunteer program, outside of the volunteer attorney program. Fundraising is a challenge right now, and the economic environment is difficult, but we can continue to add capacity by adding volunteers.” “Our intense focus on the capital campaign left us with a need to reassess our internal processes, work on staff development and focus on management issues,” Owen continued. “We really appreciate that the Melvin R. Lane Fund and The Community Foundation recognize the need for organizational development. As much as we always see the need for that work, it is not going to happen without specific funding. We do what we are funded to do – help those in desperate need - so it often leaves out our own internal health.”

The three-year funding commitment from MRL enables nonprofits to think for the long term and to stay focused and committed to their core mission. Especially during this period of economic recovery, these grants mean that effective organizations can help more people in need across Western North Carolina. Fozzard knows that making the awards now, when funds are harder to come by and needs are great, is the right thing to do. She said, “My parents would be so pleased that their investment in Western North Carolina is providing important targeted funding to strengthen nonprofits so they can continue to provide the social safety network that helps families when they need it most.”

Give the Forever Gift Honor a friend or family member with a gift to a CFWNC Field of Interest Fund Your tax-deductible contribution to one of our community endowments can support the environment, women’s issues, the arts and much more. Visit www.cfwnc.org for details.

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ORGANIZATIONAL FUND PROFILE

The YMCA Blue Ridge Assembly

Nonprofit Black Mountain Conference Center Benefits from CFWNC Partnership

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he YMCA Blue Ridge Assembly is a nonprofit conference and leadership training center owned by the YMCAs of ten southeastern states. In addition to YMCAs, the facility serves nonprofit organizations, schools, government entities and churches by offering a full-service conference center situated on 1200 acres in Black Mountain surrounded by ridges, valleys and spectacular mountain views. The facility, established in 1906 as a Christian conference and training center by Dr. Willis D. Weatherford, Sr., hosted its first conference in the summer of 1912. The campus offers a variety of accommodations and outstanding programs designed to enrich the spirit, mind and body of guests of all ages.

Community Foundation, we institutionalized our assets and placed them in the hands of experts,” said Hibbard. “By bundling our money with theirs, we gain access to layers of supervision, diversity of investments, benchmarks and standards that a portfolio of our size could never command on its own. Simply put, the Foundation enables

For additional information about the YMCA Blue Ridge Assembly, visit www.blueridgeassembly.org.

The Community Foundation has enjoyed a productive partnership with the Blue Ridge Assembly, which has maintained two funds at CFWNC for more than a decade. Roger Hibbard, who retired as CEO of the Blue Ridge Assembly last year, explained that prior to transferring assets to the Foundation, the board managed the funds themselves. “When we invested with The

us to operate in a much better investment environment.” Another benefit of maintaining funds with the Foundation, according to Hibbard, is that donors have access to sophisticated giving tools such as charitable remainder trusts and charitable gift annuities that the Assembly could not offer and that put the needs and desires of donors

first. These donors, he reports, are pleased with the thorough, timely and accurate reporting that the Foundation is responsible for producing. Hibbard complimented the professionalism and investment performance of the Foundation and pointed out that there are other benefits of the partnership. “Ultimately our affiliation with The Community Foundation indicates our support for their charitable goals in our region,” he continued. “Both organizations are engaged in lifeimpacting, important work and in helping to meet needs. We are all as one in that effort and it means a great deal to us.” The Community Foundation helps more than 130 regional nonprofits by offering them expertise in administration and investment management. Working with the Foundation enables nonprofits to access institutional-caliber strategies in a cost-effective manner and complements their development efforts with CFWNC’s full range of services. A fund that benefits a specific organization can be established by the organization or by an individual donor. Please contact Sheryl Aikman at 828-254-4960 or aikman@cfwnc. org to learn more.

The Power in Listening and Working Together A Reflection from CFWNC Program Officer Beth Maczka

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ver the past few years, the Foundation has made grants supporting nonprofits that proposed building community-based solutions by listening and/or bringing stakeholders together. It is fair to say that at the time these grants were “leaps of faith” as we were not being asked to support a program, we were being asked to support the learning process. I was struck recently, as I reviewed a number of final grant evaluations, that these nonprofits took program development to a new level of understanding and developed very specific solutions working for their communities.

their fears, hopes and needs and proposing solutions. The process can lead to new ideas and possibilities and the identification of common ground.

Some of these nonprofits conducted a Listening Project, a process developed over 25 years by Herb Walters, the director of Rural Southern Voice for Peace (RSVP). A Listening Project (LP) is a comprehensive process that includes “deep listening” interviews and community organizing that can result in cooperative community education and action. LPs are especially useful in communities where conflict, divisions or disempowerment weakens efforts for positive change.

In spring 2008, RSVP received a $25,000 CFWNC Strategy Grant for the Christian Stewardship Listening Project. The project interviewed 53 church leaders from primarily conservative and evangelical churches in Yancey and Madison counties. This enabled people Beth Maczka has been with the Foundation since 2007. who had previously been disengaged or critical of environmentalism to create their own local, faith-based approach to caring for the earth.

LPs have been used to solve problems in war-torn countries as well as in communities across the U.S. LP interviewers are trained to take time and build trust and understanding as they ask pre-determined, open-ended questions that help people go deeper into expressing

Interviews and follow-up organizing resulted in the formation of a widely-respected church leadership team that continues to work on several successful projects with local churches including an Adopt-A-Stream program, energy audits for churches, home weatherization Continued on page 4

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Power in Listening continued from page 3

for eligible families, watershed protection, programs for youth and youth educators and the formation of Sustainable Yancey, an organization working to determine local support and priorities for sustainable development. This fall, the Asheville City Schools Foundation launched In Real Life – an after-school initiative that was a direct result of the Listening to Our Teens project in the spring of 2008. A CFWNC Opportunity Grant for $7,000 enabled the Asheville City Schools Foundation to work with Herb Walters of RSVP to recruit and train volunteers to talk and listen to middle-school teens and their families. The result of these conversations was a clear identification of the need for relevant after-school activities for youth in our community.

CFWNC Donors Ken and Ida Brown, Kate Pett and Leah Ferguson of Asheville City Schools Foundation and CFWNC President Elizabeth Brazas celebrate the launch of In Real Life at Asheville Middle School.

“We were told at the beginning of the process that interviews had to lead to action or we would lose our credibility,” noted Kate Pett of the Asheville City Schools Foundation. Less than two years later, students at Asheville Middle School can take advantage of an exciting menu of after-school activities that includes sports, the arts and academic support. The project, modeled on a successful program in Rhode Island, simplifies program delivery by coordinating registration and transportation for youth. The impact of this small grant is even more powerful now that the United Way of Asheville and Buncombe County has chosen to focus on middle school success and will work closely with Asheville Middle and Owen Middle to support strong after-school programming.

Finally, a CFWNC Strategy Grant in the fall of 2008 supported a six-county collaboration of Healthy Carolinian Partnerships. The local groups came together to learn about the documentary, Unnatural Causes – Is Inequality Making Us Sick? Together these counties hired a facilitator to help each community host local viewings of the documentary and conduct discussions about how best to address larger structural issues that impact health outcomes such as the location of grocery stores, access to recreation facilities and land-use planning.

identified the need for a Latino Center and a campaign to address drunk driving. Macon County chose to focus on the social isolation of teens in a very rural area. What is important is that each of the three grants launched a process without a clear indication of what might be learned but with the commitment and capacity to act on their findings. Each organization has made significant strides in increasing communication and problem solving in ways that respect differences and ensure community participation and collaboration. The Community Foundation’s support of process, of convening and of working with stakeholders to ensure community-based solutions is an important aspect of our work that will impact our region for years to come. As a program officer reviewing grant applications and reports, I am inspired that nonprofits are creating new solutions, involving broad constituencies and developing effective programs unique to their communities. Working together, respecting differences and ensuring that all voices are heard, we can create positive and lasting change and have a real impact on our region.

As expected, each county’s strategy was unique to their local resources and dynamics. Buncombe County recently hosted a three-day training session for healthcare workers to address institutional racism. McDowell County

CFWNC Welcomes New Board Members T

he Community Foundation is pleased to announce new board members who have been elected to serve a threeyear term. These individuals are carefully selected for a variety of strengths and experience in order to guide the growth and direction of the Foundation. Our new board members are: G. Edward Towson, II, a certified public accountant who is president of Gould Killian CPA Group in Asheville. Ed works with numerous construction contractors and real estate developers, as well as medical practices and small businesses providing tax and estate planning and management advisory services. He is active in the community and serves on the board of Givens Estates, Asheville Symphony and Buncombe County Medical Society Foundation.

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Educator and writer Dr. J. Wilson Bowman whose experience includes leading the YWCA of Asheville and working in administration at Mars Hill College, in addition to consulting, presenting and publishing. She is an Associate Professor of Education at UNC Asheville. An active community volunteer, Dr. Bowman is involved with the Land of Sky Regional Council, Kiwanis of Asheville, Links Incorporated and OnTrack Financial Education and Counseling.


GIVING BACK

Giving in a Time of Tax Uncertainty L ast month, a survey released by Fidelity of more than 500 financial advisors to affluent people found that 87 percent expect these clients to be subject to higher income taxes in the coming year. You can support your favorite organization and reduce your tax bill, and The Community Foundation of Western North Carolina can help. IRA conversion If you’ve started the process to convert your traditional IRA to a tax-favored Roth IRA, making charitable gifts may offset all or part of the related taxable income. In future years, the reduced value of deductions may make a Roth conversion combined with additional gifts less advantageous. Retirement withdrawals and appreciated stock Make a taxable withdrawal from an IRA or a qualified retirement plan or give appreciated shares

in 2010 before the predicted rise in tax rates. Your charitable deduction for this year can reduce or even eliminate the tax cost of the withdrawal. When you give appreciated shares, no capital gains tax is incurred, and the full market value is deductible. Create a donor advised fund with your gift and you can distribute grants to charities whenever you wish.

Life insurance A life insurance policy that you no longer need – when it has a cash value – can be an excellent asset for giving. If you’ve reassessed your life insurance needs recently and have a policy you no longer need, you have a charitable asset that is waiting to be put to good use. Estate tax changes If Congress fails to act on the estate tax, 2011 also means that estates valued at $1 million or more will probably owe taxes. Making

Grant Announcement continued from page 1

substantial gifts now can provide a current charitable deduction and reduce future taxes on your estate. An alternative to a private foundation You can create a fund that allows you to give to specific organizations, make gifts over time, recognize you and your family and grow your charitable dollars through investment without the administrative burden and expense of a private foundation. We’re here to help you give wisely and well. Whether you want to simplify your personal giving, involve your family or plan your legacy, the Foundation can help. We work in concert with your vision, your unique circumstances and your advisors. Contact Sheryl Aikman or Becky Davis for a confidential conversation about your giving plans.

President’s Message continued from page 1

does that mean for the Foundation? It means that we must continue to be deliberate and thoughtful in how we use our resources while we set a new course for the future. The Foundation’s unbiased role in the region allows us to bring people, organizations and resources together to solve problems. Much of the Foundation’s strength lies in the permanence of our funds and our ability to connect donors to community needs. Through the expertise of our staff, we were recently able to introduce two promising programs in need of funding to a donor with the capacity to give and the desire to support initiatives that benefit children. With funding from this CFWNC donor, both programs have been implemented and are serving children in the region right now. I think this is a crucial function of the Foundation and that we can do more to use our knowledge of nonprofits to serve as true philanthropic advisors to our donors. Of the assets in our care, only a fraction is completely discretionary. Most of our grants, approximately 60%, are made through donor-advised funds and reflect the interests and desires of those who created them. Through strategic planning, it is my hope that more of the Foundation’s resources, unrestricted and donor advised, will be devoted to focus areas that together we determine represent the most pressing needs facing our region. The Community Foundation remains committed, as always, to supporting our broad nonprofit sector. We continue to provide significant support to WNC Nonprofit Pathways and have seen this initiative step up to the challenge of the last two years by working with organizations to address the impact of the recession. During the spring of 2010, Pathways conducted its own outside evaluation to gauge the effectiveness of its work and, as a result, program delivery will be adjusted so that the region’s nonprofit sector can continue to be strong, effective and responsive. I will have been at the Foundation for a year in November. I have experienced a wonderful welcome to this special region. I have met many people who have embraced philanthropy and are helping others as a way to enrich their own lives, and just as many who work tirelessly at nonprofits stressed by the economy to meet the ever-changing needs of Western North Carolina. I am grateful for the opportunity to be of service to this Foundation and to be inspired by the good work happening across these mountains. I look forward to The Community Foundation’s process of determining our “what’s next” and hope that you will join us on our journey.

The Women for Women giving circle made a $100,000 twoyear grant to OnTrack Financial Education and Counseling for the Women’s Financial Empowerment Center. “The Center has been a dream of OnTrack’s since we made the first presentation at a Women for Women education session in 2005,” said Celeste Collins, OnTrack’s executive director. “Thanks to this amazing grant the dream has become a reality and OnTrack is positioned to provide knowledge, skills, support and encouragement that women need to feel empowered in their journey toward their financial goals.” Nonprofits interested in applying for funding from Women for Women can read more about the program on our website www.cfwnc.org. Letters of intent are due November 12, 2010. OnTrack Board President Vicki Banks cut the ribbon at the opening celebration for the Women’s Financial Empowerment Center in August.

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“The need for safe, affordable youth development programs is great, as many of our Club families are facing extreme economic hardships,” said Jones. “This grant will help us become a more sustainable organization. The children of Transylvania County are the true recipients of this grant.” Lyn Fozzard, daughter of Melvin R. Lane, oversees the fund with her husband Harry and members of the Advisory Board. “We are proud to be making these grants during a period of economic recovery when building capacity and increasing effectiveness of social service nonprofits remains critical,” said Fozzard. “During the recession, many nonprofits were focused on surviving and providing services to people in need. Many did not have the resources to work on their internal systems and to plan for the long term.”

This year, those invited to submit a full application to the Melvin R. Lane Fund took part in an organizational assessment through WNC Nonprofit Pathways. “Every finalist, whether awarded a grant or not, went through the assessment process to help identify strengths and challenges,” said Bob Wagner, CFWNC vice president for programs. “This is the first cycle that included the organizational assessment. It allowed us to use the expertise of WNC Nonprofit Pathways to provide a more in-depth analysis and better direct grant funds toward the most pressing organizational issues.” According to Tina Owen at PLS, the value of the assessment was highlighted through the dialogue created between PLS staff and board members. “The results were pretty spot on but the greater value to us came from the facilitated discussions. Going through the process has provided us with some new ways of thinking and a spirit of openness for both the board and staff,” she said. “The assessment helped us prioritize. We felt empowered to make changes that we could implement immediately even before we knew we had been awarded the grant.”

Pisgah Legal Services, Inc. (PLS), a regional nonprofit providing legal assistance to vulnerable populations in Western North Carolina and helping more than 10,000 people annually, is the only nonprofit to have received two grants Fozzard and her advisory board from the Melvin R. Lane recognize the importance of Fund. Between 2000 and a timely assessment and are Marie Messer, a retired widow for whom PLS helped to prevent 2003, a grant from the conducting a similar analysis foreclosure and secured a loan modification, cutting her mortgage Melvin R. Lane Fund helped of their own operation. In an payments in half, with photographer Michael Muller. Michael PLS increase services in effort to stimulate their own volunteers for PLS after the organization helped save his mother’s home from foreclosure. Henderson County and learning, improvement and grow fundraising capacity, wise decision making, the MRL which ultimately laid the Fund is embarking on a threegroundwork for a permanent Henderson County office year, fund-focused evaluation. The study will be directed and a successful capital campaign. The organization has by Dr. Doug Easterling of Wake Forest University with recently set the goal of doubling the number of people the results made public and used to guide future grant served within the next 10 to 15 years. cycles. With help from the Melvin R. Lane program, PLS plans to hire a volunteer coordinator to enable them to increase the number and improve coordination of non-attorney volunteers. The organization will also focus on staff and board development and retention. “We have been through a period of sustained growth in staff and services that led us to a place where we could double our programs and strengthen our impact,” reported Tina Owen, capital campaign manager for PLS. “Having just finished a significant (and our only) capital campaign, we have a great opportunity and asset in the goodwill of the people in our community who want to work with us. We don’t have a volunteer program, outside of the volunteer attorney program. Fundraising is a challenge right now, and the economic environment is difficult, but we can continue to add capacity by adding volunteers.” “Our intense focus on the capital campaign left us with a need to reassess our internal processes, work on staff development and focus on management issues,” Owen continued. “We really appreciate that the Melvin R. Lane Fund and The Community Foundation recognize the need for organizational development. As much as we always see the need for that work, it is not going to happen without specific funding. We do what we are funded to do – help those in desperate need - so it often leaves out our own internal health.”

The three-year funding commitment from MRL enables nonprofits to think for the long term and to stay focused and committed to their core mission. Especially during this period of economic recovery, these grants mean that effective organizations can help more people in need across Western North Carolina. Fozzard knows that making the awards now, when funds are harder to come by and needs are great, is the right thing to do. She said, “My parents would be so pleased that their investment in Western North Carolina is providing important targeted funding to strengthen nonprofits so they can continue to provide the social safety network that helps families when they need it most.”

Give the Forever Gift Honor a friend or family member with a gift to a CFWNC Field of Interest Fund Your tax-deductible contribution to one of our community endowments can support the environment, women’s issues, the arts and much more. Visit www.cfwnc.org for details.

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Good Works

PAID Asheville, NC Permit No. 518

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To receive future newsletters electronically and to subscribe to CFWNC E-News, please send an email with “subscribe” in the subject line to Semadeni@cfwnc.org.

FA L L 2 0 1 0 / W I N T E R 2 0 1 1

H O M E G R OW N P H I L A N T H R O PY FO R E V E R GRANT ANNOUNCEMENT

$900,000 Awarded to Help Human Service Nonprofits

Confirmed in Compliance with National Standards for U.S. Community Foundations

CFWNC Phone: 828-254-4960 Fax: 828-251-2258 www.cfwnc.org

Officers Marla Adams, Chair Ernest E. Ferguson, Vice-Chair Terry Van Duyn, Secretary William N. Lewin, Treasurer

Our Affiliates Black Mountain Community Endowment Fund Cashiers Community Fund The Fund for Haywood County Highlands Community Foundation The McDowell Foundation Foundation for Mitchell County Rutherford County Foundation Transylvania Endowment Yancey Foundation

Calendar

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Board of Directors 2010-2011

Board Members Louise W. Baker Gene Bell J. Wilson Bowman, Ph.D. David S. Dimling Jennie Eblen Thomas Lee Finger John N. Fleming Harry Jarrett

Please visit www.cfwnc.org for a complete list including scholarship deadlines.

John G. Kelso Virginia Litzenberger T. Wood Lovell Tina McGuire Janet Smith Moore Ramona C. Rowe George W. Saenger Anna S. (Candy) Shivers James W. Stickney, IV Jerry Stone G. Edward Towson, II Kate Vogel Laura A. Webb Laurence Weiss John G. Winkenwerder

Executive Staff Elizabeth Brazas, President Sheryl Aikman, Vice President, Development Graham Keever, Vice President, Finance and Administration Bob Wagner, Vice President, Programs

Newsletter Editor Lindsay Hearn, Communications Director

Jennifer Buffet to Speak at the 7th Annual Power of the Purse MONDAY, MAY 23, 2011, CROWNE PLAZA RESORT ASHEVILLE

October

For Nonprofits 1 The Ramble Charitable Fund Grant Application Deadline 1 Biltmore Lake Charitable Fund Grant Application Deadline For Women for Women Members 5 Women for Women Social event 5–7pm; Gallery Minerva, 8 Biltmore Avenue, Asheville; RSVP to Jacqui Friedrich, 684-2600 or jacquifriedrich@yahoo.com

12 Women for Women Fall Membership meeting 4:30–6:30pm; Zealandia Castle, Asheville; email butler@cfwnc.org to register

For Nonprofits 19 2010 Leadership Forum 3:30-7:00pm; visit www.nonprofitpathways.org to register

November

For Nonprofits 12 Women for Women Grant Letter of Intent Deadline 25 & 26 CFWNC Closed for the Thanksgiving holiday

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December

24 CFWNC Closed for the Christmas holiday

January 3 CFWNC Closed for the New Year’s holiday 17 CFWNC Closed for Martin Luther King Jr. holiday

January Deadlines for Scholarship Seekers 5 Asheville Young Woman Leadership Award 10 Irving Jacob Reuter Award 14 All programs listed on the Common Scholarship Application 14 Far West Scholarship 21 Mike Davis Team Spirit Award 21 Cal and Carol Peddy Scholarship 25 Johneen Roth Epstein Scholarship Unless otherwise noted, grant applications must be received by 5 p.m.

Philanthropist and community leader Jennifer Buffet is the keynote speaker for the 2011 Power of the Purse Luncheon taking place Monday, May 23, in Asheville. Buffett is co-chair and president of the NoVo Foundation, a philanthropic organization focused on creating a more just and balanced world based on cooperation and compassion, primarily through the empowerment of girls and women. The foundation invests in long-term strategic initiatives that lead to systemic change, specifically ending violence against girls and women, unlocking the potential of adolescent girls and advancing social and emotional learning. NoVo is a major philanthropic partner with the Nike Foundation, fueling “The Girl Effect”—the social and economic change brought about when every girl has the power to participate equally in her community. In September 2008, Jennifer and her husband Peter received the Clinton Global Citizen Award for their “visionary leadership and sustainable, scalable work in solving pressing global challenges.” In December 2009, they were named among Barron’s top 25 most effective philanthropists. In 2010, Jennifer was chosen by President Clinton to be a founding member of Clinton Global Initiative’s young global leaders cohort, “CGI LEAD.” Buffet’s work in philanthropy began in 1997 when Peter’s parents, Susan and Warren Buffett, bequeathed Jennifer and Peter a small charitable fund. Proceeds from the Power of the Purse benefit The Women’s Fund, a permanent endowment created at CFWNC to support the unmet needs of women and girls in our mountain region. If you are interested in sponsorship opportunities, contact Becky Davis at bdavis@cfwnc.org or 828-254-4960.

hanks to the Melvin R. Lane Fund of The Community Foundation, six social service nonprofits serving Western North Carolina will receive $150,000 each over three years to improve operations, become more collaborative and secure their futures. The multi-year grants are made possible through the Melvin R. Lane Fund, created by Melvin and Georgianna Lane, longtime residents of Henderson County. The 2010-2012 grant recipients are: All Souls Counseling Center; Boys and Girls Club of Transylvania County; Literacy Council of Buncombe County; Our Voice, Inc.; Pisgah Legal Services; and Youth Empowerment. Each has plans to use the funds to implement changes or add capacity that will enable the organization to operate more effectively and meet more needs.

Melanie Jones, executive director of the Boys and Girls Club of Transylvania County, reports that she has witnessed a 20% increase in membership and a significant decrease in funding over the past 18 months. Her organization will use the funds to increase fundraising by strengthening systems and transition their part-time Director of Resource Development & Community Outreach Gardening is an integral part of the summer program for 11-year-olds to a full-time position. at the Boys and Girls Club of Transylvania County with much of the The grant will enable the produce being put to use in the Club’s kitchen. Here Ana Adame hoes and weeds while Danielle Troyer harvests onions. Club to raise additional funds for operating help retire capital debt, eliminate an expenses, which have annual interest expense and begin a grown substantially over the last planned giving/endowment program. six years, and will support work to Continued on page 5

P R E S I D E N T ’ S M E SSAG E

Letter to the Community from Elizabeth Brazas

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his fall The Community Foundation will embark on a strategic planning process to evaluate our activities, programs and ways of working. We will emerge from this process with a plan that will guide our thinking and serve as the basis for our decisions and work in the communities we serve. The analysis and focus that are a part of this process are valuable in many ways and especially timely for The Community Foundation. Strategic planning often takes place after a leadership transition, a significant shift in the economy or a clear change in industry best practices. Your Community Foundation is functioning in a new environment that includes all three of these factors. With consultants and an internal project team, we will examine all departments; interview stakeholders on our role as philanthropic advisor, funder and community leader; analyze industry best practices for foundations of a similar size and geographic diversity; determine and prioritize needs across the 18-county service area; frame a plan; and determine what is implementable. I expect

that we will learn from what is working well and will also have to make some difficult decisions. Through this planning process, we are preparing to hold ourselves accountable to the same standards that we expect from our grantees. We need to focus our resources so that we can make a Elizabeth Brazas CFWNC President measurable impact across Western North Carolina. We owe it to our donors to invest their money wisely and to be able to outline a strategy, identify benchmarks and report concrete results. In the last few months, we have seen the markets continue to fluctuate. While the Foundation’s assets have recovered to nearly $150 million, there is widespread agreement that economic recovery will be erratic. What Continued on page 2

Fall 2010 Good Works The Community Foundation of Western North Carolina News Letter Fall 2010  

Fall 2010 The Community Foundation of Western North Carolina, Good Works

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