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Nonprofit Organization U.S. Postage

Good Works

PAID Asheville, NC Permit No. 518

Suite 1600, The BB&T Bldg. One West Pack Square P.O. Box 1888 Asheville, NC 28802

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S u m m e r / Fa l l 2 0 1 1

H o m e g r ow n P h i l a n t h r o py Fo r e v e r P RE S ID E N T’ S M E SSAG E

Letter to the Community Elizabeth Brazas

Confirmed in Compliance with National Standards for U.S. Community Foundations

CFWNC Phone: 828-254-4960 Fax: 828-251-2258 www.cfwnc.org

Our Affiliates Black Mountain-Swananoa Valley Foundation Cashiers Community Fund The Fund for Haywood County Highlands Community Foundation The McDowell Foundation Foundation for Mitchell County Rutherford County Foundation Transylvania Endowment Yancey Foundation

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Board of Directors 2011-2012 Officers Marla Adams, Chair Ernest E. Ferguson, Vice-Chair Terry Van Duyn, Secretary William N. Lewin, Treasurer

Board Members Maurean B. Adams Louise W. Baker J. Wilson Bowman, Ph.D. David S. Dimling Jennie Eblen Thomas Lee Finger John N. Fleming Howell A. Hammond Darryl Hart

A.C. Honeycutt, Jr. John G. Kelso Virginia Litzenberger T. Wood Lovell Tina McGuire Janet Smith Moore Lowell R. Pearlman Ramona C. Rowe George W. Saenger Anna S. (Candy) Shivers James W. Stickney, IV Jerry Stone G. Edward Towson, II Laurence Weiss

Executive Staff Elizabeth Brazas, President Sheryl Aikman, Vice President, Development Graham Keever, Vice President, Finance and Administration Bob Wagner, Vice President, Programs

Newsletter Editor Lindsay Hearn, Communications Director

• We will continue to grow, and the desire of many of our donors to work with us as true charitable advisors will support that growth.

Community Foundation to Relocate to Historic Biltmore School

• Never has our regional knowledge and expertise been so important. • To meet our donors’ desires and to have maximum impact in the region, we must lead with our

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fter an extensive downtown search, The Community Foundation is purchasing an office suite in the Biltmore School building on Hendersonville Road near I-40. The iconic building has been bought by a local investment group that plans to restore it. The 57,000 square foot structure was completed in 1927 and has stood vacant for more than a decade. Previous efforts to restore it for adaptive reuse were not successful. The purchase and move will be accomplished without a capital campaign and will allow the Foundation to build equity. Local construction company Beverly-Grant will do the renovation, which will include upgrading building systems, restoring the façade and adding fire protection, elevators, solar panels and parking. Alan McGuinn of CJMW Architecture will oversee the project. Local real estate broker and investment partner John Spake, CCIM of Spake Real Estate, is handling sales and leasing. He can be reached at 828-277-9670 or john@spakerealestate.com.

FWNC is 32 years old. In 2009, we experienced the convergence of the recession, a leadership change and a shift in what donors and communities were asking of us. Clearly it was time to step back and look at everything we do and assess our goals. In October, we embarked on an in-depth strategic planning process to do just that. Our comprehensive strategic planning has included a board retreat, consultants, focus groups and much more. Here is some of what we have learned:

grantmaking and alter the way we invest our limited discretionary funds. While our grantmaking is the most visible way that we work in our region, we can also bring together donors, nonprofits, government and business leaders and citizens around collective strategies. This is one of our strengths, and now is the time for us to focus on what we do best. Though we recognize that focus can be difficult, we look forward to this challenge. Our ability to mobilize resources requires us to move first and then ask others to join us to tackle regional issues. We believe that with the support of our donors and other regional and national partners, we can truly enrich lives and communities. All of the ways we strive to serve Western North Carolina will be enhanced, I believe, by aligning our resources – financial and otherwise –

behind efforts to address regional needs. In order to effectively invest our dollars, we need to understand community assets, funding gaps, potential alliances and the resources we can provide. Rest assured that as we make this shift, the core of our being will remain the same. We will continue to assist caring people across the region with their charitable giving and provide exceptional service and stewardship. Looking forward, there are two other exciting developments to share. In spring 2012, we will conduct the first grant cycle from the Janirve Legacy Fund, supporting nonprofits serving people in need. Distributing $10 million over 25 years, especially in smaller communities, will help thousands of people, and we are honored to have been chosen to carry on the Janirve legacy of caring.

Elizabeth Brazas CFWNC President

I also want to let you know that we have committed to purchase a suite of offices in the Biltmore School building on Hendersonville Road. This new location in a restored historic structure will provide easy access, ample parking and an opportunity for the Foundation to own our office space, reducing operating costs while building equity. So, yet another transition is in our future. It is a great privilege to serve The Community Foundation of Western North Carolina. Thank you for the trust you place in our work and organization. With you, we look forward to what’s on the horizon.

A ffi l iate N e ws

Inaugural Ramble Run Benefits The Women’s Fund On May 7, more than 1,200 runners participated in the inaugural Ramble Run 5K and 12K that benefitted The Community Foundation’s Women’s Fund. A check for $2,500 was presented to Elizabeth Brazas by Kelly Allen of the Asheville Track Club. CFWNC staff was well-represented with Sheryl Aikman, Elizabeth Brazas, Spencer Butler, Diane Crisp, Becky Davis, Lindsay Hearn, Beth Maczka, Tara Scholtz, Tim Richards and members of their families participating. CFWNC Board member John Fleming and his wife Amy and Women for Women members Nancy Brown and Leah Broker ran as well.

Yancey Foundation to Raise $1 Million over Ten Years T

he Community Foundation serves 18 counties, and through the work of our nine affiliate funds, we are able to be truly regional. The Yancey Foundation, established in 1998, serves a rural county that lies northeast of Asheville and exemplifies how leaders, donors and nonprofits can band together to improve lives and leverage support for local needs. The Yancey Foundation has made more than $500,000 in grants since its founding. Recent grants supported an irrigation system for Dig In! Community Garden, training for the Children’s Advocacy Center staff and a study regarding telemedicine in the schools

that leveraged one million dollars for program implementation. As it looks ahead, the Yancey Foundation aims to raise $1 million over ten years, and set and met the first year’s goal of $50,000 in just over nine months. “Goals inspire people,” explains board member Howell Hammond. “Our annual donations were running about $25,000 so it was going to take us 20 years to get to $1 million. We could get there in ten years, but we needed time to increase fundraising gradually, so decided to increase our goal annually by $5,000.”

John Miller, Director of Reconciliation House in Burnsville, with cabbages grown by Dig In! Community Garden.

Continued on page 5

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Sc holarsh ips

CFWNC Awards $315,250 in Scholarships T

he Community Foundation recently approved scholarships totaling $315,250 to 87 students from Western North Carolina. The Foundation administers approximately 60 scholarship funds, about 40 of which run a spring cycle offered to high school seniors each year. These are just numbers until you look deeper at the young people who are transforming their lives through higher education. According to John Fleming of the WNC Regionals Scholarship Committee, those interviewed during the selection process impressed the committee with their focus, ambition and commitment to their work and communities. “This is a group of young people who are pursuing their education and dreams with determination and excitement,” he said. “Some of these future pharmacists, linguists, engineers, doctors and veterinarians come from economicallydepressed households or otherwise face hurdles that might make academic success a challenge but they do not let anything stand in their way. It is deeply rewarding to be able to support their efforts.”

Top recipient David L. Wang of T.C. Roberson High School won the prestigious Irving Jacob Reuter Award, valued at $48,000 over four years. This scholarship recognizes exceptional academic performance, coupled with significant school and community involvement. Wang will be attending Harvard in the fall and hopes to become a member of the Federal Reserve. The Irving Jacob Reuter Award, funded by the Janirve

Foundation through CFWNC, is offered to public high school seniors in Buncombe and Madison counties. Erich Baker of Macon County is the recipient of a four-year Clyde and Mildred Wright Scholarship valued at $20,000. He will be attending Davidson College in the fall. “I have a passion for medicine and pharmacy,

Erich Baker of Macon County is the recipient of a 2011 four-year Clyde and Mildred Wright Scholarship

and I truly believe I could spend my life in one of those professions,” said Baker. “They also happen to be wellpaying careers, and I can’t say that isn’t important to me. My family has struggled financially at times, and if I achieve almost nothing else, I will escape from that kind of financial uncertainty for myself and my children. But a career is a long way off for an 18-year-old, and right now the idea of

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doing something I love and getting paid well for it is as much as I can hope for.” The Wright award earned by Erich is part of the WNC Regional Scholarships offered to public and home-schooled high school seniors in the 18-county region served by CFWNC.

The goal drives this energized affiliate. Raising $1 million in a county of 310 square miles and population of just under 18,000, is no easy feat. The board is active and engaged; they are contributing as individuals and asking others to help. Already the Yancey Foundation has added two dozen new donors to its roster and many regular contributors have increased the amount of their gifts.

According to Maria Juarez, the Foundation’s Scholarship Officer, there is great need for educational help in our region. She says, “Many of the students seeking assistance come from rural areas and depressed economic backgrounds, yet their academic records and intense community involvement speak to their drive to succeed and core values.” She noted that some are the first in their families to attend college, and some have parents who didn’t graduate high school, “but this generation,” she continues, “is determined to break the cycle of poverty and to give back to their communities in a significant way.”

“If you get an effective committee structure in place and get people involved and enthusiastic, it makes a big difference,” said Hammond. “We also have to communicate more often and effectively with our donors and prospective donors and let them know that their gifts are having an impact. We produced a brief video to explain why the Yancey Foundation is the best place to invest for the long-term good of Yancey County.” (To see this video and others, visit the Yancey Foundation’s web page at www.cfwnc.org under “Our Affiliates.”)

CFWNC scholarships are open to Western North Carolina residents who are public high school seniors, who attend the NC School of Science and Mathematics or the UNC School of the Arts High School or who study in a home school registered with the North Carolina Division of NonPublic Education. There are programs open to private high school students in Buncombe County, and a few programs open to students already in college or employees or children of employees of certain area corporations. For information on applying for a scholarship or supporting scholarships, visit www.cfwnc.org.

G iving Back

The opportunity to give the gift of a lifetime . . . but only until December 31 Shon P. Norris

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ou can give more for less. Until December 31, 2011, you can give individual retirement account (IRA) funds to charity. So, your retirement funds can go farther than ever before. You can give tax-free. These gifts count toward your 2011 required minimum distribution and are excluded from your gross income, so it’s a taxfree way to make a gift to the causes you care about. This is especially valuable if you utilize the standard deduction, but also helps reduce limitations on tax deductions related to gross income. To qualify: • You must be 70 1/2 or older at the time of the gift. • Transfers must go directly from the IRA to charity. • You can give up to $100,000 per taxpayer. • The account must be a traditional or Roth IRA.

• Your gift must be completed by December 31, 2011.

• IRA gifts cannot be made to donor advised funds, but CFWNC can help you create a fund to support your designated charities – a wonderful way to use IRA assets to “pre-fund” the charitable gifts you plan to make over the next three, five or ten years, or to pay an existing multi-year donation. Giving to a donor advised fund? Swap IRA assets to your stock portfolio. Continued on page 5

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“Affiliates are led by people who know and care about a community. I personally am energized by what the Yancey Foundation is doing,” said Tara Scholtz, the Foundation’s affiliate officer. “They are utilizing the Foundation’s resources and acting locally to improve their own community. My role with the Yancey Foundation is strategic. I work to support their plan.” Scholtz continued, “The most rewarding aspect of my work with the affiliates is supporting thoughtful community leaders. They care about their neighbors and are working to ensure that there are resources to address issues for decades to come.” Affiliates are meaningful pillars in their communities to nonprofits and donors alike. Each affiliate fund leverages support from The Community Foundation and adds value to the work of the Foundation across the region. Affiliate boards know their nonprofits, the needs and the community leaders who can get things done. “Our region is so big and diverse,” explains Scholtz. “We rely on them to help us make better investments, and they have the relationships to be successful fundraisers.” The Community Foundation has nine affiliate funds. Each was started because locals desired to see an endowment created. The Janirve Foundation supported the development and growth of the affiliate network contributing a $25,000 match to each; The Community Foundation contributed a $10,000 match to each start-up. Affiliate funds were required to reach $70,000 before beginning to make grants. Currently, affiliate fund balances range from $250,000 to more than $2 million. To learn more about the Yancey Foundation or other CFWNC affiliate funds, visit www.cfwnc.org.

Your gift can last forever. Your gift can be placed into an endowment that is invested and will grow over time. Grants addressing community needs will be made forever. Consider the following: • Create a charitable fund in your name, the name of your family or in honor of any person or organization you choose.

Recently, a former seasonal resident passed away and included the Yancey Foundation in his estate. His $39,000 bequest will launch a Legacy Society, honoring those who plan to contribute to the Yancey Foundation through their estates. “Delia and Marshall Courtney loved Yancey County and the time they spent here with family. This gift is a fitting tribute to their generous spirit and belief that every gift makes a difference,” said Sheryl Aikman, the Foundation staff member who helped the Courtneys with their plans.

Giving Back continued from page 2

Shon P. Norris is a member of the CFWNC Professional Advisory Committee. He began with the Gould Killian CPA Group, P.A. as an intern in May 2000. He received his bachelor’s degree from the University of North Carolina at Asheville and his masters in accounting from Western Carolina University. A native of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Shon is an active community volunteer. His practice focuses on income tax planning and preparation for small businesses and individuals. He has extensive experience in the real estate, construction, aviation, professional group and hospitality industries.

Transfer appreciated securities to a donor advised fund, then use a distribution from your IRA to replace those portfolio holdings, establishing a new and higher cost basis. Or, diversify your portfolio by purchasing other securities. Too young to give IRA assets? If you’re not yet age 70 1/2, IRA assets are especially well-suited for charitable gifts after your lifetime, by naming a charity as your primary or contingent beneficiary. Your IRA plan provider can provide a change of beneficiary form (most companies make them available online). CFWNC can help when you want to make one gift from your IRA that will benefit several charitable causes. Need more information? Want to talk about your giving goals and ways to use IRA assets to achieve them? Contact Sheryl Aikman, Vice President, Development at aikman@cfwnc.org or 828-254-4960.

CFWNC Welcomes New Board Members C

FWNC’s volunteer Board of Directors guides the Foundation’s direction and activities. Board members are chosen to represent the public’s interest and for their knowledge of our regional needs. Currently, the Board has 27 members. We would like to express our appreciation to Gene Bell, Harry Jarrett, Kate Vogel, Laura Webb and John Winkenwerder who are rotating off the Board. We welcome our new members listed below: Maurean B. Adams retired as the Executive Director of the Children & Family Resource Center of Henderson County. An active community volunteer, Adams is the President-elect of the Hendersonville Rotary Club and Vice President of the Blue Ridge Community Health Services Board of Directors. She serves on the development committees for Hands On! A Child’s Gallery and the Immaculate Conception Catholic Church. Chemist Howell A. Hammond retired as a research scientist and manager for Eastman Kodak of Rochester, NY. His work for Kodak included serving as the Manager of the Chemistry Division in Harrow, England, and the establishment and construction of a $65 million research and development lab in Japan. He served as the United Way Coordinator for Kodak Research Labs for many years and currently is the Yancey Foundation Board Secretary and the Mountain Air Pilots Association Treasurer. Darryl Hart is a life-long resident of Asheville and is employed as Vice President and General Manager of Hart Funeral Service, Inc. He serves on the board of directors of Mission Hospitals, Eagle Market Streets Development Corporation, Asheville Housing Authority, A-B Tech Community College Foundation and the Better Business Bureau. He formerly served on the board of the United Way of Asheville & Buncombe County. A.C. Honeycutt, Jr. is Senior Vice President at First Citizens Bank. He and his wife Susie are co-founders of the Fields of Hope Community Garden in Mars Hill, which grows vegetables to help feed the hungry and supplies Asheville’s MANNA FoodBank and other organizations. Honeycutt is active in his church and serves on the boards of Avista Development Corporation and Homeward Bound. He is on the Board of Adjustments for the Town of Mars Hill and on the Advisory Board for Mars Hill College. Lowell R. Pearlman, retired former owner of Pearlman’s Carpets in Asheville, is active in the community and at Temple Beth HaTephila. He serves as a guardian ad litem and is on the Biltmore Forest Country Club Board of Governors. He formerly served as a SCORE counselor and on the boards of the YMCA and First Union National Bank.

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Grant News

Janirve Legacy Fund Created First Grant Cycle to Take Place Spring 2012

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he Asheville-based Janirve Foundation, closing its doors in 2012 after a quarter century of support for Western North Carolina nonprofits, is making a multi-million-dollar farewell gift to benefit the region’s needy. The Janirve Legacy Fund, administered by CFWNC, will support nonprofits that serve people in need. The first grant cycle will take place in Spring 2012. “The Community Foundation is a natural partner for the Janirve Foundation at this point. We share a similar service area and grantee list, especially with regard to ‘people in need’,” said Janirve Chairman E. Charles Dyson.

“All of my life, I have had close connections with animals whether they have been squirrels in my backyard or family pets. I believe animals offer a type of love, companionship and understanding that people simply cannot convey; I wish to give back to them with my career for what they have constantly given me. At this point, there is no doubt in my mind that this is what I am meant to do, and I believe that my traits of pervasiveness and thoroughness will help me achieve my goal of becoming a veterinarian.” — Caide Wooten, 2011 Recipient of a four-year Clyde and Mildred Wright Scholarship. Attending N.C. State.

Since 1984, Janirve has quietly distributed more than $100 million to regional nonprofits, with grants ranging from $5,000 to $2 million. During the same period, the Janirve Foundation supported the growth and development of The Community Foundation. “The Janirve Foundation has understood the mission and potential of The Community Foundation from our earliest days,” says CFWNC President Elizabeth Brazas. “We share a common goal of stronger and better-funded nonprofits to serve our region.” “The Janirve Foundation leadership has been extremely thoughtful in the planning of this transition,” said Brazas. “With the development of the new fund they have kept the best interest of the people of Western North Carolina at the heart of every decision made.” Application information and grant guidelines will be posted on www.cfwnc.org in November.

Do nor P rofi le

Terry Van Duyn T

erry Van Duyn is a self-confessed tech geek. When reading Al Gore’s new book, published as an app, she seems most excited about the maps and interactivity, and her mind immediately leaps to the possibilities inherent for education and textbooks. Van Duyn is smart and smiles easily. She and her husband, Ted, met in school and both worked in programming for BMC Software in Houston, which became a Fortune 500 company. The Van Duyns did well with their stock options, retired and moved to Asheville. Now, they are doing very well for our community. “WNC has been good to me,” she says. “I give back because it makes me feel good, and I get to work with such great people.” Van Duyn has volunteered for many local nonprofits including extensive involvement with Pisgah Legal Services, Carolina Day School, WCQS and The Genesis Alliance. At The Community Foundation, Van Duyn serves as secretary on the Board of Directors. She chairs the distribution committee and is a member of the finance committee, is a Founding Member of the Ted and Terry Van Duyn Women for Women giving circle and very involved with the Women for Women advocacy committee. She’s gotten over her initial surprise at how seriously the Women for Women grants committee takes its responsibility ($270,000 in grants were recently announced, see page 4). “There is so much talent, commitment and real care involved in the Women for Women grants process. I enjoy the camaraderie and opportunities to learn at the membership meetings and am proud of the grants that we have made – more than $1.2 million in just seven years.” In the 90’s, the Van Duyns created a private foundation. They are in the process of dissolving the foundation and placing

the proceeds in a donor advised fund at The Community Foundation. CFWNC can provide professional and costeffective ways of administering private foundation assets and is an attractive option for people who want to continue their philanthropy without the administrative burden. “I am so impressed with The Community Foundation’s expertise, investment strategy and knowledge about issues. The grantmaking team really understands the challenges facing our region.” “I was very proud of our work on the Recession Response Fund. In the midst of an economic disaster, the Foundation didn’t wait. We significantly changed our grantmaking to provide operating support to nonprofits to help them continue serving the region, even in a crisis.” “I am excited about the Foundation’s new strategic plan, which points us toward really leveraging our experience and expertise to make a difference in Western North Carolina. We’re taking another step forward toward becoming even more proactive in the way we operate across our region.” Terry defines a philanthropist as someone who is interested in the work of nonprofits and is willing to back up that interest with a commitment to help and support. The Community Foundation is well-positioned to offer people like Terry Van Duyn the options they need to make their philanthropy work for them … and their community. In today’s giving climate, donors have many choices. The Community Foundation’s staff understands the field and works with individuals to craft a giving plan that meets their needs and fulfills their dreams. Visit www.cfwnc.org to learn more.

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Wo me n’s P h i la nthropy

Jennifer Buffett Addresses Crowd at Power of the Purse $95,000 Raised for The Women’s Fund & $270,000 in Grants Announced

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he 7th Annual Power of the Purse luncheon raised a record $95,000 for The Women’s Fund, and included the announcement of $270,000 in grants to nonprofits addressing the needs of women and girls in Western North Carolina made by the Women for Women giving circle. Luncheon guests enjoyed a deeply personal and powerful message from philanthropist Jennifer Buffett (selected video clips are available at www.cfwnc. org). Buffett’s comments addressed her personal evolution as well as the work undertaken around the world by the NoVo Foundation to empower girls. The Oliver Family Foundation, held at CFWNC, issued a challenge grant that boosted fundraising and brought The Women’s Fund endowment to more

than $500,000. Proceeds from this endowment are distributed through the Women for Women grant program. The goal of the Women for Women grant program is to increase the economic self-sufficiency of women and girls in Western North Carolina. The 2011 grant recipients are: • Asheville-Buncombe Technical Community College Foundation $100,000 awarded over two years to significantly increase the retention and graduation rates of low-income female scholarship recipients. • Pisgah Legal Services - $100,000 awarded over two years to establish the Rutherford Women’s Economic Empowerment Project in partnership with Consumer Credit Counseling Services of Rutherford County.

• Children First/Communities in Schools Buncombe County - $50,000 awarded to support advocacy and community engagement programs. • Center for Participatory Change - $20,000 awarded for the Latina Women’s Worker-Owned Business Project. Elizabeth Brazas said, “Women for Women is making a real and measurable difference in the lives of women and girls in Western North Carolina through its grant program and advocacy. The giving circle is a signature program of the Foundation and a great example of the power of collective giving and action.” Women for Women is always open to new members. For more information, visit www.cfwnc.org.

Save the Date - May 21 2012 Power of the Purse Features Keynote From Gloria Steinem The 2012 Power of the Purse event will take place in Asheville on May 21 and will feature writer, lecturer, editor and feminist activist Gloria Steinem. Steinem travels and lectures internationally and is a frequent spokeswoman on issues of equality. Her interests include the shared origins of sex and race caste systems, gender roles and child abuse as roots of violence, non-violent conflict resolution, the cultures of indigenous peoples and organizing across boundaries for peace and justice. Registration for this event will begin in early 2012.

Turning Point Program Changes Lives Women for Women Grant having Impact

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n 2010, Women for Women awarded $100,000 to the Task Force on Family Violence: Reach, Inc. to expand and enhance the existing Turning Point program of the Women’s Resource Center. Partnering with Tri-County Community College and local businesses, the program provides assessment, counseling, educational training and job placement to disadvantaged women. The project area is one of great need in Western North Carolina and includes Cherokee, Clay and Graham counties. The area has suffered the loss of the textile industry, including Levi Strauss, and has a high incidence of domestic abuse.

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“I was encouraged to try to get my G.E.D. again, but I was hesitant because of my past experiences,” Lanier said. “When I went to TCCC, the classes weren’t overcrowded. I started immediately and was able to take the test shortly after.”

The Turning Point program has exceeded its enrollment goals and is changing lives.

With the help of study sessions at TCCC, assistance from the Turning Point project and support from friends and family, the mother of five took the G.E.D. test and passed.

Tammy Lanier dropped out of high school 19 years ago, and since then has worked a variety of jobs ranging from cashier to maid. After completing her degree from Tri-County Community College (TCCC) she hopes to add operating room nurse to the resume.

Lanier has not stopped pursuing an education since she completed her G.E.D. In April, she enrolled in nursing assistant (CNA) classes and hopes to get a phlebotomy class under her belt before beginning TCCC’s pre-nursing program.

Years ago, Lanier tried to complete a high school equivalency program, but found herself faced with crowded General Education Development (G.E.D.) classrooms and inconvenient scheduling. When she moved to Robbinsville, Lanier joined the Turning Point project, a program that aims to make women of Graham, Cherokee, and Clay counties more financially independent by assessing their career readiness and providing training at TCCC.

The TCCC student is not the only one in her household looking to improve her education and job prospects.

Dr. Donna Tipton-Rogers, TCCC president, (right) congratulates Tammy Lanier (left) at the G.E.D. graduation ceremony in May.

“Since I got my G.E.D., my oldest son is looking for a better job, my 17-year-old wants to get his G.E.D. and my younger children are now saying they want to go to college,” Lanier said. “Even my boyfriend wants to go back to school now.”


Sc holarsh ips

CFWNC Awards $315,250 in Scholarships T

he Community Foundation recently approved scholarships totaling $315,250 to 87 students from Western North Carolina. The Foundation administers approximately 60 scholarship funds, about 40 of which run a spring cycle offered to high school seniors each year. These are just numbers until you look deeper at the young people who are transforming their lives through higher education. According to John Fleming of the WNC Regionals Scholarship Committee, those interviewed during the selection process impressed the committee with their focus, ambition and commitment to their work and communities. “This is a group of young people who are pursuing their education and dreams with determination and excitement,” he said. “Some of these future pharmacists, linguists, engineers, doctors and veterinarians come from economicallydepressed households or otherwise face hurdles that might make academic success a challenge but they do not let anything stand in their way. It is deeply rewarding to be able to support their efforts.”

Top recipient David L. Wang of T.C. Roberson High School won the prestigious Irving Jacob Reuter Award, valued at $48,000 over four years. This scholarship recognizes exceptional academic performance, coupled with significant school and community involvement. Wang will be attending Harvard in the fall and hopes to become a member of the Federal Reserve. The Irving Jacob Reuter Award, funded by the Janirve

Foundation through CFWNC, is offered to public high school seniors in Buncombe and Madison counties. Erich Baker of Macon County is the recipient of a four-year Clyde and Mildred Wright Scholarship valued at $20,000. He will be attending Davidson College in the fall. “I have a passion for medicine and pharmacy,

Erich Baker of Macon County is the recipient of a 2011 four-year Clyde and Mildred Wright Scholarship

and I truly believe I could spend my life in one of those professions,” said Baker. “They also happen to be wellpaying careers, and I can’t say that isn’t important to me. My family has struggled financially at times, and if I achieve almost nothing else, I will escape from that kind of financial uncertainty for myself and my children. But a career is a long way off for an 18-year-old, and right now the idea of

Affiliate News continued from page 1

doing something I love and getting paid well for it is as much as I can hope for.” The Wright award earned by Erich is part of the WNC Regional Scholarships offered to public and home-schooled high school seniors in the 18-county region served by CFWNC.

The goal drives this energized affiliate. Raising $1 million in a county of 310 square miles and population of just under 18,000, is no easy feat. The board is active and engaged; they are contributing as individuals and asking others to help. Already the Yancey Foundation has added two dozen new donors to its roster and many regular contributors have increased the amount of their gifts.

According to Maria Juarez, the Foundation’s Scholarship Officer, there is great need for educational help in our region. She says, “Many of the students seeking assistance come from rural areas and depressed economic backgrounds, yet their academic records and intense community involvement speak to their drive to succeed and core values.” She noted that some are the first in their families to attend college, and some have parents who didn’t graduate high school, “but this generation,” she continues, “is determined to break the cycle of poverty and to give back to their communities in a significant way.”

“If you get an effective committee structure in place and get people involved and enthusiastic, it makes a big difference,” said Hammond. “We also have to communicate more often and effectively with our donors and prospective donors and let them know that their gifts are having an impact. We produced a brief video to explain why the Yancey Foundation is the best place to invest for the long-term good of Yancey County.” (To see this video and others, visit the Yancey Foundation’s web page at www.cfwnc.org under “Our Affiliates.”)

CFWNC scholarships are open to Western North Carolina residents who are public high school seniors, who attend the NC School of Science and Mathematics or the UNC School of the Arts High School or who study in a home school registered with the North Carolina Division of NonPublic Education. There are programs open to private high school students in Buncombe County, and a few programs open to students already in college or employees or children of employees of certain area corporations. For information on applying for a scholarship or supporting scholarships, visit www.cfwnc.org.

G iving Back

The opportunity to give the gift of a lifetime . . . but only until December 31 Shon P. Norris

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ou can give more for less. Until December 31, 2011, you can give individual retirement account (IRA) funds to charity. So, your retirement funds can go farther than ever before. You can give tax-free. These gifts count toward your 2011 required minimum distribution and are excluded from your gross income, so it’s a taxfree way to make a gift to the causes you care about. This is especially valuable if you utilize the standard deduction, but also helps reduce limitations on tax deductions related to gross income. To qualify: • You must be 70 1/2 or older at the time of the gift. • Transfers must go directly from the IRA to charity. • You can give up to $100,000 per taxpayer. • The account must be a traditional or Roth IRA.

• Your gift must be completed by December 31, 2011.

• IRA gifts cannot be made to donor advised funds, but CFWNC can help you create a fund to support your designated charities – a wonderful way to use IRA assets to “pre-fund” the charitable gifts you plan to make over the next three, five or ten years, or to pay an existing multi-year donation. Giving to a donor advised fund? Swap IRA assets to your stock portfolio. Continued on page 5

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“Affiliates are led by people who know and care about a community. I personally am energized by what the Yancey Foundation is doing,” said Tara Scholtz, the Foundation’s affiliate officer. “They are utilizing the Foundation’s resources and acting locally to improve their own community. My role with the Yancey Foundation is strategic. I work to support their plan.” Scholtz continued, “The most rewarding aspect of my work with the affiliates is supporting thoughtful community leaders. They care about their neighbors and are working to ensure that there are resources to address issues for decades to come.” Affiliates are meaningful pillars in their communities to nonprofits and donors alike. Each affiliate fund leverages support from The Community Foundation and adds value to the work of the Foundation across the region. Affiliate boards know their nonprofits, the needs and the community leaders who can get things done. “Our region is so big and diverse,” explains Scholtz. “We rely on them to help us make better investments, and they have the relationships to be successful fundraisers.” The Community Foundation has nine affiliate funds. Each was started because locals desired to see an endowment created. The Janirve Foundation supported the development and growth of the affiliate network contributing a $25,000 match to each; The Community Foundation contributed a $10,000 match to each start-up. Affiliate funds were required to reach $70,000 before beginning to make grants. Currently, affiliate fund balances range from $250,000 to more than $2 million. To learn more about the Yancey Foundation or other CFWNC affiliate funds, visit www.cfwnc.org.

Your gift can last forever. Your gift can be placed into an endowment that is invested and will grow over time. Grants addressing community needs will be made forever. Consider the following: • Create a charitable fund in your name, the name of your family or in honor of any person or organization you choose.

Recently, a former seasonal resident passed away and included the Yancey Foundation in his estate. His $39,000 bequest will launch a Legacy Society, honoring those who plan to contribute to the Yancey Foundation through their estates. “Delia and Marshall Courtney loved Yancey County and the time they spent here with family. This gift is a fitting tribute to their generous spirit and belief that every gift makes a difference,” said Sheryl Aikman, the Foundation staff member who helped the Courtneys with their plans.

Giving Back continued from page 2

Shon P. Norris is a member of the CFWNC Professional Advisory Committee. He began with the Gould Killian CPA Group, P.A. as an intern in May 2000. He received his bachelor’s degree from the University of North Carolina at Asheville and his masters in accounting from Western Carolina University. A native of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Shon is an active community volunteer. His practice focuses on income tax planning and preparation for small businesses and individuals. He has extensive experience in the real estate, construction, aviation, professional group and hospitality industries.

Transfer appreciated securities to a donor advised fund, then use a distribution from your IRA to replace those portfolio holdings, establishing a new and higher cost basis. Or, diversify your portfolio by purchasing other securities. Too young to give IRA assets? If you’re not yet age 70 1/2, IRA assets are especially well-suited for charitable gifts after your lifetime, by naming a charity as your primary or contingent beneficiary. Your IRA plan provider can provide a change of beneficiary form (most companies make them available online). CFWNC can help when you want to make one gift from your IRA that will benefit several charitable causes. Need more information? Want to talk about your giving goals and ways to use IRA assets to achieve them? Contact Sheryl Aikman, Vice President, Development at aikman@cfwnc.org or 828-254-4960.

CFWNC Welcomes New Board Members C

FWNC’s volunteer Board of Directors guides the Foundation’s direction and activities. Board members are chosen to represent the public’s interest and for their knowledge of our regional needs. Currently, the Board has 27 members. We would like to express our appreciation to Gene Bell, Harry Jarrett, Kate Vogel, Laura Webb and John Winkenwerder who are rotating off the Board. We welcome our new members listed below: Maurean B. Adams retired as the Executive Director of the Children & Family Resource Center of Henderson County. An active community volunteer, Adams is the President-elect of the Hendersonville Rotary Club and Vice President of the Blue Ridge Community Health Services Board of Directors. She serves on the development committees for Hands On! A Child’s Gallery and the Immaculate Conception Catholic Church. Chemist Howell A. Hammond retired as a research scientist and manager for Eastman Kodak of Rochester, NY. His work for Kodak included serving as the Manager of the Chemistry Division in Harrow, England, and the establishment and construction of a $65 million research and development lab in Japan. He served as the United Way Coordinator for Kodak Research Labs for many years and currently is the Yancey Foundation Board Secretary and the Mountain Air Pilots Association Treasurer. Darryl Hart is a life-long resident of Asheville and is employed as Vice President and General Manager of Hart Funeral Service, Inc. He serves on the board of directors of Mission Hospitals, Eagle Market Streets Development Corporation, Asheville Housing Authority, A-B Tech Community College Foundation and the Better Business Bureau. He formerly served on the board of the United Way of Asheville & Buncombe County. A.C. Honeycutt, Jr. is Senior Vice President at First Citizens Bank. He and his wife Susie are co-founders of the Fields of Hope Community Garden in Mars Hill, which grows vegetables to help feed the hungry and supplies Asheville’s MANNA FoodBank and other organizations. Honeycutt is active in his church and serves on the boards of Avista Development Corporation and Homeward Bound. He is on the Board of Adjustments for the Town of Mars Hill and on the Advisory Board for Mars Hill College. Lowell R. Pearlman, retired former owner of Pearlman’s Carpets in Asheville, is active in the community and at Temple Beth HaTephila. He serves as a guardian ad litem and is on the Biltmore Forest Country Club Board of Governors. He formerly served as a SCORE counselor and on the boards of the YMCA and First Union National Bank.

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Nonprofit Organization U.S. Postage

Good Works

PAID Asheville, NC Permit No. 518

Suite 1600, The BB&T Bldg. One West Pack Square P.O. Box 1888 Asheville, NC 28802

To receive future newsletters electronically and to subscribe to CFWNC E-News, please send an email with “subscribe” in the subject line to Semadeni@cfwnc.org.

S u m m e r / Fa l l 2 0 1 1

H o m e g r ow n P h i l a n t h r o py Fo r e v e r P RE S ID E N T’ S M E SSAG E

Letter to the Community Elizabeth Brazas

Confirmed in Compliance with National Standards for U.S. Community Foundations

CFWNC Phone: 828-254-4960 Fax: 828-251-2258 www.cfwnc.org

Our Affiliates Black Mountain-Swananoa Valley Foundation Cashiers Community Fund The Fund for Haywood County Highlands Community Foundation The McDowell Foundation Foundation for Mitchell County Rutherford County Foundation Transylvania Endowment Yancey Foundation

C

Board of Directors 2011-2012 Officers Marla Adams, Chair Ernest E. Ferguson, Vice-Chair Terry Van Duyn, Secretary William N. Lewin, Treasurer

Board Members Maurean B. Adams Louise W. Baker J. Wilson Bowman, Ph.D. David S. Dimling Jennie Eblen Thomas Lee Finger John N. Fleming Howell A. Hammond Darryl Hart

A.C. Honeycutt, Jr. John G. Kelso Virginia Litzenberger T. Wood Lovell Tina McGuire Janet Smith Moore Lowell R. Pearlman Ramona C. Rowe George W. Saenger Anna S. (Candy) Shivers James W. Stickney, IV Jerry Stone G. Edward Towson, II Laurence Weiss

Executive Staff Elizabeth Brazas, President Sheryl Aikman, Vice President, Development Graham Keever, Vice President, Finance and Administration Bob Wagner, Vice President, Programs

Newsletter Editor Lindsay Hearn, Communications Director

• We will continue to grow, and the desire of many of our donors to work with us as true charitable advisors will support that growth.

Community Foundation to Relocate to Historic Biltmore School

• Never has our regional knowledge and expertise been so important. • To meet our donors’ desires and to have maximum impact in the region, we must lead with our

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fter an extensive downtown search, The Community Foundation is purchasing an office suite in the Biltmore School building on Hendersonville Road near I-40. The iconic building has been bought by a local investment group that plans to restore it. The 57,000 square foot structure was completed in 1927 and has stood vacant for more than a decade. Previous efforts to restore it for adaptive reuse were not successful. The purchase and move will be accomplished without a capital campaign and will allow the Foundation to build equity. Local construction company Beverly-Grant will do the renovation, which will include upgrading building systems, restoring the façade and adding fire protection, elevators, solar panels and parking. Alan McGuinn of CJMW Architecture will oversee the project. Local real estate broker and investment partner John Spake, CCIM of Spake Real Estate, is handling sales and leasing. He can be reached at 828-277-9670 or john@spakerealestate.com.

FWNC is 32 years old. In 2009, we experienced the convergence of the recession, a leadership change and a shift in what donors and communities were asking of us. Clearly it was time to step back and look at everything we do and assess our goals. In October, we embarked on an in-depth strategic planning process to do just that. Our comprehensive strategic planning has included a board retreat, consultants, focus groups and much more. Here is some of what we have learned:

grantmaking and alter the way we invest our limited discretionary funds. While our grantmaking is the most visible way that we work in our region, we can also bring together donors, nonprofits, government and business leaders and citizens around collective strategies. This is one of our strengths, and now is the time for us to focus on what we do best. Though we recognize that focus can be difficult, we look forward to this challenge. Our ability to mobilize resources requires us to move first and then ask others to join us to tackle regional issues. We believe that with the support of our donors and other regional and national partners, we can truly enrich lives and communities. All of the ways we strive to serve Western North Carolina will be enhanced, I believe, by aligning our resources – financial and otherwise –

behind efforts to address regional needs. In order to effectively invest our dollars, we need to understand community assets, funding gaps, potential alliances and the resources we can provide. Rest assured that as we make this shift, the core of our being will remain the same. We will continue to assist caring people across the region with their charitable giving and provide exceptional service and stewardship. Looking forward, there are two other exciting developments to share. In spring 2012, we will conduct the first grant cycle from the Janirve Legacy Fund, supporting nonprofits serving people in need. Distributing $10 million over 25 years, especially in smaller communities, will help thousands of people, and we are honored to have been chosen to carry on the Janirve legacy of caring.

Elizabeth Brazas CFWNC President

I also want to let you know that we have committed to purchase a suite of offices in the Biltmore School building on Hendersonville Road. This new location in a restored historic structure will provide easy access, ample parking and an opportunity for the Foundation to own our office space, reducing operating costs while building equity. So, yet another transition is in our future. It is a great privilege to serve The Community Foundation of Western North Carolina. Thank you for the trust you place in our work and organization. With you, we look forward to what’s on the horizon.

A ffi l iate N e ws

Inaugural Ramble Run Benefits The Women’s Fund On May 7, more than 1,200 runners participated in the inaugural Ramble Run 5K and 12K that benefitted The Community Foundation’s Women’s Fund. A check for $2,500 was presented to Elizabeth Brazas by Kelly Allen of the Asheville Track Club. CFWNC staff was well-represented with Sheryl Aikman, Elizabeth Brazas, Spencer Butler, Diane Crisp, Becky Davis, Lindsay Hearn, Beth Maczka, Tara Scholtz, Tim Richards and members of their families participating. CFWNC Board member John Fleming and his wife Amy and Women for Women members Nancy Brown and Leah Broker ran as well.

Yancey Foundation to Raise $1 Million over Ten Years T

he Community Foundation serves 18 counties, and through the work of our nine affiliate funds, we are able to be truly regional. The Yancey Foundation, established in 1998, serves a rural county that lies northeast of Asheville and exemplifies how leaders, donors and nonprofits can band together to improve lives and leverage support for local needs. The Yancey Foundation has made more than $500,000 in grants since its founding. Recent grants supported an irrigation system for Dig In! Community Garden, training for the Children’s Advocacy Center staff and a study regarding telemedicine in the schools

that leveraged one million dollars for program implementation. As it looks ahead, the Yancey Foundation aims to raise $1 million over ten years, and set and met the first year’s goal of $50,000 in just over nine months. “Goals inspire people,” explains board member Howell Hammond. “Our annual donations were running about $25,000 so it was going to take us 20 years to get to $1 million. We could get there in ten years, but we needed time to increase fundraising gradually, so decided to increase our goal annually by $5,000.”

John Miller, Director of Reconciliation House in Burnsville, with cabbages grown by Dig In! Community Garden.

Continued on page 5

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Fall 2011 Goodworks  

Summer/Fall 2011 Goodworks Publication

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