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Wednesday, June 9, 2010 | 50¢

Carson student overcomes adversity to graduate BY KATHY CHAFFIN

that,” she says. “I really, really needed support because my mom was so sick. “I kind of fell for him.” Life had never been easy for Madison. “My parents fought,” she says. “It showed me what I do and don’t want out of a relationship.” Just 10 days before Madison’s 15th birthday, her mother died. She went to live with her grandparents, Elizabeth and Leon Long, while two of her sisters, Amanda and Sarah, found other living arrangements. Her sister, Amy, was already living on her own. Madison’s grandparents lived in the Carson district, so she transferred there from East Rowan High School, leaving her friends behind. Gary already went to Carson, and seeing each other every day, they grew even closer. Madison had been

kchaffin@salisburypost.com

Madison Long was only 14 when her parents died. She was helping to care for her mother, who had cirrhosis of the liver and Hepatitis C, when her father died of a drug overdose. Madison says it was her boyfriend, Gary Scott, who helped her through it. Gary was her cousin’s best friend, and she had met him at her grandparents’ house. “We talked for about four months and had starting going out with friends,” she says. Madison says she became so overwhelmed taking care of her mother after her father died that she began to neglect herself. “Gary made sure I was taking a bath every day and getting something to eat and stuff like

going to Carson for about six months when she found out she was pregnant. “I cried,” she says. Madison told her sisters that night, and Gary told his mother, Rhonda Wells. “They were all upset and disappointed,” she says, “but they were there for me.” It was more difficult for Madison to tell her grandmother. “I didn’t tell her until I was about three months,” she says. As it turned out, her grandmother already suspected that Madison was pregnant. “She was very, very upset that I didn’t tell her as soon as I found out,” she says. Soon afterward, Madison moved in with Gary and his mother and grandmother. “My grandmother didn’t want KATHY CHAFFIN/SALISBURY POST

See ADVERSITY, 2A

Carson High School senior Madison Long and Gary Scott stand on the stairs to their apartment with son Sage.

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Woman sentenced in rat poison case Attempted murder charges result in 23-year prison term Staff report

JON C. LAKEY/SALISBURY POST

Tina Hall, right, answers questions during a political forum in advance of a runoff election between Hall and Chad Mitchell, left, for seats on the Rowan County Commission. Both are current members of the board.

Hall and Mitchell focus on education, budget BY KARISSA MINN

kminn@salisburypost.com

Two county commissioners running for re-election focused on budget and education issues in a candidate forum Tuesday. Rowan County Commissioners Chad Mitchell and Tina Hall addressed voters during a candidate forum Tuesday at Catawba College. In the June 22 second primary election, the two will compete for a spot on the November ballot Mitchell and Hall finished third and fourth, respectively, in the May 4 Republican primary race for county commissioner. Mitchell didn’t receive a large enough share of the votes to avoid a runoff election. He is running for a third term on the board of commissioners, and Hall is seeking a second. Dr. Michael Bitzer, associate professor of political science and history at Catawba, served as a moderator. He asked the candidates several questions on different topics, some of which came from Post readers. The first question addressed the topic of school funding, fresh in many people’s minds from the county’s public hearing on the budget Monday evening. A Post reader asked if the candidates were willing to support meeting Rowan-Salisbury Schools halfway in making up the $3 million gap in its funding request. Mitchell, 34, is a teacher at East Rowan High School. He replied that while the county could fund half or even all of the request for one year, it

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likely wouldn’t be able to sustain that funding. A smaller increase, he said, may be the best option. “We have to fund the schools at a level where they can operate and do what they’re supposed to do at a level of sustainability that the county can continue funding,” he said. Hall, 59, is retired from the RowanSalisbury Schools, where she had been a teacher, assistant principal, director and principal. She said the county couldn’t come up with $3.3 million as a continuing item, but commissioners should work to provide some of that increase. She said there is a good chance the state will give more responsibilities to counties in order to balance its budget in future years, leaving counties with even less money. “As a commissioner, I have to look at the big picture,” Hall said. Another question asked how infrastructure repairs and maintenance at Rowan-Cabarrus Community College fit into the candidates’ budgetary priorities. Hall said the school has dire needs, but the county will have a hard time coming up with the $3 million to $10 million it would take to address those needs. She suggested putting an item on the November ballot, similar to one recently passed to pay for a jail annex, that would propose a temporary tax increase to pay for RCCC’s capital needs. “I know we have a very kind and understanding community in Rowan

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A Salisbury woman will spend at least 23 years in prison for trying to murder her boyfriend with rat poison. On Monday, Superior Court Judge Ted Royster sentenced Debora Kay Nelson to 23 to 281⁄3 years in prison for the attempted first-degree murder of her boyfriend. A Rowan County jury convicted Nelson Thursday of using rat poison to try and kill Richard Whitling, the man she was living with at 350 Old Wood Lane. Royster made his decision on the NELSON sentence after the jury found that an aggravating factor existed — that Nelson took advantage of a position of trust or confidence to commit the crime. Nelson is 49; Whitling, 76. The Rowan County Sheriff's Office charged Nelson in 2007 after following up on an anonymous tip that she had been putting rat poison in Whitling's coffee over an extended period of time. He was hospitalized after her arrest. A January 2009 trying of the case was declared a mistrial when the jury could not reach a verdict. Nelson has been in jail since April 2007. Assistant District Attorney Karen Biernacki prosecuted the case last week.

Arson suspected in Salisbury Auto Spa blaze Chad Mitchell answers questions during the forum. County, and they support the community college and the students that go there,” Hall said. “We can’t just come up with $3 million to $10 million, but I think our voters will be able to help us.” Mitchell said that the county should work on stepping up its funding to RCCC, because the current rate per full-time student is one of the lowest in

Jessica L. Livengood Lucille H. Lippard Jimmie L. Gooden

See FORUM, 2A

Modene C. Head Carl M. Overcash

Contents

An arson investigation is under way in a fire that destroyed a Jake Alexander Boulevard business. Salisbury Auto Spa, a car detailing business at 1500 Jake Alexander Blvd., was destroyed in the blaze around 3 a.m. Monday. Deputy Police Chief Steve Whitley said two people have called police to report seeing a older model — possibly a late 1990s white Ford pickup in the area. The callers said the vehicle made three or four trips through the adjacent Jake Alexander Auto Sales and by the detail shop. The callers said that after the vehicle passed by a final time there was a loud pop and then flames. Salisbury Police are working with the city fire investigators and the SBI. Anyone who has any information is asked to call 704-638-5333. The auto detailing shop and adjacent auto sales business are owned by Mark Honeycutt.

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2A • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2010

ADVERSITY FROM 1A

me to,” she says, “but at the time, she had to work all the time. It was easier for me to get back and forth to the doctor.” Though she had only been going to Carson for a short while, Madison says she had developed two or three close friendships with students. “When they found out I was pregnant, they were supportive,” she says, “but you could tell it put space between us.” Four months into her pregnancy, Madison heard that one of her best friends at East named Holly was also pregnant. “So we went through our pregnancies together,” she says. Madison was able to complete her sophomore year at Carson and gave birth to Sage on July 18, 2008. Holly was there for the delivery, and Madison says she was with Holly when she gave birth to her son, Kyle. They have remained good friends and get together with their sons for “little park dates,” she says. Gary’s mother took time off from her job when Sage was born to help Madison and

Gary with him. She took care of him during the day when they returned to Carson. When Sage got older and Gary’s mother returned to work, Madison says they tried leaving him with three or four different babysitters. “But it never worked out,” he says. “Finally, at the end of my boyfriend’s senior year, he dropped out and starting watching the baby full time.” Madison says Gary plans to return to school at some point to earn his high school equivalency. They have rented an apartment together in Granite Quarry. “We have disagreements like all couples,” Madison says, “but we sit down and talk about them. We know that we have a little boy, so we work through it and talk about it. That helps a lot.” Brooke Misenheimer, guidance counselor at Carson, has worked with Madison since she transferred there her sophomore year. “I have truly been amazed at how she has overcome so many obstacles and so many challenges,” she says. “I am just so, so proud of her. “Words just can’t express how happy I am for her and just how amazed I am at what she’s been able to accomplish despite the challenges that

JON C. LAKEY/SALISBURY POST

Chad Mitchell and Tina Hall answer questions during a political forum at the Tom E. Smith Auditorium on the Catawba College campus. The forum is in advance of a runoff election between Mitchell and Hall for seats on the Rowan County Commission. Both are current members of the board. see fit. “Sometimes, we get the idea that development is bad, and no development is allowed on farmland,” Mitchell said. “That is where I do not believe a county-wide plan is in the best interest of citizens.” Hall said that a land use plan, while not the same as a farmland preservation plan, has worked well for western Rowan County and will likely be expanded to

the rest of the county. “The plan is not all that some folks wanted, and it’s more than other folks wanted, but it’s a good start,” she said. Other questions asked the candidates about their long-term vision for Rowan County, and what they would like to see funded once revenues improve. Hall stressed open government, saying that the best decisions are made

when discussions are public. With more revenue, she said she would like to see more work done on RCCC and the county airport. She also has long held a dream of an International Baccalaureate program in the county to draw the “best minds” and businesses here. Mitchell said his three main priorities were financial stability, full employment and a great school sys-

tem. He said he would like to see RCCC’s needs addressed, and lottery money — currently used to pay down the county’s bond debt — transitioned to the schools for capital needs. If all service levels are adequate, he said, he would then seek to cut taxes. Catawba College, the Salisbury Post and the Rowan County Chamber of Commerce sponsored Tuesday’s forum.

have come her way over the last few years.” Misenheimer says Madison may be the most resilient young woman she has ever known. “She has been able to maintain this positive attitude and has stayed so motivated.” Madison, who will graduate from Carson on Friday with a 3.6 grade-point average, received the $500 J. Michael McDuffie Memorial Scholarship for students who persevere through a significant hardship and excel in school. She also received a Good Beginnings for Teen Parents Scholarship for $500 and an F&M Bank Scholarship for $500. Madison plans to attend Rowan-Cabarrus Community College and earn her RN degree in the two-year program there. “I’ve wanted to be a nurse for a long, long time,” she says, “since I was about 5. Once my mom got sick, I was like ‘This is what I have to do. This is what I love to do.’ ”

Her career goal is to become a labor and delivery nurse. Madison says Misenheimer was always there for her when she had a question or needed to talk about problems at home and school. “She would help me to figure it out and help me not to be so stressed.” Misenheimer says Madison went through some major life changes at Carson. “I think a lot of times, she just needed somebody to listen to her. Madison is very open and honest and very willing to share. That’s something I really respect about her is she’ll tell you exactly what’s she’s thinking.” Madison says all of the teachers and staff at Carson have been very supportive of her. When it comes to issues she faces as a young mother, Madison says she receives support through the Parents as Teachers Program sponsored by the Rowan County Adolescent and Family En-

richment Council. As part of the program, a parent educator is assigned to each teen parent. Mary Burrage is currently assigned to help Madison. “She comes out to my house every two weeks,” Madison says, “and she shows me different things that I can do with Sage and makes sure he’s doing what he’s supposed to do at different ages.” Sage, for example, at almost 23 months, is a little delayed in speech. “He’s not bad,” Madison says, “but I was concerned about that, so she gave me different handouts showing me ways I could work with him and try to get him to talk to me.” Orrie Bowes previously worked with Madison as a parent educator. “She’s not my educator anymore,” she says, “but she and I still talk daily and she gives me advice. She’s like my best friend.” When asked what she would say to a young teenager who just found out she’s

pregnant, Madison says she would encourage her not to drop out of school. “There are resources that can help you,” she says. “You just have to seek them out and not give up.” Madison says she believes that “God doesn’t put too much on you, so when you feel like you can’t go on, remember He knows you can handle it.” Though she doesn’t attend church regularly, Madison says she went to church faithfully with her grandmother until she was 7 years old. ‘I still go every once in a while,” she says, “and I pray.” After giving birth to Sage, a cute little boy with blonde hair, Madison says she knew she really had to put her mind to doing well in school. Knowing that she has to be able to provide for him is what keeps her going. “I want his life to be a lot better than mine was when I was little,” she says. Contact Kathy Chaffin at 704-797-4249.

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Clarification • The last five words of the story, “Hunters of men,” was omitted from Monday’s Post. The full sentence should have read: “What they don’t see is waiting in the woods in the rain all day for someone to come home. Or lying on the frozen ground in the dead of winter, your body heat melting out a place in the ground, working to return a person to justice.”

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the state. He said before any repairing or rebuilding work starts, though, there needs to be a plan in place. “We have to work with RCCC, Rowan-Salisbury Schools and Rowan County general government and know exactly what buildings we need in Rowan County, when we need them and... how we intend on paying for them,” Mitchell said. When asked what the key difference was between them, Hall and Mitchell both said that while their voting records are quite similar, distinctions can be found in their governing style. “I’m a full-time commissioner,” Hall said. “I’m retired, so I am able to devote 100 percent of my time to being a county commissioner.” Hall also said that she and Mitchell differed on a key vote on the tax rate in 2007. She voted for revenueneutral rate, and Mitchell did not. Mitchell said that while he isn’t a full-time commissioner, his time spent in the schools and the community gives him a different perspective than someone might get by staying in the county office. “I think I get a better understanding of what citizens of Rowan County need, want and deserve from talking with them outside of the context of an official capacity,” Mitchell said. One question Tuesday asked about candidates’ priorities when balancing the county budget. “Is it raising revenues, cutting county staff, cutting county programs such as li-

Dedicated to the memory of four “special friends”: Billy Mesimer – A.D. Powell Ezra Gilliam – Richard Perkins R124319

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FROM 1A

braries and parks, and/or cutting education funding?” Bitzer asked. Mitchell answered that he does not support increasing revenue in the form of raising taxes or fees. Fortunately, he said, the county hasn’t had to make major cuts to county programs or education funding, because it has used the savings in its fund balance to sustain services. Hall said the county has cut staff, changed its insurance carrier and made other changes to reign in spending. In the future, she said, the county may have to look into cutting hours at the parks and libraries in order to remain financially sound. The candidates were asked how much the county should dip into its $22 million fund balance to continue to fund requests from schools and other county agencies. Mitchell said that the county already has dipped into its fund balance for $1 million last year, and it likely will do so again this year for $1.5 to $3 million. If revenues don’t improve significantly, another $3 million hit the following year could bring it down to $16 million. Mitchell and Hall both agreed that commissioners should follow the advice of County Manager Gary Page not to fall below the $16 million mark. Beyond that, bond rating agencies will view the county as fiscally irresponsible and increase its interest rates. The candidates also were asked if a county farmland preservation plan would be a priority. Mitchell replied that while agriculture is important to the county, people generally should be able to do with their land what they

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Landis, Mecklenburg County enter into 9-year recycling contract BY SHAVONNE POTTS

spotts@salisburypost.com

LANDIS — Town residents will be able to recycle under an agreement approved by the Board of Aldermen this week. The board voted Monday to enter into a nine-year recycling contract with Mecklenburg County. The service will begin in August. The service won’t mean an additional cost to residents although the town will be respon-

sible for transporting recyclables to the Metrolina Recycling Center in Charlotte. Mecklenburg, which normally would charge a tipping fee if the town’s recyclables reached a certain limit, will sell the recyclable materials and won’t charge Landis for taking them as long as the center’s revenue exceeds its operating costs. “They’re excited to receive our recyclables,” Town Manager Reed Linn said. The town would have to

share in Mecklenburg’s cost to dispose of non-recyclable waste mixed in with recyclables if the waste reaches a particular percentage. Alderman Tony Hilton said the program will help the environment and save money on tipping fees. He also asked that residents be informed about the program via media outlets and inserts in the utility bills. The town board discussed offering curbside recycling during its earlier budget work-

shops, though Monday’s discussion didn’t specify whether residents will have curbside bins under the approved plan. Town leaders didn’t discuss how much it would cost to deliver the recyclables to Mecklenburg County. The board also: • Denied a request from True Homes, developers of the Oaks of Landis subdivision along U.S. 29, to reduce square footage in some new homes. The developers asked the

board to drop the minimum size from 1,400 square feet to 1,170 square feet because they want to market to retirees who want less space. Planning board members expressed concern at their May and June meetings about mixing smaller homes with existing larger homes, the potential effect on property values in the area and questions about whether families would be allowed to buy the smaller homes if retirees don’t.

See LANDIS, 5A

Truck driver struck by train in fair condition

“Everyone she touches seems to benefit from knowing her; she’s a very positive force in our community.” LINDA

The planning board suggested a separate “retirement cluster” to be built along North Chapel Street. • Approved a resolution to apply for a grant with the N.C. Rural Economic Development Center to assist in a wastewater or water conservation project. The grant is for a planning program that would help the town engineer create a 10year capital outlay plan.

JONES

Salisbury Symphony Orchestra executive director about Susan Trivette

BY MARK WINEKA

mwineka@salisburypost.com

Susan Trivette, far left, performs with the Salisbury Symphony Orchestra during the 2008 Pops at the Post concert. Trivette has been a flutist in the orchestra since she was a junior in high school in 1969.

The driver of a tractor-trailer struck Monday morning by a westbound train near Shaver Wood Products was listed in fair condition today at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. The N.C. Highway Patrol identified the driver as Ronald Lee Shoemaker, 47, of Statesville, a driver for American Cartage. Trooper J.N. Horton charged Shoemaker with careless and reckless driving. Horton reported that two eyewitnesses said Shoemaker’s rig, which was leaving Shaver Wood Products and heading toward U.S. 70, approached the tracks slowly but continued into the rail crossing without stopping. The rig was hit by a westbound Norfolk Southern freight train. The collision sent the tractor-trailer down an embankment and onto its side, where it caught on fire. Passing motorists and three men from Shaver Wood Products — a couple of whom were mowing grass — helped free Shoemaker from the cab of the truck. One of the workers, William Trull, was treated at Iredell Memorial Medical Center for smoke inhalation. Shoemaker initially went to Iredell Memorial, but was flown later to Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem. Horton said the driver’s injuries included a neck injury and cuts to his face. Shoemaker doesn’t remember what happened, Horton said. The crossing leaving Shaver Wood Products is marked by both a stop sign and a rail crossing sign, according to Horton.

WAYNE HINSHAW / FOR THE SALISBURY POST

One note at a time Susan Trivette uses music, teaching to serve the community Watching Susan Trivette’s fingers dance along the keys of the flute as she plays “Simple Gifts,” it’s obvious she loves performing. “Every time you play it’s a different experience,” she said. “It’s not like listening to a recording, which is the same every time you listen to it. “Live music is always a new experience.” The Rowan County native has been performing as a flutist in the Salisbury Symphony Orchestra since her junior year of high school in 1969. She began playing the instrument in sixth grade and

auditioned for the orchestra at the suggestion of her piano teacher. “It was very intimidating to do that,” she said. “But it got me ready for the college auditions.” Trivette took a four-year hiatus from the orchestra to attend the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, where she received her Bachelor of Music Education with a concentration in flute and secondary in organ. After graduating, she returned to Rowan County with plans to teach high school band, but with no positions available at the time she accepted a job as an elementary music teacher. Trivette fell in with love with teaching elementary music and

ended up holding the position in the Rowan-Salisbury School System for 31 years. It was a position she found both rewarding and valuable. “(Music) is a way for students to excel when they can’t excel academically,” she said. “It gives them self confidence, improves their self esteem and they learn that you have to work for things to happen — you just can’t go straight to class and not practice. “You have to work at it and sometimes it takes a while to see results.” Her dedication to education earned her the honor of Granite Quarry Elementary’s Teacher of the Year in 1998. Trivette’s commitment to ed-

ucation extends far beyond the classroom. After retiring in 2008, she took on the role of director of education with the Salisbury Symphony Orchestra. She is responsible for running the after-school strings program and collaborating with the school system to offer special programs and workshops throughout the year. “She has been a wonderful partner from day one; she’s marvelous to work with,” Linda Jones, executive director of the orchestra, said. “From the beginning she was always asking what she could do.”

No tax hike in Spencer BY SHELLEY SMITH

ssmith@salisburypost.com

See TRIVETTE, 4A

Wife of internationally known philanthropist dies at 67 BY MARK WINEKA

mwineka@salisburypost.com

Josephine “Josie” Tucker Robertson, wife of Salisbury native and internationally known hedge fund manager and philanthropist Julian Robertson Jr., died Tuesday at her home in New York City. She was 67 and had put up a long fight against breast cancer. It was in his wife’s honor — and

as a surprise — that Julian Robertson gave $25 million to New York’s Lincoln Center in 1998. The plaza outside the Lincoln Center bears her name. Robertson said at the time it’s one of New York’s most beautiful spots, and it was lucky to have his wife’s name. With an $18 million initial endowment, Julian Robertson Jr. established the Blanche and Julian

Robertson Family Foundation in 1997 in honor of his late parents, longtime Salisbury residents. The foundation, overseen by a mostly local board of directors, has become Rowan County’s foremost charitable organization over the past dozen years. David Setzer, executive director

See WIFE, 5A

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See SPENCER, 4A

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The Spencer Board of Aldermen approved the town’s fiscal year 201011 budget during its Tuesday meeting, which includes no tax increase. The current tax rate of $0.60 per 100 dollars will remain for 2010-11. No merit raises were granted, however, cost of living raises of 2.5 percent were included in the budget. Spencer has a budget total of about $2.4 million to work with starting in July. Some departments saw cuts, while others saw increases in budget allocations: • Governing Body — a decrease of $41,982 to $46,134. A contingencies fund of $39,097 was cut from departmental operating budgets in FY 200910, and the cut is being extended to

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AREA/OBITUARIES

4A • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2010

CRIME ROUNDUP Family members charged with intimidating witness Family members of a man charged with stealing a woman’s medication are now facing charges of intimidating a witness. Maracella Merie Goble, 30, and her husband, Kim M. GOBLE Delain Goble, both of 1375 Percy Lane, Rockwell, were charged Sunday with felony intimidating or interfering with witnesses. Deputy Chief Steve Whitley of the Salisbury Police Department, said Marcella Goble is the sister of Joshua Craig, who K. GOBLE was previously charged with stealing medication and awaiting a court date on July 1. According to the police report, the victim in the larceny case was at a bus stop in downtown Salisbury on May 30. She reported to police that the Gobles were in a car that pulled up. The victim and witnesses told police that Gobles cursed the victim and told her “you’re a dead b----, if you go to court.” Additional threats were also reported.

Man charged with manufacturing marijuana The Rowan County Sheriff’s Office has arrested and charged a China Grove man with manufacturing marijuana. Kevin Lynn Eaton, 19, was arrested and placed in the Rowan County Detention Center on June 7 under $2,500 secured bond, pending a court date of June 16. Deputies with the sheriff’s office were notified that mari-

SPENCER FROM 3A

FY 2010-11. • Administration — an increase of $12,446 to a total of $375,712. Includes estimated upgrades to rear parking area security and the anticipated salary of a summer grant writing intern. • Police — a decrease of $16,254 to $777,272. Includes savings and costs that will be associated with the take-home vehicle policy that becomes effective July 1. Also includes two in-car camera upgrades. • Fire — an increase of $7,579 to $286,098. Includes increased salary associated with an increase in calls, increased maintenance and repairs on a brush truck. • Streets — a decrease of $40,648 to $368,405. The decrease is because of no proposed capital expenditures or replacements in the upcoming year.

TRIVETTE FROM 3A

Jones said Trivette was immediately met with challenges upon taking on her new role. When the school system cut funding for the afterschool strings program, Trivette didn’t accept the news, instead, she got busy writing grants and searching for options to keep the program intact. Her enthusiasm encouraged people to go online to vote in the Pepsi Refresh Project, which landed the program a $5,000 grant. “We got that grant because she got the community involved and excited.” Jones said. “That (money) is going to make our after-school strings program strong again. “(Trivette) just fanned the flames until the fire built back up.” Although Trivette has spent most of her life as an educator, she also finds time to use her skills to serve the community. “She’s been in the community a long, long time and she’s very much a part of it,” Jones said. She performs at several lo-

juana plants had been located growing in a wooded area behind 425 Goodman Road on May 15. Detectives from the Sheriff’s Special Investigations Unit responded and found 42 marijuana plants growing in the woods. Investigators followed a footEATON path from the plants to 425 Goodman Road, and found an additional marijuana plant growing beside the front porch. Investigators received permission to search the residence and found additional items related to growing marijuana. Investigators later interviewed Eaton who admitted that the plants belonged to him.

Teen shoots himself in toe

$2,250, from behind a building at 4955 Sherrills Ford Road. The items were taken between noon and 3:30 p.m. on June 3. • James Billy Gragg of Landis reported the theft of a Tom Tom GPS device and a .38-caliber Smith & Wesson revolver from a vehicle parked on Ney Street in Kannapolis. • Jerry Robert Christie, Farm House Road, reported the theft of $1,800 in cash from his residence. The theft occurred on June 4. • Clifford Phillip Brady of Gold Hill reported his 2000 blue Dodge Dakota pickup truck was damaged $500 while parked at East Rowan High School. • Tiffany Leanne was charged with felony possession of drugs at 1250 Chow Drive, Rockwell.

Salisbury couple charged with child abuse

A Mount Ulla teenager sustained a minor gunshot wound to this toe when a gun accidentally discharged. Zachery Howard Krivanek, 16, of Joe Rankin Road sustained a minor wound to his right big toe in the mishap June 4 at a residence on Parks Road. Capt. John Sifford of the Rowan County Sheriff’s Office said Krivanek picked up a .38caliber revolver with the trigger in the cocked position. The teen didn’t think the gun was loaded, but it was. Krivanek was charged with possession of a firearm by a minor. Other reports or charges from the Rowan County Sheriff’s Office: • Jamie Yates, Bee Tree Lane, reported the theft of her dog, a shih-tzu, valued at $1,000. The dog was taken between 3:30 p.m. June 2 and 9:30 a.m. June 3. • Angela Sheppard, Concord, reported the theft of a York air conditioning unit valued at $5,000 from a house at 8600 Archer Road, Kannapolis. The unit was taken between June 3 and June 5. • James Barkley Summit reported the theft of hydraulic cylinders and a plow, valued at

A Salisbury couple has been charged with child abuse after they left three small children home alone. Raynard Lamont Bookhart, 25, and Starla Dawn Rea, 23, both of 200 N. Martin Luther King Jr. Ave., were charged with misdemeanor child abuse. According to Salisbury Police, Rea’s three children were left alone Saturday morning while Bookhart drove her to her job in China Grove. Bookhart was arrested after the children were picked up by their grandmother. In other reports or charges from the Salisbury Police Department. • Mickey Jerome Harrison, 32, 130 Stoneybrook Road, Salisbury, was charged on June 5 with driving while impaired. Police were dispatched to 330 Holly Ave. where they found a Oldsmobile Alero on its top in the front yard. According to the police report Harrison was nearby and had several bruises and cuts. The officer reported that when he asked Harrison to take a sobriety test, Harrison replied, “there is no way I will pass any tests, I am too drunk.”

• Solid/yard waste — a decrease of $7,971 to $311,283. The decrease is due to amended proposal requests for capital expenditures. A replacement tractor is budgeted, however, a replacement truck has been delayed. • Land management — a decrease of $15,686 to $109,321. The decrease is due to not having to pay anticipated demolition costs for a dilapidated downtown commercial structure. • Library — an increase of $49,053 to $68,364. The increase reflects the anticipated November opening of the library, as well as the first payment on loan proceeds for the repair project. • Recreation — an increase of $6,700 to $22,575. Includes an anticipated “sensory trail” construction project in the Rowan Avenue Park. Projected revenues and expenditures for FY 2010-11 are nearly $2.4 million. The Powell Bill Fund has projected revenues and expenditures of

$98,838. The general fund is made up of current year and prior year ad valorem taxes, tax penalties and interest, sales tax proceeds, other taxes and proceeds and miscellaneous revenues. “Other taxes” include privilege licenses that include the sweepstakes cafe privilege/ occupational license fee of $1,000 per machine. Spencer has anticipated a $5,000 revenue in privilege license fees. In other news: • The board voted to keep its membership with the Centralina Council of Government. • Two Spencer fire fighter are now certified EMTs. • The public comment section was moved from the end of regularly scheduled board meetings, closer to the beginning of the agenda, between committee reports and unfinished or new business. The board will hold its next meeting at 7 p.m. Tuesday, July 13.

Get to know Susan Trivette • Education — Bachelor of Music Education from UNC-G • Career — Taught elementary music for Rowan-Salisbury Schools for 31 years, current director of education for the Salisbury Symphony Orchestra, has played flute in the orchestra since 1969, serves as organist at First United Church of Christ • Children — Daniel Trivette and Kathryn Wear • Husband — Bobby Trivette

cal nursing homes, provides accompaniment to students at Catawba College, serves as the organist at First United Church of Christ and has previously participated in productions put on by the Piedmont Players and the Uwharrie Players. The Rev. Mike Childress of First United Church of Christ said Trivette has worked tirelessly with music directors

throughout the years to provide leadership and guidance. “As a staff member of the church, she has contributed extensively to the music program … and went beyond the expectations of the church,” he said. “Her dedication to excellence has underscored her rich and varied repertoire. “Simply put, the music program at First Church is the beneficiary of her extraordinary talent and will be forever grateful for her faithful service.” Trivette said it just seems natural to be involved in a variety of activities, combining her zest for music, teaching and community. “I always have something that I’m working on whether it’s a concert, musical theater or playing with the church,” she said. “There’s always something new to be working on.” Jones said Trivette continues to play a vital role in the community, offering a helping hand whenever needed. “She’s much more likely to say ‘how can I help you,’ than to say ‘see you later,’” she said. “Everyone she touches seems to benefit from knowing her; she’s a very positive force in our community.”

Modene Creason Head

MOCKSVILLE — Mrs. Modene Creason Head, 81, formerly of Highway 601 South, died Saturday, June 5, 2010, at Remmington House Assisted Living Facility in Kingsport, Tenn., where she had lived for the past year. She was born May 3, 1929, in Davie County to the late Wilburn and Essie Shoaf Creason. Mrs. Head had attended Cooleemee First Baptist Church and was retired from B&F Manufacturing. In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by her husband of 62 years, Clarence William “Bud” Head; a son, Gerry W. Head; and a son-in-law, Douglas Lloyd. Survivors include two daughters, Carolyn H. Newell (Charles Rest) of Tennessee and Crystal H. Lloyd of Mebane; six grandchildren, Mike Newell (Sherrie), Melissa Ealey (Tommy), Eric Head (Amanda), Randi-Sue Head, Brett Lloyd and Chad Lloyd; and three great-grandchildren, Logan Ealey, John Lloyd Newell and Kaliska Head. Service: A cryptside service will be conducted at 2 p.m. Thursday, June 10 at Rowan Memorial Park Mausoleum Chapel in Salisbury with Mr. Doll Foster officiating. Visitation: The family will receive friends from 7 to 9 p.m. Wednesday, June 9 at Eaton Funeral Home. Memorials: They request that memorials be considered for Hospice and Palliative CareCenter, 377 Hospital St., Suite 103, Mocksville, NC 27028. Online condolences may be made at www.eatonfuneralservice.com.

SALISBURY POST

Lucille Hendrix Lippard

CLEVELAND — Lucille Hendrix Lippard, age 99, of Cleveland, passed away Monday, June 7, 2010, at The Laurels of Salisbury. Born May 17, 1911, in Rowan County, she was the third child of the late Dennie Linnet Hendrix and Frances (Fannie) Myers Hendrix of Salisbury. She was a 1929 graduate of Boyden High School and was a lifelong resident of Cleveland. She was an active member of Cleveland First Baptist Church as long as her health permitted. Mrs. Lippard was a homemaker and was well-known for her excellent cooking, especially her delicious chocolate pies. She enjoyed watching baseball, with the Atlanta Braves being her favorite team. She was a dedicated servant to the church and to her community. She was a member of the Maddie Tolbert Sunday School Class. In addition to her parents, Mrs. Lippard was preceded in death by her husband, Ralph Clinton Lippard, on Dec. 23, 1991; a son, Walter Ralph Lippard, on Sept. 13, 2009; a granddaughter, Rebecca Dianne Lippard, on Aug. 18, 1968; a step-grandson, Frankie Wrights, Jr., on April 15, 2008; and two brothers, Lester and Hoyle Hendrix. Those left to cherish her memory are her children, Frances Lippard Barber (Charles) of Cleveland, Helen Lippard Wrights (Frank) of Salisbury, Harvey Clyde Lippard (Faye) of Davenport, Fla., Harry Edward Lippard (Susan) of Salisbury; daughter-in-law Flaydene Lippard of San Antonio, Texas; and special friend Wanda Sheek. Mrs. Lippard is survived by the following grandchildren: Richard Barber (Vickie), Patricia Peacock (Darrell), Jack Davis (Blanca), Barbara Lippard, Wanda Colbert (Donald), Tim Lippard (Dawn), Cynthia Glasser, Henry Lippard (Cindy), and Harriet Michael (Brian); and a step-granddaughter, Patricia Dorsey (Carl). She is survived by 12 great-grandchildren; seven stepgreat-grandchildren; eight great-great-grandchildren; and 13 step-great-great-grandchildren. She is also survived by two sisters and one brother, Mildred Poteat of Salisbury, Clara Poteat of Salisbury and Robert Hendrix of Raleigh; and several nieces and nephews. Service: Services honoring Mrs. Lippard's life will be held at Cleveland First Baptist Church at 2 p.m. Thursday, June 10 with the Rev. Glenn Dancy, III and the Rev. Bobby Seagroves officiating. She will lie in state 30 minutes prior to the service. Interment will follow in the church cemetery. Visitation: The family will receive friends at Summersett Funeral Home Wednesday from 6-8 p.m. Memorials: In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Cleveland First Baptist Church, 200 Maple St., P.O. Box 325, Cleveland, NC 27013; or Enon Baptist Church, (DL Hendrix Library Fund) 1875 Enon Church Road, Salisbury, NC 28147. The family would like to express their thanks to Dr. Thompson and the entire staff at the Laurels for the love they showed to our mother and the wonderful care, love and kindness they gave her each and every day. Summersett Funeral Home is serving the Lippard family. Online condolences may be made at www.summersettfuneralhome.com.

Jimmie Lee Gooden

CHARLOTTE — Jimmie

Carl McElwee Overcash Lee Gooden, 55, died Friday,

CLEVELAND — Carl McElwee Overcash, 83, of Cleveland, passed away on Monday, June 7, 2010, at Autumn Care of Statesville. Born on March 16, 1927, in Iredell County, he was the son of the late George Ulyesses and Molly Christy Overcash. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by his wife, Nettie Lucille Overcash; son, Carl Ricky Overcash; son-in-law, Kevin Brown; great-granddaughter, Faith Hall; sister, Edith London; brothers, Hoyle Overcash, Gilbert Overcash, and Keever Overcash. Survivors include his daughters, Patty Hall and husband Kenneth of Statesville, and Sylvia Brown of Salisbury; sister, Opal Simms of Mooresville; grandchildren, Brian Hall and Leslie, Bradley Hall and wife Wanda, Shannon Nichols and husband Billy, and Matthew Fox; great-grandchildren, Andrew Hall, Carlee Hall, Morgan Hall, and Bethany Fox. Funeral services: 11 a.m., Thursday, June 10, at Amity Lutheran Church with Rev. Gene Bruce officiating. Burial will follow the service in the church cemetery. The family will receive friends following the burial in the church sanctuary. Memorials: In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Amity Lutheran Church, 1367 Amity Oswalt Road, Cleveland, NC 27013 and/or Hospice & Palliative Care of Iredell County, 2347 Simonton Road, Statesville, NC 28625. Cavin-Cook Funeral Home, Mooresville, is serving the Overcash family.

Jessica L. Livengood

SALISBURY — Jessica Lynn Livengood, 20, of Salisbury, passed away Saturday, June 5, 2010, in Yadkin County, as the result of an automobile accident. Arrangements are incomplete with Cremation Concepts, LLC in charge.

Stephen E. Blanton, Sr. Correction

SALISBURY — Stephen Eric Blanton, Sr., who died June 2, 2010, in Baltimore, Md., is survived by an aunt, Sandra E. Boger of Salisbury, who was omitted from an earlier obituary. Services are entrusted to Hairston Funeral Home, Inc.

June 4, 2010, at Hefner VA Medical Center, Salisbury. Service: Wednesday, June 9, 2 p.m., Thrift Baptist Church, 8415 Moore's Chapel Road, Charlotte, NC 28214. The family extends special thanks for the outstanding care to the Staff at Salisbury Medical Center. Online condolences at: crownfuneralservice.com

Mrs. Lucille Hendrix Lippard 2:00 PM Thursday First Baptist Church of Cleveland Visitation: 6-8 PM Wednesday

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Centralina Council of Government asks Rowan to keep membership BY KARISSA MINN

kminn@salisburypost.com

Representatives from the Centralina Council of Government (CCOG) asked county commissioners Monday to keep Rowan County’s membership to the group. At its first budget workshop last week, the Rowan County Board of Commissioners asked County Manager Gary Page to evaluate the costs and benefits of membership in CCOG and two other partnerships. Commissioners have talked previously about pulling out of the group, but the proposed budget still includes about $34,000 in dues. Al Sharp, executive director of CCOG, spoke during the county’s public hearing on the proposed budget Monday. “We have just conducted a blue-ribbon panel, and Centralina is refocusing on needed regional policy issues that will affect us all,” Sharp said. Those issues include air quality, water resources and transportation planning — including the Yadkin River Bridge, he said. “In economic development, we’ve been working with infrastructure issues,” Sharp said. “We’ve brought more than $10 million to the region. Regretfully, none of this is to Rowan County because you’ve not

WIFE FROM 3A

of the foundation, said he learned of Josie Robertson’s death Tuesday afternoon in an e-mail from Julian’s sister, Wyndham. He informed members of the board of directors after receiving that notice. The Robertsons had been married for 38 years and had three boys: Spencer of Brooklyn, Jay of Hawk’s Bay, New Zealand; and Alexander of Manhattan. The daughter of Robert and Josephine “Pimmie” Spencer Tucker, Josie Robertson was born May 16, 1943, in San Antonio, and graduated from Saint Mary’s Hall there in 1961. She later attended Briarcliff College and graduated from the University of Texas in 1965. Before her marriage to Robertson in 1972, Josie Robertson and her sister-inlaw started and managed Tuckertown, a business designing and producing Christmas-tree ornaments sold to leading department stores. Known throughout her life for her artistic talents and creativity, she collaborated with her husband to build two

LANDIS FROM 3A

According to the resolution, the town wants to plan for the construction or rehabilitation of a publically owned treatment works or alternate wastewater system or wastewater collection system, water conservation projects and water supply systems. Hilton said if such projects brought new businesses to

been active in this program.” Also speaking for CCOG was the council’s aging program administrator, Gayla Woody. “I have been working in Rowan County now for more than 25 years,” Woody said. “We’ve seen a number of services and programs for older adults built during those 25 years.” More than half of the county’s membership dues, she said, allow the allocation of $755,000 in grant funds for programs like adult day care, inhome aide services, senior center operation and congregate meals. The council also helps provide funding for older adult job training, evidence-based health promotion, a family caregiver program and an ombudsman program for those in long-term care. Woody said that in 20 years, 75 percent of North Carolina’s counties will have more older adults than people under 17 years old. “It’s very important that we work together to look for ways to provide and accommodate for our older population, so that they can stay well and active and involved members of the community,” she said. Sharp told commissioners that if the county pulled out of CCOG, it would cost $16,000 to

apply for the grants the county normally receives. He said having a voice in regional issues through membership with the council can help bring additional benefits to Rowan County. “While aging is our most important and popular program,” he said, “it’s being at the table that makes a difference for Rowan to have a voice in the region.” At last Wednesday’s budget workshop, Commissioner Jon Barber was the first to request a cost-benefit analysis for memberships in CCOG and the North Carolina Association of County Commissioners. Others agreed and added the Charlotte Regional Partnership to that list. “I would like to see, for those annual membership dues, what are we getting for them?” Barber said. He and Chairman Carl Ford both brought up concerns about the administration fees necessary to continue applying for grant money. “We still have to go through CCOG, because that’s the way it’s set up with the state, to make sure that we get our grants and keep senior services flowing,” Ford said. Commissioner Chad Mitchell said the fees would be worth paying to save the difference in the cost of the dues.

golf-course resorts in New Zealand, which they designed from scratch, beginning in the 1990s. According to a press release, hers was the eye behind the impeccable style of the two award-winning lodges built near the golf courses. An avid golfer, she was the 2006 women’s champion at Sebonack Golf Club in Southampton, NY. She also was a wizard with flowers and loved arranging them when entertaining friends and family. Described as gracious, lighthearted and kind, she masked a formidable set of organizational skills which she put to work as a mother of three sons and as a volunteer in New York City. Josie Robertson joined the Women’s Board of The Boys’ Club of New York in 1978, served as its president, and in 2000 was elected to its board of trustees. In 2007, when she was the honoree at its annual spring dance, a group of friends raised money in her honor for the Boys’ Club’s Josie Robertson School of Music and Art. She also was on the Board of Overseers of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center since 2004 and was a director of Classroom Inc. from 1999-2008, before serving as an honorary director and

chairing the Classroom Inc. Council. In 1996, the Robertsons established the Robertson Foundation which supports education, medical research, religion and spirituality, and environmental causes. She and her husband were leading supporters also of the Central Park Conservancy, where she joined the board of the Women’s Committee in 1997. In 1998 they funded the restoration of the 59th Street Pond and its surrounding landscape. In addition to her husband and sons, she is survived by Spencer’s wife, Sarah, and their three children, Hollis, Hart and Wyndham; two sisters, Mary Cassell of Albuquerque and Julia Rasmussen of Houston; and two brothers, Robert Tucker of San Antonio and George Tucker of Midland. The funeral will be at 11 a.m. Friday at St. Bartholomew’s Church, 325 Park Ave., N.Y. Visitation will be from 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m. and 5-7 p.m. at Frank Campbell Funeral Home, 1076 Madison Ave. Thursday. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Boys Club of New York, Memorial Sloan Kettering Hospital, and PAVE Academy Charter School.

the downtown area, the town should proceed with the grant application. • Heard from Recreation Director Julie Noblitt, who will continue her talks with the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission about the town’s plans to allow fishing at Lake Corriher. The town has already outlined in the upcoming budget fishing permits and plans to develop the area for residents to use. The Wildlife Resources Commission has agreed to

test the area’s fish and offered to help the town build a fishing pier with boat access if needed. Noblitt said she would tour Lake Corriher and Lake Wright with someone from the commission to discuss plans for those sites. Linn said there has been some interest from residents who want to fish at the lake. • Approved closing town hall June 30 so staff can close out the books for this fiscal year.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2010 • 5A

Posters • Simmons reunion — descendants of Lemuel Paige “Lem” Simmons’ annual reunion, 11 a.m., Saturday group shelter at Watson Mill Bridge State Park, between Carlton and Comer, Ga. Many family members moved to Cabarrus/Rowan to work at Cannon Mills. For reunion information or to pass along family information, contact Nathan Simmons at 704-4670585. • Shady Grove Baptist Church children’s fitness camp, 2-6 p.m. daily, Monday-Friday June 21-August 13. For children ages 6 to 12. $30/week with $15 registration fee. Paul Lawrence Dunbar Center, East Spencer. Applications available at Shady Grove Baptist Church, S. Long St., every Saturday or Sunday. Director: Mary Cooper, assistants: Tim Walker, Sandra Campbell , Gwen Cuthberson. Registration information: 704-4330956. • United House of Prayer for All People, 501 Old Concord Road, dinners sold from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. today. Call in orders to 704-637-1528.

Village Park in Kannapolis to screen ‘Princess Bride’ BY EMILY FORD

eford@salisburypost.com

KANNAPOLIS — The cult classic film “The Princess Bride” will play outdoors Friday night in Kannapolis. Village Park will screen the movie at 8:45 p.m. Before the film, the park will host a cornhole tournament starting at 6 p.m. “The Princess Bride,” a 1987 American film, comes in at No. 50 on Bravo’s list of “100 Funniest Movies” and No. 88 on the American Film Institute’s 100 greatest film love stories of all time. The movie combines comedy, adventure, romance and fantasy. It’s about a beautiful woman, the hero who loves her and the evil prince who wants to marry her. The Kannapolis Regulators will run a cornhole tournament prior to the movie. Sign-in starts at 6 p.m. and games being at 6:30 p.m. The entry fee is $5.

To register or learn more, call 980-521-6957. Blankets, lawn chairs and picnics are permitted at Village Park, 700 West C St., but pets, alcohol, grilling and glass bottles are forbidden. In other live entertainment this week in Kannapolis, Thursdays on Main are back with the Acoustic Supershow featuring Joey, Johnny & Kenny from Superglide. The show begins at 11:30 a.m. Thursday under the oak trees at Veterans Park, the corner of Main Street and First Avenue in downtown Kannapolis. Lunch is available for purchase from Restaurant 46.

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S TAT E

6A • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2010

SALISBURY POST

N.C. Democrats complain about petition drive tactics Whalen said the party would e-mail Democrats advising them that they can call county election offices and ask that their signatures be removed. “We are trying to make sure that people are being honest with the registered voters of the 8th District,” Whalen said in an interview. North Carolina First is being funded by the Service Employees International Union and its local, the State Employees Association of North Carolina. It must turn in petitions to county election board offices in the 8th District by Thursday in order to so the signatures could be verified. The group needs nearly 17,000 verified signatures from registered voters so Wendell Fant, who used to work in Kissell’s office, can run if he chooses. North Carolina First Chairman Chuck Stone said in an

interview there’s “been no distortion in informing people of why we’re trying to create a third party and put another candidate on the ballot.” He called it typical of the two major parties to try to discredit those who would try to give voters more options. The group is unhappy with Kissell’s voting record, particularly his opposition to the Democatic-penned health care legislation approved by Congress and signed by President Obama. Kissell defeated GOP incumbent Robin Hayes in 2008. “Apparently Larry Kissell and the Democratic Party will do or say anything to keep voters from having another choice in the district,” North Carolina First spokesman Greg Rideout added. North Carolina First was unsuccessful in obtaining the more than 85,000 signatures it needed to become an offi-

cial new political party in North Carolina this year so it could field candidates in at least two other congressional races. The group decided instead to focus on collecting signatures to help Fant become a candidate in the 8th District against Kissell; a Republican challenger yet to be decided; and Libertarian Thomas Hill. Stone said he expected the group will turn in a number of signatures this week that would exceed the threshold for an independent candidate. Democrats were worried about a third party’s ability to cut into votes for incumbents, which could lead to Republicans winning seats. The union groups have “failed in their effort to create a new party and are now continuing to waste their member’s hard-earned dues in this foolhardy and shortsighted attempt to place a

candidate on the November ballot,” Whalen said in a news release. The barrage between the unions and the party is surprising because SEIU gave more than $1 million to the state Democratic Party for

the 2008 elections, and the State Employees Association’s political arm generally has supported Democratic candidates. The association did endorse Republican gubernatorial candidate Patrick Ballantine in 2004.

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RALEIGH (AP) — A fight between the state Democratic Party and a union over a swing congressional district got tougher Tuesday as party officials accused a group trying to qualify an independent candidate of misleading voters into signing petitions before a key deadline. Party leaders contend voters in the 8th Congressional District that paid representatives of the group North Carolina First aren’t explaining when they go door-to-door that they’re trying to put another candidate on the ballot to challenge Democrat incumbent Larry Kissell. Instead, they’ve been saying the petition is for “better jobs,” according to Andrew Whalen, the party’s executive director, citing media reports and phone calls from Democrats in the district who have received knocks on their doors.

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Liquor law changes approved by House panel J.A. FISHER RALEIGH (AP) — Local ABC boards would have to meet financial and customer service standards in its liquor sales or they could face closure, and all its members would be subject to a gift ban and other ethics rules in legislation approved Tuesday by a state House panel. The bill that left the House’s Alcoholic Beverage Control Committee went beyond the recommendations of a special study commission completed last month before the session began. The state ABC Commission also would receive more power to monitor the activities of the local, largely independent boards that sell liquor in cities or counties. The study commission examined the ABC rules following news reports about the high salaries of local board administrators and meals paid for by liquor companies to local ABC leaders. Gov. Beverly Perdue had sought changes, too. “It puts the ABC Commission in a new role in providing more direct oversight and setting performance standards,” said state commission Chair-

man Jon Williams. a Perdue appointee. “All told, it looks like that we will emerge with a much stronger, more reliable ABC system and the public will have more assurance these public enterprises are run with the high ethical standards that the public deserves.” North Carolina is among 18 “control” states where government directly controls wholesale and retail liquor distribution, but it’s the only one where local ABC boards sell the spirits and essentially run their own operations. The measure went beyond the study commission’s recommendations to require the state’s nearly 170 local ABC boards to create their own ethics codes. It also would prohibit local board members from accepting gifts from contractors doing business with their panel or stores and to avoid conflicts of interest that could financially benefit themselves or family members. Each local board would be subject to performance standards set by the state ABC Commission, including store operating efficiency, solven-

cy and customer service and enforcement of the alcohol laws. Lawmakers avoided the word “profitability” although some poorly performing stores don’t make money. Other lawmakers and advocates of the current system argue the purpose of the nearly 75year-old ABC system and its more than 400 stores is to control liquor sales, not to make a profit. The state ABC Commission could close stores or force a local board to merge with one nearby if standards aren’t met, but the local board could have up to 20 months to fix the problems. An amendment offered by Rep. Pryor Gibson, D-Anson, raised that period of time from 12 months. “On balance, having more time is a very important part of the proposal,” said Jon Carr, lobbyist for the North Carolina Association of ABC Boards. “We’d ask for time to improve.” Rep. Edgar Starnes, RCaldwell, said 12 months was already enough time: “If you don’t meet your performance standards, there needs to be a consequence.” The measure, which now

A R O U N D T H E S TAT E Tests negative for envelope found at state Capitol

odor, which might have sickened employees. Immigration officials say operations were back to norRALEIGH (AP) — More mal by Tuesday afternoon. state lab tests show the white powder found in an envelope Former N.C. gov opened in North Carolina’s old Capitol building this week is- takes leave from n’t hazardous. Va-based law firm The Department of Crime RALEIGH (AP) — Former Control and Public Safety confirmed on Tuesday additional North Carolina Gov. Mike tests performed on the pow- Easley has taken a leave of abdery substance showed no sence from the law firm he signs of things like anthrax, joined before investigations surrounding him surfaced. toxins and viruses. William Allcott with the An assistant for Gov. Beverly Perdue’s chief of staff McGuire Woods firm in Viropened the envelope Monday ginia confirmed Tuesday that afternoon, leading to an evac- Easley took leave several uation. The building houses of- weeks ago but didn’t say why. fices for Perdue and others and An attorney for Easley didn’t the old House and Senate respond to a request for comment. chambers. The News & Observer of While employees returned to work Tuesday, the 170-year- Raleigh first reported the deold building in Raleigh re- parture. Easley and two ex-aides mained closed to the public but joined the firm in Raleigh afshould reopen Wednesday. The State Capitol Police and ter the Democrat left office in the FBI are investigating. The early 2009. One of the three — envelope was addressed to the Ruffin Poole — no longer state Capitol and contained a works at the firm. He pleaded guilty earlier this year to fedletter inside. eral tax evasion. Federal prosecutors have Suspicious parcel sought information about sickens 3 transactions around Easley immigration workers and his associates. Easley hasn’t been charged with any DURHAM (AP) — Three crimes. employees say they felt sick after a strange envelope with Workers rally an oily residue was delivered to a federal immigration office at Legislature in North Carolina. against layoffs WRAL-TV reports that RALEIGH (AP) — North Durham police evacuated the U.S. Bureau of Citizen and Im- Carolina state employees have migration Service office on gathered to oppose a pending Tuesday after employees re- state budget that threatens ported nausea and irritated some jobs and freezes pay and benefits. eyes. Hundreds of blue-shirted Three workers were taken to a local hospital as a precau- members of the State Employtion. Initial tests on the enve- ees Association of North Carlope did not find hazardous olina rallied on Tuesday in Raleigh. The association says chemicals. It’s been sent to the state Di- its 55,000 members want lawvision of Public Health for makers to approve a budget friendlier to working families. more tests. Kim Stewart of Franklin Durham Police Captain D.C. Allen says the envelope had an County says the budget cuts

mean she’s facing layoff after more than 28 years of work and just over a year before retirement. Stewart’s work as a vocational rehabilitation specialist keeps people like Mildred Bartley-Fox of Rocky Mount out of nursing homes. BartleyFox is a multiple sclerosis victim who also spoke against the budget cuts.

Troops celebrate Army birthday with run FORT BRAGG (AP) — North Carolina-based soldiers joined in the celebration of the Army’s 235th birthday with a four-mile run and some cake. The Fayetteville Observer reports that Tuesday’s run was sponsored by the 18th Airborne Corps, stationed at Fort Bragg. An estimated 8,000 soldiers participated. Post commander Lt. Gen. Frank Helmick set the pace during the run and led the pack. After he finished, he climbed onto a reviewing stand and cheered on the runners who had followed him.

Inmate in 1985 child death faces new charge RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — A man imprisoned for sexually assaulting and killing an 8year-old girl in North Carolina 25 years ago is being charged with the death of a 7year-old girl. Multiple media outlets reported that George Richard Fisher was arrested Tuesday in the 1984 death of Carrie Wilkerson. The girl was discovered strangled and sexually assaulted in a burning mobile home in Carrboro. Police have linked Fisher to the case using DNA evidence that was not available during the original investigation. Fisher is serving life in prison for the 1985 killing and attempted rape of 8-year-old Jean Fewel in Chapel Hill.

goes to another House committee, would require local boards to follow the same rules local governments do in carrying out their annual budgets, including making their spending proposals public records. Local boards also would have to hold a public hearing before it can be adopted. The bill also would: — limit the compensation of local ABC general managers to the pay that local Clerks of Superior Court receive, up to $112,607 in the most populous counties. But pay can go higher if a county commission or town council approves it. — prohibit an employee from having direct supervision over a family member in a local ABC board. The two changes are in response to reports that the father-and-son store administrators in New Hanover County received more than $400,000 in combined compensation.

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FOOD

WEDNESDAY

June 9, 2010

SALISBURY POST

Katie Scarvey, Lifestyle Editor, 704-797-4270 kscarvey@salisburypost.com

7A

www.salisburypost.com

WHERE THERE’S SMOKE, THERE’S FATHER Father’s Day is occasion to light the torch, pass it on BY GRETCHEN MCKAY Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

I don’t know about you, but I sort of freak out when something I’m grilling catches fire and dinner, quite literally, goes up in a plume of black smoke. But my husband? No barbecue flame is ever too big, too hot or too scary for him to manage. Call it a guy thing. Since the first prehistoric man discovered that woolly mammoth tasted a heck of a lot better roasted than bloody and raw, men have been cooking over fire and loving every sizzling, potentially dangerous minute of it. “It’s primal,” my husband, a grillmeister if there ever was one, tells me. “We see a fire and get the urge to throw something big and juicy on it.” And if that “something” accidentally ignites? That’s why they invented squirt bottles, 18-inch tongs and insulated oven mitts, dummy! In the kitchen, notes Bob Sloan, author of “Dad’s Awesome Grilling Book,” it always feels as though something could go wrong. The pace is a bit more frenetic, there’s more margin for error and the end product (even if it’s delicious) is naturally compared with Mom’s version. “No matter how hard I try, whatever I make is either ‘not as good as Mom’s’ or ‘just as good as Mom’s,’ “he writes. “Either way, I’m deep in her gastronomic shadow.” But the grill? That’s a man’s special domain, his oasis from the vicissitudes of being a dad, Sloan says. Other than the lid and the burner knobs, there’s not a whole lot of moving parts on a grill, he says, so men feel more in control — of the heat, of the food, of their culinary abilities. They appreciate the simplicity of grill cooking. “Ultimately, it’s Step A and then Step A again,” Sloan says in a phone interview. Men also get to be outside while grilling. With that in mind, it’s completely understandable why dads all across the country will be firing up the grill in celebration of Father’s Day on June 20. And why Mom will be hovering happily in the background. His day, his say, his way. “What’s the joke ... where there’s smoke, there’s father?” quips Sloan. Most likely, legions of sons also will be watching and learning, so when the time comes for the ceremonial passing of the tongs, they’ll be ready. Not that that’s a problem, as grilling has come a long way from its humble roots in the past few years. When Sloan was a kid, for instance, homemade sauces still were fairly unheard of, and the Asian section at the grocery store consisted of soy sauce, water chestnuts and baby corn. So the Chinese-style, sweet-andsour steaks his father cooked were — well, he can’t really say if they were good or not. “But it was fun and he was deft on the grill.” Today? More dads than ever are trying their hand at new techniques — plank grilling and smoking are increasingly popular — and they’re stretching beyond the traditional burgers, steaks and brats. That’s part of the reason Sloan, who worked as a caterer for many years in Manhattan, cooked up this sixth cookbook: to encourage them to further expand their repertoire with some easy yet incredibly tasty recipes, all written in a language that Dad can understand (with honesty, brevity and humor). Consider his recipe for barbecued leg of lamb, which marries the smoky heat of chipotle chilies with garlic, tomatillo and cinnamon. Many guys might say, “What’s ‘butterflied’ mean?” or better yet, “What’s a leg of lamb?” Yet show ‘em how that particular piece of meat is no different from a cut of beef, he says, and the mystery is gone. (In case you’re wondering, ‘butterflied’ means to cut open and spread flat.) “In a way, it’s like a giant hamburger. You’re cooking it the same way,” says Sloan. The following recipes were all tested by the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

METRO CREATIVE CONNECTION

On Father’s Day, dads can usually be found behind the grill. More dads than ever are trying their hand at new grilling techniques.

Stir-grilled coconut shrimp

Honey-glazed spareribs

Stir-frying on the grill is easier than you might think. You just have to remember to drain the excess marinade before you place the wok on the grates.

These sticky-sweet ribs are precooked, so they only require a short time on the grill. Be sure to use tongs instead of a fork to turn them or you’ll release the precious juices from the meat.

2 green onions, thinly sliced on the diagonal 11⁄ 2 C. coconut milk 1 Tbsp. finely minced jalapeno pepper 1 Tbsp. finely minced serrano pepper Grated zest and juice of 1 lime 1 pound large shrimp, peeled and deveined 1 ⁄2 C. unsweetened shredded coconut 1 C. black or jasmine rice, cooked Special equipment: 12-inch metal grill wok or basket with perforations Prepare marinade by whisking together green onions, coconut milk, jalapeno, serrano, lime zest and lime juice. Rinse shrimp under cold running water and pat dry. Place shrimp in a large sealable plastic bag and pour in 3/4 of the marinade. Seal, toss to coat and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes or up to 8 hours, tossing occasionally. Cover and refrigerate the remaining marinade until ready to use. Meanwhile, prepare a medium-hot fire in your grill. Place grill wok over the kitchen sink and pour in shrimp mixture, draining the marinade. Sprinkle shrimp with coconut. Set wok on baking sheet and carry out to grill. Place wok on grill. Grill, tossing with long-handled wooden spatulas every 3 to 4 minutes, for 12 to 15 minutes, or until shrimp are pink and opaque. Toss rice with the reserved marinade and serve with the shrimp. Serves 8 as an appetizer or 2 to 3 as an entree. — “300 Big & Bold Barbecue & Grilling Recipes” by Karen Adler and Judith Fertig

1 1

⁄ 2 C. white wine ⁄ 2 C. soy sauce

1 bunch scallions, green parts only, finely chopped 3 Tbsp. finely chopped fresh ginger 8 cloves garlic, coarsely chopped 6 Tbsp. brown sugar 1 Tbsp. Chinese five-spice powder Pinch ground cayenne pepper 3 to 4 pounds spareribs (about 2 slabs) cut into individual ribs Honey glaze (see following recipe) Preheat oven to 350 degrees. In a large bowl, combine the wine, soy sauce, scallions, ginger, garlic, brown sugar, five-spice powder and cayenne. Place the ribs in the bowl with the wine mixture, tossing them gently so they are all coated evenly. Transfer the ribs and liquid to a baking pan, cover with foil and bake in the center of oven for 1 hour. Let ribs cool, then transfer them to a plastic container and refrigerate for up to 2 days. To finish ribs on the grill, prepare enough coals for a medium-hot charcoal fire, or preheat gas grill on medium-high for 10 minutes with the lid closed. When coals are ready or gas grill is hot, grill the ribs until heated through, about 15 minutes, turning and mopping them several times with the Honey Glaze so they are nicely coated. Serve immediately with a lot of napkins. Serves 4. — “Dad’s Awesome Grilling Book” by Bob Sloan

Honey glaze

⁄3 C. honey ⁄2 C. fresh orange juice 1 ⁄4 C. fresh lemon juice 2 1

3 Tbsp. soy sauce 2 Tbsp. Dijon-style mustard 1 Tbsp. sesame oil 1 tsp. curry powder 1 tsp. ground ginger

In a medium bowl, stir together all ingredients. Set aside until ready to use, or refrigerate, covered, for up to 1 week. Let the glaze come to room temperature before using. Makes about 2 cups. — “Dad’s Awesome Grilling Book” by Bob Sloan

Amber cayenne-citrus marinade Dad probably loves to drink it, so why not use beer in your cooking, too? This easy marinade can be used on beef or lamb. 2 12-ounce bottles amber ale 1 Tbsp. red wine vinegar 2 Tbsp. fresh orange juice 1 tsp.grated orange zest 1 ⁄2 C. canola oil 1 Tbsp. grated horseradish 1 ⁄2 C. minced onion 2 Tbsp. minced garlic 2 tsp. salt 1 tsp. cayenne pepper (or more, to taste) Mix all ingredients together in a blender, pureeing until onions and garlic are liquefied. Reserve 1 cup for basting, and use remainder as a marinade for beef or lamb (shoulder or leg cut). Marinate meat for at least 2 hours for best flavor. Makes about 2 cups of marinade. — Grillingwithbeer.com Gretchen McKay can be reached at gmckay@post-gazette.com.

Profile: Meet longtime Farmers Market vendor Duard Cress BY SUE DAVIS

For the Salisbury Post

Cress Farm has been part of the Salisbury-Rowan Farmers Market since its beginning. When I asked Duard what keeps bringing him back to the market each year, he said, “People.” At 89, Duard still keeps beef cattle, grows a variety of popular local vegetables and cut-to-order lumber. His favorite crop is tomatoes. If you want to see Duard’s face light up, mention birds, fishing or baseball. Birds, like the one nesting in one of his chocolate cherry tomato plants or the hummingbirds outside his back door, make him smile. He takes time every day to enjoy the birds. He loves to saltwater fish, but does not find time to fish often. And mention South Rowan American Legion baseball, which has supported since it began, and he’ll tell you about the most recent games and the team’s standings. Duard always has a good story to tell. His

daughter, Mary, looks after customers while the story gets told.

Local corn available Local corn, green beans, hot peppers and okra are available this week. Last Saturday morning Miller Farms brought two small loads of corn; it didn’t last very long. This week corn should be available from several vendors. Cress Farms may have a few baskets of blueberries. Correll Farm has fresh local garlic. Try it in your favorite tomato sauce or as an addition to any of the varieties of summer squash available throughout the market. Wild Turkey Farms has fresh pepperoni made from their pasture-fed meats. Their sausage offerings are very tasty. If pepperoni sounds interesting, ask for a sample. The Bread Basket has a very rich and moist Oatmeal Apple Bread with a nice natural sweetness. Emma Ruth developed the recipe for us to enjoy.

She is now making fresh hamburger rolls. The idea of a freshly baked roll, holding a hamburger made with locally grown beef and a slice of local tomato is too good to pass up. T&D Beef has added chicken to their offerings. The pasture raised chickens have a lot of flavor. You can buy a whole uncut chicken or leg and breast quarters. Stop by the Farmers Market booth and learn how to make a credit card or debit card purchases at the market. Farmers Market manager Harry Agner will also be able to help you with using Food Stamps, WIC and Senior Vouchers. For more information about the Farmers Market visit www.salisburyfarmersmarket.c om. The Farmers Market is located in downtown Salisbury at the corner of South Main and Bank streets. Visit the Farmers DARRELL BLACKWELDER/FOR THE SALISBURY POST Market on Wednesdays from 7 Duard Cress welcomes customers at the Farmers Market. a.m. until 1 p.m. and Saturdays from 7 a.m. until noon.


COLUMNS

8A • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2010

SALISBURY POST

Ask Amy: You need a degree to handle all these situations

Quick tricks add up to kitchen savings If you ever have loaded up on groceries one day only to wonder where all the food went the next, you might be ripe to learn easy ways to make food go further. Today’s collection of great reader tips will do just that, while they make you smile. MARY • Precious HUNT peaches. We bought a case of peaches. After assembling six pies, we still had plenty left over, so I blanched them to remove the skins. Then I dipped them in limeade to keep them from turning brown. I froze them for later use. The combination of the lime and peach flavors is really tasty. — Zoe, e-mail

• Secret sauce. My wife can’t tolerate artificial sweeteners, but sugar dissolves slowly in iced drinks. Instead, I make her a batch of simple syrup that she can add to her

tea as needed. I heat 1 cup each of water and sugar in a saucepan until the sugar dissolves. When the solution has cooled, I put it in a squeeze bottle. — James S., e-mail

• Selective scooping. Instead of purchasing a mango cutter, I found that using my grapefruit knife works perfectly. The gentle curve of the blade hugs the seed without slicing into it, maximizing the amount of mango that actually remains on the skin. We also use the grapefruit spoon to scoop out every delicious bite! — Joni,

silks are easier to remove after they’ve been microwaved. — Wendy, e-mail

• Ground gratification. I pride myself on being a savvy shopper, and I found the best deal yet. This week, my local supermarket had boneless chuck on sale for $1.59 a pound. At the meat counter, I asked the butcher to grind two packages for me. My quality ground beef ended up costing $2 less per pound than the regular price of ground beef. Most butchers gladly will grind meat for you when it is on sale. — Dick, New Hampshire

Texas

• Corn creativity. I have a tip that saves time, electricity and heat in summertime cooking. Instead of boiling fresh corn, I stick the entire husk in the microwave to cook it. I cook four ears for four minutes. Then I flip them and cook for another four minutes. They cook in their own steam and come out perfectly. Plus, the husks and

• Simple seasoning. I make my own all-purpose seasoning with this combination of spices: 1 part salt, 1 part pepper, 1 part garlic powder. I’ve found this mixture works well with almost any food. — Margie, California

• Veggie delight. I love grilled zucchini and yellow summer squash. I wash

them and slice them without peeling them. Then I put them in a bowl with just enough olive oil to coat. I add a dash of salt and pepper and some shakes of Italian seasoning and stir. After a few minutes on the grill, they are ready to eat. I use a grill pan that has openings of squares or circles rather than horizontal slits so they don’t fall through. — Naomi L., e-mail

Would you like to send a tip to Mary? You can e-mail her at mary@everydaycheapskate.com, or write to Everyday Cheapskate, P.O. Box 2135, Paramount, CA 90723. Include your first and last name and state. Mary Hunt is the founder of www.DebtProofLiving.com and author of 18 books, including “Debt-Proof Living” and “Tiptionary 2.” To find out more about Mary and read her past columns, please visit the Creators Syndicate website at www.creators.com. CREATORS.COM

Largest festival of disabled artists opens in D.C. WASHINGTON (AP) — Jesse Higman’s paintbrush isn’t a brush at all. With limited mobility in his hands because of a car crash 27 years ago, this Seattle-based artist created a method all his own. To control his colors, Higman built intricate tables with weights that bend his wooden canvas. Then he carefully pours pigment and water on the surface and watches them swirl to a small hole. The paint is like light being sucked into a black hole in space, he said. Left behind is a design he calls “Bone Orchid.” “I think of it like I’m playing with nature on this tabletop,” said Higman, 42, who has been in a wheelchair since age 15. His table and the painting went on display Tuesday at the Smithsonian Institution as part of the world’s largest festival of artists with disabilities. While Higman had wanted to focus more on fine art after working for years in the music industry, the idea of joining the 2010 International VSA Festival in Washington gave him pause: Would he gain a permanent label as a disabled artist? How would he be perceived? But he decided to go with it.

“It’s a legitimate art show, which I was a little bit skeptical of at first,” Higman said. “I wondered if it was going to be to champion people with disabilities, to give them a pat on the back.” Instead, he found dozens of pieces of vibrant, interesting art. The festival, hosted by the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts at sites across the nation’s capital, runs through June 12 and features many free daily performances, films and visual arts. A juried exhibit, “Revealing Culture,” that includes Higman’s work among 130 pieces at the Smithsonian will remain on view through Aug. 29. Renowned glass artist Dale Chihuly contributed a large-scale installation. Performances will feature singer Patti LaBelle, as well as Josh Blue, who won season four of “Last Comic Standing.” Organizers brought in more than 600 artists, performers and educators from around the world, including students from every state who competed to have their work shown at Washington’s Union Station. Taylor Bernard, 8, of Richmond, Va., who has cerebral palsy, was among

the winners selected from 5,500 entries for her watercolor painting, inspired by the sunset at her grandmother’s Virginia Beach home. She was with big company Tuesday as Jean Kennedy Smith, the last living sibling of President John F. Kennedy, met the students as their artwork went on view. “We’re big believers that the arts are for everybody,” said Smith, who founded VSA (formerly Very Special Arts) in 1974. The festival was timed to coincide with the 20th anniversary of the Americans With Disabilities Act. The exhibits are designed to be more accessible to disabled audiences than ever before. They include touchable examples of artworks, audio descriptions and labels written with Braille, curator Stephanie Moore said. One installation, “Sight Unseen,” is the first major exhibit of the most-accomplished photographers with visual impairments. One section includes images with raised ink to allow blind visitors to feel the shape and dimension of the photograph. Another exhibit features the work of Judith Scott, who was kept in an institution for 35 years with Down syn-

drome but began creating sculptures from yarn, paper towels and other simple materials almost constantly for 18 years once she was released to her sister’s custody. “What I really want people to see is that, indeed, artists with disabilities play a major role in the arts community,” said Kennedy Center President Michael Kaiser. “It is crucial that we not disenfranchise that segment of our population.”

Dear Amy: I received an announcement for a friend’s daughter’s graduation from college. There is a statement at the bottom that, unfortunately, there wouldn’t be tickets available. Included with the invite was a self-addressed, stamped envelope. I had no intention sending this young person a gift and felt that this was a blatant solicitation. What do you think? — Wondering Dear Wondering: If this graduation event is already oversubscribed and there is

no RSVP required, I can’t figure out what the self-addressed, stamped envelope is for, unless it is the blatant gift solicitation you suggest. Because that concept is too awful to contemplate, you should assume it is the result of an envelope-stuffing error. All the same, it’s a shame to waste a stamp these days. Perhaps you could write a note to the graduate, congratulating her on her achievement, pop it in the supplied envelope and set it free. Send questions via e-mail to askamy@tribune.com or by mail to Ask Amy, Chicago Tribune, TT500, 435 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, IL 60611. Amy Dickinson’s memoir, “The Mighty Queens of Freeville: A Mother, a Daughter and the Town that Raised Them” (Hyperion), is available in bookstores. TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES

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Dear Confused: Your sister kicked you out of her life. But that doesn’t mean you have to kick her out of yours. You can’t control her choices or behavior. You can only make your own choices, based on what you want. Because you love her children and want to try to stay in their lives, you should invite them to this event. Because your sister is their mother and most likely controls their transportation and social calendar, you should include her too. If she attends this event to try to stay close to your son, then good for her. This might be the beginning of a

reconciliation. Don’t worry about drama. It takes at least two people to pitch a good drama. If you decide ahead of time to be cordial, kind and focused on the celebration, your sister’s attempts at theatrics won’t find an audience.

36

son’s special day! How should I handle this and similar situations in the future? It makes even sending a Christmas card complicated! — Confused Sis

12

Dear Amy: I come from a

family of seven children. About six months ago, my sister “Janet” kicked four of her siblings, including me, out of her life. Janet has two children, ages 15 and 18, whom I love dearly. This summer I’m having a graduation party for my son and don’t know what to do about inviting my niece and nephew. Do I send an invitation with just their names on it? Or should I invite my sister as well, since she still seems to want to have a relationship with my children? My son is fine with however I want to handle it, but I really can’t decide what to do. This party will be held at another sister’s house (whom Janet also kicked out of her life) and she is fine with whatever I do. I don’t want drama on my

R

Dear Confused: Don’t look for a specific protocol to cover every situation. Depending on the occasion

and your relationship to the person celebrating the occasion, you and your husband will want to give a gift and sign the card “From Aunt Bitsy and Uncle Bob and all your ‘Smith’ cousins.” Sometimes you’ll include your offspring, and sometimes you won’t. Your children can then separately choose to congratulate the person in their own way. I’d think that a 27-yearold would get a little embarrassed by having mom and dad handle all of life’s occasions on her behalf. You don’t describe your daughter’s situation, but if she’s able she should give her cousin a small gift. This doesn’t have to be monetary; a card and a favorite book, a CD or a copy of the classic movie “The Graduate” would be appropriate.

R123200

Dear Amy: My husband and I are attending a graduation party for my nephew. My daughter, who is 27, is still living with us. She is also going to this party. Is she obligated to give a separate monetary gift to her cousin? At what time in our ASK life should we AMY stop including our children as part of “our” gift? I also have a son living with us who just graduated from college and another son who lives elsewhere. — Confused

Unclaimed Photos If you have submitted photos to the Salisbury Post of loved ones for Birthdays, Engagements, Anniversaries, Weddings, Obituaries, etc., and the photos were not picked up, please do so. All unclaimed photos will be discarded June 30th, 2010. Thank you! S45584

www.salisburypost.com

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Gary Coleman’s will names a friend and former manager as executor of the late child star’s estate and specifies that he wanted to be cremated. The will was filed Tuesday in 4th District Court in Provo, where the 42-year-old Coleman died May 28 after suffering a brain hemorrhage. Coleman appointed friend Dion Mial as his executor. Coleman says in the 1999 will that he wanted to be remembered in a wake conducted by people who had no financial ties to the star of the sitcom “Diff’rent Strokes.” The will was written years

before Coleman met Shannon Price on a movie set in 2006. The couple married in 2007 and divorced in 2008. A representative says Price believes she has a claim to the estate and planned to meet with her lawyer Tuesday. Although the couple was divorced, they still lived together in Santaquin, about 55 miles south of Salt Lake City. It was Price — who was named in an advanced health care directive — who ordered that Coleman be taken off of life support. Price referred to Coleman as her husband when she called 911, saying Coleman

had fallen and was bleeding severely from the back of his head. Coleman was still conscious when he was taken to a hospital in Provo, but slipped into unconsciousness the next day and was placed on life support for a day. Coleman starred for eight seasons on the sitcom “Diff’rent Strokes,” starting in 1978. The tiny 10-year-old’s “Whachu talkin’ ’bout?” became a catch phrase in the show about two AfricanAmerican brothers adopted by a wealthy white man. He played Arnold Jackson, the younger of the two brothers.

R120718

Gary Coleman’s 1999 will filed in Utah court


N AT I O N

SALISBURY POST

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2010 • 9A

Officials: Fishermen caught mustard gas off N.Y. BOSTON (AP) — State and federal officials worked Tuesday to decontaminate a clam boat anchored in isolation off Massachusetts after it dredged up old munitions containing mustard gas, severely sickening a crewman. The Coast Guard was trying to locate the two military shells, which the crew tossed overboard in about 60 feet of water about 45 miles south of Long Island, said Coast Guard Petty Officer James Rhodes. He acknowledged finding the shells will be difficult. The military used the ocean as a dumping ground for munitions from after World War II through 1970. While the tons of old chemical weapons in offshore waters present a danger to fishermen, experts don’t believe they are a possible source of weapons for terrorists. The Atlantic City, N.J.based vessel was fishing Sunday in a charted munitions dumping zone, but the designation is just a warning and carries no fishing restrictions, Rhodes said. The two shells — about a foot long and three inches in diameter — came aboard in a haul of clams. The Coast Guard believes one of the shells cracked or otherwise leaked its contents. On Tuesday, a National Guard team boarded the vessel, the ESS Pursuit, to test for contamination, while the Coast Guard worked to secure the ship in waters off New Bedford so that it can be moored and decontaminated. The captain and first mate have declined to leave the

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The ESS Pursuit is tied up about a half-mile off Fort Taber to undergo inspection from the Coast Guard in New Bedford, Mass. The U.S. Coast Guard says a Massachusetts-based fishing boat dredging for clams off New York pulled up 10 canisters, including one that broke open and caused two crew members to experience blistering and difficulty breathing. 145-foot dragger, fearing it could run aground, the Coast Guard said. The boat had returned to New Bedford early Monday after one of its six crewmen, Konstantin Burndshov, reported blistering and shortness of breath. Hours later, another crewman was brought ashore after he reported feeling lightheaded. He was examined and released. Two other crewmen left the boat late Monday, with one reporting nose and eye irritation. Burndshov had painful

blisters about three-quarters of an inch high on an arm and a leg, said Dr. Edward Boyer, a toxicologist who is treating the man at UMass Memorial Medical Center in Worcester. Boyer suspected exposure to mustard gas, used most frequently during World War I, given Burndshov’s telltale symptoms: blistering and the onset of his symptoms about 24 hours after exposure. On Monday night, blood and urine tests confirmed the diagnosis. Boyer said even though Burndshov was wearing protective clothing, in-

cluding oil skins and elbowlength gloves, the mustard gas still penetrated to his skin. “It literally pulls the top of the skin off the layer underneath it,” Boyer said. The doctor said Burndshov was “handling it very well,” and Burndshov was listed in good condition at UMass Memorial. The Defense Department began using the ocean as a dumping ground for chemical and conventional munitions after World War II. The military says it stopped in

1970, and two years later Congress banned waste disposal in oceans, including chemical weapons. Officials say it’s impossible to know exactly how much and what type of weapons have been dumped in the ocean because of incomplete records. A 2001 Army report found 74 past instances of ocean disposal — 32 off U.S. shores and 42 off foreign coasts. For example, in 1967 the Army dumped 4,577 one-ton containers of a mustard agent and 7,380 sarin rockets off the New Jersey shore, according to Army records. Only some of the ocean dumps were mapped, and chemical munitions have been found in areas they weren’t supposed to have been dumped, such as just a few miles off Hawaii, said Craig Williams of the Chemical Weapons Working Group, a Kentucky-based organization. In 1976, a fisherman in Hawaii was burned after bringing up a mortar round filled with mustard gas. A mustard gas-filled artillery shell was found in Delaware in 2004 after it was dredged up by a clam boat off New Jersey and remained intact after being sent through a crusher that was making clamshell driveway fill. Three bomb disposal experts were injured dismantling it. Mustard gas, also called sulphur mustard, is usually not a gas at all, but a thick, odorless and colorless liquid that turns solid in temperatures over 58 degrees. It

looks brown when mixed with other chemicals and has a garlic-like smell. Mustard gas can be deadly if it’s used as an aerosol and inhaled, causing blisters and other problems in the lungs. More frequently, it’s used to weaken the enemy by forcing them to devote men and resources to get incapacitated victims off the battlefield and into care, said Dr. Steve Bird, an associate professor at the University of Massachusetts Medical School and a chemical weapons expert. The gas was used most frequently during World War I, but has been used sporadically since, including during the Iran-Iraq War in the 1980s, he said. The chemical retains its potency over time, though some of its components break down, he said. “The stuff still works just the same, and is still as toxic as it was before,” Bird said. The tons of chemical weapons underwater are an extremely unlikely source of weapons for terrorists, Williams said, given the difficulty in locating them, uncertainty about the hazards they present in an inevitably deteriorated condition and the fact that other dangerous chemicals are more readily available. “That’s pretty farfetched,” he said. “If I’m a terrorist and I want to use chemical weapons, I can go to 16 hardware stores and get the stuff I need to make it, rather than be trolling around in the middle of the ocean.”

2009 charitable giving falls 3.6 percent in U.S.

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center’s president, Jane Fer- creased 5.5 percent to $14.1 • International affairs orreira, said its deficit this year billion, while foundation ganizations received nearly is about $160,000 of an esti- grant-making was $38.44 bil- $9 billion, up 6.2 percent. mated $1.2 million annual lion, down 8.9 percent, the re• Environmental and anibudget. Ferreira said the port said. mal organizations received group saw a 30 percent drop • Religious organizations just more than $6 billion, up in donations from foundations received just more than $100 2.3 percent. and has had to depend on in- billion, or one-third of the toOverall, this year’s report dividual donors. tal, down 0.7 percent. shows Americans continue to “They’re the one who have • Education organizations give when faced with hardcarried us through this reces- received about $40 billion, ships, Falk said. sion,” Ferreira said. “People down 3.6 percent. “Even in difficult times, who are committed to your • Human services organ- Americans will dig deep to mission are the ones who are izations received about $27 support those organizations sustaining us right now.” billion, up 2.3 percent. that they care about and they The center’s drop in dona• Health organizations re- feel are making a real differtions from foundations re- ceived nearly $22.5 billion, up ence in meeting human needs flects the survey’s finding 3.8 percent. in their communities,” Falk that foundation giving fell in • Arts, culture and hu- said. “We’re an amazingly 2009. manities organizations re- generous group of people and “(Foundations) didn’t want ceived just more than $12 bil- I think the numbers bear that to have to cut back signifi- lion, down 2.4 percent. out.” cantly,” Falk said. “They stopped giving to new projects and they refocused to the projects that are core to the mission of that founda• Tooth Colored Crowns start at $495 tion.” • Dental Implants for $695 The survey also suggested individual giving in• Mini-Dental Implants for creased at the very end of denture stabilization $250 2009, when the stock market rose and media highlighted • Zoom Whitening $300 charities’ needs. Feeding America reported a strong • Cleanings, Fillings and Extractions fourth quarter, raising $26.33 million during the last Payment Plan with CareCredit three months of 2009 compared to $20.5 million during the same period in 2008. This year’s survey results www.mikemortondentistry.com will surprise many because 201 Security Street, Kannapolis, NC 28083 giving didn’t fall as much as info@mikemortondentistry.com 704/938-3189 expected, said Stacy Palmer, editor of the Washingtonbased Chronicle of Philan- “We Want To Be Your Flower Shop” thropy. But Palmer said the giving isn’t the kind that allows for charities to recover from the recession. “It’s still going to be a We buy your broken gold long time before most non- Call (704) 633-5310 • Salisbury jewelry or scrap gold profit groups are raising as • Say It With Fresh or Silk Flowers much as they did before the • Wilton Cake & Candy Supplies recession started,” Palmer 107 N. Main St. • Balloons said. Salisbury, NC • Many Gift Items But things are looking up, Palmer said, citing a study Delivery & Wire Service Available – Weddings 704-636-3127 from her publication that R105635 found the country’s biggest charities grew by a median of 11 percent in the first WE ACCEPT: three months of 2010, not including giving that went to the Haitian earthquake. Individual giving, the largest category of gifts, was an estimated $227.41 billion, or 75 percent of the total, in 2009 — down 0.4 percent AD APPEARS ONLINE AT: WWW.SALISBURYPOST.COM/CLASS from 2008. Corporate giving in-

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CHICAGO (AP) — Charitable giving fell by 3.6 percent last year as Americans continued to struggle with the recession, though some philanthropic experts feared the decrease could have been much worse given the economic downturn, according to an authoritative annual survey released Wednesday. Americans donated $303.75 billion during 2009, the second-worst year since 1956, when the Giving USA Foundation started conducting its surveys. The worst year was 1974, when giving fell an inflation-adjusted 5.5 percent. However, 2009 also was the third-straight year giving reached more than $300 billion. “We actually were anticipating a larger drop,” foundation chairwoman, Edith Falk, said, ticking off the challenges that 2009 presented for donors to make charitable donations, including high unemployment and home foreclosure rates. “Given all those factors we really were expecting people were not going to be in the position to give,” Falk said. The survey found that giving to human services, health, international affairs and environment and animal-related groups all saw increases in 2009, while donations to education, arts, culture and humanities organizations fell overall. “On the margin people were increasing their giving to help those who were less fortunate,” said Patrick Rooney, executive director of the Center of Philanthropy at Indiana University in Indianapolis. The report is based on research by from the center. The Chicago-based hunger-relief charity Feeding America raised $75 million during fiscal year 2009, exceeding its donations from the previous fiscal year by more than $15 million, the group said. Feeding America has more than 200 food banks across the country. But the survey found education organizations, like Mercy Learning Center in Bridgeport, Conn., which provides literacy programs for disadvantaged women, saw decreased giving in 2009. The


OPINION

10A • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2010

SALISBURY POST

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Salisbury Post

More things I just don’t understand

“The truth shall make you free” GREGORY M. ANDERSON Publisher

704-797-4201 ganderson@salisburypost.com

ELIZABETH G. COOK Editor

704-797-4244 editor@salisburypost.com

CHRIS VERNER

Editorial Page Editor

704-797-4262 cverner@salisburypost.com

CHRIS RATLIFF

Advertising Director

704-797-4235 cratliff@salisburypost.com

RON BROOKS

Circulation Director

704-797-4221 rbrooks@salisburypost.com

PANEL PROPOSES CHANGES

Beefing up ABC controls Obama’s education promise T

he state’s loose-knit system of Alcohol Beverage Control boards is a step closer to coming under new, needed controls — both to pull some wayward local systems in line and to protect the integrity of the state’s system as a whole. The House’s Alcoholic Beverage Control Committee on Tuesday gave the nod to legislation that would require local liquor boards to meet performance standards in operating their stores. The bill would also make ABC board members subject to a gift ban. If it doesn’t already, the legislation should apply the same standards to ABC system managers and their employees. A year ago, the Post reported that the manager of the Rowan-Kannapolis ABC system spent some $24,000 at restaurants and hotels from Washington, D.C., to Orlando, Fla., over a two-year period. Manager Terry Osborne had letters and receipts to back up his contention that he was on official business, advocating for stronger laws and investigating education programs. But the spending did not sit well with county officials. The local ABC Board tightened travel and spending policies and revised its own funding habits when it came to passing profits on to local government. But a few months later, the Rowan-Kannapolis issues looked like small potatoes after some other ABC boards’ practices came to light. For example, a father-son team was running the system in New Hanover County — both with six-figure salaries. And the Mecklenburg ABC board was wined and dined at a $12,700 dinner hosted by liquor distributor Diageo Americas. Obviously change is in order. Calls for privatizing the system have been rejected, as they should be. Now the challenge is to implement controls that bring about consistency and ethics without creating unnecessary burdens for local boards. If the bill can strike that balance, it could remove the cloud of doubt last year’s controversies put on the ABC system as a whole.

Team effort in Landis Here’s a tip of the ball cap to a group of

Landis residents who decided that rather than fight City Hall, they’d partner with it. Faced with cuts in the town’s Recreation Department that would have doomed some popular sports activities for children, the group of parents and others pooled their ideas and came up with a solution. The group, the South Rowan Sports League, will provide equipment and secure sponsors, as well as draw up the schedules. It will save money for the town, while saving summer fun for the kids. Citizens can’t take up the slack for bigticket budget cuts, but here’s an instance where they stepped up to the plate to preserve worthwhile recreational activities.

Common sense

(Or uncommon wisdom, as the case may be)

“I don’t know the key to success, but the key to failure is trying to please everybody.” — Bill Cosby

Moderately confused

W

ASHINGTON -- While the nation remains preoccupied by the drama of the oil leak in the Gulf, which consumes an inordinate portion of time and attention in the media, a struggle of potentially greater consequence for most American families is taking place with far less publicity. I am referring to the scenarios being enacted in legislatures DAVID across the land BRODER as the final strokes are being placed on state budgets, and the fate of literally thousands of teachers and pupils is being decided. As noted here more than once, the arguments over taxes and borrowing that have become louder and more pointed in Washington are nothing compared with the fiscal mayhem in capitals from Sacramento to Boston. State economies have barely begun to recover from the wreckage of the Great Recession. And since taxes are mostly collected retroactively, after individual incomes are earned and spent, it will be well into 2011 or more likely 2012 before state and local budgets can be restored to their pre-recession levels — when more people are working. Meanwhile, state after state is wrestling with the dilemma posed by their schools, the largest single item in most of their budgets. They were given a year’s grace when President Obama dedicated a large slice of the 2009 fiscal rescue package of $787 billion to staving off the cuts that otherwise would have taken place in school budgets for this year.

Of all the dilemmas Obama faces, this may be the cruelest. The arguments on each side — for averting teacher layoffs and for avoiding even more ruinous debt — are entirely convincing That saved an estimated 300,000 or more teaching slots. But there is currently no second-year funding coming from Washington for another rescue mission. Liberal Democrats, led by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, are trying to assemble such a package, but they have encountered resistance not only from Republicans but from moderate and conservative Democrats, well aware that the voters are becoming more and more worried about the deficits and debts this nation is incurring. Of all the dilemmas Obama faces, this may be the cruelest. The arguments on each side — for averting teacher layoffs and for avoiding even more ruinous debt — are entirely convincing. But they collide. In an ideal world, the president and his party would respond by passing a budget resolution providing an immediate rescue package for the states and committing to longer-range economies and revenue adjustments that would assure bond markets and financial circles that, with recovery, deficits will soon start to shrink. But as they talked among themselves before the Memorial Day recess, the Democ-

rats could not muster the will, or the courage, even to attempt to pass a budget resolution. Instead, they prefer to leave the hard trade-offs to the commission on deficit reduction that Obama has appointed, which will not report its recommendations until after Election Day. The irony of ironies is that while these thousands of teachers are left twisting in the wind, the states, in a rare act of courage, have committed to each other to stiffen their requirements in English and math — the most heartening step in education reform in many years. This bipartisan movement, encouraged by the administration but not led or forced by it, has won voluntary backing from the vast majority of states. That is a powerful statement from grassroots America about the willingness to improve the education of our children so they can measure up to international competition. But we cannot commit to raising standards in one breath, and turn around and issue layoff notices to thousands of teachers in the next. That would be as unconscionable as vowing to rid Afghanistan of the Taliban, while simultaneously pulling out the increment of NATO troops. As the days before the midterm reckoning dwindle, the inevitable paring of the Obama agenda will proceed at a faster pace. He will not be able to satisfy all the demands cascading on him. But when he looks at his young daughters, it should be clear to him that saving the schools is one promise he must keep. • • • David Broder’s e-mail address is davidbroder@washpost.com.

RCCC facility needs are real & urgent BY CARL M. SHORT JR. For the Salisbury Post

A

s a member of the Rowan-Cabarrus Community Board of Trustees, I appreciate and encourage public discussion about the college. However, I want to make sure members of our community understand how RCCC is publicly funded and its current facility needs. In North Carolina, community colleges receive two types of public funding — state and local county. The state, through its annual budget, allocates money to the state community college system to support academic programs, operations related to instruction, and faculty and staff salaries. These are the only expenses state funds can be used for at the 58 community colleges. Specifically, state funds cannot be used for building or campus maintenances. The state determines how much each community college receives based upon a formula that is primarily driven by the number of full-time equivalent students. The state, through its funding control, exercises a great deal of authority over each college in everything from programs offered to administrative salaries. By N.C. State statute, it’s

Currently, RCCC ranks dead last among nine community colleges in this region of the state in terms of county funding per full-time student. the responsibility of the county commission to fund the facilities needs of community colleges — new building construction, facilities maintenance and physical plant staff. As mentioned before, community colleges cannot use state funds for facilities; such funds must come from the local county. In the case of RCCC, Cabarrus County pays for the buildings and maintenance in Cabarrus County, Rowan County does the same for our facilities in Rowan County. Currently, RCCC ranks dead last among nine community colleges in this region of the state in terms of county funding per full-time student. RCCC currently receives $619 per full-time student from Rowan County. That’s about 27-percent less than the state average of $845. RCCC’s North Campus has

several immediate needs. Eight of the nine buildings on our North Campus are at least 30 years old; one building is approaching the 50-year mark. These aging buildings need extensive renovation and repair — everything from leaky roofs and crumbling sidewalks and staircases, to sorely out-of-date science labs and overcrowded technical program spaces. Additionally, in a few weeks, the college will dedicate its first new North Campus building in 30 years. Though the county partly funded its construction, there is inadequate money in the proposed 2010-11 Rowan County budget to support the upkeep of this new LEED classroom building. RCCC’s North Campus facility needs are real, and they are immediate. It’s the statemandated responsibility of Rowan County to meet the construction and maintenance needs of the North Campus. That’s why RCCC is working hard to communicate the severity of these needs. The college needs the county’s support, and it’s our responsibility to make sure the county is aware. • • • Carl M. Short Jr. serves on the Board of Trustees for Rowan-Cabarrus Community College

1. Why won’t all the students at Knox stand for our pledge? Do they not care about the hundreds of thousands of Americans who died and are still dying for their freedom? 2. Congress is starting to craft a final financial overhaul bill this week. The Senate wants to include “Requires mortgage lenders to consider whether the borrowers can repay.” Huh? Is this for real? You mean banks didn’t require folks to repay? 3. Why are atheists offended by the words “In God We Trust” and “Christmas?” Does seeing the words turn them into werewolves or something? 4. Other than the ACLU, who could possibly be offended by a prayer said before a football game for the safety of the players? Can’t the offended just plug their ears? 5. The U.S. ambassador to Israel says the president is dedicated to Israel’s security. Why not Arizona’s? Why not the entire USA? 6. Our country is falling apart, so why is Congress taking time to deal with gays and lesbians in the military? 7. Why isn’t our government sending an invoice to Mexico to pay for all the free services given to their citizens who come here illegally? 8. Ever try to find Christmas cards that say Merry Christmas? Not so easy. 9. Why do the poor keep on voting for the same political party? Doesn’t do any good; after many years of voting they're still poor. Rather than vote, they should just get an education, dress nice, speak well, get a job and give their employer 110 percent. This works 99.99 percent of the time to get out of poverty, not taking government entitlements. — Donald Schumacher Salisbury

Age discrimination I recently read about the 61-year-old man who cannot find a job because of his age. There is too much discrimination going on in the world — race discrimination and age discrimination. No one should be denied a job because of their age or the color of their skin. If a person is in good health and physically able to work, he or she should not be turned down for the reasons I mention. I would like to say to the 61-year-old man that he should keep praying and believing. God said in his word that you should pray, believing that you will receive. He knows what we need before we pray. I’m praying and believing that you will find a job real soon. God also said he would supply all our needs according to his riches in glory and he will not leave us begging for bread. — Joanne McKinney Spencer

Reject rate hike The city of Salisbury does not need a water and sewer rate increase. — Carl Massie Salisbury

Letters policy The Salisbury Post welcomes letters to the editor. Each letter should be limited to 300 words and include the writer’s name, address and daytime phone number. Letters may be edited for clarity and length. Limit one letter each 14 days. Write Letters to the Editor, Salisbury Post, P.O. Box 4639, Salisbury, NC 28145-4639. Or fax your letter to 639-0003. E-mail: letters@salisburypost.com.


W O R L D / N AT I O N

SALISBURY POST

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2010 • 11A

Arkansas Senator fights opposition as outsiders test their strength WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrat Blanche Lincoln battled to survive union opposition and an anti-establishment tide that’s already drowned two fellow senators, and political outsiders from coast to coast tested their strength Tuesday on the busiest day of an unpredictable primary season. With polls showing a sullen electorate, there was no shortage of subplots as voters in nearly a dozen states chose candidates for Congress and governors’ offices. Californians decided whether to lead the fall GOP ticket with a pair of wealthy businesswomen campaigning on a promise to cut spending, and tea party activists tested their muscle in Nevada, backing Sharron Angle in a multi-candidate race to select a Republican opponent against Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid in a state where unemployment was 13.7 percent in April. Nevada’s Republican governor, Jim Gibbons, faced strong opposition for renomination after a term marked by a messy public divorce. At the same time, a pair of former governors — Republican Terry Branstad in Iowa and Democrat Edmund G. Brown Jr. in California — hoped to take the first steps toward reclaiming the power they once held. In the House, one Republican incumbent and one Democrat faced what amounted to ideological purity challenges.

BP oil spill scatters uncertainty across the Gulf NEW ORLEANS (AP) — The cap over a broken BP wellhead at the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico is collecting more gushing crude day by day, but that’s about the extent of the details known as authorities try to pinpoint how much oil is escaping, where it’s going and what harm it will cause. The recently installed containment cap on the stricken BP wellhead is helping to limit the leak, collecting more than 620,000 gallons of oil Monday, Coast Guard Adm. Thad Allen said Tuesday in Washington. Still, underwater video feeds continue to show a dark geyser. “I have never said this is going well,” said Allen, who’s monitoring the response effort for the government. “We’re throwing everything at it that we’ve got. I’ve said time and time again that nothing good happens when oil is on the water.” Authorities had earlier reported that the cap collected around 460,000 gallons Sunday and that it was capturing anywhere from a third to three-quarters of the oil spewing out after a damaged riser pipe was cut as part of the containment effort, increasing the flow as a side effect. University of Texas engineering professor Paul Bommer, a member of the Coast Guard team that’s trying to determine how much oil is still leaking, told The Associated Press it’s possible that estimates the team will generate could be a bit higher than current government estimates.

Obama assures seniors that Medicare benefit is protected WHEATON, Md. (AP) — President Barack Obama on Tuesday sought to sell the health overhaul law to skeptical seniors, launching a defense of his presidency’s biggest accomplishment as the election season gets under way and the Gulf oil spill dominates news. The questions Obama got from a crowd at a senior center in suburban Maryland, and from others listening on the phone, suggested that plenty of doubts remain even now that the rancorous health care debate has faded from the headlines. There’s only so much Obama can do to ease concerns. But with crucial midterm elections looming, the administration is deter-

mined to put the law’s benefits front and center as they come online, in hopes of winning over public opinion for the new system and generating confidence in leadership by Obama and his Democratic allies controlling Congress. Tuesday’s event was timed to coincide with the release later this week of the first batch of $250 checks to seniors who fall into Medicare’s prescription drug coverage gap, known as the “doughnut hole.” Some 4 million elderly and disabled people will get checks this year, a down payment on the law’s approach to closing the doughnut hole entirely over the next decade. The first question came from a woman in the audience: Why can’t he close the doughnut hole faster?

Police say Joran Van der Sloot confesses to killing Lima woman LIMA, Peru (AP) — Dutchman Joran van der Sloot, long the prime suspect in the 2005 disappearance of a U.S. teen in Aruba, has confessed to killing a young Peruvian woman in his Lima hotel room, a police spokesman said. Peru’s chief police spokesman, Col. Abel Gamarra, told The Associated Press that Van der Sloot admitted under questioning Monday that he killed 21year-old Stephany Flores on May 30. Several Peruvian media reported that Van der Sloot killed Flores in a rage after learning she had looked up information about his past on his laptop without his permission. They did not name their sources for the information. The newspaper La Republica said that he tearfully confessed, in the presence of a prosecutor and a stateappointed attorney, to grabbing Flores by the neck and hitting her because she had viewed photos and videos about the Aruba case on his computer while he was out buying coffee. Gamarra would not provide details of the confession. Nor would the chief of Peru’s criminal police, Gen. Cesar Guardia, when the AP reached him by telephone. Guardia said only police director Gen. Miguel Hidalgo could authorize the information to be divulged. Hidalgo’s cell phone rang unanswered.

Sex abuse crisis gives new momentum to Catholic dissidents ROME (AP) — The clerical sex abuse crisis is energizing Roman Catholic dissidents who want to open up the priesthood to women and ditch celibacy requirements. They marched on Rome Tuesday even as Pope Benedict XVI called on priests to converge on the Vatican to cap a yearlong celebration of the priesthood. And in a sign of the deepening crisis, the faithful in traditionally Catholic Austria are at the forefront of demands for change. In Rome, church reformers demanded changes in the male-dominated church structure they say is responsible for covering up priestly sex abuse for decades, pressing their case on the eve of a three-day rally of the world’s priests summoned by Benedict. What was meant to be a year of celebration has turned into one marred by revelations of hundreds of new cases of clerical abuse and Vatican inaction to root out pedophile priests. Representatives from a half-dozen pro-women’s ordination groups denounced Benedict’s rally, saying the Vatican shouldn’t be honoring priests amid a clerical sex abuse scandal.

Texas Panhandle pipeline blast injures at least 3 DARROUZETT, Texas (AP) — A sheriff’s official says three people are injured and others are miss-

ing after a natural gas pipeline exploded in a remote part of the Texas Panhandle. Vickie Nelson of the Lipscomb County Sheriff’s Office the blast about 4 p.m. Tuesday was near the small town of Darrouzett, a few miles from the Oklahoma border. Nelson says at least one person has been taken to a burn unit, but she didn’t immediately have other details on the injured or missing. The blast about 270 miles northeast of Lubbock is the second natural gas line explosion in Texas in as many days. A line exploded in Cleburne, south of Dallas, on Monday as utility workers were digging in the area. One worker was killed in that blast

At inmate’s request, Utah prepares firing squad SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Barring a last-minute reprieve, Ronnie Lee Gardner will be strapped into a chair, a hood will be placed over his head and a small white target will be pinned over his heart. The order will come: “Ready, aim...” The 49-year-old convicted killer will be executed by a team of five anonymous marksmen firing with a matched set of .30-caliber rifles. He is to be the third person executed by firing squad in Utah — or anywhere else in the U.S. — since the death penalty was reinstated in 1976. Utah was a long holdout in keeping the method, which it has used in 40 of its 49 executions in the last 160 years. Utah lawmakers made lethal injection the default method of execution in 2004, but inmates condemned before then can still choose the firing squad. That’s what Gardner did in April, politely telling a judge, “I would like the firing squad, please.” Neither he nor his attorneys have said why.

Mass. teacher finds 1792 document PEABODY, Mass. (AP) — A Massachusetts teacher cleaning up her classroom in preparation for a move has discovered a Colonial-era document buried in a pile of outdated textbooks and dusty scraps of papers. Michelle Eugenio, a fourth-grade teacher in Peabody, Mass., found the yellowed sheet of paper two weeks ago. Dated April 1792 and protected by plastic, it appears to document the payment of a debt by a Vermont man named Jonathan Bates. Peabody Historical Society President Bill Power verified the paper’s authenticity. He tells The Salem News he was thrilled with the discovery. No one knows how the paper ended up at Peabody’s Center School or how long it has been there. Bates served in the Continental Army in 1780 and died in 1808 at age 63. He’s buried in Williamstown, Vt.

NASA plans Arctic mission at sea ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — NASA is launching a mission from Alaska next month, but it won’t be into space. The agency will take to the sea June 15 from Dutch Harbor in the Aleutians on its first dedicated oceanographic field campaign. The voyage is billed as an up close look at how conditions in the Arctic are affecting ocean chemistry and ecosystems that play a critical role in global climate change. More than 40 scientists will spend five weeks on board the Coast Guard Cutter Healy, the country’s most technologically advanced polar icebreaker. The Seattle-based Healy provides more than 4,200 square feet of scientific laboratory space. Scientists will sample physical, chemical and biological characteristics of the Chukchi and Beaufort seas and sea ice.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

In this courtroom sketch, Sam Adam Jr., left, attorney for former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich, delivers his opening argument to the jury during Blagojevich’s federal corruption trial Tuesday in Chicago.

Attorney: Blagojevich ‘didn’t take a dime’ CHICAGO (AP) — Rod Blagojevich is an honest man who “didn’t take a dime” but had the bad judgment to trust the wrong people, the former Illinois governor’s fiery attorney said Tuesday at his corruption trial. Blagojevich will also take the stand on his own behalf, not just let a lawyer speak for him, defense attorney Sam Adam Jr. said in his opening statements. “The guy ain’t corrupt,” Adam whispered, after slamming his hand down. He said the ousted governor’s wife, Patti Blagojevich, will take the stand as well. Adam, who punctuated his opening remarks by waving his arm and pointing his fingers with his arm extended, said Blagojevich was fooled by those close to him. Now-convicted influence peddler Antoin “Tony” Rezko helped raise money for lots of political candidates, including Blagojevich, Adam said. But he told jurors that “not a single penny” of ill-gotten money went into Blagojevich’s campaign fund or his own pockets. “You have to be comatose not to figure out how to get a dollar out of $52 billion,” Adam said, referring to the state budget. “But who didn’t? Him!” he said indicating his client. Adam says Blagojevich thought Rezko knew campaign laws because he was so good at raising money. Rezko has since been convicted of skimming campaign contributions and seeking personal kickbacks from companies. Blagojevich has pleaded

not guilty to trying to sell or trade President Barack Obama’s former Senate seat. He also denies that he plotted to turn his power as governor into a moneymaking scheme for himself and insiders. If convicted, he could face a sentence of up to 415 years in prison and fines totaling $6 million. A federal prosecutor told jurors earlier that Blagojevich sought to use his power as governor to get benefits for himself and his inner circle through “a series of illegal shakedowns.” And when Obama was elected — meaning the governor could appoint his successor to the Senate — Blagojevich’s “golden ticket arrived,” prosecutor Carrie E. Hamilton said. In her opening statement, Hamilton methodically laid out what she called a pattern of lying, scheming and extortion that consumed the former governor’s time in office, and intensified as his personal financial troubles deepened. “When he was supposed to be asking, ’What about the people of Illinois,’ he was asking, ’What about me?”’ Hamilton said. She told jurors that Blagojevich sought to arrange deals in which entities that got state funding or approvals would then contribute to his campaign, that he sought to line the pockets of himself and his closest allies, and that he lied to the FBI when questioned about his fundraising activities. “In each one of these shakedowns, the message was clear .... ’Pay up or no

state action,”’ she said. The ousted governor sat listening with his head down, scribbling notes as the prosecutor spoke. In referring to federal authorities, and their might against Blagojevich, Adam told jurors the same people that were chasing al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden were chasing him. “And you know how many illegal accounts they found — none. He’s. Broke. He’s broke.” Judge James B. Zagel had given Adam — best known for his theatrical and successful defense of R&B star R. Kelly two years ago — an hour and 45 minutes for his statement. He had asked for up to two and a half hours. The former governor’s co-defendant — and brother — Robert Blagojevich, 54, a Nashville, Tenn., businessman, has pleaded not guilty to taking part in the alleged plan to sell the Senate seat and plotting to illegally squeeze a racetrack owner for a hefty contribution to the Blagojevich campaign fund. His attorney, Michael Ettinger, reminded jurors that Robert Blagojevich is a retired lieutenant colonel in the Army reserve who served in missile unit based in Germany and stayed in the reserves for 16 years. “Why am I telling you this? Because Robert Blagojevich ... is not about money,” Ettinger said, raising his voice slightly for emphasis. The jury was sworn in earlier Tuesday. Including alternates, the panel has 11 women and seven men.

General Motors pulls back on dealership cuts DETROIT (AP) — General Motors will keep open about 900 dealerships across the country that it had planned to close, a shift in corporate strategy that could preserve thousands of jobs. The automaker will wind up with about 5,000 U.S. dealers in July, up from original plans for 4,100, Mark Reuss, GM’s North America president, told The Associated Press. It had about 6,000 when it filed for bankruptcy last year. The change represents a desire by GM’s new leadership team to avoid the expense of closing dealerships, a step they say is not critical to bring the company back to profits. GM’s large dealer network “used to be one of our main, massive strengths,” Reuss told the AP during a recent test drive of the new Chevrolet Cruze. “I still think that’s true. It can be true with the right dealers.” July is the end of a federally mandated arbitration process under which dealerships that GM and Chrysler Group had targeted could appeal. Partly because of GM’s strategy change, only about a quarter of the 1,576 cases brought by GM and Chrysler dealers remain before arbitrators. “Everyone’s pretty excited,” said Bob Kapp, new car manager at Allen Chevrolet Cadillac in Monroe, Mich., which learned in April that it would be reinstated as a GM dealer and plans to hire 10 to 12 people as business picks up. “It was tough there for a while.” GM on Tuesday would not estimate how many to-

tal jobs might be saved. The National Automobile Dealers Association, a trade group, says about 50 people work at an average new-car dealership. Both GM and Chrysler announced plans to shed 2,800 dealerships as part of their reorganizations. The companies said their U.S. sales didn’t justify so many dealers — nearly 10,000 between them. By comparison, Toyota has only about 1,200 even though it’s the secondlargest automaker by U.S. sales. GM and Chrysler also argued that closing some dealers would make the remaining ones more profitable and allow them to invest in nicer facilities, advertising and training. GM’s last CEO, Fritz Henderson, convinced an Obama administration task force that GM needed to close struggling dealers. But he was ousted in November, just before Congress passed a law requiring arbitration before either automaker could cut a dealership loose. Since the arbitration hearings began in February, most cases have been settled — either because GM and Chrysler reinstated dealers or the dealers withdrew their cases, some of them to sign with other automakers, others to close for good. About 300 GM dealers and fewer than 100 Chrysler dealers targeted for closure are still awaiting a decision from arbitrators. Reuss wouldn’t elaborate on the change in GM’s strategy. “I’m concentrating on what it needs to be for the new GM,” he said. “I think

we’ve removed a lot of the anxiety and all the things that go with that.” Chrysler, too, will have more dealers than it planned when it emerged from bankruptcy, although it won’t say exactly how many. It closed about 800 last summer but has since agreed to reinstate about 10 percent of those. Chrysler has been more aggressive than GM in closing dealerships. It sued North Carolina and four other states to stop state laws that would have protected dealers. Because it closed its dealers immediately last year — instead of giving them a year’s warning, as GM did — Chrysler also faces some sticky legal cases. For example, an arbitrator recently ruled that Chrysler should reinstate a Dodge dealer in Deland, Fla., that was terminated last June. But Chrysler had already awarded Deland Dodge’s franchise agreement to another dealer across the street. Deland Dodge general manager Jeremy Kiel said it’s unclear what will happen next. In the meantime, he has had to lay off 10 employees. Still, arbitrators are siding with Chrysler more often than not. As of Tuesday, arbitrators have decided 22 cases in Chrysler’s favor and six in favor of dealers. “Business is business. There isn’t anything personal with it,” said Catherine Zimmer, owner of a Chrysler dealership in Florence, Ky., who just won her franchise back after arbitrators overruled Chrysler’s decision to cut her. She hopes to start selling new cars again by July 1.


N AT I O N

12A • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2010

SALISBURY POST

Officials: U.S. Border agent shot teen at bridge EL PASO, Texas (AP) — A U.S. Border Patrol agent shot and killed a 15-year-old Mexican boy after a group trying to illegally enter the U.S. threw rocks at the agents at an international bridge near downtown El Paso, authorities said Tuesday. The shooting, which happened Monday evening, drew sharp criticism from Mexico, where the government said Tuesday that “the use of firearms to repel attacks with stones represents disproportionate use of force, particularly coming from authorities who have received specialized training.” According to the FBI, Border Patrol agents were responding to a group of suspected illegal immigrants being smuggled into the U.S. near the Paso Del Norte bridge, across from Ciudad Juarez, Mexico around 6:30 p.m. Monday. One suspected illegal immigrant was detained on the levy on the U.S. side, the FBI said in a statement. Another Border Patrol agent arrived on the concrete bank where the Rio Grande would be if there was water flowing, and detained a second suspect. Other suspects ran back into Mexico and began throwing rocks, the FBI said. At least one rock came from behind the agent, who was kneeling beside the suspected illegal immigrant he had prone on the ground, said FBI spokeswoman Andrea Simmons. The agent told the rock

throwers to stop and back off, but they continued. The agent fired his weapon several times, hitting one who later died, said the FBI, which is leading the investigation because it involved an assault on a federal officer. The agent was not injured, Simmons said. Border Patrol Special Operations Supervisor Ramiro Cordero said preliminary reports show that Border Patrol agents on bicycle patrol “were assaulted with rocks by an unknown number of people.” “During the assault at least one agent discharged his firearm,” he said. “The agent is currently on administrative leave. A thorough, multiagency investigation is currently on-going.” Chihuahua State officials released a statement Tuesday demanding a full investigation into the death of the boy, identified as Sergio Adrian Hernandez Huereca. The boy’s sister, Rosario Hernandez, told Associated Press Television News that her brother was playing with several friends and did not plan to cross the border. “They say that they started firing from over there and suddenly hit him in the head,” she said Monday. His mother, Maria Guadalupe Guereca, told Milenio TV in Mexico that her son had gone to visit his brother, who handles luggage at a border customs office. While there, he met up with a group of friends and

they decided to hang out by the river, she said. “That was his mistake, to have gone to the river,” she said. “That’s why they killed him.” She said he ran and hid underneath one of the bridge’s pillars upon hearing gunfire. “He was a boy, and even then they killed him,” she said. “I ask that they punish them. ... They left me without anything.” Sergio Belmonte, spokesman for the Ciudad Juarez mayor, said state justice officials have the body and are performing an autopsy before releasing the body to the family. The boy was shot once near the eye, and authorities found one 40-millimeter casing near the body on Mexican soil, said Arturo Sandoval, a spokesman for the Chihuahua Attorney General’s office. Authorities are still investigating the bullet’s trajectory, he said. Mexico’s Foreign Relations Department said it “energetically condemns” the shooting and demanded “an expeditious and transparent investigation of the facts and, if applicable, punishment of the guilty.” “Mexico is aware of the existing risks in the region, but, according to international standards, lethal force must be used only when the lives of people are in immediate danger and not as a dissuasive measure,” it said. The department said its

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Mexican forensic experts examine the body of 15-year-old Sergio Adrian Hernandez Huereca under the Paso Del Norte border bridge in the city of Ciudad Juarez, Mexico on Monday. Chihuahua State officials released a statement Tuesday demanding a full investigation into the death of the boy who was allegedly shot by a U.S. Border Patrol agent after a confrontation, according to Mexican authorities. records indicated that the number of Mexicans killed or wounded by immigration authorities rose from five in 2008 to 12 in 2009 to 17 so far this year, which is not yet half over. The Rio Grande, which marks the U.S.-Mexico border in Texas, is now a broad muddy moat flanked by shallow concrete banks. T.J. Bonner, president of the union representing Bor-

der Patrol agents, said rock throwing incidents against Border Patrol agents are common and capable of causing serious injury. “It is a deadly force encounter,” Bonner said. “One that justifies the use of deadly force.” The violence in Mexico combined with assaults against Border Patrol agents in the U.S. has increased the level of apprehension agents

have about their safety, Bonner said. Less than two weeks ago, Mexican migrant Anastacio Hernandez, 32, died after a Customs and Border Protection officer shocked him with a stun gun at the San Ysidro border crossing that separates San Diego and Tijuana, Mexico. Last week the San Diego medical examiner’s office ruled that death a homicide.

In wake of blast, Massey says feds require unsafe mine ventilation miners in different states,” Harvey said. In the letter, Blankenship tells the governors of Illinois, West Virginia, Virginia and Kentucky that the system required by federal regulators is unsafe. All four are major coal-producing states. MSHA had no immediate comment. West Virginia mine safety chief Ron Wooten said there’s not enough information available to substantiate Massey’s charges. “Hopefully the conclusions of this investigation will help all parties fully understand what happened,” Wooten said through a spokeswoman. Virginia plans to review issues raised in the letter as individual

mine ventilation plans are submitted, said Mike Abbott, a spokesman for the Department of Mines Minerals and Energy. The mines in question use a longwall system — a 1,000-footlong machine somewhat akin to a deli slicer — to extract coal. The system MSHA is pushing was designed to capture methane in longwall mines working in the Pittsburgh seam in southwestern Pennsylvania and northern West Virginia, Massey said. That seam is prone to releasing relatively high volumes of methane. The company argues that the system is dangerous in seams that release lower amounts of methane because it keeps gas levels closer to the explosive range.

N.Y. teen charged in 2nd plot on his old high school Sweepstakes! similar” to Franko’s arrest in 2007 as a juvenile on charges of plotting to attack the school. That case was handled in Family Court; Franko left Connetquot High School and graduated from a special-education program where he met Saltzman, who is still a student. She is expected to be arraigned June 17 on the same felony conspiracy count. Her attorney, Cesar Galarza, said she intended to plead not guilty. “This was all his doing,” Galarza said. “He basically tried to take a 16-yearold and get her to carry out his plan, which she never intended to carry out.” The prosecutor noted that had Franko remained at the school, he would have been a graduating senior this month. “This was really his last opportunity to get all of these kids in the same place at the same time,” Kurtzrock said. Although Franko was ordered held without bail, Suffolk County Judge Stephen Braslow issued restraining orders barring the teen from contacting anyone associated with the school. “The school has been watching Christopher since prior to the first incident,” Connetquot Superintendent Alan Groveman said. “We remain concerned about the student’s anger toward students and staff.” He added that despite Franko’s incarceration, security staff, administrators and others have been provided with a photograph of the teenager as a precaution. “The most disturbing part of this is the potential danger to students and staff. It’s hard to be 100 percent perfect,” Groveman said. “To hear that students and staff have been targeted is really disturbing.” A court-appointed attor-

ney from Legal Aid, John Schick, entered the not guilty plea on behalf of Franko. He said he had only been assigned to the case on Tuesday and needed to research the allegations further. “Quite obviously there may be quite a few extenuating circumstances that could surface,” he told Suffolk County Court Judge Stephen Braslow. If convicted, Franko could be sentenced to up to 25 years in prison.

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RIVERHEAD, N.Y. (AP) — A teenager plotted with another to pull off a Columbine-style attack on his former high school, authorities on New York’s Long Island said Tuesday — the second time in three years he has been accused of such a plot. Christopher Franko, who turned 18 on Tuesday, was ordered held without bail after his court-appointed attorney entered a not guilty plea to felony conspiracy. Franko and Dana Saltzman, 16, were arrested in early May on misdemeanor conspiracy, but a grand jury voted to upgrade the charges. The teens were plotting to attack Connetquot High School this Thursday with shotguns and explosives, prosecutors said. Their plan was to kill security guards outside of the school, then go inside and shoot as many students as possible, Assistant District Attorney Glenn Kurtzrock said. Once police arrived at the school, the pair planned to fire at officers before ultimately killing themselves, the prosecutor added. Kurtzrock added that Franko had diagrams of the school and they intended to go to locations “where they knew a lot of students congregated for the purpose of killing as many students as possible.” Their plot was thwarted in part when their attempts to purchase a shotgun at a local sporting goods store were rejected because neither teen was 18. Prosecutors say Franko intended to return to the store on Tuesday to make the purchase. Kurtzrock said he could not explain a motive, other than Franko had apparently been teased by classmates — a slight he never forgot. “He’s definitely a danger,” Kurtzrock said, adding that the case is “chillingly

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“We can demonstrate, I think, that air flow was reduced after we implemented this plan,” Harvey said. Blankenship charges that MSHA’s system lowered air flow to the longwall face and the mined out area behind the machine at Big Branch. The system also sent air containing dust and methane removed from other parts of the mine on a circuitous route to the surface. Modern coal mines rely on ventilation to dilute methane and flush it out as quickly as possible. “The air flow under their plan met the minimum requirements,” Harvey said. “Ours would produce a lot more air to flush away methane.”

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nois coal company, Mach Mining. But Massey stopped short of claiming the ventilation system caused the Upper Big Branch tragedy. “We’re not ready to say that yet. We’re willing to say that it’s something that certainly should be looked as part of the investigation and should be looked at by somebody other than MSHA,” said Massey lawyer Shane Harvey. MSHA required a Mach mine in Illinois to use the system last year and is believed to be requiring it at mines in several other states, Harvey said. Mach is appealing citations for violations stemming from MSHA’s ventilation plan. “We think it’s a safety issue that affects different states and

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CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — Massey Energy Co. claimed Tuesday that a federal ventilation plan designed for coal mines with high levels of methane can reduce air flow in mines that produce less of the gas, potentially creating explosive buildups. The Mine Safety and Health Administration required the plan at Massey’s Upper Big Branch mine, where 29 men died in a suspected methane explosion April 5. The blast is the focus of civil and criminal investigations. Massey Chief Executive Don Blankenship said in a letter to governors in several states that MSHA required the plan at Upper Big Branch despite a warning about its safety last year by an Illi-


SPORTS

Soccer’s best West’s Baucom player of the year as All-County soccer team announced/12B

WEDNESDAY

June 9, 2010

SALISBURY POST

Ronnie Gallagher, Sports Editor, 704-797-4287 rgallagher@salisburypost.com

1B

www.salisburypost.com

Moore, Lyerly drafted BY RONNIE GALLAGHER

rgallagher@salisburypost.com

The excitement surrounding Stephen Strasburg’s major-league debut for the Washington Nationals on Tuesday night reached Rowan County when Catawba outfielder and former West Rowan star Wade Moore was taken by the Nationals in the 19th round of the 2010 MLB draft. Moore, a third-team All-American, was the 566th pick. He had some company 15 picks later when team-

mate and former East Rowan star Craige Lyerly was chosen by the Tampa Bay Rays at No. 581. Catawba coach Jim Gantt was happy for both Rowan County greats. “There’s a lot of good athletes in the county,” Gantt said. “They love their baseball.” Moore, reached by phone on Tuesday night, said, “Obviously, I’m ecstatic.” Moore was the 2006 Rowan County Athlete of the Year and turned down football scholarships to sign with N.C. State in baseball.

MOORE

LYERLY

He decided to transfer home for his senior season just to get on the field. He said he knew he could play at the major-league level, but added,

Lakers defeat Celtics

“Obviously, I couldn’t leave it in the hands of N.C. State.” Moore has been working out for several clubs. He said the most interest came from the Nationals, Cubs, Giants and Braves. He worked out for six teams, showing them throws from the outfield and running the 60-yard dash. “But I really felt, with the relationships I had with the area scouts, it didn’t surprise me (being drafted by the Nationals).” • Lyerly couldn’t be reached Tues-

day but Gantt gushed about the East Rowan product. Unlike Moore, Lyerly didn’t have the huge fanfare coming out of high school but Gantt realized his potential. “I remember him telling me not to worry about him — with his schoolwork or with baseball,” Gantt said. But the fanfare came. By the end of his career, Gantt said even the scouts were calling him by nickname, “Ern.”

See DRAFT, 12B

BASEBALL

BY JIMMY GOLEN Associated Press

BOSTON —

Kobe Bryant Lakers 91 s c o r e d Celtics 84 29 points a n d Derek Fisher added 16 to lead Los Angeles to a 91-84 victory over the Boston Celtics on Tuesday night and give the Lakers a 2-1 lead in the NBA finals. Bryant had 25 points after three but did not score for the first 10 minutes of the fourth quarter. That’s when Fisher took over, adding four key baskets after Boston winnowed a 17point first-half lead to one point. The Lakers regained home-court advantage they had lost when Boston took Game 2 in Los Angeles. Game 4 is Thursday night in Boston. Pau Gasol and Andrew Bynum had 10 rebounds apiece for Los Angeles. Kevin Garnett, who had just six points in Boston’s victory Sunday, had 25 in Game 3. But Ray Allen, who had 32 points in Game 2, missed all 13 field goal attempts — one shy of the NBA finals futility record. The Celtics had high hopes after splitting the opening two games in Los Angeles, but the “Beat L.A.!” chants at the TD Garden couldn’t help them overcome poor shooting. The Lakers led by as many as 17 points in the first half, but Boston cut the deficit to four late in the third quarter and then made it 68-67 early in the fourth on consecutive drives by Glen “Big Baby” Davis and Rajon Rondo. With a chance to take the lead, Allen was called for an offensive foul away from the ball. Fisher drove for a layup at the other end that made it a three-point game then scored four of the Lakers’ next five baskets to give them a five-point lead with about 41⁄2 minutes left. “We just had to be poised and understand they’re going to make a run, and we did that,” Bryant said. “They made a push but they never fully got control of the game. We made big shots when we needed it.” Bryant said his teammate was “just Derek being Derek. He makes big plays all the time. He never ceases to amaze me.” Allen and Paul Pierce combined to go 1 for 13 from the field as Boston went nearly 6 minutes without a field goal in the first half. Pierce finished with 15 points, including 3 for 4 from 3-point range, but Allen never snapped out of it.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Nationals starting pitcher Stephen Strasburg is greeted by his teammates as he steps into the dugout in the seventh inning.

Strasburg doesn’t disappoint BY JOSEPH WHITE Associated Press

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Washington’s Stephen Strasburg struck out 14.

WASHINGTON — Stephen Strasburg Nationals 5 struck out 14 Pirates 2 batters in his first game, took three shaving cream pies to the face, donned a silver Elvis wig — then compared it all to getting married. What could he possibly do for an encore? Baseball’s newest wunderkind went beyond the hype — and anyone’s reasonable expectations — with an electric and unprecedented major league debut Tuesday night in the Washington Nationals’ 5-2 win over the Pittsburgh Pirates. “I’ve been catching a lot of guys,” said likely Hall of Famer Ivan Rodriguez, patting Strasburg

on the left shoulder, “but this kid is unbelievable.” With a standing-room-only crowd roaring at every chance, last year’s No. 1 overall draft pick put on a dazzling display of power pitching. His fastballs reached 100 mph — and still had movement when they crossed the plate — and his nasty curves were nearly impossible to hit. The 21-year-old right-hander allowed four hits, two earned runs and didn’t walk a batter, piling up the most strikeouts in a big league debut since J.R. Richard fanned 15 for Houston in 1971. He was pulled for a pinch hitter after seven innings and took a quick curtain call. After the final out, Strasburg was pelted with a shaving cream pie to the face courtesy of teammate John Lannan. The rookie was quickly handed a towel, but

after wiping his face was blindsided by two more pies. Then someone crowned him with the goofy, oversized wig that’s named after Elvis Presley — a clubhouse ritual for whoever teammates choose as the player of the game. “It’s hard to talk with so much shaving cream on my head,” Strasburg said. “I just wanted to go out there and say I’ve had my first outing in the big leagues. I’ve had a great time.” Strasburg always pitches in a hurry — the game took only 2 hours, 19 minutes — and plate umpire Tom Hallion even suggested to him that he slow down his warmups because the breaks between innings are longer in the majors. “The only thing I really remember is the first pitch — ball

See STRASBURG, 12B

Best start in South history BY MIKE LONDON

mlondon@salisburypost.com

ALBEMARLE — South Rowan’s LeS. Rowan 20 gion team is Stanly 3 9-1 — the best start in the program’s 15-year history. South is also 5-0 where it counts — in the Southern Division of Area III — after destroying Stanly 20-3 on the road on Tuesday night. South has scored 52 runs

and launched 10 homers in its last three games, and Carson Cougars powered three longballs to bury Stanly (6-4, 4-4). Gunnar Hogan and Julio Zubillaga ripped three-run shots. Joseph Basinger added a tape-measure, two-run bomb that might still be going. Catcher Tyler Freeze also had a big night. He doubled twice, scored three times and picked a runner off base. Coach Michael Lowman was attending to a family matter and missed South’s latest

offensive explosion, but Kenny Simpson, who took the reins, didn’t have to push many buttons or make any magical strategic moves. “When the kids are playing like this, you just let them go play,” Simpson said. “I felt for Stanly. I know they were way low on pitching and we were hitting the ball.” South was also pitching it. Weston Smith, a rising junior at Northwest Cabarrus, was phenomenal considering he dealt with serious down

time while his teammates were batting. South had a marathon, eight-run second and a seven-run sixth, so Smith basically had to warm up three different times. “It was kinda tough staying loose with all those long innings, but you never mind the run support,” Smith said. “And I liked Coach Goody’s (Brian Goodnight) pitch selection.” Smith, who has an MLB frame already, worked all seven innings. He struck out eight and scattered three hits.

HOGAN

ZUBILLAGA

Smith was dominant the last three innings, fanning seven of the last 11 he faced. Stanly’s Jordan Hildreth hit a two-run homer to left that curved around the foul pole. South fans barked, but Smith said the homer was legit.

See SOUTH, 12B


SCOREBOARD

2B • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2010

TV Sports Wednesday, June 9 COLLEGE SOFTBALL 8 p.m. ESPN2 — World Series, finals, game 3, UCLA vs. Arizona, at Oklahoma City (if necessary) MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 8 p.m. ESPN — Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee NHL 8 p.m. NBC — Playoffs, finals, game 6, Chicago at Philadelphia

Area schedule Wednesday, June 9 AMERICAN LEGION BASEBALL 7 p.m. Lexington at Rowan Kannapolis at Mocksville Statesville at South Rowan Mooresville at Concord

Wachovia Cup 1A YVC Team standings 1. East Montgomery . . . . . . . . . . . . 630 2. Albemarle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 580 3. South Stanly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 572.5 4. Chatham Central . . . . . . . . . . . . . 565 5. North Moore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 550 5. West Montgomery . . . . . . . . . . . 550 7. Gray Stone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 542.5 8. North Rowan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 515 9. South Davidson . . . . . . . . . . . . . 380

2A CCC Team standings 1. Salisbury . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164 2. West Davidson . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144.5 3. Central Davidson. . . . . . . . . . . . . 144 4. East Davidson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129 5. Lexington . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115.5 6. Thomasville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96

3A NPC Team standings 1. East Rowan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 757.5 2. Statesville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 665 3. West Rowan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 662.5 4. Carson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 627.5 5. North Iredell. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 625 6. South Rowan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 620 7. West Iredell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 577.5

3A SPC Team standings 1. Robinson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 720 2. Concord . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 687.5 3. Hickory Ridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 682.5 4. NW Cabarrus. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 645 5. A.L. Brown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 600 6. Mt. Pleasant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 597.5 7. Cox Mill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 495 8. Central Cabarrus . . . . . . . . . . . 387.5

4A CPC Team standings 1. Mt. Tabor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 805 2. R.J. Reynolds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 755 3. West Forsyth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 737.5 4. Reagan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 710 5. Davie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 657.5 6. North Davidson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 610

Legion baseball Area III Southern Division Division Overall South Rowan 5-0 9-1 Mooresville 7-1 9-2 4-4 6-4 Stanly County Kannapolis 4-4 5-6 Mocksville 4-5 6-6 Concord 3-4 4-4 Rowan County 2-3 5-5 Lexington 3-5 3-7 Wilkes 2-3 2-3 Statesville 0-5 0-6 Sunday’s games Mocksville 14, Rowan 5 Lexington 10, Mocksville 0 (7 inns.) Stanly 11, Rowan 3 Mooresville at Statesville, ppd. Monday’s games Kannapolis 10, Stanly 9 Wilkes 7, Mocksville 0 Randolph 8, Lexington 7 Tuesday’s games South Rowan 20, Stanly 3 Mooresville 12, Cherryville 9 Mint Hill at Concord Wednesday’s games Mooresville at Concord Kannapolis at Mocksville Lexington at Rowan Statesville at South Rowan Wilkes at Stanly Thursday’s games Lexington at Statesville Mooresville at Rowan

Minor Leagues South Atlantic Northern Division W L Pct. GB Hickory (Rangers) 35 25 .583 — Lakewood (Phillies) 34 26 .567 1 Hagerstown (Nationals) 30 30 .500 5 West Virginia (Pirates) 29 31 .483 6 Kannapolis (White Sox) 28 31 .475 61⁄2 Greensboro (Marlins) 28 32 .467 7 Delmarva (Orioles) 26 34 .433 9 Southern Division W L Pct. GB Augusta (Giants) 36 24 .600 — Savannah (Mets) 35 25 .583 1 Greenville (Red Sox) 30 30 .500 6 Lexington (Astros) 30 30 .500 6 1 Charleston (Yankees) 27 32 .458 8 ⁄2 Asheville (Rockies) 25 34 .424 101⁄2 Rome (Braves) 25 34 .424 101⁄2 Tuesday’s Games Lexington 12, Hickory 4 Asheville 11, West Virginia 5 Greenville 4, Augusta 1 Greensboro 6, Lakewood 3, 10 innings Charleston 7, Rome 1 Delmarva 4, Hagerstown 3 Savannah 8, Kannapolis 7, 10 innings Wednesday’s Games No games scheduled Thursday’s Games Savannah at Greensboro, 7 p.m. Greenville at Rome, 7 p.m. Hickory at Augusta, 7:05 p.m. Charleston at Hagerstown, 7:05 p.m. Asheville at Kannapolis, 7:05 p.m. Delmarva at Lexington, 7:05 p.m. Lakewood at West Virginia, 7:05 p.m.

College baseball Super Regionals (Best-of-3) The visiting team plays as home team for Game 2; a coin flip determines home team for Game 3 x-if necessary At Dick Howser Stadium Tallahassee, Fla. Friday, June 11: Vanderbilt (45-18) at Florida State (45-17), Noon Saturday, June 12: Florida State vs. Vanderbilt, 1 p.m. x-Sunday, June 13: Vanderbilt vs. Florida State, 1 p.m. At McKethan Stadium Gainesville, Fla. Friday, June 11: Miami (43-18) at Florida (45-15), 7 p.m. Saturday, June 12: Florida vs. Miami, 7 p.m. x-Sunday, June 13: Miami vs. Florida, 7 p.m. At UFCU Disch-Falk Field Austin, Texas Friday, June 11: TCU (49-11) at Texas (49-11), 3 p.m. Saturday, June 12: Texas vs. TCU, 1 p.m. x-Sunday, June 13: TCU vs. Texas, 4 p.m. At Jackie Robinson Stadium Los Angeles Friday, June 11: Cal State-Fullerton (4516) at UCLA (46-13), 10:30 p.m.

Saturday, June 12: UCLA vs. Cal StateFullerton, 7 p.m. x-Sunday, June 13: Cal State-Fullerton vs. UCLA, 10 p.m. At Davenport Field Charlottesville, Va. Saturday, June 12: Oklahoma (47-15) at Virginia (50-12), 3 p.m. Sunday, June 13: Virginia vs. Oklahoma, 4 p.m. x-Monday, June 14: Oklahoma vs. Virginia, 1 or 7 p.m. At Doug Kingsmore Stadium Clemson, S.C. Saturday, June 12: Alabama (41-23) at Clemson (41-22), 6 p.m. Sunday, June 13: Clemson vs. Alabama, 7 p.m. x-Monday, June 14: Alabama vs. Clemson, 1 or 7 p.m. At BB&T Coastal Field Myrtle Beach, S.C. Saturday, June 12: South Carolina (4615) at Coastal Carolina (55-8), Noon Sunday, June 13: Coastal Carolina vs. South Carolina, 1 p.m. x-Monday, June 14: South Carolina vs. Coastal Carolina, 1 or 7 p.m. At Packard Stadium Tempe, Ariz. Saturday, June 12: Arkansas (43-19) at Arizona State (50-8), 9 p.m. Sunday, June 13: Arizona State vs. Arkansas, 10 p.m. x-Monday, June 14: Arkansas vs. Arizona State, 7 p.m.

NBA Playoffs NBA FINALS Game 1: Los Angeles 102, Boston 89 Game 2: Boston 103, Los Angeles 94 Tuesday: Los Angeles 91, Boston 84 Thursday: L.A. at Boston, 9 p.m. June 13: L.A. at Boston, 8 p.m. June 15: Boston at L.A., 9 p.m. June 17: Boston at L.A., 9 p.m.

Tuesday’s box Lakers 91, Celtics 84 L.A. LAKERS (91) Artest 1-4 0-0 2, Gasol 5-11 3-6 13, Bynum 3-9 3-3 9, Fisher 6-12 4-4 16, Bryant 10-29 8-8 29, Walton 1-1 0-0 2, Odom 5-5 1-1 12, Brown 2-3 0-0 4, Farmar 1-2 0-0 2, Vujacic 00 2-2 2. Totals 34-76 21-24 91. BOSTON (84) Pierce 5-12 2-3 15, Garnett 11-16 3-4 25, Perkins 1-4 3-4 5, Rondo 5-10 1-4 11, R.Allen 0-13 2-2 2, Wallace 1-5 0-0 2, Davis 4-5 4-5 12, T.Allen 3-4 1-2 7, Robinson 2-4 0-0 5. Totals 32-73 16-24 84. L.A. Lakers 26 26 15 24 — 91 17 23 21 23 — 84 Boston 3-Point Goals—L.A. Lakers 2-15 (Odom 11, Bryant 1-7, Farmar 0-1, Brown 0-1, Artest 0-2, Fisher 0-3), Boston 4-18 (Pierce 3-4, Robinson 1-2, Rondo 0-1, Wallace 0-3, R.Allen 0-8). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds— L.A. Lakers 48 (Gasol, Bynum 10), Boston 46 (Perkins 11). Assists—L.A. Lakers 13 (Bryant, Gasol 4), Boston 20 (Rondo 8). Total Fouls— L.A. Lakers 20, Boston 27. A—18,624 (18,624).

NHL Playoffs STANLEY CUP FINALS Game 1: Chicago 6, Philadelphia 5 Game 2: Chicago 2, Philadelphia 1 Game 3: Philadelphia 4, Chicago 3 (OT) Game 4: Philadelphia 5, Chicago 3 Game 5: Chicago 7, Philadelphia 4 Wednesday: Chicago at Philadelphia, 8 p.m. Friday: Philadelphia at Chicago, 8 p.m

ML Baseball Leaders NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTING—Prado, Atlanta, .325; Byrd, Chicago, .319; Polanco, Philadelphia, .319; Zimmerman, Washington, .316; Freese, St. Louis, .313; Pujols, St. Louis, .311; Guzman, Washington, .311. RUNS—Kemp, Los Angeles, 47; Prado, Atlanta, 44; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 43; BPhillips, Cincinnati, 42; Uggla, Florida, 41; Braun, Milwaukee, 40; KJohnson, Arizona, 40; Utley, Philadelphia, 40. RBI—McGehee, Milwaukee, 45; Cantu, Florida, 44; Glaus, Atlanta, 44; Pujols, St. Louis, 44; Howard, Philadelphia, 43; Reynolds, Arizona, 42; Ethier, Los Angeles, 40; Rolen, Cincinnati, 40; CYoung, Arizona, 40. HITS—Prado, Atlanta, 81; Braun, Milwaukee, 71; Byrd, Chicago, 69; BPhillips, Cincinnati, 69; Headley, San Diego, 68; Howard, Philadelphia, 67; Kemp, Los Angeles, 67; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 67. DOUBLES—Werth, Philadelphia, 23; Byrd, Chicago, 21; BPhillips, Cincinnati, 19; Cantu, Florida, 18; KJohnson, Arizona, 18; 6 tied at 17. TRIPLES—SDrew, Arizona, 6; Victorino, Philadelphia, 6; AEscobar, Milwaukee, 5; Morgan, Washington, 5; Bay, New York, 4; Olivo, Colorado, 4; Pagan, New York, 4; JosReyes, New York, 4; Stubbs, Cincinnati, 4; Venable, San Diego, 4. HOME RUNS—Hart, Milwaukee, 15; Pujols, St. Louis, 14; Rolen, Cincinnati, 14; AdGonzalez, San Diego, 13; Reynolds, Arizona, 13; Uggla, Florida, 13; KJohnson, Arizona, 12; Zimmerman, Washington, 12. STOLEN BASES—Bourn, Houston, 19; JosReyes, New York, 14; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 13; Victorino, Philadelphia, 13; Morgan, Washington, 12; Stubbs, Cincinnati, 12; Venable, San Diego, 12. PITCHING—Jimenez, Colorado, 11-1; Silva, Chicago, 8-0; Pelfrey, New York, 8-1; Wainwright, St. Louis, 8-3; Halladay, Philadelphia, 8-3; Clippard, Washington, 83; DLowe, Atlanta, 8-5. STRIKEOUTS—Lincecum, San Francisco, 89; Haren, Arizona, 88; Wainwright, St. Louis, 85; Gallardo, Milwaukee, 84; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 80; Dempster, Chicago, 79; Jimenez, Colorado, 78. SAVES—Capps, Washington, 19; HBell, San Diego, 16; FCordero, Cincinnati, 16; BrWilson, San Francisco, 15; Lindstrom, Houston, 14; Broxton, Los Angeles, 14; Marmol, Chicago, 12; FRodriguez, New York, 12; Dotel, Pittsburgh, 12; Nunez, Florida, 12. AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING—Cano, New York, .370; Morneau, Minnesota, .362; ISuzuki, Seattle, .347; MiCabrera, Detroit, .344; Beltre, Boston, .333; Guerrero, Texas, .330; Butler, Kansas City, .325. RUNS—Youkilis, Boston, 51; Cano, New York, 43; Gardner, New York, 42; MiCabrera, Detroit, 41; Crawford, Tampa Bay, 41; Andrus, Texas, 40; JBautista, Toronto, 40. RBI—MiCabrera, Detroit, 52; Guerrero, Texas, 49; Longoria, Tampa Bay, 46; JBautista, Toronto, 45; Cano, New York, 45; ARodriguez, New York, 43; Konerko, Chicago, 41; Ordonez, Detroit, 41. HITS—Cano, New York, 85; ISuzuki, Seattle, 82; Jeter, New York, 75; MYoung, Texas, 75; Beltre, Boston, 74; Butler, Kansas City, 74; AJackson, Detroit, 74. DOUBLES—VWells, Toronto, 21; Morneau, Minnesota, 20; TorHunter, Los Angeles, 19; FLewis, Toronto, 19; Longoria, Tampa Bay, 19; Pedroia, Boston, 19; Cano, New York, 18. TRIPLES—Crawford, Tampa Bay, 4; Span, Minnesota, 4; Boesch, Detroit, 3; Cuddyer, Minnesota, 3; DeJesus, Kansas City, 3; Gardner, New York, 3; AJackson, Detroit, 3; AdJones, Baltimore, 3; Maier, Kansas City, 3; Youkilis, Boston, 3. HOME RUNS—JBautista, Toronto, 18; MiCabrera, Detroit, 17; Konerko, Chicago, 17; VWells, Toronto, 15; Guerrero, Texas, 13; JGuillen, Kansas City, 13; Morneau, Minnesota, 13; Wigginton, Baltimore, 13. STOLEN BASES—RDavis, Oakland, 23; Pierre, Chicago, 23; Gardner, New York, 20; Andrus, Texas, 18; Crawford, Tampa Bay, 18; Rios, Chicago, 18; ISuzuki, Seattle, 18. PITCHING—PHughes, New York, 8-1; Price, Tampa Bay, 8-2; Buchholz, Boston, 8-3; Pettitte, New York, 7-1; Lester, Boston, 7-2; Slowey, Minnesota, 7-3; Talbot, Cleveland, 7-4. STRIKEOUTS—RRomero, Toronto, 86; JerWeaver, Los Angeles, 83; Lester, Boston, 81; FHernandez, Seattle, 79; JShields, Tampa Bay, 78; Liriano, Minnesota, 76; Morrow, Toronto, 74. SAVES—RSoriano, Tampa Bay, 15; NFe-

liz, Texas, 15; Rauch, Minnesota, 15; Gregg, Toronto, 14; MRivera, New York, 13; Papelbon, Boston, 13; Soria, Kansas City, 13.

Standings American League East Division W L Pct GB Tampa Bay 38 20 .655 — New York 36 22 .621 2 Boston 35 25 .583 4 1 Toronto 33 26 .559 5 ⁄2 Baltimore 16 42 .276 22 Central Division W L Pct GB Minnesota 34 24 .586 — Detroit 30 27 .526 31⁄2 Chicago 24 33 .421 91⁄2 Kansas City 24 35 .407 101⁄2 Cleveland 21 36 .368 121⁄2 West Division W L Pct GB Texas 31 27 .534 — Los Angeles 32 28 .533 — Oakland 30 29 .508 11⁄2 Seattle 23 35 .397 8 Tuesday’s Games Boston 3, Cleveland 2 N.Y. Yankees 12, Baltimore 7 Tampa Bay 9, Toronto 0 Texas 7, Seattle 1 Detroit 7, Chicago White Sox 2 Minnesota 7, Kansas City 3 L.A. Angels at Oakland, 10:05 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Boston (Buchholz 8-3) at Cleveland (Masterson 1-5), 7:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 5-3) at Baltimore (Tillman 0-1), 7:05 p.m. Toronto (Marcum 5-2) at Tampa Bay (Price 8-2), 7:10 p.m. Seattle (Snell 0-4) at Texas (C.Wilson 4-3), 8:05 p.m. Detroit (Porcello 4-5) at Chicago White Sox (F.Garcia 5-3), 8:10 p.m. Kansas City (Davies 4-4) at Minnesota (Pavano 5-6), 8:10 p.m. L.A. Angels (J.Saunders 4-6) at Oakland (Braden 4-5), 10:05 p.m.

Tuesday’s boxes

Tampa Bay 000 171 00x—9 E—Mccoy (1). Dp—Tampa Bay 1. Lob— Toronto 3, Tampa Bay 9. 2b—Longoria (19). Hr—C.Pena 2 (11). IP H R ER BB SO Toronto Tallet L,1-2 4 6 5 5 1 3 4 4 4 2 1 12⁄3 R.Lewis 1 0 0 1 3 Janssen 11⁄3 Purcey 1 1 0 0 0 1 Tampa Bay 2 0 0 1 6 Niemann W,6-0 9 Tallet pitched to 4 batters in the 5th. HBP—by Tallet (S.Rodriguez), by Niemann (A.Hill). T—2:54. A—12,937 (36,973).

Tigers 7, White Sox 2 Detroit

Chicago ab r h bi ab r h bi AJcksn cf 5 0 0 0 Pierre lf 4 0 2 0 Damon dh 4 1 1 0 Vizquel 3b 4 0 0 0 Rburn lf 3 2 2 1 Rios cf 4 0 1 0 Kelly lf 1 0 1 0 Konerk 1b 2 1 2 0 MiCarr 1b 4 1 0 0 Kotsay dh 4 1 1 2 Boesch rf 5 1 2 3 Quentin rf 4 0 0 0 Guilln 2b 5 1 3 2 Przyns c 4 0 1 0 Inge 3b 5 0 2 0 AlRmrz ss 4 0 1 0 Avila c 3 0 0 0 Bckhm 2b 4 0 0 0 Santiag ss 4 1 2 0 Totals 39 713 6 Totals 34 2 8 2 Detroit 000 001 600—7 Chicago 000 200 000—2 E—Inge (4), Beckham (6). Dp—Detroit 1, Chicago 1. Lob—Detroit 9, Chicago 7. 2b— Raburn 2 (7), Konerko (9). Hr—Boesch (6), C.Guillen (3), Kotsay (6). Sb—Pierre (23), Rios (18). Cs—Pierre (6). IP H R ER BB SO Detroit 5 7 2 2 2 2 Galarraga Thomas W,3-0 2 0 0 0 0 0 Zumaya 1 1 0 0 0 0 Valverde 1 0 0 0 0 0 Chicago Floyd 6 6 1 1 2 8 3 5 5 2 1 Thornton L,2-3 1⁄3 3 1 1 0 1 Linebrink 12⁄3 Williams 1 1 0 0 0 0 WP—Galarraga. T—2:59. A—20,776 (40,615).

Standings

Twins 7, Royals 3 Kansas City Minnesota ab r h bi ab r h bi Pdsdnk lf 3 0 0 1 Span cf 5 0 2 2 Kendall c 4 0 0 0 Tolbert 2b 4 1 1 1 DeJess rf 4 0 1 0 Mauer c 3 1 1 0 BButler 1b 4 1 0 0 Mornea 1b 4 0 0 0 JGuilln dh 4 1 2 1 Cuddyr rf 4 1 2 1 Cllasp 3b 4 0 0 0 Kubel dh 4 1 2 3 Aviles 2b 4 0 2 1 DlmYn lf 4 1 1 0 Maier cf 3 1 1 0 Valenci 3b 4 2 3 0 YBtncr ss 4 0 1 0 Punto ss 3 0 0 0 Totals 34 3 7 3 Totals 35 7 12 7 Kansas City 000 000 012—3 Minnesota 300 211 00x—7 E—B.Butler (3), Cuddyer (1). Lob—Kansas City 6, Minnesota 7. 2b—Dejesus (16), J.Guillen (10), Kubel (7). Hr—Kubel (7). S— Punto. Sf—Podsednik. IP H R ER BB SO Kansas City Greinke L,1-8 5 9 6 6 1 6 Texeira 1 2 1 1 1 1 V.Marte 1 0 0 0 0 1 D.Hughes 1 1 0 0 0 2 Minnesota Slowey W,7-3 7 3 0 0 0 3 1 2 1 1 0 0 Al.Burnett 2 ⁄3 2 2 0 1 0 Mijares 0 0 0 0 0 Guerrier S,1-3 1⁄3 WP—Texeira. T—2:45. A—38,970 (39,504).

Rangers 7, Mariners 1 Seattle

Texas h bi ab r h bi 0 0 Andrus ss 5 1 3 2 0 0 MYong 3b 5 1 1 0 2 0 J.Arias 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kinsler 2b 3 1 0 0 0 0 ABlanc 3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 Guerrr dh 5 1 1 2 2 1 Hamltn lf 3 1 1 2 0 0 DvMrp rf 3 0 1 0 0 0 Smoak 1b 2 1 1 1 MRmrz c 3 1 0 0 Borbon cf 4 0 1 0 34 7 9 7 Totals 31 1 4 1 Totals Seattle 000 100 000—1 Texas 200 003 20x—7 E—Jo.Wilson (5), Andrus (9). Lob—Seattle 6, Texas 9. 2b—Ro.Johnson (5), Andrus (8), Hamilton (17). Hr—Guerrero (13). Cs— Ro.Johnson (1). IP H R ER BB SO Seattle F.Hrnndez L,3-5 6 8 7 7 3 5 Olson 1 0 0 0 1 1 C.Cordero 1 1 0 0 0 0 Texas C.Lewis W,5-4 7 4 1 1 3 5 Ray 1 0 0 0 0 0 O’Day 1 0 0 0 0 0 F.Hernandez pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. HBP—by F.Hernandez (Hamilton, Kinsler). T—2:40. A—18,774 (49,170). ab ISuzuki rf 4 Bradly dh 4 FGtrrz cf 4 JoLpz 3b 3 Carp 1b 4 JWilsn ss 4 RJhnsn c 4 MSndrs lf 2 Figgins 2b 2

r 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

Yankees 12, Orioles 7 New York Baltimore ab r h bi ab r h bi Jeter ss 4 1 1 0 Lugo 2b 4 2 1 0 Russo 3b 1 0 0 0 MTejad 3b 5 1 3 0 Swisher rf 6 2 3 5 Markks rf 5 1 2 2 Teixeir 1b 4 2 3 2 Wggntn 1b 5 1 2 1 Rdrgz 3b 5 0 0 0 Scott dh 4 1 2 0 R.Pena ss 1 0 0 0 AdJons cf 5 1 1 2 Cano 2b 4 2 3 0 Wieters c 5 0 3 1 Posda dh 3 1 0 0 Montnz lf 4 0 1 1 Grndrs cf 5 2 2 4 CIzturs ss 4 0 0 0 Cervelli c 3 1 1 0 Gardnr lf 4 1 2 1 Thams lf 1 0 0 0 Totals 41121512 Totals 41 7 15 7 New York 204 000 600—12 Baltimore 000 210 022— 7 E—Wigginton (8). Dp—New York 1, Baltimore 1. Lob—New York 10, Baltimore 9. 2b— Swisher (13), Markakis (15). Hr—Swisher (10), Teixeira (9), Granderson (4), Ad.Jones (7). Sb—Granderson (5). IP H R ER BB SO New York P.Hughes W,8-1 6 9 3 3 0 4 1 1 0 0 0 2 D.Robertson Gaudin 2 5 4 4 2 1 Baltimore Millwood L,0-7 52⁄3 10 6 6 5 6 1 ⁄3 0 0 0 0 0 Mata 1 ⁄3 3 4 4 1 1 Hendrickson 2 ⁄3 2 2 2 0 0 Albers A.Castillo 2 0 0 0 2 2 WP—Millwood, Hendrickson. T—3:34. A—23,171 (48,290).

Red Sox 3, Indians 2 Boston

Cleveland h bi ab r h bi 0 0 Crowe cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 Choo rf 3 1 2 0 1 0 Kearns lf 4 0 0 0 3 1 Peralta 3b 4 0 0 0 1 1 Branyn 1b 3 0 0 0 2 0 Duncan dh 4 1 1 1 1 1 Valuen 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 Marson c 2 0 0 0 0 0 AMarte ph 1 0 0 0 1 0 Rdmnd c 0 0 0 0 Donald ss 2 0 0 0 Hafner ph 1 0 1 0 AHrndz ss 0 0 0 0 32 2 4 1 Totals 35 3 9 3 Totals Boston 000 300 000—3 Cleveland 100 000 100—2 E—Beltre (11), Crowe (2). Dp—Cleveland 2. Lob—Boston 8, Cleveland 5. 2b—Youkilis (16), Beltre (17), Hall (4), Hafner (10). 3b— Choo (2). Hr—Duncan (1). Sb—Youkilis (2), A.Hernandez (1). IP H R ER BB SO Boston 1 4 2 1 0 6 Wkefield W,2-4 7 ⁄3 1 ⁄3 0 0 0 1 0 Okajima H,6 0 0 0 0 0 R.Ramirez H,2 1⁄3 D.Bard S,2-5 1 0 0 0 1 2 Cleveland D.Huff L,2-7 6 8 3 0 1 6 1 0 0 0 0 11⁄3 J.Lewis Sipp 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 C.Perez 12⁄3 Sipp pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. HBP—by C.Perez (D.McDonald). T—2:56. A—15,462 (45,569). ab Sctaro ss 5 Pdroia 2b 4 VMrtnz c 4 Youkils 1b 4 D.Ortiz dh 3 Beltre 3b 4 Hall lf 3 J.Drew rf 1 Camrn cf 4 DMcDn lf 3

r 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0

Rays 9, Blue Jays 0 Toronto

ab FLewis lf 4 A.Hill 2b 3 Lind dh 3 V.Wells cf 3 JBautst rf 3 Overay 1b 3 J.Buck c 3 Ecrnc 3b 3 McCoy ss 3 Totals 28 Toronto

r 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Tampa Bay h bi ab r h bi 0 0 BUpton cf 4 2 2 0 0 0 SRdrgz 2b 4 1 1 0 1 0 Longori 3b 5 1 3 2 0 0 Zobrist rf 5 0 1 0 0 0 WAyar dh 5 1 2 2 0 0 Shppch c 4 1 0 0 0 0 Pena 1b 3 2 2 5 0 0 Kapler lf 4 0 1 0 1 0 Brignc ss 3 1 0 0 2 0 Totals 37 9 12 9 000 000 000—0

National League East Division W L Pct GB Atlanta 33 25 .569 — Philadelphia 31 26 .544 11⁄2 New York 31 27 .534 2 Florida 28 31 .475 51⁄2 1 Washington 28 31 .475 5 ⁄2 Central Division W L Pct GB St. Louis 33 25 .569 — 1 ⁄2 Cincinnati 33 26 .559 Chicago 26 32 .448 7 Milwaukee 24 34 .414 9 Pittsburgh 23 35 .397 10 Houston 23 36 .390 101⁄2 West Division W L Pct GB Los Angeles 34 24 .586 — San Diego 34 24 .586 — San Francisco 32 25 .561 11⁄2 Colorado 30 28 .517 4 Arizona 23 35 .397 11 Tuesday’s Games Philadelphia 10, Florida 8 Washington 5, Pittsburgh 2 N.Y. Mets 2, San Diego 1, 11 innings San Francisco 3, Cincinnati 0 Milwaukee 3, Chicago Cubs 2 Houston 4, Colorado 3 Atlanta at Arizona, 9:40 p.m. St. Louis at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Florida (Jo.Johnson 6-2) at Philadelphia (Halladay 8-3), 7:05 p.m. Pittsburgh (Lincoln 0-0) at Washington (Lannan 2-3), 7:05 p.m. San Diego (Latos 5-4) at N.Y. Mets (J.Santana 4-2), 7:10 p.m. San Francisco (J.Sanchez 4-4) at Cincinnati (Harang 4-5), 7:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Zambrano 1-4) at Milwaukee (Wolf 4-5), 8:10 p.m. Houston (F.Paulino 1-7) at Colorado (Cook 2-3), 8:40 p.m. Atlanta (Kawakami 0-8) at Arizona (I.Kennedy 3-3), 9:40 p.m. St. Louis (Wainwright 8-3) at L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 5-3), 10:10 p.m.

Tuesday’s boxes Giants 3, Reds 0 San Francisco Cincinnati ab r h bi ab r h bi Torres cf 4 0 1 0 OCarer ss 3 0 0 0 Snchz 2b 3 0 0 0 BPhllps 2b 4 0 3 0 Sndovl 3b 4 0 2 0 Votto 1b 3 0 0 0 A.Huff rf 3 0 0 0 Rolen 3b 4 0 2 0 Uribe ss 5 1 1 1 Bruce rf 4 0 0 0 Burrell lf 4 0 2 0 L.Nix lf 4 0 1 0 Schrhlt rf 1 1 0 0 Heisey cf 3 0 0 0 Posey 1b 3 1 1 0 Masset p 0 0 0 0 Ishikw 1b 0 0 0 0 DelRsr p 0 0 0 0 BMolin c 4 0 1 1 Gomes ph 1 0 0 0 Cain p 4 0 2 1 RHrndz c 3 0 0 0 LeCure p 2 0 1 0 Ondrsk p 0 0 0 0 Rhodes p 0 0 0 0 Stubbs cf 1 0 0 0 32 0 7 0 Totals 35 310 3 Totals San Francisco 000 100 020—3 Cincinnati 000 000 000—0 Dp—San Francisco 1, Cincinnati 2. Lob— San Francisco 12, Cincinnati 7. 2b—Torres (17), Burrell (2), B.Phillips (19), Rolen (14), Lecure (1). Hr—Uribe (9). Cs—B.Phillips (6). IP H R ER BB SO San Francisco Cain W,5-4 9 7 0 0 2 5 Cincinnati Lecure L,1-2 6 5 1 1 4 3 2 ⁄3 1 0 0 1 0 Ondrusek 2 ⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 Rhodes 2 ⁄3 3 2 2 1 1 Masset Del Rosario 1 1 0 0 1 1 T—2:50. A—13,011 (42,319).

Mets 2, Padres 1 (11) San Diego New York ab r h bi ab r h bi Eckstn 2b 5 0 1 0 JosRys ss 4 1 2 1 Headly 3b 4 1 2 0 Pagan cf 5 0 2 0 AGnzl 1b 5 0 1 1 Bay lf 5 0 0 0 Hairstn lf 5 0 0 0 I.Davis 1b 5 1 1 1 Hundly c 4 0 0 0 DWrght 3b 4 0 2 0 Venale rf 4 0 0 0 Barajs c 4 0 0 0 HrstnJr ss 4 0 0 0 Francr rf 4 0 1 0 Gwynn cf 4 0 1 0 RTejad 2b 3 0 1 0 Richrd p 1 0 0 0 Carter ph 1 0 0 0 Zwdzk ph 1 0 1 0 FRdrgz p 0 0 0 0 Adams p 0 0 0 0 PFelicn p 0 0 0 0 Grgrsn p 0 0 0 0 Dessns p 0 0 0 0 Salazar ph1 0 0 0 Pelfrey p 3 0 0 0 Mujica p 0 0 0 0 Cora 2b 1 0 0 0 Totals 38 1 6 1 Totals 39 2 9 2 San Diego 100 000 000 00—1 New York 000 000 100 01—2 No outs when winning run scored. E—Richard (1), D.Wright (7). Dp—San Diego 1. Lob—San Diego 6, New York 8. 2b— Ad.Gonzalez (10), Zawadzki (2), D.Wright (14). 3b—Pagan (4). Hr—Jos.Reyes (2), I.Davis (7). Sb—Pagan (11), D.Wright (11). S—Headley, Richard. IP H R ER BB SO San Diego Richard 7 7 1 1 1 6 1 0 0 0 0 1 Adams Gregerson 1 0 0 0 0 3 Mujica L,2-1 1 2 1 1 0 1 New York Pelfrey 9 5 1 1 0 6 1 0 0 0 0 2 F.Rodriguez 2 ⁄3 1 0 0 0 0 P.Feliciano 1 0 0 0 0 1 Dessens W,1-1 ⁄3 Mujica pitched to 1 batter in the 11th. T—3:02. A—30,086 (41,800).

Phillies 10, Marlins 8 Florida

Philadelphia ab r h bi ab r h bi Coghln lf 5 1 2 2 Victorn cf 4 2 1 1 Snchz 1b 5 2 2 1 Polanc 3b 4 1 1 0 Hensly p 0 0 0 0 Utley 2b 3 3 2 1 Tnkrsly p 0 0 0 0 Howard 1b 4 2 2 2 HRmrz ss 5 1 2 2 BFrncs rf 4 2 2 2 Cantu 3b 5 0 1 1 Ibanez lf 5 0 4 2 Uggla 2b 5 0 0 0 WValdz ss 5 0 1 2 C.Ross cf 3 1 0 0 C.Ruiz c 3 0 0 0 Stanton rf 5 2 3 0 Kndrck p 2 0 0 0 RPauln c 5 1 2 1 Gload ph 1 0 0 0 Volstad p 1 0 0 0 Durbin p 0 0 0 0 Sanchs p 0 0 0 0 Dobbs ph 1 0 0 0 Bonifac ph1 0 0 0 Contrrs p 0 0 0 0 Sosa p 0 0 0 0 Lidge p 0 0 0 0 VndnHr p 0 0 0 0 Helms 3b 1 0 1 1 Totals 41 813 8 Totals 3610 1310 Florida 112 200 110— 8 Philadelphia 003 121 03x—10 E—Uggla (5), H.Ramirez (7), Howard (7), K.Kendrick (3). Dp—Florida 2. Lob—Florida 9, Philadelphia 10. 2b—Cantu (18), R.Paulino (9). 3b—Coghlan (2), Helms (1). Hr— G.Sanchez (5), H.Ramirez (9), Victorino (10), Howard (10). Sb—B.Francisco (1). S—Vol-

SALISBURY POST stad. Sf—Utley.

IP H R ER BB SO Florida Volstad 4 8 6 5 3 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 Sanches Sosa 1 2 1 1 1 0 VandenHurk 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 ⁄3 0 2 2 1 1 Hnsley L,1-3 2 ⁄3 3 1 1 0 0 Tankersley Philadelphia K.Kendrick 5 6 6 5 1 4 2 3 1 1 0 2 Durbin Cntreras W,3-2 1 2 1 1 0 2 Lidge S,3-3 1 2 0 0 1 2 Volstad pitched to 4 batters in the 5th. HBP—by Hensley (Utley). WP—Volstad. T—3:14. A—44,098 (43,651).

Brewers 3, Cubs 2 Chicago

Milwaukee h bi ab r h bi 0 0 Weeks 2b 3 1 2 0 2 0 Gomez cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 Fielder 1b 3 1 0 0 2 1 Braun lf 4 0 0 0 1 0 McGeh 3b 4 0 1 2 0 0 Hart rf 3 1 1 1 1 0 AEscor ss 3 0 0 0 2 0 Kottars c 3 0 0 0 0 0 Gallard p 2 0 0 0 0 1 Villanv p 0 0 0 0 0 0 Edmnd ph 1 0 0 0 Axford p 0 0 0 0 Totals 34 2 8 2 Totals 30 3 5 3 Chicago 000 000 011—2 Milwaukee 000 000 012—3 Two outs when winning run scored. Dp—Chicago 1, Milwaukee 1. Lob—Chicago 8, Milwaukee 3. 2b—S.Castro (2). Hr— Hart (15). Sb—Fukudome (4), Weeks (4), Gomez (8). IP H R ER BB SO Chicago 8 4 1 1 0 8 Lilly 2 ⁄3 1 2 2 1 0 Marmol L,1-1 Milwaukee Gallardo 7 4 0 0 2 7 1 2 1 1 1 1 Villanueva Axford W,2-1 1 2 1 1 0 1 HBP—by Marmol (Weeks). T—2:32. A—30,082 (41,900). ab Theriot 2b 5 Fukdm rf 4 D.Lee 1b 2 Colvin lf 4 Byrd cf 4 Fntent 3b 4 K.Hill c 4 Castro ss 4 Lilly p 2 ASorin ph 1 Marml p 0

r 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0

Astros 4, Rockies 3 Houston

Colorado h bi ab r h bi 2 0 CGnzlz cf 5 1 2 0 2 1 S.Smith lf 4 1 1 0 0 1 Tlwtzk ss 3 1 2 2 3 1 Hawpe rf 4 0 2 1 0 0 Olivo c 4 0 1 0 0 0 Helton 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 Mora 3b 3 0 1 0 0 1 Brmes 2b 2 0 0 0 1 0 Stewart ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 JHerrr pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 Francis p 2 0 0 0 0 0 Belisle p 0 0 0 0 1 0 FMorls p 0 0 0 0 RBtncr p 0 0 0 0 Giambi ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 35 410 4 Totals 32 3 9 3 Houston 000 100 120—4 Colorado 300 000 000—3 Dp—Houston 4, Colorado 2. Lob—Houston 4, Colorado 7. 2b—Keppinger (17), Ca.Lee (9), Tulowitzki (16), Mora (4). Sb— Berkman (2). Cs—Olivo (3). IP H R ER BB SO Houston Moehler 6 9 3 3 3 4 1 0 0 0 0 1 W.Lpez W,3-0 Lyon H,10 1 0 0 0 0 1 Lndstrm S,14-17 1 0 0 0 1 1 Colorado Francis 7 7 2 2 0 1 1 ⁄3 2 2 2 0 0 Belisle L,1-2 1 ⁄3 0 0 0 0 0 F.Morales 1 0 0 0 1 R.Betancourt 11⁄3 HBP—by Moehler (Tulowitzki). Balk— Moehler, Belisle. T—2:38. A—26,201 (50,449). ab Kpngr 2b 4 Mnzell ss 4 Brkmn 1b 4 Ca.Lee lf 4 Lyon p 0 Lndstr p 0 Pence rf 4 P.Feliz 3b 4 Michals cf 4 Cash c 4 Moehlr p 2 WLopez p 0 Bourn cf 1

r 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

Late Monday Dodgers 12, Cardinals 4 St. Louis Los Angeles ab r h bi ab r h bi FLopez 3b3 0 2 2 Furcal ss 5 1 2 2 B.Ryan ss 4 0 0 0 Kemp cf 4 1 2 1 4 1 1 0 Pujols 1b 4 0 0 0 Ethier rf Hollidy lf 3 0 0 0 MnRmr lf 3 1 1 0 Stavinh lf 1 0 0 0 RJhnsn lf 2 1 2 0 Ludwck rf 4 2 2 2 Loney 1b 2 2 0 0 Winn cf 3 1 2 0 Bellird 3b 3 2 2 1 Scmkr 2b 3 1 1 0 DeWitt 2b 3 2 2 5 LaRue c 4 0 0 0 A.Ellis c 4 1 1 1 Hwksw p 1 0 0 0 Mnstrs p 2 0 0 0 Freese ph 1 0 0 0 JuMillr p 0 0 0 0 Walters p 1 0 0 0 GAndrs ph 1 0 1 1 Miles ph 1 0 0 0 Link p 0 0 0 0 Totals 33 4 7 4 Totals 3312 14 11 St. Louis 010 000 300— 4 Los Angeles 200 440 20x—12 Dp—St. Louis 3, Los Angeles 1. Lob—St. Louis 5, Los Angeles 5. 2b—F.Lopez (7), Winn (1), Furcal (7), Man.Ramirez (8), G.Anderson (3). Hr—Ludwick 2 (9), Dewitt (1). Sb— F.Lopez (4), Winn (1), Furcal (9), Belliard (1). S—Monasterios. Sf—Dewitt. IP H R ER BB SO St. Louis Hwksworth L,0-3 4 7 6 6 3 5 Walters 4 7 6 6 3 1 Los Angeles Mnastrios W,3-0 6 4 3 3 3 0 1 2 1 1 0 1 Ju.Miller Link 2 1 0 0 0 1 Monasterios pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. WP—Hawksworth. PB—LaRue. T—2:46. A—44,876 (56,000).

Transactions BASEBALL Major League Baseball MLB—Suspended New York Yankees minor league pitcher Angel Rincon (Dominican Summer League), free agent pitcher Edgar Alexander Estanga and free agent pitcher Hector Garcia 50 games apiece for violating the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program. American League CLEVELAND INDIANS—Designated INF Mark Grudzielanek for assignment. Purchased the contract of INF Anderson Hernandez from Columbus (IL). DETROIT TIGERS—Announced the resignation of director of player development Glenn Ezell. Named vice president-assistant general manager Al Avila interim director of player development. MINNESOTA TWINS—Placed 2B Orlando Hudson on the 15-day DL. Activated RF Michael Cuddyer from the bereavement list. National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS—Selected the contract of RHP Blaine Boyer from Reno (PCL). Designated RHP Saul Rivera fro assignment. FLORIDA MARLINS—Designated INF Mike Lamb for assignment. Called up OF Mike Stanton from Jacksonville (SL). WASHINGTON NATIONALS—Recalled RHP Stephen Strasburg from Syracuse (IL). Activated C Ivan Rodriguez from the 15-day DL. Designated Jamie Burke for assignment. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association NBA BOARD OF GOVERNORS—Approved the sale of the Washington Wizards to an enterprise controlled by Ted Leonsis. PHOENIX SUNS—Announced F Grant Hill has exercised the one-year player option of his contract. FOOTBALL National Football League BUFFALO BILLS—Signed OL Kyle Calloway. Waived DB Stephan Virgil. CAROLINA PANTHERS—Signed LB Thomas Davis and CB Richard Marshall to one-year tenders. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS—Signed TE Aaron Hernandez. COLLEGE basketball F Evan Ravenel is transferring from Boston College.

Racing Sprint Cup Through June 6 Points 1, Kevin Harvick, 2,063. 2, Kyle Busch, 2,044. 3, Denny Hamlin, 1,927. 4, Matt Kenseth, 1,893. 5, Kurt Busch, 1,881. 6, Jimmie Johnson, 1,849. 7, Jeff Gordon, 1,827. 8, Jeff Burton, 1,803. 9, Carl Edwards, 1,729. 10, Greg Biffle, 1,727. 11, Mark Martin, 1,711. 12, Clint Bowyer, 1,686. 13, Tony Stewart, 1,685. 14, Ryan Newman, 1,668. 15, Martin Truex Jr., 1,621. 16, Dale Earnhardt Jr., 1,599. 17, Joey Logano, 1,585. 18, Jamie McMurray, 1,576. 19, David Reutimann, 1,540. 20, Juan Pablo Montoya, 1,513.

Freeze, Ajayi make decisions From staff reports Carson catcher Tyler Freeze has signed with Pfeiffer’s baseball program, while East Rowan guard Phillip Ajayi will continue his basketball career at Pfeiffer. Stories are upcoming.

 American Legion baseball Billy Nantz hit a two-out, three-run homer in the top of the ninth to lift Mooresville to a 12-9 win at Cherryville on Tuesday night. A.J. Nelson was the winner for the Moors (9-2) in the non-division game, while Kyle Altizer picked up his third save. Michael Gatton belted a three-run homer. Catawba signee Chris Dula had a solo shot and three hits for the winners.

 Wachovia Cup winners East Rowan took Wachovia Cup honors in the NPC for overall athletic excellence, with first-place spring finishes in baseball, softball and boys and girls track. Statesville placed second in Cup points. West Rowan was third, with Carson fourth and South Rowan sixth.  Salisbury dominated the spring season in the CCC with championships in boys golf, tennis and track and girls soccer and won the league Cup. West Davidson was runner-up.  North Rowan finished eighth in the YVC in the Wachovia Cup race. East Montgomery won Cup honors for the league.  Jay M. Robinson finished first in the Cup competition in the SPC. Concord finished second. Northwest Cabarrus was fourth. A.L. Brown was fifth.  Mount Tabor took honors in the CPC. R.J. Reynolds finished second. Davie was fifth. See Scoreboard for all the standings.

 Hurley Y programs Registration ends for summer programs on June 18. Programs offered include:  Summer basketball, boys, ages 8-13, Mondays and Thursdays, starting June 21  Coed indoor soccer, ages 5-11, Tuesdays and Fridays, starting June 22  T-Ball clinic, boys and girls, ages 4-7, offered on June 21, 22, 24, 28 and 29, July 1, 6:307:30 p.m.  Coed T-Ball, ages 4-7, Mondays and Thursdays, starting July 5  Coed Coach Pitch, ages 6-9, Tuesdays and Fridays, starts July 6  Offensive skills and scoring basketball camp, with coach Paul Hoover, June 21-22. Coed youth camp, ages 8-12, 9-noon. Coed teen camp, ages 13-17, 1-4 p.m. Contact John Peterson at 704-636-0111 or jpeterson@rowanymca.com.

 Homeschool Monarchs The Mecklenburg Homeschool Monarchs Basketball Program is looking for home education athletes ages 11-18 to fill its middle and high school boys basketball teams. Contact the Monarchs at 704-267-9374 or mecklenburghomeschool@yahoo.com.

 North basketball camp North Rowan varsity girls basketball coach Tony Hillian will direct a camp on June 22-24 from 8-noon daily at the North Rowan High Gym. The cost is $25. Registration dates at North are June 10 (68 p.m.), June 13 (4-6 p.m.), June 17 (6-8 p.m.) and June 21 (11-3 p.m.). Contact Hillian at 704202-7275 or tonyhillian@gmail.com.

! Intimidators lose For the fourth time this season, the Savannah Sand Gnats walked off with an extra-innings victory against Kannapolis. The Sand Gnats pulled out an 8-7, 10-inning decision on Tuesday in the finale of a fourgame series. Nick Ciolli went 4-for-5 for the Intimidators.

UCLA wins softball title Associated Press

OKLAHOMA CITY — Andrea Harrison hit a grand slam, Megan Langenfeld homered for the third time in two games and UCLA put on a record-setting offensive show to beat Arizona 15-9 Tuesday night and win its 11th Women’s College World Series title. Julie Burney and Samantha Camuso also homered for the Bruins (50-11) as a matchup of college softball’s two most successful programs turned into a home run derby. Stacie Chambers went deep twice and Lini Koria hit a solo shot for Arizona (52-14) as the teams combined to set a World Series record with seven long balls in the game. Ten of the 29 previous World Series didn’t have that many home runs during the entire event. But in this new offensive era, the championship trophy is headed back to a familiar place. It’s the first title for UCLA since the program won back-to-back trophies in 2003-04, and the first won by fourth-year coach Kelly Inouye-Perez. She won three NCAA championships as a catcher for the Bruins between 1989 and 1992. A 12th title for the Bruins, won in 1995, was later vacated due to NCAA rules infractions. The 24 runs scored in the game were five more than in any previous World Series game. Langenfeld was voted the event’s Most Outstanding Player after going 12 for 17.


SPORTS DIGEST

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2010 • 3B

Coach K salary was $4 million

Panthers’ LaFell prepared to block Associated Press

The NFL notebook ... CHARLOTTE — Rookie Brandon LaFell gets an earful each time he’s around new Panthers teammate Jonathan Stewart. In Carolina, blocking is not optional for a receiver. So if LaFell hopes to replace Muhsin Muhammad as a starter, he’ll have to open holes downfield for Stewart and DeAngelo Williams, the first teammates since the 1970 merger to each rush for over 1,100 yards. While the former LSU star’s head is spinning in optional workouts this month as he scrambles to learn the NFL, LaFell is confident he can be the big target, strongblocking receiver opposite Steve Smith after Carolina decided not to re-sign Muhammad. The 23-year-old LaFell also has the added motivation of trying to prove a lot of teams wrong for falling into the third round of the draft. MORE PANTHERS CHARLOTTE — Carolina Panthers restricted free agent linebacker Thomas Davis and cornerback Richard Marshall have signed their one-year tenders. Tuesday’s signings come hours after Davis appeared to tweak his surgically repaired right knee. The starting linebacker had been participating in the optional workouts this month under an injury waiver. Davis will make $3.268 million this season. Marshall, a starting cornerback, will make $1.759 million. Both players would have

been unrestricted free agents if NFL owners hadn’t decide to end the collective bargaining agreement after this season. That put new rules into place that made Davis and Marshall restricted free agent with few options. The Panthers made no attempt to sign either player to a long-term deal. REVIS RETURNS NEW YORK — All-Pro cornerback Darrelle Revis returned to practice with the New York Jets on Tuesday, despite not having a new contract in place. Revis was back for the voluntary practice session in a good-faith gesture after sitting out last Thursday amid a contract dispute. He has only missed that practice this offseason, and was not fined because it was voluntary. HENRY UPDATE CHARLOTTE — A toxicology report found no alcohol in Chris Henry’s system after the Cincinnati Bengals receiver died in December from a fractured skull and other head injuries in what’s been ruled an accident. The full autopsy and toxicology reports were released by the Mecklenburg County medical examiner’s office on Tuesday, nearly six months after Henry died when he came out of the back of a pickup truck driven by his fiancee. No traces of alcohol were found. The toxicology report didn’t include any other tests for drugs. Witnesses told police Henry jumped into the back of the moving vehicle driven by Loleini Tonga in the driveway of her family

Big Ten, Kansas sits and sweats. A pullout by the Huskers and Tigers could result in the collapse of the Big 12 and strip Kansas, Kansas State and Iowa State of the safety and privileges of membership in a Bowl Championship Series conference.

Associated Press

ASSOCIATED PRESS

New York Jets head coach Rex Ryan threw out the first pitch at Citi Field during a Mets game recently. home in Charlotte on the morning of Dec. 16 during a domestic dispute. It remains unclear if Henry jumped or fell out of the truck while it was traveling about 19 mph on a windy road about a mile from the home. Henry was declared brain dead 18 hours later. He was 26. Tonga, who claimed in an interview with ESPN that Henry jumped from the truck, was not charged. SAINTS VISIT FORT JACKSON, La. — A Who Dat Nation weary from the worst-ever U.S. oil

spill set aside its misery for a few hours Tuesday to schmooze with the Super Bowl-champion New Orleans Saints. Along the main highway to Fort Jackson in Plaquemines Parish, coach Sean Payton, team owner Tom Benson and some players passed “Who Dat?” banners that sprouted where anti-BP signs had stood. A crowd packed the fort, which has been a staging area for cleaning birds rescued from the oil flowing from BP’s well in the Gulf of Mexico.

DURHAM — A retired Duke University financial executive has surpassed Mike Krzyzewski as the highest-paid person by the school — for one year, anyway. The Associated Press on Tuesday obtained Duke’s most recent IRS documents for the fiscal year that ended June 30, 2009. Krzyzewski received nearly $4.2 million in total compensation in 2008-09 with a base salary of nearly $2 million and about $1.8 million in bonuses and incentives, according to the IRS Form 990 documents filed last month. Nearly $420,000 was listed as deferred compensation. The Hall of Fame coach annually ranks as the highest-paid employee at the school, which has a longstanding policy of not discussing contracts or salaries. The documents also show football coach David Cutcliffe was paid nearly $1.6 million.

GOLF

ORLANDO, Fla. — Tiger Woods will return Down Under to defend his title at the Australian Masters. Woods announced on his website Tuesday that he will play the Australian Masters on Nov. 11-14. He won the event last year at Kingston Heath for his 82nd title worldwide. It also gave him a victory on every continent in which golf is played.

NHL

PHILADELPHIA — In a city where the Stanley Cup drought is 49 years and ticking, the temptation is to say it’s OK to win the silver trophy at home. Win it in front of the rowdy home fans. Win it with “Chelsea Dagger” roaring through the stadium in an endless loop. Win it and keep partying right into the parade down past City Hall. It’s tempting, for sure. It’s just not necessarily ideal. The Chicago Blackhawks lead the Philadelphia Flyers 3-2 in the Stanley Cup finals. The Blackhawks can win their first championship since the days of Bobby Hull and Stan Mikita in 1961 in Game 6 on Wednesday.

JILTED?

LAWRENCE, Kan. — For the Kansas Jayhawks and their proud basketball heritage, all this could not be more demeaning. All of a sudden, Kansas’ status as a major player in college athletics has been placed in the hands of Nebraska and — humiliation of humiliations — archrival Missouri. While those two decide whether to abandon the Big 12 for the more lucrative

Pelfrey is terrific again

Logano getting tough

and no walks. The 6-foot-7 right-hander is 4-0 with a The National League 1.19 ERA in his last five roundup ... starts. NEW YORK — Ike Davis Phillies 10, Marlins 8 homered in the 11th inning PHILADELPHIA — Ben and Mike Pelfrey turned in Francisco hit a two-run sinanother terrific outing for gle with two outs in the New York, which won its eighth inning to help ninth straight home game. Philadelphia rally. Davis started the 11th Brad Lidge pitched out of with a long drive into the a bases-loaded jam in the second deck in right field off ninth for his third save in Edward Mujica (2-1) for his three tries. seventh homer. The rookie Giants 3, Reds 0 first baseman was mobbed CINCINNATI — Matt by his teammates at home Cain pitched a seven-hitter plate after New York’s latest for his second shutout of the dramatic win at Citi Field. season and singled home a Pelfrey allowed one run run in the eighth inning to and five hits in nine innings, lead San Francisco. finishing with six strikeouts Cain (5-4) subdued the

CHARLOTTE — Joey Logano made it clear on pit road at Pocono that he’s sick and tired of being pushed around. It’s about time. Logano, the scrawny new kid on the playground, finally stood up to one of the neighborhood bullies by essentially telling Kevin Harvick he was done playing nice. If the confrontation following Sunday’s race wasn’t enough to make his point, Logano followed up with three pointed shots at the veteran driver in a live television interview. One of them was about Harvick’s wife! Who knew the kid had it in him? After all, it was long overdue display of backbone for Logano, who likely earned a fair share of respect for finally standing up for himself after a season-and-a-half of being polite. Problem is, his newfound moxie has been somewhat overshadowed by the presence of Daddy. Ah, yes, Tom Logano. Back in the center of the storm. The elder Logano learned a hard lesson last year, when NASCAR pulled his credential for entering pit road to confront Greg Biffle following the Nationwide Series race at California. He was angry at how Biffle had raced his son, who only two weeks earlier had rolled his car seven times in a spectacular accident at Dover. Young Joey was clearly

Associated Press

NL’s most prolific offense — Brandon Phillips had three of Cincinnati’s hits. Astros 4, Rockies 3 DENVER — Carlos Lee had three hits, including a tie-breaking RBI single in the eighth inning, and Houston rallied from a three-run deficit. Colorado starter Jeff Francis left after seven innings with a 3-2 lead but the Rockies’ bullpen could not protect it. Brewers 3, Cubs 2 MILWAUKEE — Casey McGehee hit a two-run single with two outs in the ninth inning to rally Milwaukee. Facing Cubs reliever Car-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Mets starting pitcher Mike Pelfrey (34) winks as he is greeted after leaving the field during the ninth inning. los Marmol with runners on second and third and the Brewers trailing by one, McGehee rolled a single up the middle to score Rickie Weeks and Prince Fielder. Marmol (1-1) had six straight save opportunities.

Big inning lifts Tigers over White Sox Associated Press

The American League roundup ... CHICAGO — Far from perfect this time, Armando Galarraga was long gone when Brennan Boesch and Carlos Guillen hit back-to-back homers in a six-run seventh inning to lift the Detroit Tigers to a 7-2 victory over the Chicago White Sox on Tuesday night. The centerpiece of a national story when a blown call against Cleveland last week spoiled a perfect game, Galarraga had a relatively uneventful night. He was cheered on his way to the mound and allowed two runs and seven hits in five innings. Rays 9, Blue Jays 0 ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Strug-

gling slugger Carlos Pena homered twice and drove in five runs to back unbeaten Jeff Niemann’s two-hit pitching as Tampa Bay beat Toronto. Yankees 12, Orioles 7 BALTIMORE — Curtis Granderson hit a grand slam, Nick Swisher homered and drove in five runs, and New York cruised past Baltimore. Red Sox 3, Indians 2 CLEVELAND (AP) — Tim Wakefield bounced back from two rough outings and became Boston’s career leader in innings pitched, leading the Red Sox over Cleveland. Wakefield (2-4) gave up four hits and one earned run in 7 1-3 innings to reach 2,777 innings with Boston, one more than Roger Clemens worked in a

Red Sox uniform. Rangers 7, Mariners 1 ARLINGTON, Texas — Colby Lewis allowed four hits over seven innings and Vladimir Guerrero homered to help Texas beat Felix Hernandez. Lewis (5-4) had lost four of his previous five decisions before getting back on track against the Mariners. Elvis Andrus went 3 for 5 with two RBIs for the Rangers, who ended a two-game skid. Twins 7, Royals 3 MINNEAPOLIS — Zack Greinke was hit hard again, and Kansas City never recovered from its first-inning deficit in a loss to Kevin Slowey and Minnesota. Slowey (7-3) allowed three hits.

Cavs confirm contract offer to Izzo Associated Press

The NBA notebook ... CLEVELAND — LeBron James can pick his next team. If it’s the Cleveland Cavaliers, he won’t be selecting their coach. That was the powerful message from Cavaliers owner Dan Gilbert, who refused to comment Tuesday on reports he has offered a massive contract to Michigan State’s Tom Izzo and adamantly denied that James, the twotime MVP now on free agency’s doorstep, has been running Cleveland’s franchise.

Gilbert added that James will not be consulted during the team’s coaching search. HILL COMING BACK PHOENIX — The Phoenix Suns say veteran forward Grant Hill has exercised the one-year player option on his contract and will return to the team next season. The 16-year veteran and seven-time All-Star averaged 11.3 points and 5.5 rebounds last season. Hill has played the last four seasons in Phoenix, averaging 12.1 pointswhile playing 233 of a possible 246 regularseason games. Last season, he became

shaken following that wreck, and his post-accident demeanor raised questions about his mettle. It didn’t help that TV cameras caught Tom Logano making a panicked sprint to the care center, painting a picture of a scared little boy in need of his father. It was probably an unfair characterization, but bigtime pro sports can be cutthroat and Joey Logano endured a decent dose of whispering about the back-toback incidents and the role of his father, the overzealous protector. Yet there he was again on Sunday at Pocono, where he was the second to reach Joey’s car after he was spun by Harvick in the closing laps. The first was a Joe Gibbs Racing crewman, who made an honest effort to keep the driver from wading into the sea of yellow-clad team members who had formed a barrier around Harvick. What happened next is up for interpretation, but multiple replays seemed to show the father encouraging his son to confront Harvick with both a gesture and what appeared to be a shout of “Go Ahead!” Joey Logano never got that close to Harvick, but he was red-faced and shouting, behavior never before seen in NASCAR from the polite 20-year-old. At some point in all the commotion, Tom Logano apparently shoved a television reporter out of his way, an action that earned the father his own trip to the NASCAR hauler.

Associated Press

the 18th active player to score 15,000 points. • Amare Stoudemire says he will opt out of the final year of his contract if he doesn’t re-sign with the Phoenix Suns before then. Stoudemire, speaking at his basketball camp Tuesday, said he deserves a maximum contract and would like it to be with Phoenix, where he has played since he was drafted out of high school in 2002. The All-Star power forward said there was “no chance” he would exercise the final year of his contract with the Suns, which would pay him $17 million.

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Baby Items Trek Firefly Jogging Stroller. Brand new! Sharp colors - red, black, & gray. Folds easily. Non-swivel front wheel. Ex. storage & plastic rain protection. Lists for $449. Sell for $250. 336-909-3122

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We had looked everywhere. Then we looked at the Classified section of the Salisbury Post.

Growing Pains Family Consignments Call (704)638-0870 115 W. Innes Street

Electronics Desktop computer, HP tower, 19” fat screen monitor, Lexmart x485 printer, keyboard, speakers, mouse $100.00 Call 704-209-6460

Exercise Equipment Elliptical exerciser, Horizon Fitness, Club Series CSE2. Sold new for $1,000. Asking $450. Used very little. Sue at 704-633-7167 7pm-10pm Elliptical exerciser: Horizon Fitness, Club Series CSE2. Sold new for $1,000. Asking $450. Used very little. 704-6337167 from 7-10 pm. Ask for Sue.

Farm Equipment & Supplies

A REAL GEM!

Furniture & Appliances For Sale: Youth Oak bedroom furniture / dresser w/mirror, chest of drawers and night stand. Great condition! $250.00 Call 704-640-7009. Mattress Overstock: Sets start at T-$119, F-$149, Q-$159, K-$239. Warranties, delivery option. 704-677-6643

Nice

Kitchen table, blonde wood with white tile inlay and 4 wooden chairs. 60 x 30. Good condition. $175.00 704-209-3282 Range, GE ($75) & Dishwasher ($50) - $100 for set. Almond/black. 704-855-3669. Refrigerator, 20.5 cu. ft., double door w/icemaker, bisque, GE, great condition $200.704-279-4106

SOLD

I sold my bedroom suite the first day! I was delighted! ~ R.D., Salisbury

SOLD SOLD

I sold our bed, dresser, lamp & pack-n-play within 3 days! It was great!~ E.K., Salisbury

SOLD

Farm Equipment, new & used. McDaniel Auction Co. 704-278-0726 or 704798-9259. NCAL 48, NCFL 8620. Your authorized farm equipment dealer. Free Kittens! 3 males & 1 female! Ready now! Call for more information. 704-433-0118

Furniture & Appliances 1 yr old Whirlpool Washer and Dryer. White, top loading. Great condition. $400.00 704-245-8032 Air Conditioners, Washers, Dryers, Ranges, Frig. $65 & up. Used TV & Appliance Center Service after the sale. 704-279-6500 Antique bed and nightstand, mahogany $140, Frigidaire dryer, heavy duty, nice $120. 704-279-9405

And there it was. Our dream home.

BEDROOM SET QUEEN - CHERRY Moving ~ must sell! Beautiful four poster queen size bed, triple dresser/mirror, night stands. $1250. Call 704-213-7192 or email jonesel@hotmail.com

Buying or Selling? We can help make your dream a reality.

Misc For Sale

Misc For Sale

30 Country Lane numbered Brandywine collectibles. $200.00 704-2782346 before 9:00 p.m.

Over 300 pieces of Avon. Some are older. $150 OBO for all. Please call 704-209-3502

Yard Machine riding mower. 14hp, 38" cut, looks and runs great. $400. Call 704-209-1265

Amish Buggy Good condition. $500. Please call 704636-7268 for more info.

Phone. Nextel i730 Motorolla silver & black flip. Outside caller IDonly used 2 months. Like new. $29. Call Scott 704637-2322

ANDERSON'S SEW & SO, Husqvarna, Viking Sewing Machines. Patterns, Notions, Fabrics. 10104 Old Beatty Ford Rd., Rockwell. 704-279-3647

$75-$150. 3 ½ HP to 5 ½ HP. Delta 10'' miter saw, $40. 704-431-4838

BOAT FOR SALE 1997 Procraft 205 Pro. White/Teal/Mid Green, Tan Interior, Tandem Trailer w/Spare Tire & Wheel, Mercury 200 EFI, Trolling Motor, 2 Depth Finders, Hot Foot. 704-202-9548 Books. Do-It-Yourself Popular Mechanic All Collector Series 1-18. $75 obo. 704-797-9020 Chair, ladder back, $20. Rocker, $25. Like new wood file cabinet, $35. 704-680-3270

Table, walnut color w/ 2 leaves 42”x5', $49; coffee table, $45; entertainment ctr, $35. 704-932-5008

Genuine cloissaine pendants, belts, etc. with carry cases. Retail $400. 704-633-3036

Thomasville Oak China cabinet. Great condition. $300. Rockwell. 704-2797165

Keurig Elite B40 Brewer. Has extra K-Cup for your own coffee brand. Used only three months. $65. 704-633-2349

Ring. Ladies' 14K multigem ring ~ diamond, ruby, sapphire, emerald. Paid $800, will sacrifice for $199. 336-853-4798

Lawn and Garden

Come Ride It! Go Cart. 2 seater runs good, needs choke adjustment, $300. Need to sell. 704-245-9229 anytime. Holshouser Cycle Shop Lawn mower repairs and trimmer sharpening. Pick up & delivery. (704)637-2856

Medical Equipment Wheel chair, electric, Jazzy. For adults. Model # 1105. $500 or best offer. Call 704-798-1926

Lumber. 1x3x16 $2; 2x3 stud $1; 2x6x8 $3; 2x6x115 $5; double wide trusses $4; single wide trusses $8; floor trusses $5. All new! Please call 704-202-1412 or 704202-0326

METAL: Angle, Channel, Pipe, Sheet & Plate Shear Fabrication & Welding FAB DESIGNS 2231 Old Wilkesboro Rd Open Mon-Fri 7-3:30 704-636-2349

Show off your stuff!

Want to Buy Merchandise

With our

Send us a photo and description we'll advertise it in the paper for 15 days, and online for 30 days for only

30*!

$

Call today about our Private Party Special!

Salisbury Post Classifieds 704-797-4220

*some restrictions apply

Slide in oven cooktop and hood. Used. All for $60. Please call 704-6337766 for more info.

Helping dreams come true.

Clothes dryer. Electric GE, white $125. Electric Whirlpool washer $175, Reel grass mower $50. Call 704-279-4094

Free Kittens, 6 weeks old, 2 Black (F) 2 Black & White (F) 704-857-8356 Free kittens. Beautiful, long & short haired. Litter trained, friendly & playful. Need loving home. 336300-5636 or 336-7511805. LM for Brenda Free puppies, beagle/pug mix 2 mos. & 4 mos. old We also have a pup that has a disability, in need of a good home for info please call 704-639-0253 Free puppy, 7 month old female merle pit bull, call 704-402-8858

Play Time

Foosball table. In good shape. $25.00 Please call 704-928-5062

All Coin Collections Silver, gold & copper. Will buy foreign & scrap gold. 704-636-8123

Lost & Found

Snow Skis. KV COMP snow skis w/ poles. $30. Good shape. Call Scott 704-637-2322

SOLD

RFP for Transportation Services

The Rowan County Health Department requests proposals from established organizations to provide Community Health Workers responsible for delivering family support services to low-income families with infants/young children. Organizations submitting a proposal must have knowledge, capacity and experience in improving the lives of low-income families with infants and young children through a home-visiting approach. Contract is July 1, 2010 to June 30, 2011. Proposal requirements: summary of qualifications, samples of previous work, 2 references, project timeline and cost.

BOOTH RENTAL Busy salon. 704-6337535 or 980-521-6565 J.Y. Monk Real Estate School-Get licensed fast, Charlotte/Concord courses. $399 tuition fee. Free Brochure. 800-849-0932

Deadline is June 18, 2010 Please send proposals to Steve Joslin, Rowan County Health Dept., 1811 E. Innes St., Salisbury, NC 28146

Free Stuff 2 FREE dogs! 1 male & 1 female..smaller dogs, very friendly. Good with kids & other animals. Call 704-431-4054

GOING ON VACATION?

FREE 1 cat 3 kittens, to good home. We are moving. Gray and Black in color. 704-603-8454

Send Us Photos Of You with your Salisbury Post to: famous@salisburypost.com

Let us know! We will run your ad with a photo for 15 days in print and online. Cost is just $30. Call the Salisbury Post Classified Department at 704-797-4220 or email classads@salisburypost.com !

3620 Hwy 152 East, Salisbury. .73 Acre, 2,100 sq feet, 3 BR, 2.5 BA, custom built brick home, oversize garage, hardwood and tile floors throughout living areas, fresh paint, new carpet in master, plenty of storage space. $239,900. Call 704-855-1357 or email: rcmead@ctc.net

Found dog. Small black & white dog, May 27, in Rowan Mill Rd area. Call to identify. 704-857-3003

Free dogs, 1 1/2 year old Boston Terrier mix and 2 year old Retriever mix. Moving! House trained/ inside dogs, rabies UTD. 704-603-8454

Have You Seen Me?

7 month old Lab mixed puppy named Ruby. (Yellow with white feet and white stripe down nose). Very sweet. Glover road/ Faith area. Has on black collar. Please call 704-267 -7553 or 704-209-1073.

BEAUTIFUL HOME

3 BR, 2.5 BA, wood floors, large pantry, open / airy floor plan, screen porch off master BR, deck, convenient location, easy access to interstate, conditioned crawl space. B&R Realty Dale Yontz 704.202.3663

Lost & Found Found Dog. Labrador Retriever, June 2, Liberty Road. Call to identify. 704-223-2616

Free dog, to GOOD home. Full blooded 9 mo. old Jack Russell Terrier. Petey is very energetic and needs a fenced yard. Shots UTD. Call 704212-2637 before 10pm.

Free Kittens, Litterbox trained, very friendly. 1 dark grey striped and 1 white/grey (M), 1 calico (F). Needs good homes immediatey. Call 704212-2637 before 10pm.

3 BR, 2 BA. All appliances stay. Free standing gas log fireplace in master bedroom. Garden tub in masterbath. 24X30 garage with lean to. Out building with attached play house. Swingset stays. R50545A $89,900 Lesa Prince (704) 796-1811 B&R Realty

RFP for Community Outreach Worker

thebennetts1@comcast.net

Stop Smoking – Lose Weight with Hypnosis. Only $49.99 It's easy, safe, and it really works ! !!! 704-933-1982

Monument & Cemetery Lots

To provide direct (point A to point B) transportation services to low-income families with infants/young children. Organizations submitting a proposal must have capacity and experience in providing transportation services to low-income families while effectively minimizing noshow rates. Contract is July 1, 2010 to June 30, 2011. Proposal requirements: summary of qualifications, samples of previous work, 2 references, service description, cost and copy of valid insurance policy covering general and professional liability from the acts or omissions of its drivers and its employees in the minimum amount of $1,000,000 for occurrences and $2,000,000 in the aggregate. Deadline is June 18, 2009. Please send proposals to Steve Joslin, Rowan County Health Dept., 1811 E. Innes St., Salisbury, NC 28146

AVON - Buy or Sell Call Lisa 1-800-258-1815 or Tony 1-877-289-4437

STEEL, Channel, Angle, Flat Bars, Pipe Orders Cut to Length. Mobile Home Truss- $6 ea.; Vinyl floor covering- $3.85 yd.; Carpet- $5.75 yd.; Masonite Siding 4x8- $15.50. RECYCLING, Top prices paid for Aluminum cans, Copper, Brass, Radiators, Aluminum. Davis Enterprises Inc. 7585 Sherrills Ford Rd. Salisbury, NC 28147 704-636-9821

Lost dogs. Schnauzers. Male, salt-n-pepper, named Zach. Female, black, named Blessie. From West A St. in Kannapolis on May 31st. 704-793-3260

Notices

Business Opportunities

Speaker box. Holds 14” speakers. New. $65. Please call 704-212-7807 for more information.

113 Prestwick Court in Corbin Hills

Lost dog. Golden Retriever, male, June 3, Brown Acs Rd, between 52 & Fish Pond Rd., GQ area, has collar & tag. Reward offered. 704-798-3238

Notices

I sold my outside storage buildng the first day in the Salisbury Post! R.W., Salisbury

Homes for Sale

Lost Dog. English Mastiff (120 lbs.), female, 10 mos old, May 31, Cameron Glen neighborhood, brown collar w/pink pola dots, tag has vet info. 315-447-3785

2 Spaces in Rowan Memorial Park, Garden of Cross. $1,795 for both, or best offer. 6 Joining lots in Brookhill Memorial Gardens. $1,000 ea., obo. Call 704-634-2045.

Watches – and scrap gold jewelry. 704-636-9277 or cell 704-239-9298

SOLD

Free Kittens, rescued, to good homes. Please adopt a rescue. Vet checked and have received first shots and wormer. Please call 704/245-2820.

Found dog. Black & white Collie mix. In vicinity of Old Concord & Troutman Rd. White paws. Injured back leg. Call 704-506-5882

Want to buy: Motor for old John Deere 2 cylinder tractor or complete trac-tor for parts. 704-209-1442

Misc. Equipment & Supplies

2004 - 6 ½' x 10' Superior Trailer, heavy duty, w/lights. New treated 2x6 floor boards with galvenized bolts. Ladder racks and overhead racks. Excellent cond. Has title. 704-637-3679

Free Stuff

Timber wanted - Pine or hardwood. 5 acres or more select or clear cut. Shaver Wood Products, Inc. Call 704-278-9291.

Bedroom suite, new 5 piece. All for $297.97. Hometown Furniture, 322 S. Main St. 704-633-7777 Chairs. High back chairs by Loeblien Co. Very good condtion. $25 each. Call 704-433-8776

Lost & Found

AA Antiques. Buying anything old, scrap gold & silver. Will help with your estate or yard sale. 704-433-1951.

Cash for riding mowers & small garden/farm tractors. Running or not. Any salvage equipment. 704209-1442

704-797-4220

Large bronze color wall mirror & sconces, $15. Large media shelving, DVD, CD, VHS. Custom made $25 704-680-3270

Jewelry

SIG SAUER 556 SWAT Edition. New In Box Complete Includes Strobe Light and Collapsible Stock $2,000 call Ray at 704-433-4022

Roach Belt Conveyor for sale. Variable spd motor. Works fine. $400.00 704-433-7949

Bike, 26" women's Huffy Cranbrook Comfort Cruis-er. Used very little neon blue. $60 firm. 704-209-1680

$35; ea; $35; $45; 704-

White Kitchen Table w/4 chairs $200 obo. Kitchenaid Prof. 6 mixer with attachments $185.00 Call 704-245-8843

Sporting Goods

Push Mowers, 3.

Freezer compressor (2) 86 model 5hp 3 phase in good condition, large fans, $4,000 OBO. (Ran 16x24 freezer) 704-6420129 lv msg.

Table, cafe type, chairs, stuffed $2 Dresser 3 drawer corner cabinet, Chrome lamp $45. 932-5008 Massey Ferguson 135 is a 1966 4 cylinder Continental gas with power steering, runs good, "All the bells & whistles." $3700.00 Call 704-773-4886 or 704932-2217

Misc For Sale

Home Builders Spencer C. Lane Construction-Quality Home Builder Custom & Spec Homes 704-633-4005

Homes for Sale

1123 Edgedale Drive. 3 BR, 1 BA brick home. New HVAC. Energy Saving Windows. Fenced Back Yard. 2 Carports. REALTORS WELCOME. $94,900. 704-202-0505

BUYER BEWARE The Salisbury Post Classified Advertising staff monitors all ad submissions for honesty and integrity. However, some fraudulent ads are not detectable. Please protect yourself by checking the validity of any offer before you invest money in a business opportunity, job offer or purchase.

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C42147

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CLASSIFIED

SALISBURY POST Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Bank Foreclosures & Distress Sales. These homes need work! For a FREE list:

OLDE SALISBURY

www.applehouserealty.com

Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Lake Property

3 BR. 2 BA. Stack stone fireplace, REAL HARDWOODS, ceramic and carpet, maple cabinets, GRANITE countertops, chair railing galore, split bedrooms for privacy, Enormous back deck, Completion date 07/30/2010 STILL MAY PICK COLORS!! Monica Poole 704.245.4628 B&R Realty East Rowan

REDUCED

Faith. 1145 Long Creek. 3 Beds, 2 Baths, 2 Bonus Rooms. Master on main, Hardwood and ceramic tile floors. Storage everywhere. $219,900. Kerry, Key Real Estate 704-857-0539. Directions: Faith Rd to L on Rainey. R into Shady Creek.

SUNDAY 3PM-5PM Rockwell. 2 BR, 1 BA, hardwood floors, detached carport, handicap ramp. $99,900 R47208 B&R Realty 704.633.2394

High Rock Lake, Cute waterfront log home that has 75' water frontage. Beautiful waterfront view! 1 1/2 story home in Summer Place. Roof painted 3 yrs ago. Dale Yontz B&R Realty 704.202.3663

Land for Sale Below appraised value, 10 private acres, small creek, possible pond site, financing avail., must see, Call Now! 704-563-8216

$3,000 TOWARDS CLOSING COST Covington Heights. 309 Lochshire Ln. Woodleaf. 3BR, 2BA. 1,254 sq. ft. home built in 2002. New heating & air unit. ½ acre lot w/privacy fence. All appliances included. Wood laminate floors. Contact Michelle at 704-267-5120 or boogamom@gmail.com

Genesis Realty 704-933-5000 genesisrealtyco.com Foreclosure Experts

HEATED POOL

Salisbury

We’ll print and distribute over 22,000 copies of your ad every week! Salisbury. 2 or 3 bedroom Townhomes. For information, call Summit Developers, Inc. 704-797-0200

Land for Sale

Faith. 7 Acres. Pasture, woods and creek. 175 ft road frontage. $70,000. Call 704-279-9542 W. Rowan 1.19 acs. Old Stony Knob Rd. Possible owner financing. Reduced: $19,900. 704-640-3222

Woodleaf (Covington Heights), 602 Lockshire Lane, all brick, 3BR/2BA, enclosed & screened in breezeway, large deck in back overlooking woods, double garage, pull down stairs with floored in storage above garage, wrap around porch, gas fireplace, hardwood floors, master BR w/walk-in closet & BA w/separate shower & tub. $149,900. MOVE IN READY! 704-278-9779

1 Hr to/from Charlotte, NC nr Cleveland & Woodleaf and 3 Interstates: I-40, I77, I-85. Restricted, no mobile or mod. Very rural, mostly wooded. Good hunting, deer, small game. Frontage on Hobson Rd., 2nd gravel driveway beside 2075 Hobson Rd mailbox. Interior very secluded, a real sanctuary from cities. Needs to be sold this year. Owner phone: 336-766-6779, or E-mail to: hjthabet@cs.com See photos and directions at: http://NCHorseCountryFarmland.com

Homes for Sale

New Construction

Lots for Sale East Rowan

*will be similar to photo

2 homes plus pool house on property. Main house: 4 BR, 3.5 BA, 3483 sq ft. Guest house: 1295 sq ft, 3 Br, 1 BA, attached garage. Detached 24x28 garage and 2 other outbuildings. Concrete pool w/waterfall. B&R Realty Dale Yontz 704.202.3663

2110 Chantilly Lane, Olde Salisbury. Hurry! Get $8,000 tax credit. Cute 3BR, 2BA. 2-car garage. Very nice area w/ payments as low as $724/mo. Financing Avail. No closing costs! Vickie 704-213-3537 Salisbury

REDUCED

HOME FOR SALE WITH HUGE SHOP 129 Chapel Court, Salisbury, two story, 1+ acre w/ wooded lot in back, 1,562 sq. feet, 3 BR, 2 BA, 2 car garage plus 32 x 32 detached shop with bonus room, home office, closet built-ins, heated with natural gas, well water, new stainless steel appliances, fireplace, great neighborhood for families on street with cul-de-sac. West Rowan schools. $155,000. Call 704-798-1040

3 BR, 2.5 BA, nice wood floors. Range, microwave, refrigerator, dishwasher, garbage disposal, washer, dryer, gas logs, outbuilding. 1 yr home warranty. $1,500 carpet allowances. R49933A $195,500 B&R Realty Dale Yontz 704.202.3663

Kannapolis 3BR/2BA. Everything fresh. Just recently remodeled. 1.2 acs of land, 1 car garage. Nice neighborhood. Close to the new research facility. $129,000. 704245-2765

Mt. Ulla. 1 mile from Millbridge Elementary. 4BR, 2BA. Doublewide on 1 acre private lot. Approx. 1,640 sq. ft. New carpet. Open floor plan. Very spacious. Kitchen has parquet floors, ceramic sinks in baths & kitchen. Large bedrooms w/walk-in closets. Dish and cable available. Dishwasher, refrigerator & stove. $79,900. 704-857-9495 or 704-223-1136

New Home

Salisbury, 3BD/2 BA, 1582 Sq.Ft. Wonderful remodel, New Carpet, Fresh Paint, New Appliances, New Fixtures, THIS ONE IS SPECIAL! Only $109,900. #50515 Call Jim: 704-223-0459 Key Real Estate Inc. 1755 US HWY. 29 South China Grove, NC. 28023

Homes for Sale Salisbury

Homes for Sale

Home Warranty

3 BR, 1½ BA, 1100 sq. ft., new carpet, 24x36 double garage with attic storage & fan. Large backyard perfect for garden, pool or fun and games! Low taxes! Reduced to $121,000!

Beautifully Remodeled And Newly Landscaped Home!

1.5 ACRE LOT. Level & partially wooded. Perked in 2006 for 3BR home. Pretty land and area. $29,500 Call Ashley at Ashley Shoaf Realty. 704-633-7131

www.AshleyShoafRealty.com

Manufactured Home Sales A TREE PARADISE

15 minutes N. of Salisbury. 2001 model singlewide 3 bdr/2 bath on large treed lot in quiet neighborhood. $1,200 start-up, $475/month includes lot rent, home payment, taxes, insurance. RENT or RENTTO-OWN. 704-2108176.

Real Estate Commercial

Spencer, Huge Renovated 4BR / 2BA, Hardwood & Tile Floors, Large Fenced Back Yard 108 2nd Street. $99,999. 704-202-0091 #910644

West Rowan. 3BR, 2½BA. Newly remodeled 2 story. Vinyl siding w/ shutt-ers. Approx. 1,600-1,800 sq.ft. Garage with opener. Kitchen w/new appliances, energy efficient windows, new flooring hardwood/car-pet. New heat/AC unit, Trane. Big backyard w/20x 20 deck, wired storage bldg 16x20, playground. Schools: Hurley, SE, West. $165,000. Call Ron 704-636-4887

Arey RealtyREAL Service in Real Estate 704-633-5334 www.AreyRealty.com

www.bentleyrealtyinc.com Info@bentleyrealtyinc.com

Century 21 Towne & Country 474 Jake Alexander Blvd. (704)637-7721 Forest Glen Realty Darlene Blount, Broker 704-633-8867 KEY REAL ESTATE, INC. 1755 U.S. HWY 29. South China Grove, NC 28023 704-857-0539 Rebecca Jones Realty 610 E. Liberty St, China Grove 704-857-SELL

www.rebeccajonesrealty.com

Rowan Realty www.rowanrealty.net, Professional, Accountable, Personable . 704-633-1071 US Realty 516 W. Innes, Salisbury 704-636-9303

www.USRealty4sale.com

William R. Kennedy Realty 428 E. Fisher Street 704-638-0673

ALEXANDER PLACE

China Grove, 3 homes available: 2 under construction, 1 move in ready. All 3 BR, 2 BA. Call for details. $109,900 to $114,900 B&R Realty 704.633.2394

OFFICE SPACE

Granite Quarry

Employment

Drivers

Employment Automotive

Mechanic needed. Must have 8-10 years experience, have own tools. Must be able to do it all! Salary negotiable. Apply in person: Granite Auto Parts, 303 N. Salisbury Ave., Granite Quarry.

$10 to start. Earn 40%. 704-637-3440 or 704278-2399

OTR drivers

CDL-A and 3 yrs exp req'd. Clean MVR. Apply in person to Trinity Transport, 317 Green Needles Rd, Lexington. 336-956-6200 EDUCATION/ TRAINING Tumbling Coach, PT must have Level 4 or above experience. Cheerleading skills a plus. references required. Apply and/or inquire-Stars Cheerleading 336-247-1768, 625 Corporate Circle Healthcare

Childcare/Domestics

House Manager/Nanny needed full-time. Must be a good driver, take the initiative, & be energetic. For a very busy, non-smoking, Christian family. Salary to be negotiated. Benefits possible. Send resume/letter of interest to: Blind Box 379, c/o The Salisbury Post, PO Box 4639, Salisbury, NC 28145. Drivers

Drivers Wanted Full or part time. Req: Class A CDL, clean MVR, min. 25 yrs old w/3 yrs exp. Benefits: Pd health & dental ins., 401(k) w/match, pd holidays, vac., & qtrly. bonus. New equip. Call 704630-1160

North Rowan

www.AshleyShoafRealty.com

Color backgrounds as low as $5 extra* 704-797-4220

Restaurant/Food Service

HIRED We had a tremendous reponse to our ad with qualified applicants! ~ H.T., Salisbury

HIRED

Now Hiring FT & PT Management Flexible Hours Apply in Person: 301 Faith Road

HIRED We had over 200 applicants at our Job Fair thanks to our advertisement in the Salisbury Post! It was very successful. ~ A.A.

HIRED

WIFE FOR HIRE needs FULL TIME WORKER Serious minded only apply. Must be hard worker. U.S. Citizen Non-smoker only. Will be drug tested and criminal background check.

Salisbury. Off 13th St. Huge lot. Could be nice home, too. Conveniently located. 1200+ sq. ft. with lots of extras. Call our office for more information. C48040. $129,900. B&R Realty 704-6332394

Leave brief message

Local Drivers Home nights and weekends. Piedmont Transportation, headquartered in Salisbury, is looking for local drivers. Must have a Class A CDL, Hazmat, minimum three years current experience and a clean MVR. Apply at 200 Montclair Dr. EOE M/F

Drivers

Hiring Event CLASS-A CDL DRIVERS $5,000 Team Sign-on Bonus Local - Home Daily Earn up to $1000 per week or more with great benefits

WHEN Tues., June 15th & Wed., June 16th 9am-4pm

THE MASON & DIXON Lines Experienced Owner/Ops Wanted. Daily Settlements. No Forced Dispatch, Fuel Discount Programs, Flatbed & Van Divisions. Contact Donna 877-2421276. dreynolds@madl.com

WHERE

D.M. Bowman, Inc. Terminal 12801 Mt. Holly-Huntersville Road Huntersville, NC

Call: 800-609-0033

Or apply online: www.joindmbowman.com Equal Opportunity Employer

18 acres with frontage on Highway 29 at Piper Lane. Income producing property with 64,000 sq ft of warehouse space. Rowan Corporation 704.636.0556

Prime Property • Pay your subscription online: salisburypost.com/renew • Place a vacation hold: salisburypost.com/subscription

4BR/3BA in Timber Run. Approx. 4,000 SF brick home in established neighborhood, oversized 2 car garage, bonus room, walk-in closet in master BR, beautiful hardwood floors, 2 gas log fireplaces, Rinnai tankless water heater, generator, fenced in back yard, finished walk-out basement, storage area & workshop. E. Rowan Schools. Mins. away from I-85 & shopping $369,000. Call Tina at 980-234-2881

Salisbury - City block (minus service station) for sale at Statesville and Innes, including many buildings, INCOME PRODUCING, fronts 4 streets, 46,000 SQ FT, 2.7 acres. Priced below tax value. Rowan Corporation 704.636.0556

• Send any comments: salisburypost.com/subscription

Homes for Sale

Timothy G. Livengood, REALTOR Mid Carolina Real Estate, LLC. 206 E Fisher! (704) 202-1807

China Grove. 2785 Hwy 152. 2,100 heated sq. ft. 4BR, 2BA on .72 acres. $219,900. 704-640-5428

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY, 3pm-5pm

Brick ranch 1840 sq. ft. built in 1915. 2BR, 2BA & basement. Currently utilized as a Bed & Breakfast. $105,000. Ashley at Ashley Shoaf Realty. 704-633-7131

Make Your Ad Pop!

*some restrictions apply

CNA's NEEDED Primary Health Concepts, Jake Alexander Blvd., 704-637-9461

WHAT TOOK YOU A LIFETIME TO LEARN CAN BE LOST IN MINUTES.

Salisbury. Forest Creek. 3 Bedroom, 1.5 bath. New home priced at only $98,900. R48764 B&R Realty 704.633.2394

Lawncare Company needs PT help. Would be responsible for weed eating and trimming. Approx 30 hrs/ week. $9/hr. Must have experience. 704239-1563

704-633-9295

Drivers

Prime Property 3BR/1½ BA brick home. Kitchen, D/R, L/R + bonus room. All new stainless steel appliances, new washer & dryer, cement drive, new roof, H/W floors in kitchen, D/R & hall, rest of house has new carpet. $129,900. Owner will pay closing costs. 704-202-2343

Employment

Drivers

Downtown Salis, 2300 sf office space, remodeled, off street pking. 633-7300

Kannapolis/Rowan County

1,540 Sq. Ft. 3BR, 2BA. Walk-in closets, formal dining room, alarm system, central air, new paint, carpet & flooring ~ immaculate throughout. True modular (not a doublewide). To be moved from present location & priced accordingly at $92,000. 704-636-2732

Real Estate Services

Real Estate Commercial

Call Cathy Griffin at 704-213-2464

Unusual Opportunity

Salisbury Area 3 or 4 bedroom, 2 baths, $500 down under $700 per month. 704-225-8850

Bentley Julian Realty 704-938-2530

25 Acres Beautiful Land for Sale by Owner

Salisbury E. Area 5BR / 2BA, spacious & charm-ing older home with 2,500 sq.ft. Great neighborhood in rural setting, but close to town, I-85, High Rock Lake & Dan Nicholas Park. Builtin china cabinet, french doors, hardwood/carpet. Large partially fenced yard w/mature shade trees, large deck, carport and storage bldg. 704-6421827 lv msg.

American Homes of Rockwell Oldest Dealer in Rowan County. Best prices anywhere. 704-279-7997

www.bostandrufty-realty.com

www.dreamweaverprop.com

Forest Abbey. 3BR, 2½BA with upgrades, formal dining & breakfast. Cul-de-sac lot, basement with storage. Gorgeous! $248,900. (980) 521-7816

3BR, 2BA DW on 4 + acre. Own for less than $750/mo. Call 980-6217760 or 704-985-6832

B & R REALTY 704-633-2394

REDUCED

Salisbury, Adorable bungalow close to shopping and I-85. Two bedrooms one bath with a nice lot. Home has been remodeled and is charming. $76,900. Dream Weaver Properties of NC LLC 704-906-7207

Manufactured Home Sales $500 Down moves you in. Call and ask me how? Please call (704) 225-8850

OPEN SUNDAY 2-4 PM

CHINA GROVE Salisbury, New Home 3 BR. 2 BA. REAL HARDWOODS, Gorgeous kitchen, stainless appliances, vaulted ceiling in great room! Pretty front porch, even has a 1 car garage! Pick your own colors. Monica Poole 704.245.4628 B&R Realty

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2010 • 5B

China Grove. 335 Wellington Dr. Custom Built. 2,900 heated sq. ft. 4BR, 3 ½ BA on 1 acre lot. $344,900. 704-640-5428

WITH A STROKE, TIME LOST IS BRAIN LOST. Learn the warning signs at StrokeAssociation.org or 1-888-4-STROKE

©2004 American Heart Association Made possible in part by a genereous grant from The Bugher Foundation

C44624


CLASSIFIED

6B • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2010

AUCTIONS can be promoted in multiple markets with one easy and affordable ad placement. Your ad will be published in 114 NC newspapers for only $330. You reach 1.7 million readers with the North Carolina Statewide Classified Ad Network. Call this newspaper's classified department or visit www.ncpress.com Carolina's Auction Rod Poole, NCAL#2446 Salisbury (704)633-7369 www.thecarolinasauction.com

DONATE YOUR VEHICLE Receive $1000 Grocery Coupon. United Breast Cancer Foundation. Free Mammograms, Breast Cancer info: www.ubcf.info. Free Towing, Tax Deductible, Non-Runners Accepted, 1-888-468-5964. Heritage Auction Co. Glenn M.Hester NC#4453 Salisbury (704)636-9277 www.heritageauctionco.com

Job Seeker meeting at 112 E. Main St., Rockwell. 6:30pm Mons. Rachel Corl, Auctioneer. 704-279-3596 KEN WEDDINGTON Total Auctioneering Services 140 Eastside Dr., China Grove 704-8577458 License 392 NC Waterfront Homes, Lot, Boat Slips, Near Charlotte, Huge Discounts, Low Taxes, No Snow, Great Schools, Auction 6/22/10. Iron Horse Auction, 910-997-2248, www.ironhorseauction.com.

R. Giles Moss Auction & Real Estate-NCAL #2036. Full Service Auction Company. Estates ** Real Estate Had your home listed a long time? Try selling at auction. 704-782-5625 www.gilesmossauction.com

Rowan Auction Co. Professional Auction Services: Salis., NC 704-633-0809 Kip Jennings NCAL 6340. Tony McBride Auction Your Full Service Auction Co. One Piece/Entire Estate. 704-791-5625. NCAL 6894

Drywall Services

Heating and Air Conditioning

Lippard Garage Doors Installations, repairs, electric openers. 704636-7603 / 704-798-7603

OLYMPIC DRYWALL & PAINTING COMPANY

Piedmont AC & Heating Electrical Services Lowest prices in town!! 704-213-4022

For All Your Drywall & Painting Needs Residential & Commercial

704-279-2600 Since 1955

We Build Garages, 24x24 = $12,500. All sizes built! ~ 704-633-5033 ~

Child Care and Nursery Schools Experienced Home Child Care 6 wks-11 yrs 6am-6pm Reasonable rates Convenient to I-85 & Salisbury Call Michelle 704-603-7490

Loving childcare center. Openings available 7 days a week 1st and 2nd shifts. Educated, loving staff. DSS vouchers accepted. Ages 6 wks-12 yrs old. Summer Program also. Call 704-637-3000

Cleaning Services !!!!! Residential & Commercial Free Estimates References available Call Zonia 704-239-2770 C.R. General Cleaning Service. Comm. & residential. Insured, Bonded. Spring Cleaning Specials! 704-433-1858 www.crgeneral.com

Do U work 2 hard?

Let me help! I clean houses & I'm good at it. VERY reasonable. 20 yrs. FREE estimates. Make tomorrow better by calling me today! 704-279-8112

Wife For Hire Inc.,

olympicdrywall@aol.com olympicdrywallcompany.com

Fencing Free Estimates Bud Shuler & Sons Fence Co. 225 W Kerr St 704-633-6620 or 704-638-2000 Price Leader since 1963

Reliable Fence All Your Fencing Needs, Reasonable Rates, 21 years experience. (704)640-0223

Perry's Overhead Doors Sales, Service & Installation, Residential / Commercial. Wesley Perry 704-279-7325

“We can remove bankruptcies, judgments, liens, and bad loans from your credit file forever!” The Federal Trade Commission says companies that promise to scrub your credit report of accurate negative information for a fee are lying. Under federal law, accurate negative information can be reported for up to seven years, and some bankruptcies for up to ten years. Learn about managing credit and debt at ftc.gov/credit. A message from the Salisbury Post and the FTC.

Grading & Hauling Beaver Grading Quality work, reasonable rates. Free Estimates 704-6364592 Grading, Clearing, Hauling, and Topsoil. Please Call 704-633-1088

Mocksville 133 Avgol Dr. 50x100 (5,000 sq. ft.) commercial metal building on 1.1 ac, 3 phase electrical, 3 bay doors, office, breakroom, zoned HC (Highway Commercial). Extra nice $219,000. Call 336-391-6201

Resort & Vacation Property

Myrtle Beach. 3BR/2BA “K” condo/rancher FOR SALE in Seagate Village at former Myrtle Beach Air Force base. Minutes from Market Commons. Call 704-425-7574

Wanted: Real Estate *Cash in 7 days or less *Facing or In Foreclosure *Properties in any condition *No property too small/large Call 24 hours, 7 days ** 704-239-2033 ** $$$$$$ Are you trying to sell your property? We guarantee a sale within 1430 days. 704-245-2604

Apartments

1, 2, & 3 BR Huge Apartments, very nice. $375 & up. 704-890-4587

A HANDYMAN & MOORE Kitchen & Bath remodeling Quality Home Improvements Carpentry, Plumbing, Electric Clark Moore 704-213-4471

Granite & solid surface for kitchens & baths, cultured marble vanity tops, tubs & enclosures, standard & custom walk-in showers. FREE ESTIMATES!

Brisson - HandyMan Home Repair, Carpentry, Plumbing, Electrical, etc. Insured. 704-798-8199 Browning ConstructionStructural repair, flooring installations, additions, decks, garages. 704-637-1578 LGC

Professional Services Unlimited Licensed Gen. Contractor #17608. Complete contracting service specializing in foundation & structural floor repairs, basement & crawlspace waterproofing & removal, termite & rot damage, ventilation. 35 yrs exper. Call Duke @ 704-6333584. Visit our website: www.profession-

Kitchens, Baths, Sunrooms, Remodel, Additions, Wood & Composite Decks, Garages, Vinyl Rails, Windows, Siding. & Roofing. ~ 704-633-5033 ~

Call Curt LeBlanc today for Free Estimates

20 Different Units 1-3BR, $300-$695 Chambers Realty 704-637-1020 2BR, 1BA apt at Willow Oaks. All electric. No pets. Rent $425, Dep. $400. Call Rowan Properties, 704-633-0446 2BR, 1BA apt. Very large. Has gas heat. We furnish refrig, stove, yard maint, and garbage pick up. No pets. Rent $425. Deposit $400. Call Rowan Properties 704633-0446

Apartments

Apartments

Airport Rd., 1BR with stove, refrig., garbage pickup & water incl. Month-month lease. No pets. $395/mo+$200 deposit. Furnished $420/mo. 704-279-3808

China Grove. 2BR, 2BA. All electric. Clean & safe. No pets. $575/month + deposit. 704-202-0605

West Side Manor

2345 Statesville Blvd. Near Salisbury Mall

704-633-1234

3 Shive St. 2 story house w/3 apts. 3 big rooms w/BA. Furnished. 134 Gold Hill Dr. 4 room house w/BA. Trailer avail. also. 704-633-5397

China Grove. One room eff. w/ private bathroom & kitchenette. All utilities incl'd. $379/mo. + $100 deposit. 704-857-8112

403 Carolina Blvd. Duplex For Rent. 2BR,1BA. $500/Mo. Call 704-2798467 or 704-279-7568

City. 2BR utilities by tenant. $400 per month. Call 704-202-5879 for more information.

Airport Rd. Duplex. 2BR, 2BA. $575/mo. 2BR, 1BA $550/mo., lease + dep., water furnished. No pets. Call 704-637-0370

CLANCY HILLS APARTMENTS 1, 2 & 3 BR, conveniently located in Salisbury. Handicap accessible units available. Section 8 assistance available. 704-6366408. Office Hours: M–F 9:00-12:00. TDD Relay 1-800-735-2962 Equal Housing Opportunity.

Apartment Management- Moving to Town? Need a home or Apartment? We manage rental homes from $400 - $650 & apartments $350 - $550. Call and let us help you. Waggoner Realty Co. 704-633-0462 www.waggonerrealty.com

Available now! We only have two 2BR, 2BA apt. still available at the Plaza! Located in the heart of downtown Salisbury, you'll live within walking distance to shopping, dining, entertainment, and more! Call today & schedule a tour. Contact Shuntale at 704637-7814 or by email: Shuntale@ DowntownSalisburyNC.com

Clancy-hills@cmc-nc.com

Clean, well maint., 2 BR Duplex. Central heat/air, all electric. Section 8 welcome. 704-202-5790

Colonial Village Apts. “A Good Place to Live” 1, 2, & 3 Bedrooms Affordable & Spacious Water Included 704-636-8385 Deer Park Apts. Cleveland, NC. Now accepting applications. No application free. Free rent. 704-278-4340 Sect 8 accepted.

Lawn Equipment Repair Services

Guaranteed! We will come to you! ! David, 704-314-7846

Lyerly's ATV & Mower Repair Free estimates. All types of repairs Pickup/delivery avail. 704-642-2787

Lawn Maint. & Landscaping Brown's Landscape & Backhoe Bush hogging, tilling for gardens & yards. Free Est. 704-224-6558 DJ's Service: Mowing & Lawncare plus bushog, mulching, tree removal, grading & hauling. 704857-2568 /or 798-0447

Anthony's Scrap Metal Service. Top prices paid for any type of metal or batteries. Free haul away. 704-433-1951 CASH FOR JUNK CARS And batteries. Call 704-279-7480 or 704-798-2930

Lawn Maint. & Landscaping Steve's Lawn Care We'll take care of all your lawn care needs!! Great prices. 704-603-4114/704-431-7225

Earl's Lawn Care " Mowing " Trimming " Edging " Landscaping " Trimming Bushes FREE Estimates 704-636-3415 704-640-3842 www.earlslawncare.com

GAYLOR'S LAWNCARE For ALL your lawn care needs! *FREE ESTIMATES* 704-639-9925/ 704-640-0542 Outdoors by overcash Mowing, Mulching, Leaf Removal. Free Estimates. 704-630-0120

Eddleman's Landscape Services For all your landscape needs. Free estimates Patios, walkways, fences, retaining walls, plantings, mulch, drainage, lighting NC LANDSCAPE CONTRACTOR 1589 704-630-1126 ! 704-267-8694

Apartments

Apartments

East area. 2BR, 1½ BA brick townhouse. Appl. furnished. Quiet. $495/mo. No pets. 704-279-3406

Mount Pleasant, 1BR, 1BA, 3-room apartment, quiet historic district. For information, call 704-436-9176.

Near Rockwell. 2 room apt. Appliances, W/D, & water furnished. $400/mo. 704-279-8880 704-279-7082

BEST VALUE

Quiet & Convenient, 2 bedroom town house, 1 ½ baths. All Electric, Central heat/air, no pets, pool. $550/mo. Includes water & basic cable.

Mobile Home Supplies~ City Consignment Company New & Used Furniture. Please Call 704636-2004

We also build custom cabinets – call for more info and free estimate! 30 years experience.

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ We Buy Any Type of Scrap Metal At the Best Prices...

Hometown Lawn Care & Handyman Service. Mowing, pressure washing, gutter cleaning, odd jobs ~inside & out. Comm, res. Insured. Free estimates. “No job too small” 704-433-7514 Larry Sheets, owner

WILL BUY OLD CARS Complete with keys and title, $150 and up. (Salisbury area only) R.C.'s Garage & Salvage 704-636-8130 704-267-4163

Reface your existing cabinets and make them look like new at half the cost.

East Rowan, large 2 BR, 1½ BA duplex, in the country, completely remodeled, ceramic tile / hardwood, large yard, dishwasher, ice maker, garbage, lawn care, & water furnished. Pets negotiable. Seniors welcome. Handicap ramp available on request. $600/month + $300 dep. 843-992-8845 or 704-279-5555

Eastwind Apartments Low Rent Available For Elderly & Disabled. Rent Based on Social Security Income *Spacious 1 BR *Located on bus line *Washer/Dryer Hookups Call Fisher Realty at: 704-636-7485 for more information. Fleming Heights Apartments 55 & older 704-636-5655 Tues.Thurs. 2pm-5pm. Call for more information. Equal Housing Opportunity. TDD Sect. 8 vouchers accepted. 800-735-2962

I rented my apartment in a little more than a week with a good applicant. ~ M.K., Salisbury

Kannapolis. 314 North Avenue. 3 BR, 2 BA. $895; 7607 Hunter Oak Drive, Concord – 3 BR, 2 BA, $975 KREA 704-933-2231

Lovely Duplex

Rowan Hospital area. 2BR, 1BA. Heat, air, water, appl. incl. $695. 704-633-3997 Luxury apartments Fulton Heights $695/mo. 704-239-0691 Moreland Pk area. 2BR all appls furnished. $495-$595/mo. Deposit negotiable. Section 8 welcome. 336-247-2593

PRIOR TO RENTING VISIT or CALL

Rolling Hills Townhomes 1, 2 & 3 Bedrooms Salisbury's Finest! 315 Ashbrook Rd 704-637-6207 Summer Specials! Salis. Nice modern 1BR, energy efficient, water furnished, off Jake Alexander $395 + dep. 704-640-5750 Salisbury City 2BR /1BA. Good neighborhood, $435 per mo. + dep. Water incl'd. 704-640-5750 Salisbury-Downtown. Two bedroom/1 bath loft style apartment in the old Cheerwine Building. Nice open living area. $750.00 Call Waggoner Realty Co. at 704-633-0462

Salisbury. 2BR/1BA. Central heat/AC. W/D hookup. $450/mo. + dep. No pets. 704-279-3518

PRICE~QUALITY~LOCATION 2BR ~ 1.5 BA ~ Starting at $555 Water, Sewage & Garbage included

Senior Discount WITH 12 MONTH LEASE

704-637-5588

Located at Woodleaf Road & Holly Avenue www.Apartments.com/hollyleaf

Rockwell area. Nice 1BR, $425/mo. and 2BR, $450/mo. No pets. Deposit req. 704-279-8428

Salisbury. 2BR, 1½BA townhouse. Range, refrigerator, W/D hook-ups. Newly remodeled. Nice neighborhood. 704-202-8965

A PA R T M E N T S We Offer

2205 Woodleaf Rd., Salisbury, NC 28147

Rockwell Area. Apt. & Duplexes. $500-$600. 2BR Quiet Community. Marie Leonard-Hartsell at Wallace Realty 704-239-3096

Salisbury. Studio apt. All utilities, $425/mo. $150 application fee. 704-239-0145 White Rock Garden Apts 1BR elderly units, located in Granite Quarry, w/handicap accessible units available. Sect. 8 assistance available. 704-2796457, 8am - 1pm TDD Relay 1-800-735-2962 “Equal Housing Opportunity”

Septic Tank Service

Bost Pools – Call me about your swimming pool. Installation, service, liner & replacement. (704) 637-1617

David Miller Septic Tank Co. Installation/ Repairs “Since 1972” 704-279-4400 or 704-279-3265

Affordable Roofing

Manufactured Home Services

Put your picture in your business or service ad for instant recognition.

Pools and Supplies

Roofing and Guttering

Junk Removal

Kitchen and Baths

H&H Construction. Bath, Kitchen, Decks & Roofs! Interior & Exterior Remodeling & Repairs! 704-633-2219 www.hhconstruction19.com

All types concrete work ~ Insured ~ NO JOB TOO SMALL!

2 BR, 1 BA Eaman Park Apts. Near Salisbury High. $375/mo. Newly renovated. No pets. 704-798-3896

Home Maid Cleaning Service, 10 yrs. exp, Free Estimates & References. Call Regina 704.791.0046

Junk Removal

alservicesunltd.com

Apartments

House Cleaning

!

Lawn Maint. & Landscaping

Wood floor leveling, jacks installed, rotten wood replaced due to water or termites, brick/block/tile work, foundations, etc. 30 YEARS EXP. 704-933-3494

Garages, new homes, remodeling, roofing, siding, back hoe, loader 704-6369569 Maddry Const Lic G.C.

HMC Handyman Services No Job too Large or Small. Please call 704-239-4883

Lawn Maint. & Landscaping

The Floor Doctor

Kitchen and Baths

Concrete Work

www.perrysdoor.com

Real Estate Commercial

Home Improvement

Financial Services

www.piedmontauction.com

Carport and Garages

Home Improvement

C46365

Auctions Auction Thursday 12pm 429 N. Lee St. Salisbury Antiques, Collectibles, Used Furniture 704-213-4101

Carport and Garages

SALISBURY POST

Miscellaneous Services The Boat Man Mobile Boat cleaning, hand wash/waxed, mold & mildew removal, upholstery cleaning. 704-5505130 or contact@theboatman.org

Moving and Storage TH Jones Mini-Max Storage 116 Balfour Street Granite Quarry Please 704-279-3808

!Quality & Experience 704-640-5154

~ 704-202-8881~

AAA Trees R Us ! Roofing & Siding ! Additions & Decks ! Windows & Doors ! In Business 35 Years ! I've Got You Covered

Let's Talk...it's Free!

FREE ESTIMATES! LOWEST PRICES!

1 Of A Kind

Graham's Tree Service Free estimates, reasonable rates. Licensed, Insured, Bonded. 704-633-9304 John Sigmon Stump grinding, Prompt service for 30+ years, Free Estimates. John Sigmon, 704-279-5763.

Plummer & Sons Tree Service, free estimates. Reasonable rates, will beat any written estimate 15%. Insured. Call 704-633-7813.

www.bowenpaintingnc.com

Plumbing Services

704-239-1955

MOORE'S Tree TrimmingTopping & Removing. Use Bucket Truck, 704-209-6254 Licensed, Insured & Bonded

Bowen Painting Interior and Exterior Painting 704-630-6976

• 25 years exp. • Int./Ext. painting • Pressure washing • Staining • Insured & Bonded 704-239-7553

Bucket Truck Chipper Stump Grinding Free Estimates

Johnny Yarborough, Tree Expert trimming, topping, & removal of stumps by machine. Wood splitting, lots cleared. 10% off to senior citizens. 704-857-1731

AFFORDABLE RATES WOODIE'S PAINTING INC., Residential & Churches 704-637-6817

Stoner Painting Contractor

A-1 Tree Service "Established since 1978 "Reliable & Reasonable "Insured Free Estimates! Recognized by the Salisbury Tree Board

Painting and Decorating

Cathy's Painting Service Interior & exterior, new & repaints. 704-279-5335

Tree Service

ROOFING ! Framing ! Siding ! Storm Repair Local, Licensed & Insured

TREE WORKS by Jonathan Keener. Insured – Free estimates! Please call 704-636-0954.

Upholstery

704-791-6856 www.insuranceroofclaim.com

SEAMLESS GUTTER Licensed Contractor C.M. Walton Construction, 704-202-8181

Plumbing

Residential & Commercial Plumbing Plumbing Repair Well Repair Reasonable Prices! Call Us For A Free Estimate! ~ 704-855-2142 ~ 20 Years Experience

Lic. #18614

Apartments Wiltshire Village 2BR, 1½BA Condo. All appl., W/D, patio. Near Jake & I-85. Pool, Tennis. $600/ mo., $500 dep. For sale or lease. 336-210-5862

Condos and Townhomes Salisbury-Wiltshire Village for rent. Two bedroom/1 1/2 baths. Townhouse style unit. $550.00 Call Waggoner Realty Co. 704-633-0462 Wiltshire Village Condo for Rent, $700. 2nd floor. Looking for 2BR, 2BA in a quiet community setting? Call Bryce, Wallace Realty 704-2021319

Houses for Rent 5 houses to choose from Affordable to luxury Chambers Realty 704-637-1020 American Dr., Salis. 3BR, 2BA. Refrig., stove, dishw. No pets. Rent, $715, $500 deposit. Call Rowan Properties, 704633-0446

Attn. Landlords

Apple House Realty has a 10 year / 95+% occupancy rate on prop's we've managed. 704-633-5067

Behind Rowan Memorial Park. Private setting. 3BR, 2BA. Large extra room can be 4th BR, office, or family room. Quiet, dead end road. Credit check, references req. Available June 20th. $925/month + deposit (includes trash collection, water, & sewer). 704-637-9918

Guttering, leaf guard, metal & shingle roofs. Ask about tax credits.

~ 704-633-5033 ~ There is a NEW group of people EVERY day, looking for a DEAL in the classifieds.

Houses for Rent

Houses for Rent

China Grove 2BR/1BA, CHA, W/D connections, $550/mo. + $550 dep. Sect. 8 OK. 704-784-4785

Rowan County

Country Club/Park Area Rent to Own. 4BR, 3BA. 2000 sq ± Can include 2BR guest house on property. $15,000 dn. $1,000/mo. 704-630-0695 E. Rowan 2BR/1BA, stove & refrig. & garbage service. $600/mo + $600 dep. 980-234-2437 East area. 2BR, 1BA. Outbuildings. 1 year lease. $725/month + deposit. 704-279-5602 Faith/Carson district. 3BR / 2BA, no pets. $700/mo + dep + refs. 704-279-8428 FREE RENT Carolina Piedmont Properties. Call for details. Sec 8 OK. 704-248-4878 Granite Quarry. 3BR, 1BA quadplex. E. Salis. 3BR, 2BA. All electric. Appliances. 704-638-0108 Houses: 3BRs, 1BA. Apartments: 2 & 3 BRs, 1BA Deposit req'd. Faith Realty 704-630-9650

Past Catawba College 3BR/1½BA, all elec., stove & refrig., $650/mo. Free water/sewer. 704-633-6035 Rent to Own 2BR partially fenced. Central heat/ac Hrdwds. $5,000 down $500/mo. 704-630-0695

RENTED

I rented my home to a reader who saw the ad in the Salisbury Post! It only took 1 week. ~ T.D. Salisbury

Catawba College area. All elec, country. 2BR, 1BA. $600/mo. 704-6339060 or 704-490-1121 Cleveland-3 bedroom/ 1bath house off Main St. Appliances, central heat & air, hard wood floors. $600.00 Call Waggoner Realty Co. 704-633-0462

Rockwell. 1BR, appl., elec. heat & air, H/W flrs, storage bldg. $500/mo. Call for special. 704-2796850 or 704-798-3035

3BR/2BA (possibly 4 bedrooms) with attached carport in a country setting. Garden space available. $875/month + deposit. 704-857-8406

Rowan Hospital area. 3BR, 2BA. Appl., central AC, gas heat. No Sect. 8. No pets. $800/mo. 1St & last month's rent & deposit. Call before 5pm 704-636-4251 Salisbury & Mocksville HUD – Section 8 Nice 2 to 5 BR homes. Call us 1st. 704-630-0695 Salisbury 2BR. $525 and up. GOODMAN RENTALS 704-633-4802 Salisbury 2BR/1BA, 142 Parrish St., $500/mo. + $325 dep. Section 8 OK. 704-754-5700 Salisbury 2BR/1BA, lg rooms, W/D connections, refrig & stove, carport. $600/mo all utilities incl'd + $600 dep. Refs & bkgrd ck. 704-433-7292 Salisbury 2BR/1BA. City loc. Cent H/A. Limit 2 adults. No pets. $595/mo. + dep. 704-633-9556 Salisbury


CLASSIFIED

SALISBURY POST

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2010 • 7B

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2010

Happy 20th,

Taylor!! S46423

SALON

DYLAN

SPECIAL $

*VALUE $125 (LONG HAIR EXTRA). FOR NEW CLIENTS ONLY & MUST HAVE APPOINTMENT. EXPIRES JUNE 30, 2010. S44331

JUST ADDED FOR 2010...NEW WATERSLIDE!

Daily Breakfast & Lunch Specials Tues.-Fri. 7:00am-2pm Sat. 7am-11am (Breakfast)

HAPPY BIRTHDAY DAPHNE LOMAX! THANK YOU FOR YOUR FRIENDSHIP! LOVE YOU GIRL, YOUR FRIEND ALWAYS, TERESA HARRISON

FOR FREE BIRTHDAY GREETINGS

Please Fax, hand deliver or fill out form online 18 WORDS MAX. Number of free greetings per person may be limited, combined or excluded, contingent on space available. The Salisbury Post reserves the right to edit or exclude any birthday submission. Space is limited, 1st come 1st served, birthdays only. Please limit your birthday greetings to 4 per Birthday. Fax: 704-630-0157 Online: www.SalisburyPost.com (under Website Forms, bottom right column of website) In Person: 131 W. Innes Street

 FFOR OR MUSEUM MEMB MEMBERS ERS  FOR FOR NON MEMBERS NON MEM MBERS 33ATURDAYS ATU ONLY #ALL    EXT 

S46181

704.636.9933

We Deliver

FUN

We want to be your flower shop!

1628 West Innes St. Salisbury, NC • 704-633-5310

www.kidsofjoy.net

S45555

Team Bounce

Birthday? ...

S40137

www.TeamBounce.com 704-202-6200

ARE YOU IN THE CELEBRATING BUSINESS?

Hours of daily personal attention and doggie fun at our safe 20 acre facility. Professional homestyle boarding, training, and play days with a certified handler/trainer who loves dogs as much as you do.

Parties, Church Events, Etc.

Salisbury Flower Shop  3 3 3ALISBURY ALISBURY ! !VENUE VENUE 3 PENCERR .#   3PENCER

 WWW NCTRANSORRG WWWNCTRANSORG

• Birthdays • Community Days

WHATEVER THE OCCASION‌ GIVE YOUR KIDS SOME JOY!

3665 Liberty Road, Gold Hill

If so, then make this ad space work for you! Call Classifieds at 704-797-4220 for more information!!! S45263

! UNIQUE BIR BIRTHDAY THDAY EEXPERIENCE XPERIENCE %%NJOY NJOY YYOUR OUR TTWO WO HOUR PARTY PARTY AND RIDE RIDE THE TRAIN TRAIN AATT THE .# 44RANSPORTATION RANSPORTATION USEUM )N 3PENCER 3PEN NCER -USEUM

704 202-5610 WE DELIVER!

S38321

%LUWKGD\ &DERR &DERRVH RVH

Inflatable Parties

Building rental for private parties & in-house catering available Call for details

S44321

Happy Birthday, Ronald! From all your loved ones & family

KIDS OF JOY

Country Porch Cafe

Happy 14th Birthday to our son, Devon Thomas! We love you & hope you have a great day! Love, Mom, Todd, Lila & Jake

Happy Birthday, Willie! From all your loved ones & family

HAPPY 9TH BIRTHDAY TO OUR LILY WE LOVE YOU!! NANA, POPPY AND TAZ

704/202-8642

Mom, Lee and Ciara

Happy Birthday, Ronald! From all your loved ones & family

Happy 15th birthday Marcus Broadway. Look out Davidson County! We love you. Mawmaw and Pawpaw Overcash

*

LIMITED OFFER.

Coupon Good w/Tiffiany Davis-Jones Only

We Love You!

Lots of love, Mom, Mark, Nicole & Sidney

6250

S44314

Hope you have a Rockin’ 16th Birthday! We are so proud of you!!

S44329

Partial highlights, conditioning treatment, cut, blowdry, style & brow wax.

Videos, Photos, Blogs, Sports, Online Forms, Job Listings, Real Estate‌ It’s more than News‌ Come See

Dogs

Cats Free kitten, female. 5-6 weeks. Please call 336-909-0912 for more information.

Dogs

Dogs

Dogs

Free puppy. Female, 912 months old. Very sweet & friendly. Short, white hair with black spots. Looks like part pointer and about 35 lbs. Call 704-279-0933.

Needs A Good home

Puppies. AKC Labrador Retriever. Chocolate and black, ready July 5. Both parents working bird hunters and family pets. Dewclaws removed and first shots. $450. 704-201-5875

AKC Black Lab Puppies Looking for a good home. DOB: April 9, 2010. Current on shots. Please call 704-239-8023

Jack Russell Terrier male, 18 months old. House broken, great with children and other dogs. Serious Inquiries contact Tracy @704-467-0479 before 10pm

Free Kittens

SOLD

Very cute (2) gray (1) white part Siamese. 6 weeks old. Please call 704-633-6478 Free kittens, must go. Owner can't keep. Male. Cream/white color. 1st shots given. Litter box trained, in house. Call 704-436-6050 Free Kittens. Absolutely beautiful. 2 light orange & 2 medium to dark gray. Please call 336-210-4329

Always dreamed of hitting the road? Check out our new and improved

Free kittens. Beautiful playful males & females. Litter box trained. Orange & white, grey & black/white. 704-212-2213

Losing Home! Free cats to good home. Two older spayed cats. Must find good home very soon. 704-298-0576

Pick One!

Two adorable orange males and three tabby/calico females with white paws and faces. 7 wks old. FREE! 704-8571579

! S D E I F CLASSI HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL OR WANTING TO BUY? ADVERTISE IN THE CLASSIFIEDS (704) 797-4220

I sold both my Golden Retrievers within two days! ~ T.B., Rockwell

AKC SIBERIAN HUSKY PUPPIES Adorable Blue Eyed Pups. Black & White and Tan & White. Born April 20. Ready June 1. Mom & Dad on site, dewormed & 1st shots, $200 without papers, $300 with papers. Call 704-237-7619.

Boston Terrier/ Mastiff Mix Pups

German Shepherd Belgian Malionis Cross puppies. 10 weeks old. $200 each. 704-239-6018

Losing Home!

Dogs

1 female tri-colored, 1st shot and wormed. $300 CASH ONLY! Parents onsite. Avail. June 9th, 2010. Call Esther at 704-5463410.

Blues, blacks, and brindle. Shots and dewormed. Great with kids. 35-40 lbs max. $100 ea. Very smart little dogs. 704-787-3891. CKC Puppies. Chihuahuas, Mini Dachshunds, Shih Tzu. $200 & $250 cash. 704-633-5344

Puppies. Alaskan Malamutes. 2 males, 5 females. Ready for new homes. $200 each. Call David 704-492-7901

Free dogs to good home. Two older neutered Rotweilers. Must find good home very soon. 704-298-0576 Puppies

Lots of Licks & Love

Full Blooded Siamese & Siamese Mix Free cats to good home. Two Full blooded Siamese & Siamese / Burmese mix. 980-2346507 No calls after 9pm

Puppies. Standard Poodles, CKC registered. Very reasonable. Malte-Pom mix puppies. 704-239-4645

Miniature Schnauzer Puppies. Full-blooded. 6 wks, not registered. 1st shots, dewormed, tails docked. Both black & salt 'n' pepper. Parents on site. $275. Non-refundable deposit of $50 to hold. 704-279-8506

Puppies. CKC registered Lhasa Apsos, male. Born 3/23/10. Shots & wormed. Price $250. Call 704785-6365 or send email: rd123griffin@ctc.net

FREE dog. Chow Chow, male, red. Exc. blood. 1½ yrs. “Pumpkinâ€? needs a home. Unique breed. Nice. 845-337-6900

Livestock

Like Eggs? Puppies, Black Lab. Born: 5/15/10. AKC registered. 4 males, 3 females. Parents on site. Great family dogs. Will be up to date on all shots prior to going to your home around 7/15/10. $350. Call Caleb to see the pups. 704-856-8292

Puppies. Labrador Retriever. AKC registered, chocolate. Both parents can be seen. Asking $300 negotiable. Call 336-2844050 or 336-909-2411

Free puppy. About 5 months old. Will be a large dog. Please call 704-431-4981

Free Chickens. 4 layers. Bring a box and take them home! Call 704209-3502

Other Pets ! ! ! ! ! ! !

Free Husky mix. To good home. Sweet & loving. Brown & white male. Call 704-633-3248 Free puppies. Black labrador mix. 2 male, 2 female. 8 weeks old. Please call 336-341-5965

Puppies, Dachshunds. AKC registered. Ready to go! 1 male, 2 females. Parents on-site. 1st shots. 2 dapple, 1 red. $350-$400 each. 704-223-0631

Puppies. Dachshunds, 3 females and 3 males, 8 weeks old, dewormed, parents on site. $250. 980-234-5053

Free 2 yr.old female Red Heeler and 2 five week old Pit Bull mix pups. To good home ONLY! Please call 704-640-8084 Free dog, Alaskan Husky. 1 ½ years old. Full-blooded. Male. Very friendly with adults & kids. 704-857-3288

SOLD Take Us Home!

Supplies and Services Puppies, German Shepherd. 2 females, 4 males. 6 weeks old. Fullblooded. Parents on-site. 1St & dewormed. $175. 704-279-0918

Puppies. Sheltie AKC registered, Beautiful sable and white! Ready June 19. $400. Parents on site. 336-853-7424

New fenced play area for dog boarding. Off the leash fun play time! Salisbury Animal Hospital 1500 E. Innes St. 704-637-0227

salisburyanimalhospital.com


CLASSIFIED

8B • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2010 Houses for Rent Salisbury 3BR/2BA, 723 Mack St., all appls. Incl'd, single car garage, all elec, no Sect. 8. $800/mo + dep. 704-754-5700 Salisbury city. 2BR, 1BA. Remodeled. Central air & heat. Good neighbors. $550. + dep 704-640-5750 Salisbury H.S. Area. 4BR/1½ BA, cent. Gas & electric H/A $700/mo. Sec. 8 OK. 704-636-3307

Office and Commercial Rental East Rowan. 24 x 50 shop. 30 x 70 pole shed. $350/mo. Call 704-2396018

Salisbury, close to town. 4BR, 2BA duplexes. Sect. 8 OK. No pets. $800/mo. + deposit. 704-433-2899

South Rowan area. Attractive mobile home lots. Water, garbage, sewer furnished. $160/mo. 704636-1312 or 704-798-0497

Salisbury- Hidden Creek. 2 bedrooms/2 baths. Ground level across from Clubhouse. No pets or smokers. $850.00 Call Waggoner Realty Co. at 704-633-0462

Manufactured Home for Rent

Salisbury. 525 E. Cemetery St. 3BR, 1BA. Sect. 8 OK. $550/mo. No pets. 704-507-3915

Lake Property Rental

FOR LEASE

170 Riverview Cir. Driftwood Cove. Waterfront with Pier. New Construction 2BR, 2BA. Prefer No Pets. $975/mo., $975 Sec Dep. 1 Year Lease. Call Marie LeonardHartsell, Wallace Realty 704-239-3096 marie@sellingsalisbury.com

Office and Commercial Rental 1250 sqft office. Lobby, 3 offices and 2 restrooms. Bradshaw Real Estate. 704-633-9011 23,000 sq ft manufacturing building with offices for lease. Bradshaw Real Estate. 704-633-9011 450 to 1,000 sq. ft. of Warehouse Space off Jake Alexander Blvd. Call 704279-8377 or 704-279-6882

5,000 or 10,000 sq. ft. distribution bldg., loading docks, office & restrooms. Bradshaw Real Estate 704-633-9011 Commercial warehouses available. 1,400 sq. ft. w/dock. Gated w/security cameras. Convenient to I-85. Olympic Crown Storage. 704-630-0066

Corner Lot

12,000 sq ft building on Jake Alexander Blvd. Could be office or retail. Heat and air. Call 704-279-8377

Faith Rd. Approx. 1,000 sq ft. $625/mo. + dep. Water, sewer, garbage pick up incl'd. 704-633-9556 Granite Quarry -Best Deal Commercial Metal buildings and office space. 300-1800 SF. Utilities and gated parking available. 704-279-4422

Numerous Commercial and office rentals to suit your needs. Ranging from 500 to 5,000 sq. ft. Call Victor Wallace at Wallace Realty, 704-636-2021

PRICED TO SELL

Granite Quarry-Garland Place, 3 BR, 2 BA, triple attached garage, single detached garage, whole house generator. Nice yard. R50640 $164,900 B&R Realty 704.633.2394 www.bostandrufty-realty.com

Prime Location, 1800+ sq.ft. office space 4 private offices, built in reception desk. Large open space with dividers, 2 bathrooms and breakroom. Ample parking 464 Jake Alexander Blvd. 704 223 2803

3990 Statesville Blvd for sale or rent, lot 6. 2BR. $329/mo. Call 704-6403222 for more information. Bostian Heights. 1 & 2BR. Trash, lawn, & water service. No pets. Rent + deposit. 704-857-4843 LM

trash and lawn service included. No pets. $475 month. 704-433-1255

Ford Focus 2001, 4 door, 87K miles, new tires, automatic, power windows, cruise, $3,700. 704-202-0326 BMW, 2004 330Xi Silver with black leather interior, 6 cylinder with auto tranny, AM, FM, CD, duel seat warmers, all power options, SUNROOF, run & drives like a DREAM! 704-603-4255 Ford, 2003 Mustang Coupe. $7,917. Automatic, V6, RWD 1-800-542-9758 Stock # F10246B www.cloningerford.com

Chevrolet, 2006, Impala. 100% GUARANTEED CREDIT APPROVAL. OVER 50 VEHICLES IN STOCK! Summer Sell-Off!

www.autohouseofsalisbury.com

East Area. 2BR, water, trash. Limit 3. Dep. req. No pets. Call 704-6367531 or 704-202-4991

Ford, 2003, Ranger XLT. 4 door extended cab. Power windows, cruise, tilt, power mirrors. 80,000 miles. Very clean. $6,495. 704-637-7327

Faith. 2BR, 1BA. Very nice. ½ acre lot. Limit 3. No pets. Ref. $400. 704279-4282 or 704-202-7294 Faith. 2BR, 2BA. Appl., water, sewer, trash service incl. $475/mo. + dep. Pets OK. 704-279-7463 High Rock Lake. 135 Sunshine Ln. 3BR, 2BA Cent. heat/AC. $450/mo. + dep. 704-279-2299 after 3pm

Rockwell. Nice & small. Ideal for 1 person. No smokers! No pets! $330/mo. 704-279-4842. Roseman Rd. area. 2 BR. No pets, appliances & trash pickup incl. $525/ mo. + dep. 704-855-7720

Chevrolet, 2006, Malibu. 100% GUARANTEED CREDIT APPROVAL. OVER 50 VEHICLES IN STOCK! Summer Sell-Off!

www.autohouseofsalisbury.com

Chevy, 2003 Silverado V8 with auto tranny am, fm, cd, cold ac, bed liner, like new tires. Extra Clean Inside & Out!! 704-603-4255

Ford, 2007 Focus SE White over gray cloth interior, 2.0 with auto trans, AM, FM, CD, sat radio, power windows, brakes & locks. Cold ac, LOW MILES, runs & drives great! 704-603-4255

West & South Rowan. 2 & 3 BR. No pets. Perfect for 3. Water included. Please call 704-857-6951

Resort & Vacation Rentals North Myrtle Beach

Ocean Front Condo

www.autohouseofsalisbury.com

Saturn, 2004, L300. 4 Speed, automatic, V6. $7,011. 1-800-542-9758 Stock # F10218A www.cloningerford.com

Saturn, 2005 Ion 1. 4 speed automatic, 4 cylinder, FWD. $6,711. 1-800-542-9758 Stock # F10090A www.cloningerford.com

Subaru, 2000, Forester. Automatic, AWD, 144K miles, 21/28 mpg. Very reliable. Perfect mountain college car. $4,900. Call 704-267-3273

www.autohouseofsalisbury.com

www.bostandrufty-realty.com

Salis. 1,000 s.f. Free standing, ample pkg., previously restaurant. Drive-In window 704-202-5879 Salisbury. Six individual offices, new central heat/air, heavily insulated for energy efficiency, fully carpeted (to be installed) except stone at entrance. Conference room, employee break room, tile bathroom, and nice, large reception area. Perfect location near the Court House and County Building. Want to lease but will sell. Perfect for dual occupancy. By appointment only. 704-636-1850

2BR, 2BA Ocean front condo. Sleeps 6, fully equipped. Outdoor pool. Quiet family area, yet close to shops and restaurants. Locally owned. Reasonbly priced. 704-603-8647

Rooms for Rent

T-BIRD, 1994 V6,automatic. Runs good. $1,200, obo. Call 704-754-7154

Volvo, 2001 V70 XC Cross Country AWD Wagon. Gray w/ tan leather interior 2.4 five cylinder turbo backed with auto trans, duel pwr seats, sunroof, all pwr options, extra clean needs nothing!! 704-6034255

Volvo, 2001, S80. Gold with tan leather interior. AM/FM/tape/CD changer. 2.9 V6. Auto transmission, sunroof. ALL POWER OPTIONS. Extra clean inside & out!!! 704603-4255

Transportation Financing

Trucks, SUVs & Vans

Transportation Dealerships CLONINGER FORD, INC. “Try us before you buy.” 511 Jake Alexander Blvd. 704-633-9321 TEAM CHEVROLET- GEO, CADILLAC, OLDSMOBILE 404 Jake Alexander Blvd., Salisbury. Call 704-636-9370

Chevy, 2005 Tahoe LS white w/ tan cloth interior 5.3 V8 auto trans, all pwr options, am, fm, tape, cd, 3rd seat, duel pwr seats, clean, cruise, alloy rims, drives great. Ready for retail! 704-603-4255

Ford, 2004, Expedition XLT. 100% GUARANTEED CREDIT APPROVAL. OVER 50 VEHICLES IN STOCK! Summer Sell-Off!

www.autohouseofsalisbury.com

Tim Marburger Honda 1309 N First St. (Hwy 52) Albemarle NC 704-983-4107 Troutman Motor Co. Highway 29 South, Concord, NC 704-782-3105

Trust. It’s the reason 74% of area residents read the Salisbury Post on a daily basis. Classifieds give you affordable access to those loyal readers.

Chevy, 2005 Trail Blazer LS Vortec 4.2 V6 auto trans, pwr options, cloth interior, AM, FM, CD, cold AC, luggage rack, alloy rims, good tires. Good on gas and fun to drive! 704-603-4255

GMC, 2002 Yukon Denali 6.0 V8 auto AWD Tan leather, all power options, front & rear heated seats, sunroof, am, fm, cd, VCR, TV, running boards. Don't be caught without one! 704-603-4255

Transportation Financing Bad Credit? No Credit? No Problem! Tim Marburger Dodge 877-792-9700

Dodge, 2003, Durango. 100% GUARANTEED CREDIT APPROVAL. OVER 50 VEHICLES IN STOCK! Summer Sell-Off!

www.autohouseofsalisbury.com

GMC, 2007,Sierra. 100% GUARANTEED CREDIT APPROVAL. OVER 50 VEHICLES IN STOCK! Summer Sell-Off!

Bank Financing available. First time buyers welcome! You deserve a fresh start! Don't wait! Low Rates Available. Minimum down payment. Carfax & warranties available. Call Steve today! 704-603-4255 or 704-224-3979 after 6pm. Visit us at: www.JakeAlexanderAutoSales.com

Trucks, SUVs & Vans

www.autohouseofsalisbury.com

Chevy, 2009 Cobalt Black w/ gray cloth interior am, fm, cd, 4 cylinder,auto, like new 24,000 miles, nonsmoker, extra clean inside and out, aluminum alloy wheels wrapped in good tires,cheap newer car for a great price. 704-603-4255

Hyundai, 2006, Tiberon GT. LIKE NEW!!! Blue/Black leather interior, SUNROOF, AM/FM/ CD. V6. Tiptronic transmission. Aluminum rims, good tires. 704-603-4255

Chrysler, 1999, Concorde LX. 100% GUARANTEED CREDIT APPROVAL. OVER 50 VEHICLES IN STOCK! Summer Sell-Off!

www.autohouseofsalisbury.com

Lincoln, 1998, Town Car. 100% GUARANTEED CREDIT APPROVAL. OVER 50 VEHICLES IN STOCK! Summer Sell-Off!

www.autohouseofsalisbury.com

Cobra, 2001 Convertible 4.6 V8 w/ cold air intake. 5 speed short throw shifter, 2 tone leather/ suede seats, all pwr ops, lowering kit, 18'' staggered FR500 rims with 3'' lip, fog lights, cruise. 704603-4255

Lincoln, 2000 LS V8, auto trans, tan leather interior, SUNROOF, all power options, duel HEATED & POWER SEATS, like new inside & out! 704-603-4255

Toyota, 2003 Corolla LE 4 Speed automatic, 4 cylinder, FWD. $6,611. 1-800-542-9758 Stock # T10557A. www.cloningerford.com

Toyota, 2003, Camry LE 4 speed, automatic, 4 cylinder, FWD. $7,717. 1-800-542-9758 Stock # T10357A www.cloningerford.com

Dodge, 2003, Stratus R/T. 100% GUARANTEED CREDIT APPROVAL. OVER 50 VEHICLES IN STOCK! Summer Sell-Off!

www.autohouseofsalisbury.com

Lincoln, 2002, LS. 100% GUARANTEED CREDIT APPROVAL. OVER 50 VEHICLES IN STOCK! Summer Sell-Off!

www.autohouseofsalisbury.com

Volvo, 2006 S60 2.5T Onyx black with cream leather interior, sunroof, cd player, all power, alloy wheels, super nice! 704-603-4255

Chevrolet 2002 Trail Blazer LT SUV. 4 Speed automatic, RWD. $10,417.1-800-542-9758 Stock # F10353A www.cloningerford.com

Ford F-150 2008 STX Regular Cab 4 Speed, automatic, V8. $13,917. 1-800-542-9758 Stock # F10290 www.cloningerford.com

1997 Caribbean Crest. 150 hp motor. 2002 EZ load trailer. Vinyl flooring. $8,200. Great condition. Please call 704-639-0359 or 704-202-8507.

Motorcycles & ATVs

Chevrolet, 1998, Tahoe. 100% GUARANTEED CREDIT APPROVAL. OVER 50 VEHICLES IN STOCK! Summer Sell-Off!

www.autohouseofsalisbury.com

Ford, 1998, Ranger. 100% GUARANTEED CREDIT APPROVAL. OVER 50 VEHICLES IN STOCK! Summer Sell-Off!

www.autohouseofsalisbury.com

Victory 2001 V92C – 1500cc with new tires, battery and bags. Has mustang seat with backrest, recent tune-up and inspection. Great condition. 17,800 miles. $4,750. 704-728-9898

Service & Parts

Authorized EZGO Dealer. 30 years selling, servicing GOLF CARS Golf Car Batteries 6 volt $58, 8 volt $62. Golf car utility sales. US 52, 5 miles south of Salisbury. Beside East Rowan HS & Old Stone Winery. Look for EZGO sign. Buy 6 batteries & receive $10 gift receipt for purchase of a bottle of OLD STONE Wine. Coupon good until 6/30/10. 704-245-3660

Dodge, 2003, Stratus, SE. 100% GUARANTEED CREDIT APPROVAL. OVER 50 VEHICLES IN STOCK! Summer Sell-Off!

www.autohouseofsalisbury.com

Volkswagon, 2006, Beetle Convertible. 100% GUARANTEED CREDIT APPROVAL. OVER 50 VEHICLES IN STOCK! Summer Sell-Off!

www.autohouseofsalisbury.com

6-volt – $58 8-volt – $68 12 month warranty If it's a battery, we sell it! We Buy Old Batteries! Faith Rd. to Hwy 152 Store across from Sifford's Marathon 704-213-1005 www.battery-r-us.com

Oldsmobile, 2001, Silhouette. 100% GUARANTEED CREDIT APPROVAL. OVER 50 VEHICLES IN STOCK! Summer Sell-Off!

www.autohouseofsalisbury.com

Chevrolet, 1999, Suburban. 100% GUARANTEED CREDIT APPROVAL. OVER 50 VEHICLES IN STOCK! Summer Sell-Off!

Ford, 2001 Focus SE Station Wagon. Automatic, 4 cylinder. $3,211. 1-800-542-9758 Stock # P7400A www.cloningerford.com

Chevy, 2003 Suburban LT black w/ tan leather interior, AM, FM, CD changer, DVD, rear audio, duel climate control, duel power and heated seats, sunroof, running boards, 3rd seat. RUNS & DRIVES GREAT. 704-603-4255

Ford, 2003 Expedition XLT 4.6 V8 with auto trans, front & rear AC, AM, FM, CD, tape, cloth interior, after market rims, GREAT SUV FOR THE FAMILY!! 704-603-4255

Suburban, 2005 LT Sport Leather interior 5.3 V8 backed w/ 4 speed automatic tranny, all pwr options incl'd heated seats, sunroof, cd, dvd, 3RD seat, steering wheel controls, running boards! 704-603-4255

2005 Jeep Liberty V6 4x4 3.5L Blk w/Tan int., 4 cyl., all power, AM/FM, C/D, low miles, chrome rims w/like new tires, Extra Clean Gas Saver !!!! 704-603-4255

BATTERY-R-US

Mazda, 2002 Miata Conv DON'T GET CAUGHT with your TOP up this summer! PERFECT and AFFORDABLE! Sunlight silver w/ dark gray cloth interior. 1.8 4 cylinder gas saver w/ auto tranny. Low Miles, alloy wheels like new tires. 704-603-4255

Kia, 2005, Sedona. 100% GUARANTEED CREDIT APPROVAL. OVER 50 VEHICLES IN STOCK! Summer Sell-Off!

KIA, 2006 Sorento 3.5 V6 auto, 4x4, cloth seats, CD, towing pkg, good tires, all power, luggage rack, runs& drives NICE!! 704-603-4255

www.autohouseofsalisbury.com

Toyota, 2006 Camry LE White w/gray cloth interior. 2.4 4 cylinder with auto tranny am, fm, cd, cold ac, sunroof, power driver seat, extra clean inside & out. Runs & drives awesome! 704603-4255

Ford 2009 Escape XLT 6 speed automatic $19,217. 1-800-542-9758 Stock # P7441 www.cloningerford.com

www.autohouseofsalisbury.com

Boats & Watercraft Toyota, 1993 2WD Truck Deluxe. Extended Cab Automatic, RWD. $4,711. Stock # F10286A 1-800-542-9758 www.cloningerford.com

Hummer 2007 H3 SUV Automatic, 4WD $19,917. 1-800-542-9758 Stock # T10292B www.cloningerford.com

Toyota, 2008 Yaris Sedan. Automatic. FWD. $12,717. 1-800-542-9758 Stock # P7459 www.cloningerford.com

www.autohouseofsalisbury.com

Toyota Forerunner 1995, V6, automatic, 4wheel drive, all power, new tires, very clean. 168K miles, $2,500. 704202-0326

Dodge, 2006 Durango LIMITED 4.7. V8 auto 4x4 Leather,DVD, all pwr options, duel power/ heated seats, rear POWER LIFT GATE, good tires, DON'T WANT TO MISS THIS ONE! 704-603-4255

GOLF CART BATTERIES Older man in Kannapolis has a nice, spacious, furnished room for rent. It's in a nice neighborhood. No smoking, drugs, loud music or animals. Cable available. Free parking. Only $85/week + $45 deposit. References required. 704-932-5008

Trucks, SUVs & Vans Ford 1976 truck, long bed, straight 6 manual, lots of new parts, $3,500 OBO. 704-642-0129. Lv msg.

NEED CASH? We buy cars & scrap metal by the pound. Call for latest prices. Stricklin Auto & Truck Parts. Call 704-278-1122 or 888-378-1122

Buick, 2004, Ranier. 100% GUARANTEED CREDIT APPROVAL. OVER 50 VEHICLES IN STOCK! Summer Sell-Off!

RENTAL SPACE Salisbury. We have office suites available in the Executive Center. With all utilities from $250 and up. Lots of amenities. Call Karen Rufty at B & R Realty 704-202-6041

SOLD

Autos

Ford, 2010, Mustang. 100% GUARANTEED CREDIT APPROVAL. OVER 50 VEHICLES IN STOCK! Summer Sell-Off!

Very nice large 4BR/2BA doublewide mobile home (2100 sq/ft). Located on large lot in the West Rowan area of Salisbury. $800.00 Mo, RENT OR RENT TO OWN. Other mobile homes also available in the Salisbury and Cleveland area. Section 8 applicants welcome to apply. 704-855-2300

We were very pleased with the response we received and would certainly choose the Post again! V.C., Rockwell

Pontiac, 2008, Grand Prix. 100% GUARANTEED CREDIT APPROVAL. OVER 50 VEHICLES IN STOCK! Summer Sell-Off!

Suzuki, 2007, Forenza. 100% GUARANTEED CREDIT APPROVAL. OVER 50 VEHICLES IN STOCK! Summer Sell-Off!

Salis., Pickler Rd, 2BR/1BA in country, priv lot, quite n'hood, cent H/A, limit 3, no pets. 704-639-1242 lv msg

South area. 2BR mobile home, remodel w/ A/C, $425/mo., $200 deposit. No pets. 704-857-2649

SOLD

I sold my car in five days. I was very happy with the results of my ad! ~ D.P., Salisbury

Service & Parts

www.autohouseofsalisbury.com

Hurley School Rd. area. 2BR, 1BA. Nice subdiv. Well kept. 2 people. $425 + dep. 704-640-5750 LEXINGTON AREA 2 BR, 2 BA Washer/Dryer/Refrig/DW Micro - Garage/Wrkshp Fenced Bckyd. $500 + dep. 704-603-4411

Audi, 2000. A6. Black, 4-door, clean. Please call 704-279-8692

Autos

Autos

DAN NICHOLAS PARK AREA

East area, 2 bedroom,

Financing Available!

Autos

HONDA, 2003, ACCORD EX. $500-700 down, will help finance. Credit, No Problem! Private party sale. Call 704-838-1538

Bostian Heights. 2BR, 1BA. 1 mile from Carson High. No pets. $400/mo. + deposit. 704-239-2833

3BR, 2BA doublewide on nice lot. Very private with fenced in front yard. $650/mo. 704-279-7642

Autos

ELLIS AUTO AUCTION 10 miles N. of Salisbury, Hwy 601, Sale Every Wednesday night 6 pm.

Spencer Shops Lease great retail space for as little as $750/mo for 2,000 sq ft at. 704-431-8636

Manufactured Home Lot Rentals

Salisbury. 3 & 2 Bedroom Houses. $500-$1,000. Also, Duplex Apartments. 704636-6100 or 704-633-8263

MILLER HOTEL Rooms for Rent Weekly $110 & up 704-855-2100

Salisbury, Kent Executive Park office suites, $100 & up. Utilities paid. Conference room, ample parking. 704-202-5879

Salisbury, city limits. 2 - 3BR. $450-$700. Central HVAC. 704-2394883 Fountain Quarters Realty Broker

Salisbury. 138 Crawford St. 1BR, 1BA. Stove, refrigerator, W/D hook-up. $395/mo. + deposit. 704-633-5397

Rooms for Rent

SALISBURY POST

Chevy, 2004 Colorado Extra clean inside & out! 4 doors, 5 cylinder, this gas saver is perfect for the first time driver or great for a back to work and home vehicle. All power, like new tires, cold ac, roll pan, exhaust. 704-603-4255

Want to Buy: Transportation Ford, 2003, Explorer Eddie Bauer. 100% GUARANTEED CREDIT APPROVAL. OVER 50 VEHICLES IN STOCK! Summer Sell-Off!

www.autohouseofsalisbury.com

DONATED passenger van or bus needed for newly formed Youth Group. Call Pastor Rob at 980-721-3371. Thanks for letting your love shine!


CLASSIFIED

SALISBURY POST

No. 59948

NOTICE TO CREDITORS Having qualified as Executor for the Estate of Mary Ellen Greene Williams, 820 Klumac Road, Salisbury, NC 28144. This is to notify all persons, firms and corporations having claims against the said decedent to exhibit them to the undersigned on or before the 24th day of August, 2010, or this notice will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons, firms and corporations indebted to said estate are notified to make immediate payment. This the 17th day of May, 2010. Larry E. Williams, Administrator for the estate of Mary Ellen Greene Williams, deceased, File 10E475, 225 Tranquil Lake Drive, China Grove, NC 28023 No. 59975

NOTICE TO CREDITORS Having qualified as Executor for the Estate of Florence McGuire Hundley, 539 Pinewood Ave., Salisbury, NC 28146. This is to notify all persons, firms and corporations having claims against the said decedent to exhibit them to the undersigned on or before the 27th day of August, 2010, or this notice will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons, firms and corporations indebted to said estate are notified to make immediate payment. This the 20th day of May, 2010. Teresa H. Burris, Executor of the estate of Florence McGuire Hundley, File #10E517, 110 Mallards Way, Rockwell, NC 28138 No. 59976

NOTICE TO CREDITORS Having qualified as Executor for the Estate of Martha Ann Brotherton Travis, 728 Klumac Road, Apt. 243-A, Salisbury, NC 28144. This is to notify all persons, firms and corporations having claims against the said decedent to exhibit them to the undersigned on or before the 30th day of August, 2010, or this notice will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons, firms and corporations indebted to said estate are notified to make immediate payment. This the 24th day of May, 2010. Martha Ann Brotherton Travis, deceased, Rowan County File #2010E560, Steven Wayne Fulcher, 5913 Sharon View Road, Charlotte, NC 28226 No. 60023

NOTICE TO CREDITORS Having qualified as Executor for the Estate of LV Brown Hilliard, 3475 Organ Church Rd., Rockwell, NC 28138. This is to notify all persons, firms and corporations having claims against the said decedent to exhibit them to the undersigned on or before the 4th day of September, 2010, or this notice will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons, firms and corporations indebted to said estate are notified to make immediate payment. This the 28th day of May, 2010. LV Brown Hilliard, deceased, Rowan County File #2010E531, Shelia Rebecca Hilliard, 3475 Organ Church Rd., Rockwell, NC 28138 No. 60059

NOTICE TO CREDITORS Having qualified as Administrator CTA for the Estate of Allen Lane Yates, 308 S. Franklin Street, China Grove, NC 28023. This is to notify all persons, firms and corporations having claims against the said decedent to exhibit them to the undersigned on or before the 10th day of September, 2010, or this notice will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons, firms and corporations indebted to said estate are notified to make immediate payment. This the 4th day of June, 2010. Allen Lane Yates, deceased, Rowan County File #2010E300, Cindy Yates, 308 South Franklin Street, China Grove, NC 28023 No. 59977

NOTICE TO CREDITORS Having qualified as Co-Executor for the Estate of Jerry Edward Barlow, 120 Barlow Ave., Salisbury, NC 28147. This is to notify all persons, firms and corporations having claims against the said decedent to exhibit them to the undersigned on or before the 26th day of August, 2010, or this notice will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons, firms and corporations indebted to said estate are notified to make immediate payment. This the 19th day of May, 2010. Tony L. Sherrill, Co-Executor of the estate of Jerry Edward Barlow, File #10E515, 904 Nance St., Kannapolis, NC 28083, James Edward Brewer, Co-Executor, 1406 Azalea Ave., Kannapolis, NC 28081 No. 60021

NOTICE TO CREDITORS Having qualified as the Administrator of the estate of Mildred H. Monroe, 108 W. 17th Street, Spencer, NC 28159. This is to notify all persons, firms and corporations having claims against the said decedent to exhibit them to the undersigned on or before the 2nd day of September, 2010, or this will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons firms and corporations indebted to said estate are notified to make immediate payment. This the 27th day of May, 2010. Mildred H. Monroe, deceased, Rowan County File #2010E402, Donna Monroe, 108 W. 17th Street, Spencer, NC 28159 Attorney at Law, Sean B. Sandison, 417 N. Main St., Ste. F, Salisbury, NC 28144

No. 60022

NOTICE BY PUBLICATION File No. 10CVD1102 State of North Carolina – Rowan County – In the District Court To: Eziquiel Martinez Osorio, Defendant: Take notice that a pleading seeking relief against you has been filed in the above-entitled action. An action by which your spouse seeks an absolute divorce. You are required to make defense to such pleading not later than forty (40) days from the first publication of this notice, and upon your failure to do so the plaintiff will apply to the court for the relief sought. This 28th day of May, 2010. No. 60015 NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S FORECLOSURE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY - 10-SP-352 UNDER AND BY VIRTUE of the power and authority contained in that certain Deed of Trust executed and delivered by Elizabeth C. Clayton, dated May 17, 2005 and recorded on May 18, 2005, in Book No. 1036, at Page 564 in the Office of the Register of Deeds of Rowan County, North Carolina; and because of default in the payment of the indebtedness secured thereby and failure to carry out and perform the stipulations and agreements contained therein and, pursuant to demand of the holder of the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will place for sale, at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash at the usual place of sale at Courthouse Steps, on June 16, 2010 at 1:00 PM that parcel of land, including improvements thereon, situated, lying and being in the City of China Grove, County of Rowan, State of North Carolina, and being more particularly described as follows: BEGINNING at an iron stake in the west edge of Brown Road (f/k/a Luckey Road) opposite Hubert Flemings corner and running thence with his line. S. 50 deg. West 200 ft. to a stake in Flemings line; thence a new line, N. 33 1/2 deg. West 100 ft. to a stake; thence North 50 deg East 200 ft. to a stake in the west edge of Brown Road (f/k/a Luckey Road); thence along said road, South 33 1/2 deg. East 100 ft. tot he beginning. Together with that certain 2003 CH626-C Champion Mobile Home, Serial No. 02303-626-05246A/B Address of property: 610 Brown Road, China Grove, NC 28023 Present Record Owners: Elizabeth C. Clayton The terms of the sale are that the real property hereinbefore described will be sold for cash to the highest bidder. A deposit of five percent (5%) of the amount of the bid or Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars ($750.00), whichever is greater, is required and must be tendered in the form of certified funds at the time of the sale. In the event that the Owner and Holder or its intended assignee is exempt from paying the same, the successful bidder shall be required to pay revenue stamps on the Trustee's Deed, and any Land Transfer Tax. The real property hereinabove described is being offered for sale "AS IS, WHERE IS" and will be sold subject to all superior liens, unpaid taxes, and special assessments. Other conditions will be announced at the sale. The sale will be held open for ten (10) days for upset bids as by law required. If the Trustee is unable to convey title to this property for any reason, the sole remedy of the purchaser is the return of the deposit. Reasons of such inability to convey include, but are not limited to, the filing of a bankruptcy petition prior to the sale and reinstatement of the loan without the knowledge of the Trustee. If the validity of the sale is challenged by any party, the Trustee, in its sole discretion, if it believes the challenge to have merit, may declare the sale to be void and return the deposit. The purchaser will have no further remedy.

No. 59947

PUBLIC NOTICE The Board of Education of the Rowan-Salisbury Schools requests written bids on two cashier counters for Child Nutrition. Specifications will be furnished upon request. Bids may be mailed to Rowan-Salisbury School Child Nutrition, Post Office Box 2349, Salisbury, North Carolina 28145-2349, or faxed (704-639-7078) to the office of the Director of Child Nutrition, 110 South Long Street, East Spencer, North Carolina 28039. A designated representative of the school board will publicly open bids in the Child Nutrition Conference Room on Monday, June 14, 2010 at 2:00 p.m. It is up to the vendor if they wish to be at the opening.

No. 59974

No. 60017

NOTICE TO CREDITORS Having qualified as Executor for the Estate of Rex C. Tucker, 9255 Castor Rd., Salisbury, NC 28146. This is to notify all persons, firms and corporations having claims against the said decedent to exhibit them to the undersigned on or before the 28th day of August, 2010, or this notice will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons, firms and corporations indebted to said estate are notified to make immediate payment. This the 21st day of May, 2010. Clint A. Tucker, Executor of the estate of Rex C. Tucker, File #10E423, 208 Friendship Village Dr., Harrington, DE 19952 Resident Process Agent, Patricia Hinson, 9255 Castor Rd., Salisbury, NC 28146 No. 59978

NOTICE TO CREDITORS Having qualified as Executor of the Estate of Teddy Ray Boykin, 107 W. 17th Street, Salisbury, NC 28144, this is to notify all persons, firms and corporations having claims against the said decedent to exhibit them to the undersigned on or before the 26th day of August, 2010, or this Notice will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons, firms and corporations indebted to said estate are notified to make immediate payment. This the 18th day of May, 2010. Dolores E. Boykin, Executor for the estate of Teddy Ray Boykin, deceased, File 10E365, 107 W. 17th Street, Salisbury, NC 28144 Attorney at Law, John T. Hudson, 122 N. Lee Street, Salisbury, NC 28144 No. 59979

NOTICE TO CREDITORS Having qualified as Executor for the Estate of Gladys Setzer Morefield Kreiser, 1550 Poole Road, Salisbury, NC 28146, this is to notify all persons, firms and corporations having claims against the said decedent to exhibit them to the undersigned on or before the 25th day of August, 2010, or this Notice will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons, firms and corporations indebted to said estate are notified to make immediate payment. This the 19th day of May, 2010. Gladys Setzer Morefield Kreiser, deceased, Rowan County File #2010E441, John C. Wyatt, 1370 Poole Road, Salisbury, NC 28146 Attorney, Carl M. Short, Jr., P.O. Box 829, Salisbury, NC 28145-0829 No. 59980

NOTICE TO CREDITORS Having qualified as Executor for the Estate of Paul Wiker Sauder, 167 Dutch Farm Road, Rockwell, NC 28138, this is to notify all persons, firms and corporations having claims against the said decedent to exhibit them to the undersigned on or before the 27th day of August, 2010, or this Notice will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons, firms and corporations indebted to said estate are notified to make immediate payment. This the 21st day of May, 2010. Paul Wiker Sauder, deceased, Rowan County File #2010E555, Vivian Grim Sauder, 167 Dutch Farm Road, Rockwell, NC 28138 Attorney, S. Edward Parrott, P.O. Box 829, Salisbury, NC 28145-0829 No. 59981

NOTICE TO CREDITORS Having Qualified as Executor for the estate of Kenneth Reed Linn, 111 West 1st St., Landis, NC 28088, this is to notify all persons, firms and corporation having claims against the said decedent to exhibit them to the undersigned on or before the 26th day of August, 2010 or this notice will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons, firms and corporations indebted to said estate are notified to make immediate payment. This the 19th day of May, 2010. Douglas Reed Linn, Executor of the estate of Kenneth Reed Linn, File #10E546, PO Box 578, Landis, NC 28088 Attorney at Law, Richard D. Locklear, P.O. Box 56, Landis, NC 28088 No. 60058

NOTICE TO CREDITORS Having qualified as Executor of the Estate of Miriam R. McCulloch, 13875 Highway 52, Gold Hill, NC 28071, this is to notify all persons, firms and corporations having claims against the said decedent to exhibit them to the undersigned on or before the 13th day of September, 2010, or this Notice will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons, firms and corporations indebted to said estate are notified to make immediate payment. This the 4th day of June, 2010. Minnie Lee Bost, Executor of the estate of Miriam R. McCulloch, File #10E548, 13845 Highway 52, Gold Hill, NC 28071 Attorney at Law, John T. Hudson, 122 N. Lee St., Salisbury, NC 28144 No. 59946

NOTICE TO CREDITORS Having qualified as Co-Administrators for the Estate of Tony Wayne Lindsay, 1145 Barrow Lane, Salisbury, NC 28146. This is to notify all persons, firms and corporations having claims against the said decedent to exhibit them to the undersigned on or before the 24th day of August, 2010, or this notice will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons, firms and corporations indebted to said estate are notified to make immediate payment. This the 17th day of May, 2010. Wanda C. Lindsay and Shelia L. Morrow, as Co-Administrators for the estate of Tony Wayne Lindsay, deceased, File 10E536, 1145 Barrow Lane, Salisbury, NC 28146, 155 Seetbriar Circle, Salisbury, NC 28146

No. 60016 NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S FORECLOSURE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY - 10-SP-349 UNDER AND BY VIRTUE of the power and authority contained in that certain Deed of Trust executed and delivered by Ernest Douglas Seaman Jr. and Gwen Seaman, dated November 16, 2006 and recorded on November 29, 2006, in Book No. 1081, at Page 457 in the Office of the Register of Deeds of Rowan County, North Carolina; and because of default in the payment of the indebtedness secured thereby and failure to carry out and perform the stipulations and agreements contained therein and, pursuant to demand of the holder of the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will place for sale, at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash at the usual place of sale at Courthouse Steps, on June 16, 2010 at 1:00 PM that parcel of land, including improvements thereon, situated, lying and being in the City of Salisbury, County of Rowan, State of North Carolina, and being more particularly described as follows: ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT OR PARCEL OF LAND SITUATED IN THE CITY OF SALISBURY, SALISBURY ROWAN COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA AND MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS, BEGINNING ON THE SOUTWEST SIDE OF WEST COUNCIL STREET AT AN IRON STATE 228 FEET SOUTHEAST FROM THE SOUTH INTERSECTION OF COUNCIL AND CALDWELL STREETS IN THE GREAT NORTH SQUARE OF THE CITY OF SALISBURY, AND RUNS THENCE SOUTHEAST WITH COUNCIL STREET 60 FEET TO AN IRON STAKE IN THE EDGE OF AN ALLEY; THENCE WITH SAID ALLEY AND PARALLEL WITH CALDWELL STREET 150 FEET TO AN IRON STAKE; THENCE NORTHWEST AND PARALLEL WITH COUNCIL STREET 60 FEET TO AN IRON STAKE; THENCE NORTHEAST AND PARALLEL WITH CALDWELL STREET 150 FEET TO AN IRON STAKE, THE BEGINING CORNER ON COUNCIL STREET, BEING LOT NO. 11 AS SHOWN UPON THE PLAT OF THE PROPERTY OF F. A. RANKIN DRAWN BY C. E. MILLER, JULY 1912. WITH FULL RIGHTS OF INGRESS, EGRESS AND REGRESS IN AND OVER A CERTAIN ALLEYWAY FRONTING EIGHT FEET ON COUNCIL STREET AND EXTENDING IN A SOUTHWESTERLY DIRECTION 150 FEET IMMEDIATELY ADJACENT TO THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PREMISES. BEING THE SAME PROPERTY CONVEYED TO ERNEST DOUGLAS SEAMAN, JR. (ALSO KNOWN AS ERNEST SEAMAN, JR.) AND WIFE GWEN SEAMAN BY DEED FROM ERNEST W. GAMBLE, JR. RECORDED 11/10/1994 IN DEED BOK 741 PAGE 853, IN THE REGISTER OF DEEDS OFFICE OF ROWAN COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA. Address of property: 511 West Council Street, Salisbury, NC 28144 Present Record Owners: Ernest Douglas Seaman Jr. and Gwen Seaman

An order for possession of the property may be issued pursuant to G.S. 4521.29 in favor of the purchaser and against the party or parties in possession by the clerk of superior court of the county in which the property is sold. Any person who occupies the property pursuant to a rental agreement entered into or renewed on or after October 1, 2007, may, after receiving the notice of sale, terminate the rental agreement upon 10 days' written notice to the landlord. Upon termination of a rental agreement, the tenant is liable for rent due under the rental agreement prorated to the effective date of the termination.

The terms of the sale are that the real property hereinbefore described will be sold for cash to the highest bidder. A deposit of five percent (5%) of the amount of the bid or Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars ($750.00), whichever is greater, is required and must be tendered in the form of certified funds at the time of the sale. In the event that the Owner and Holder or its intended assignee is exempt from paying the same, the successful bidder shall be required to pay revenue stamps on the Trustee's Deed, and any Land Transfer Tax.

Dated: May 24, 2010 David A. Simpson, P.C., Substitute Trustee By: Attorney at Law Rogers Townsend & Thomas, PC Attorneys for David A. Simpson, P.C., Substitute Trustee 2701 Coltsgate Road, Suite 300, Charlotte, NC 28211-3594 David A. Simpson, P.C., Substitute Trustee, 253

According to the American Cancer Society (ACS), most of the more than 1 million cases of nonmelanoma skin cancer diagnosed each year in the United States alone are considered to be sun-related. These cancers rarely spread to other parts of the body, and typically develop on sun-exposed areas of the body, such as the face, neck, lips, ears, etc. The most common of all cancers, skin cancer accounts for nearly half of all cancers in the United States. Fortunately, for non-melanoma cancers a cure is highly likely if de-

tected and treated early. Even melanoma, the most serious type of skin cancer, boasts a 5-year localized survival rate of 99 percent, meaning 99 percent of persons diagnosed are still alive 5 years after their initial diagnosis. Though that is encouraging, ACS statistics note that more than 10,000 people die annually from skin cancer, the vast majority of which are persons diagnosed with melanoma, emphasizing the importance of cancer screenings as well taking proper precautions when going out in the sun. TF096244

No. 60061

NOTICE TO CREDITORS Having qualified as Co-Executors for the Estate of Robert Lee Johnson, 163 Hawkins Loop, Salisbury, NC 28144. This is to notify all persons, firms and corporations having claims against the said decedent to exhibit them to the undersigned on or before the 24th day of August, 2010, or this notice will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons, firms and corporations indebted to said estate are notified to make immediate payment. This the 17th day of May, 2010. Vanessa K. Chunn and John H. Houston, Jr., as Co-Executors for the estate of Robert Lee Johnson, deceased, File 10E507, 812 Mooresville Road, Salisbury, NC 28144, 1122 Holmes Avenue, Salisbury, NC 28144

Additional Notice Where the Real Property is Residential With Less Than 15 Rental Units:

Any person who occupies the property pursuant to a bona fide lease or tenancy may have additional rights pursuant to Title VII of 5.896 - Protecting Tenants at Foreclosure Act which became effective on May 20, 2009.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2010 • 9B

The real property hereinabove described is being offered for sale "AS IS, WHERE IS" and will be sold subject to all superior liens, unpaid taxes, and special assessments. Other conditions will be announced at the sale. The sale will be held open for ten (10) days for upset bids as by law required. If the Trustee is unable to convey title to this property for any reason, the sole remedy of the purchaser is the return of the deposit. Reasons of such inability to convey include, but are not limited to, the filing of a bankruptcy petition prior to the sale and reinstatement of the loan without the knowledge of the Trustee. If the validity of the sale is challenged by any party, the Trustee, in its sole discretion, if it believes the challenge to have merit, may declare the sale to be void and return the deposit. The purchaser will have no further remedy.

TOWN OF ROCKWELL NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS The public will take notice that the Board of Aldermen of the Town of Rockwell will hold two PUBLIC HEARINGS at 7:00 p.m. On Monday June 14, 2010 at the Rockwell Town Hall, 202 E. Main Street, Rockwell to review the following: To hear comments for or against the text amendment adding rules and regulations governing Electronic Gaming/Internet Cafes to the Town's Zoning Ordinance. The public is invited to speak either for against this request. 2010-2011 Budget The recommended budget for fiscal year 2010/2011 has been submitted to the Rockwell Town Board. Copies of the proposed budget are available for public inspection at Town Hall. Sue A. Morton, CMC, Town Clerk/Treasurer No. 59982

NOTICE BY PUBLICATION STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA - ROWAN COUNTY - FILE NO. 10 CVD 748 IN THE GENERAL COURT OF JUSTICE - DISTRICT COURT DIVISION Rogelio Rosas-Carlin, Plaintiff, vs. Patricia A. Rosas, Defendant. TO: Patricia A. Rosas, Last Known Address, 1354 Steven Drive, Salisbury, NC 28147 TAKE NOTICE that a pleading seeking relief against you has been filed in the aboveentitled action. The nature of the relief being sought is as follows: An action by which your spouse seeks an absolute divorce. You are required to make defense to such pleading not later than July 5, 2010, said date being forty (40) days from the first publication of this notice, and upon your failure to do to the plaintiff will apply to the Court for the relief sought. This 17th day of May, 2010. Jennifer Davis Hammond, Attorney for Plaintiff, 215 N. Main Street, Salisbury, NC 28144, Telephone: (704) 639-1900, State Bar No. 39728 PLEASE PUBLISH ON THE FOLLOWING DATES: May 26, June 2 and June 9, 2010

No. 60060

NOTICE OF SERVICE OF PROCESS BY PUBLICATION STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA - ROWAN COUNTY IN THE GENERAL COURT OF JUSTICE SUPERIOR COURT DIVISION - 10 SP 501

IN RE: THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF PEYTON MILLER BY: GRAHAM M. CARLTON TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS TAKE NOTICE that a PETITION FOR SALE OF REAL ESTATE TO MAKE ASSETS and PETITION TO DETERMINE HEIRS were filed by GRAHAM M. CARLTON on the 3rd of June, 2010, with the Clerk of Superior Court for Rowan County, Salisbury, NC, in the above-entitled civil proceeding. The Petition relates to the Estate of PEYTON MILLER. TAKE NOTICE that you are required to make defense to such pleading no later than forty (40) days after the date of the first publication of this notice, exclusive of such date. Upon your failure to do so, the Plaintiff will apply to the Court for relief sought in the Petition. This the 7th day of June, 2010. Graham M. Carlton, Attorney for Plaintiff NC Bar #10269 109 West Council Street, Salisbury, NC 28144 No. 60028 AMENDED AND RESTATED NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S FORECLOSURE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY AND FIXTURES NORTH CAROLINA IN THE GENERAL COURT OF JUSTICE SUPERIOR COURT DIVISION ROWAN COUNTY BEFORE THE CLERK 10 SP 29 IN THE MATTER OF THE FORECLOSURE OF A DEED OF TRUST EXECUTED BY LOVE CENTER FOR COMMUNITY ENHANCEMENT, INC., RECORDED IN BOOK 1113, PAGE 221 ON JANUARY 22, 2008 IN THE ROWAN COUNTY REGISTRY, BY DAVID Y. BINGHAM, APPOINTED SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE BY INSTRUMENT RECORDED IN BOOK 1155, PAGE 533 IN THE ROWAN COUNTY REGISTRY By virtue of the power and authority contained in the Deed of Trust executed and delivered by Love Center for Community Enhancement, Inc., a North Carolina nonprofit corporation ("Borrower") dated January 18, 2008 and recorded January 22, 2008 in Book 1113, Page 221 of the Rowan County Registry (the "Deed of Trust"), and because of default in the payment of the Promissory Note ("Note") secured by the Deed of Trust, and pursuant to the Order of the Superior Court for Rowan County, North Carolina, authorizing the undersigned Substitute Trustee to proceed with foreclosure, on February 22, 2010, the undersigned Substitute Trustee posted and sent notice of a foreclosure sale to be held on April 15, 2010. By subsequent notices, the foreclosure sale was duly postponed. Pursuant to the most recent postponement, the sale is now scheduled for June 14, 2010 at 11:00 A.M. Because portions of the collateral have been released and are no longer subject to the lien of the Deed of Trust, this Amended and Restated Notice describes the remaining property that will be sold at foreclosure. In the event of a conflict between this Amended and Restated Notice and the February 22, 2010 Notice of Sale, this Amended and Restated Notice shall control. The undersigned, David Y. Bingham, Substitute Trustee by instrument recorded on January 8, 2010 in Book 1155, Page 533 in the Rowan County Registry, will expose for sale at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash, those certain tracts of property located in Rowan County, North Carolina (including any improvements thereon) as more particularly described as follows: Tract 3: Tax Map 026, Parcel 378 - 103 S. Railroad Street BEING all of that 0.273 acre, more or less, parcel designated "Tract C" as shown on a plat entitled "Property Survey for Russell D. Ulrich" dated July 11, 2003 and recorded in Book 9995, Page 4801, Rowan County Registry. Tract 4: Tax Map 026, Parcel 379 - 105 Railroad Street BEING all of that 0.312 acre, more or less, parcel designated "Tract D" as shown on a plat entitled "Property Survey for Russell D. Ulrich" dated July 11, 2003 and recorded in Book 9995, Page 4801, Rowan County Registry. The record owner of the above-described real property as reflected by the records in the Rowan County Register of Deeds not more than ten (10) days prior to the posting of this Notice is the Borrower. The above-described real property and fixtures will be sold subject to any and all superior mortgages, deeds of trust and liens, including, without limitation, the lien of all unpaid ad valorem taxes and assessments, as well as easements, conditions, restrictions and other matters of record filed prior to the Deed of Trust. The above-described property will be sold "AS IS, WHERE IS." The property is not being sold subject or together with any subordinate rights or interests. Neither the Substitute Trustee, nor the holder of the Note secured by the Deed of Trust being foreclosed, nor the officers, directors, attorneys, employees, agents or authorized representatives of either the Substitute Trustee or the holder of the Note make any representation or warranty relating to the title or any physical, environmental, health or safety conditions existing in, on, at or relating to the property being sold, and any and all responsibilities or liabilities arising out of or in any way relating to any such conditions expressly are disclaimed. Pursuant to N.C.G.S. Section 45-21.10 and the terms of the Deed of Trust, any successful bidder may be required to deposit with the Substitute Trustee immediately upon conclusion of the sale a cash deposit or certified check equaling not more than five percent (5%) of the amount bid or $750.00. Any successful bidder shall be required to tender the full balance purchase price so bid in cash or certified check at the time the Substitute Trustee tenders to the successful bidder a deed for the property or attempts to tender such deed, and should said successful bidder fail to pay the full balance purchase price so bid at that time, the successful bidder shall remain liable on the bid as provided for in N.C.G.S. Sections 45-21.30 (d) and (e).

Additional Notice Where the Real Property is Residential With Less Than 15 Rental Units:

Please be advised that an order for possession of the property may be issued by the Clerk of the Superior Court of Rowan County pursuant to N.C.G.S. 45-21.29 in favor of the purchaser and against the party or parties in possession.

An order for possession of the property may be issued pursuant to G.S. 45-21.29 in favor of the purchaser and against the party or parties in possession by the clerk of superior court of the county in which the property is sold. Any person who occupies the property pursuant to a rental agreement entered into or renewed on or after October 1, 2007, may, after receiving the notice of sale, terminate the rental agreement upon 10 days' written notice to the landlord. Upon termination of a rental agreement, the tenant is liable for rent due under the rental agreement prorated to the effective date of the termination.

Please be further advised that any person who occupies the property pursuant to a rental agreement entered into or renewed on or after October 1, 2007, may after receiving this notice of sale, terminate the rental agreement upon 10 days written notice to the landlord. Upon termination of any such rental agreement the tenant is liable for rent due under the rental agreement prorated to the effective date of the termination.

Any person who occupies the property pursuant to a bona fide lease or tenancy may have additional rights pursuant to Title VII of 5.896 - Protecting Tenants at Foreclosure Act which became effective on May 20, 2009. Dated: May 24, 2010 David A. Simpson, P.C., Substitute Trustee By: Attorney at Law Rogers Townsend & Thomas, PC Attorneys for David A. Simpson, P.C., Substitute Trustee 2701 Coltsgate Road, Suite 300, Charlotte, NC 28211-3594 343

The sale will be held open for ten (10) days for upset bid as the law requires. DATE OF SALE: HOUR OF SALE: PLACE OF SALE:

June 14, 2010 11:00 A.M. Rowan County Courthouse Courthouse Steps 210 N. Main Street Salisbury, North Carolina 28114-4374

This the 24th day of May, 2010. _____________________________ David Y. Bingham, Substitute Trustee 113 W. Council Street, Salisbury, NC 28144 Telephone: (704) 638-0100


COMICS

10B • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2010

Zits/Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

Jump Start/Robb Armstrong

For Better or For Worse/Lynn Johnston

Frank & Ernest/Bob Thaves

SALISBURY POST

Dilbert/Scott Adams Non Sequitur/Wiley Miller

Garfield/Jim Davis Pickles/Brian Crane

Hagar The Horrible/Chris Browne Dennis/Hank Ketcham

Family Circus/Bil Keane

Blondie/Dean Young and John Marshall

Crossword/NEA

Get Fuzzy/Darby Conley

The Born Loser/Art and Chip Sansom

Sudoku/United Feature Syndicate Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

Answer to Previous Puzzle

Celebrity Cipher/Luis Campos


E N T E R TA I N M E N T

SALISBURY POST WEDNESDAY EVENING JUNE 9, 2010

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2010 • 11B A - Time Warner/Salisbury/Metrolina

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Down” Å (N) Å Cancer (June 21-July 22) — Give some creNBC Nightly Inside Edition Entertainment America’s Got Talent Auditions America’s Got Talent Auditions Law & Order: Special Victims WXII 12 News at (:35) The , WXII dence to your intuition instead of depending News (N) (In Tonight (N) (In continue. (In Stereo) Å continue. (N) (In Stereo) Å Unit “Conned” Determining a mur- 11 (N) Å Tonight Show Å NBC Stereo) Å Stereo) Å der victim’s identity. Å With Jay Leno solely on logic and realism, if your hunch is My Name Is Earl So You Think You Can Dance Part two of the Vegas callbacks. (N) (In Fox News at Everybody The King of (:35) Fox News The Simpsons King of the Hill strong enough. In this instance, your insights “Hank’s Choice” 10 (N) Edge “Treehouse of 2 WCCB 11 Loves Raymond Queens “Rayny Darnell’s father Stereo) Å may hold a more detailed picture. visits. Day” Horror I” Å Å Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) — Be patient and a (:35) The NBC Nightly Jeopardy! Wheel of America’s Got Talent Auditions America’s Got Talent Auditions Law & Order: Special Victims NewsChannel D WCNC 6 Tonight Show News (N) (In (N) Å Fortune continue. (In Stereo) Å continue. (N) (In Stereo) Å Unit “Conned” Determining a mur- 36 News at good listener even when someone is belaborNBC With Jay Leno Stereo) Å “America’s Game” der victim’s identity. Å 11:00 (N) ing his/her points. If you’re tolerant enough Woodsmith PBS NewsHour (N) (In Stereo) Å Victor Borge: 100 Years of Music & Laughter! (In Straight No Chaser: Live in New York (In Stereo) Å Ed Sullivan’s Rock and Roll J WTVI 4 Shop Plywood. to hear this person out, you’re likely to learn Stereo) Å Classics: The 60s Å ABC World Deal or No Who Wants/ The Middle (In The Middle (In Modern Family Cougar Town Å (:01) Happy Town Rachel wants to Frasier “Rivals” (:35) Nightline something quite valuable. M WXLV News Deal Å Millionaire Stereo) Å Stereo) Å “Benched” leave Haplin. (N) (N) Å Å Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Staying flexiGuy (In Two and a Half Two and a Half America’s Next Top Model Dance- High Society Å Fly Girls (In 10 O’Clock (:35) Family (:05) The Office (:35) Seinfeld 8 Family N WJZY ble with both your thinking and tactics will Stereo) Å Men Men inspired photo shoot. Stereo) Å News (N) Guy Å “The Statue” Å The Simpsons Two/Half Men Two/Half Men The Unit (In Stereo) Å The Unit “Security” Å The Office The Office House-Payne House-Payne enable you to make the necessary alterations P WMYV George Lopez Deal or No Deal Law & Order: Special Victims The Unit After an assassinaThe Unit “Security” The team Tyler Perry’s Tyler Perry’s My Wife and when needed in order to keep moving forUnit “Paternity” The murder of a tion, the Unit is disavowed by the goes under cover at the Russian House of Payne House of Payne Kids Michael’s “Profiles in W WMYT 12 A recreational ward in spite of shifting circumstances. It’ll nanny. (In Stereo) Å vehicle. Spanish government. Å embassy in Israel. Å romantic plans. Courage” Å Å (:00) PBS Nightly North Carolina Paul McCartney: Good Evening New York City The Ed Sullivan’s Rock and Roll Classics: The 60s BBC World Charlie Rose (N) make you a winner. Business Now (In Stereo) singer performs some of his favorite songs at Citi Live performances of some of the biggest hits of the News (In Stereo) (In Stereo) Å Z WUNG 5 NewsHour Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — When used con(N) Å Report (N) Å Å Field in New York. (In Stereo) Å 1960s. Å Å structively to gain new knowledge, curiosiCABLE CHANNELS ty can be one of your more valuable assets. The First The First 48 Cincinnati detectives Dog the Bounty Dog the Bounty Dog the Bounty Hunter “Rumble Billy the Billy the Billy the Billy the A&E 36 (:00) 48 Å search for a shooter. Hunter Hunter in the Jungle” (N) Å Exterminator (N) Exterminator Å Exterminator Å Exterminator Å You may learn about several things that Movie: ››› “The Client” (1994) Susan Movie: ›› “The Specialist” (1994) Sylvester Stallone, Sharon Stone, James Woods. Movie: ››› “True Lies” (1994) Arnold could have a positive effect on your immeAMC 27 (5:30) Sarandon, Tommy Lee Jones. Premiere. Schwarzenegger, Jamie Lee Curtis. Å diate needs. Monsters Inside Me Å Monsters Inside Me Å Monsters Inside Me Å Monsters Inside Me (In Stereo) Monsters Inside Me Å ANIM 38 Monsters Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Before getting Tiny & Toya Tiny & Toya Movie: “Truth Hall” (2008) Jade-Jenise Dixon. Å The Mo’Nique Show Å BET 59 (:00) 106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live Å yourself immersed in something new, step Top Chef Masters “Tailgating” Top Chef Masters Å Top Chef Masters “Improv” Top Chef Masters Å Work of Art: Great Artist BRAVO 37 Top Chef back a moment to study things and think Kudlow Report (N) House of Cards American Greed Mad Money CNBC 34 Mad Money about possible alternatives. A second look John King, USA (N) Campbell Brown (N) Larry King Live (N) Å Anderson Cooper 360 Å CNN 32 Situation could prove valuable. Cash Cab (In MythBusters A second look at Weird or What? (N) (In Stereo) Å MythBusters “Flu Fiction” The Worst-Case Worst-Case Weird or What? (In Stereo) Å DISC 35 Stereo) Å some myths. (In Stereo) Å team tests frightening myths. Scenario (N) Scenario (N) Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — If you have Suite Life Wizards of Hannah Movie: ››‡ “Chicken Little” (2005) Voices of Zach (:35) Phineas Phineas and Hannah Wizards of The Suite Life to contend with an unforeseen development, DISN 54 The on Deck Waverly Place Montana Å Braff, Joan Cusack. Å and Ferb Ferb Å Montana Å Waverly Place on Deck don’t make any abrupt changes without first The Daily 10 E! Special E! Special True Hollywood Story (N) Chelsea Lately E! News E! 49 Chelsea Lately E! News (N) making sure you understand the ramificaMLB Baseball Teams TBA. (Live) Å Baseball Tonight (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å ESPN 39 (:00) SportsCenter Å tions. Football Live NFL Live (Live) College Softball NCAA World Series Championship, Game 3: Teams TBA. Å SportsNation Å Football Live ESPN2 68 Interruption Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Take the ’70s Show That ’70s Show Movie: ›‡ “Hope Floats” (1998) Sandra Bullock, Harry Connick Jr., Gena Rowlands. Å America’s Funniest Home Videos The 700 Club Å time to discuss in detail a matter that others FAM 29 That (In Stereo) Å Å Å view as abrasive. With a bit of discussion, a (:00) Movie: ›› “Vantage Point” (2008) Dennis Movie: ››‡ “Untraceable” (2008) Diane Lane, Billy Burke, Colin Movie: ››‡ “Untraceable” (2008) Diane Lane, Billy Burke, Colin FX 45 Quaid, Matthew Fox. Hanks. Hanks. reasonable solution can be found that would Hannity (N) On the Record-Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor FXNWS 57 Special Report FOX Report W/ Shepard Smith The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å satisfy everyone involved. MLB Baseball San Francisco Giants at Cincinnati Reds. (Live) MLB Baseball St. Louis Cardinals at Los Angeles Dodgers. FXSS 40 Reds Live Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Being in a gre19th Hole (Live) Big Break Top 10 Top 10 (N) Big Break Destination 19th Hole Golf Central Quest-Card GOLF 66 Quest-Card garious mood, others will find you pleasant, Touched by an Angel Å Touched by an Angel Å Movie: ›› “The Ultimate Gift” (2006) Drew Fuller, James Garner. Å Golden Girls HALL 76 M*A*S*H Å and won’t be able to help themselves from House Hunters House Hunters Property Virgin Property Virgin Holmes on Homes Å House Hunters House Hunters Renovation Nails HGTV 46 Holmes trying to emulate your happy attitude and Be Modern Marvels Å Top Shot “The Long Shot” Ice Road Truckers Å American Pickers NASCAR cham- American Pickers The guys visit HIST 65 To behavior. Continue to set a good example. Announced Sharpshooters compete. Å pion Ryan Newman. Å New Orleans. Å Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) — One of your Paid Program Helpline Today Joyce Meyer Zola Levitt Pr. Inspir. Today Life Today Paid Program Secrets/Bible Fellowship Wisdom Keys INSP 78 I Gospel (:00) Grey’s Grey’s Anatomy Alex gains the Grey’s Anatomy Derek and Movie: ›››‡ “Sleepless in Seattle” (1993) Tom Hanks, Meg Ryan, Bill Pullman. Å Will & Grace Å more effective assets is your resourcefulLIFE 31 Anatomy Å trust of a shy patient. Å Meredith try to be discreet. ness, which due to challenging develop(:00) Movie: “Second Chances” (2010) Melissa Movie: “Seven Deadly Sins” (2010) Dreama Walker, Jared Keeso, Rachel Melvin. A sheriff uncovers dark secrets when the daughter of her LIFEM 72 George, Ryan Scott Greene, Ellen Dubin. Å ments, you’ll use most brilliantly today. Othlover becomes a murder suspect. Å ers will be forced to stop and applaud. Countdown With K. Olbermann The Rachel Maddow Show (N) Countdown With K. Olbermann The Rachel Maddow Show MSNBC 50 The Ed Show Hardball Å Aries (March 21-April 19) — If there is Breakout “Prison Romance” Lockdown “Sex Offenders” Repossessed! (N) Breakout “Prison Romance” NGEO 58 Repossessed! Manhattan Mob Rampage True Jackson, iCarly (In Stereo) SpongeBob Malcolm in the Malcolm in the Everybody Everybody George Lopez George Lopez The Nanny (In The Nanny (In someone who has been on your mind, and NICK 30 VP Å SquarePants Middle Å Middle Å Hates Chris Hates Chris Stereo) Å Stereo) Å Å Å Å whom you would love to chat with, don’t wait Tori & Dean-Sweet Hollywood Jersey Couture Movie: ›› “Bringing Down the House” (2003) Å Jersey Couture OXYGEN 62 Tori & Dean to hear from him/her. Take the initiative, and UFC Unleashed Å UFC Unleashed Å The Ultimate Fighter (N) (In Stereo) Half Pint Braw. Half Pint Braw. SPIKE 44 CSI contact that person yourself. There are lots College Flash Classics College Flash Classics Braves Live! MLB Baseball Atlanta Braves at Arizona Diamondbacks. (Live) SPSO 60 In My Words of things to say to one another. Stargate Ghost Hunters Haunting in a girl’s Ghost Hunters TAPS explores a Ghost Hunters Academy “Crazy Ghost Hunters “Soul Searching” Ghost Hunters Academy “Crazy SYFY 64 (:00) Taurus (April 20-May 20) — Take some SG-1 Å bedroom. Å Victorian mansion. Å for Power” (N) Å (In Stereo) Å for Power” Å King of Seinfeld (In Seinfeld “The House of Payne House of Payne Are We There Are We There Meet the Meet the Lopez Tonight time to figure out where you stand financialTBS 24 The Queens Å Stereo) Å Gum” Å Yet? (N) Yet? (N) Browns Browns ly. It might surprise you to know that you’re Movie: ››› “June Bride” (1948) Bette Davis, Movie: ››› “The Hasty Heart” (1949) Ronald Reagan, Patricia Neal, Movie: ›››‡ “Gilda” (1946) Rita Hayworth, Glenn Ford, George TCM 25 (:00) in better shape than you thought, and that Robert Montgomery. Å Richard Todd. Macready. Å Kate Plus 8 “Episode 2” Å Kate Plus 8 (In Stereo) Å Pregnant Pregnant Toddlers & Tiaras (N) Å Pregnant Pregnant you may be able to do something you didn’t TLC 48 Say Yes Law & Bones Brennan makes a shocking Law & Order “Darkness” A black- Law & Order Detectives investigate Law & Order Owner of a trucking CSI: NY “Dead Inside” (In Stereo) think you could afford. TNT 26 (:00) Order “Cry Wolf” discovery. Å out. Å (DVS) three murders. company is murdered. Å A

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Forensic Files Forensic Files Roseanne (In Roseanne (In Stereo) Å Stereo) Å Law & Order: Special Victims Unit “Baby Killer” Å The Insider (N) (:35) Friends Scrubs (In Scrubs J.D. is Stereo) Å pushed aside.

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(iTV) Å

lights and commentary. (N)

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56 2

8:30

Most Daring How’d You Get How’d You Get So Rich (N) So Rich In Plain Sight “Her Days Are Numbered” (N) Å Eyewitness Entertainment WGN News at Nine (N) (In Stereo)

TVL

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Over the Limit Over the Limit Most Daring (N) The Cosby The Cosby EverybodyEverybodyShow Å Show Å Raymond Raymond NCIS The FBI suspects a mosque NCIS “Internal Affairs” (In Stereo) of terrorist recruitment. Å Dr. Phil (In Stereo) Å The Oprah Winfrey Show Movie: ›››‡ “The Road Warrior” (1981) Mel Gibson, Bruce Spence, Emil Minty. (In Stereo) Å

75 Police Videos

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7:30

Cops Å Cops Å All in the Family Sanford and Sanford and Son Å Son Å Å (:00) NCIS (In NCIS “Mind Games” A serial killer Stereo) Å withholds information. W. Williams Judge-Brown Judge-Brown Becker (In America’s Funniest Home Videos Stereo) Å Roller coaster. Å

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UNITED FEATURE SYNDICATE

Today’s celebrity birthdays

Keyboardist Jon Lord of Deep Purple and Whitesnake is 69. Actor Michael J. Fox is 49. PREMIUM CHANNELS Actor Johnny Depp is 47. Actress Gloria Movie: ››‡ “My Sister’s Keeper” (2009) Cameron Diaz, Abigail Movie: ››‡ “Orphan” (2009) Vera Farmiga, Peter Sarsgaard, Isabelle Real Time With Bill Maher (In Reuben is 46. Bassist Dean Felber of Hootie HBO 15 Masterclass “Frank Gehry” Breslin, Alec Baldwin. (In Stereo) Å Fuhrman. Premiere. (In Stereo) Å Stereo) Å and the Blowfish is 43. Bassist Dean Dinning (:15) Movie: ››› “The Laramie Project” (2002) Movie: “Smash His Camera” (2010) Ron Galella. I Knew It Was Shrek Forever Movie: ››‡ “Mamma Mia!” (2008) Meryl Streep, HBO2 302 Dylan Baker. (In Stereo) Å Premiere. (In Stereo) Å You: Redisco After: First Colin Firth. (In Stereo) Å (Toad the Wet Sprocket) is 43. Musician Ed Movie: ››› “Cast Away” (2000) Tom Movie: ››› “Frailty” (2002) Bill Paxton, Powers Season 2 of True Blood Sookie uses her tele- True Blood “Timebomb” Sookie’s Simons of the Chemical Brothers is 40. AcHBO3 304 (5:30) Hanks, Helen Hunt. (In Stereo) Å Boothe. (In Stereo) Å True Blood pathic powers. Å captivity. (In Stereo) Å tress Michaela Conlin (“Bones”) is 32. Actress (5:20) Movie: ›››› “The Dark Knight” (2008) Movie: ›› “Street Kings” (2008) Keanu Reeves, Forest Whitaker, Movie: ››‡ “Night at the Museum: Battle of the “Busty Cops” MAX 320 Christian Natalie Portman is 29. Actress Mae Whitman Bale. (In Stereo) Å Hugh Laurie. (In Stereo) Å Smithsonian” (2009) Å Nurse Jackie United States of The Tudors (iTV) The king’s health Inside NASCAR (iTV) News, high- The Tudors (iTV) The king’s health is 22. SHOW 340 (:15) Movie: ›› “Transporter 3” (2008) Jason Tara (iTV)

is weakened. Å

Are water softeners bad for health? Dear Dr. Gott: I reside in an independent-living complex. When it was built in 2001, they put soft water throughout our water system on both the hot and cold faucets. Could this cause problems such as high blood pressure, neuropathy, dementia and more? Many of the residents DR. PETER have had to take pills for GOTT high blood pressure and were never on them before. Some of these people are over 70 years old. Many of our residents are in the early stages of dementia and Alzheimer’s. It is scary knowing that possibly the salt water in our water system could be causing these problems. A faucet in the basement of our building isn’t connected to the system, so residents go there for a supply. The complex owner says he checked with a doctor who says the amount of salt in the

water would not be harmful to us. Do we have a chance of having a real problem here? Should the water be changed? Dear reader: Hard water causes a buildup of chemicals in household pipes, stains sinks, discolors laundry, and dries out skin following bathing. That said, the National Research Council has gone on record stating that drinking hard water does not pose health risks. While I don’t know what the condition of the water is in your area, obviously the owner of your complex determined that installing a water-softener system was the best way to go financially in the long run. The amount of sodium added to any system depends on the hardness of the water, but treated water doesn’t appear to add any significant amount of salt to the diet. Generally speaking, an 8-ounce glass of treated water contains less than 13 milligrams of sodium. The average adult without a history of hypertension requires between 1,500 and 2,400 milligrams of sodium each day. With a history of

high blood pressure, the recommended amount holds at 1,500 milligrams. A more likely cause of excessive sodium comes from a person’s diet. One teaspoon of salt contains 230 milligrams of sodium. Adding to that many processed foods, cold cuts, canned goods and soups brings the potential for excessive salt consumption far above the recommended daily allowance. There is an association between Alzheimer’s dementia and aluminum. Perhaps this is what some of your residents refer to. I cannot find any confirming reports of memory loss, Alzheimer’s or neuropathy caused by water-softening systems. A more likely consideration is that the residents of your establishment are aging and are developing diseases and disorders common to an advanced age. That said, it appears that by making a trip to the basement for drinking water, residents who fear potential side effects can bypass the problem. I would also recommend that residents request a sodium test be added to their

next routine lab work when they visit their physicians. Providing they eat a healthful diet and do not cook with or add salt to their meals, this will be one surefire way to resolve one of the issues. Because of the concerns you raise, I am sending you copies of my Health Reports “Hypertension” and “Alzheimer’s Disease.” Other readers who would like copies should send a self-addressed stamped No. 10 envelope and a $2 check or money order for each report to Newsletter, P.O. Box 167, Wickliffe, OH 44092-0167. Be sure to mention the title(s) or print an order form off my website at www.AskDrGottMD.com.

Widow of Marvin Isley calls him ‘great family man’

Sheila Isley said Tuesday that she met her husband on a plane 20 years ago and she immediately told her co-workers she would marry him. She was right. Marvin Isley stopped performing in 1996 after his diabetes caused him to have a stroke. He lost the use of his left hand and doctors had to amputate his legs. He joined his brothers’ band in 1973 after the band had scored hits like 1959’s “Shout.

Heidi Montag files for separation from co-star

of the MTV series “The Hills” and have been married since last April. The series is in its final season. Montag’s two-page handwritten filing does not offer any more details on the couple’s breakup. An e-mail sent to an MTV spokeswoman seeking comment was not immediately returned. The filing also doesn’t indicate whether Montag intends to file for divorce, which would formally end their marriage

CHICAGO (AP) — The widow of Isley Brothers’ bassist Marvin Isley says her husband was a “great family man” who always acted like she had the more high-profile job as a United Airlines flight attendant. Marvin Isley died Sunday of diabetes at an inpatient hospice in Chicago at age 56.

LOS ANGELES (AP) — More than “The Hills” may be ending for two of its stars — Heidi Montag has filed for separation from Spencer Pratt. She cited irreconcilable differences in a court document submitted Tuesday in Santa Monica, Calif. Montag and Pratt are stars

Dr. Peter H. Gott is a retired physician and the author of several books, including “Live Longer, Live Better,” “Dr. Gott’s No Flour, No Sugar Diet” and “Dr. Gott’s No Flour, No Sugar Cookbook,” which are available at most bookstores or online. His website is www.AskDrGottMD. com. UNITED FEATURE SYNDICATE

Scramble the signal with second-lowest BY PHILLIP ALDER

United Feature Syndicate

Good defenders signal to each other. Declarer must try to scramble those signals. Today’s deal is an example. Look at only the spade suit. South is in three notrump. West leads the spade ace, and East follows with the six. What should South play? The auction was straightforward, South “knowing” that his partner would cover his diamond weakness, and North happily bidding game. South starts with eight top tricks: three hearts and five clubs. He can get two extra winners in diamonds, but there is a risk that if West shifts at trick two, East may get in with the diamond ace and return a spade. How can South encourage West to continue spades? By playing his eight and hiding the two. Now West might believe that his partner began with Q-6-2 of spades. If West does play a second spade, whether it is the king or a low one, South gets his ninth trick with the spade queen. Yes, perhaps West will decide that East would have played the queen at trick one if he had it, but that would not be best if West had led from A-K-x-x or A-K-J-x. At least, though, South has given West something to think about. If instead South plays the two at trick one, West knows East has played his lowest spade. And with doubleton queen-six, East would have played the queen, hoping for

the best. The rule is: Play like the third hand. If you want the leader to continue his suit, drop an unnecessarily high card (an encouraging signal). If you prefer the leader to shift at trick two, play your lowest card (a discouraging signal).

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SPORTS

12B • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2010

SALISBURY POST

ALL-COUNTY SOCCER

RONNIE GALLAGHER/SALISBURY POST

The All-Rowan County girls soccer team consists of, Front row: Player of the Year Allison Baucom (West). Second row, from left: Toni Lucente (West), Meredith Sokolowski (North), Rachel Hardy-Simpson (East), Madison Kennedy (Salisbury), Brittany Gibbons (West), Jenna Bryan (Salisbury), Jade Lomax (North), Hannah Wilson (East) and Libby Sides (South). Third row: Sarah Haden (Carson), Whitney Brown (Salisbury), Allison Bailey (West), Allison Parker (West), Olivia Rankin (Salisbury), Nicole Lucente (West), Karen Presnell (Salisbury), Briana Weaver (Carson) and Daisy Lemke (North).

Pack’s Wilson goes in fourth one start, and was 0-1 with a 5.84 ERA. The baseball draft noteHe joins a Rockies’ organbook ... ization that certainly has no RALEIGH — Russell Wil- shortage of quarterbacks: son hopes to be both North Colorado also drafted Kyle Carolina State’s quarterback Parker of ACC rival Clemson and a minor leaguer with the in the first round, and first Colorado Rockies. baseman Todd Helton played The Rockies took Wilson QB at Tennessee while outon Tuesday in the fourth fielder Seth Smith backed up round of the baseball draft. Eli Manning at Mississippi. He says he’s “looking forThe Rockies even spent a ward to getting out there 46th-round draft choice in and being a Rocky, but I also 2006 on Damion Carter, a plan on coming back and quarterback at Southern playing football this fall. Mississippi. “They’re both my loves,” CLEMSON he added of the two sports. COLUMBIA, S.C. — While Colorado selected the Clemson coach Dabo Swin2008 ACCfootball rookie of ney expects quarterback the year with the 140th over- Kyle Parker to sign with all pick. Wilson says he prob- baseball’s Colorado Rockies, ably will play second base or he wonders if their contract center field. offer will be enough to make Among the lingering him give up football. unanswered questions: When Parker was taken by the will he report to one of the Rockies with the 26th selecRockies’ farm teams? And tion overall Monday night, a how long will he stay before short time before the basereturning to Raleigh for pre- ball Tigers wrapped up an season football camp? NCAA regional title with a Still, Wilson expressed 13-7 win at Auburn. Parker confidence that he’ll be able hit a three-run homer which to play both sports. made him the first player in “They know my situation. Division I to throw 20 touchThey know that I play footdown passes and hit 20 home ball and baseball,” Wilson runs in a school year. said. “We’ll continue to talk “I would be surprised if and figure this thing out.” he doesn’t sign a baseball Pack coach Tom O’Brien contract,” Swinney said . said it would be best for both DADDY BALL his quarterback and the team NEW YORK— The sons for him to be on campus of major league managers when camp starts Aug. 3. Jim Leyland, Bruce Bochy “There’s certainly a lot of and Ozzie Guillen were things that we have to disamong the players selected cuss from an NCAA standduring a long second day of point,” O’Brien said. “We the baseball draft. have to get those things All three managers’ ironed out, but as far as we teams drafted in the family. talked today, he has no Leyland’s Detroit Tigers agent, he signed no contract, took his son, Patrick, in the he’s taken no money. ... He eighth round. Patrick Leywants to play football (too).” land is a 6-foot-2 catcher. Wilson led the ACC with The Chicago White Sox31 touchdown passes as a took Guillen’s son, Ozney, a sophomore last season, and Florida high school outfieldset an NCAA record with 379 er, in the 22nd round. consecutive pass attempts San Francisco selected without an interception. He Bochy’s son, Brett, a righthit .306 with three home handed reliever from the runs and 12 RBIs, and University of Kansas, in the pitched in 10 games, making 20th round.

SOUTH FROM 1B

Associated Press

DRAFT FROM 1B

Lyerly finished sixth on the NCAA all-time career hit list with 336 He is fifth all-time with 537 total bases. “He just puts the barrel on the ball,” Gantt said. This season, Lyerly hit .399 and his 83 hits led Catawba. He scored 59 runs. He was named All-Southeast Region. Lyerly proved he had power (eight homers) and speed, finishing just two stolen bases (27) behind Moore’s team-leading 29. Gantt said to watch for the homerun power to increase once the Rays

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Nationals fans packed the stands to cheer on Stephen Strasburg.

STRASBURG FROM 1B

inside — everything else is just such a blur,” Strasburg said. “At one point I lost track of how many innings I threw. I was like, ’You know what? I’m just going to go out there and have fun.’ It’s amazing. “It’s kind of like when you get married and everything, you kind of go into it wanting to remember everything — and once it’s done, you can’t remember a single thing.” Strasburg should know. He was married in January. His family, gathered in the corner of the news conference room, joined in the laughter. When he left the podium, he gave hugs to all of them. Strasburg got better as the game progressed, and the ballpark was near delirium when he struck out the side on 13 pitches in his final inning. He fanned the last seven batters he faced, and all nine Pirates in the starting lineup struck out at least once. “It’s never easy to hit 97 to 100 (mph),” said Andy LaRoche, Strasburg’s final strikeout victim, “especially when he’s got a curveball like that. It’s the combination of the two. You can say, ’All right, here comes 100 right down the middle,’ or ’Here comes the curveball,’ and it’s still tough to hit.” Karl Spooner also struck out 15 in his debut with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1954. He and Richard are the only pitchers with more strikeouts than Strasburg in a major league debut since 1920 — and Spooner and Richard both had three walks. Strasburg also tied Max Scherzer of the Detroit Tigers for most strikeouts in a game in the majors this season. Scherzer had 14 on May 30 against Oakland. Strasburg left with a 4-2 lead. When it was announced that he had set a team

start working with him. “He has tremendous power,” Gantt said. “It’s going to be scary if he utilizes that power. Pitchers didn’t give him anything to hit.” Gantt said Tampa Bay is a good fit for Lyerly. “He fits their mold,” he said. “He can run.” And then, Gantt gave Lyerly the best compliment of all. “He hasn’t played his best baseball yet.” • Moore led Catawba in most offensive categories. He finished his senior year with a .410 average to go with 16 home runs, 59 runs batted in and 20 doubles. He scored 77 runs. “He came back a better player,”

record for strikeouts since the franchise’s move to Washington in 2005, the crowd cheered again — and Strasburg emerged to the top step of the dugout and tipped his cap. “It’s something I’ve never seen before,” Nationals third baseman Ryan Zimmerman said. “Usually you see it in basketball, in the NBA, stuff like that. Never in baseball. ... It’s his game and a lot of people came out to watch him. He didn’t really let them down.” The day was nicknamed “Strasmus” — and it was the biggest baseball event in the nation’s capital since the sport returned after a 33-year absence. To go real deep into history, one could argue that Strasburg had the most anticipated Washington rookie pitching debut since Walter Johnson at the long-forgotten American League Park on Aug. 2, 1907. Strasburg threw 94 pitches — roughly the limit imposed by management before the game — and 65 were strikes. He made one mistake, a 90 mph changeup golfed by Delwyn Young into the first row in right field for a two-run homer in the fourth inning. The ball would have made a great souvenir, but a fan threw it back onto the field. Cameras flashed as Strasburg (1-0) threw his first pitch at 7:06 p.m. — at 97 mph and well inside to leadoff hitter Andrew McCutchen. Fans booed when Hallion called it a ball. Rodriguez then handed the ball to the umpire and it was removed from play for posterity. “I wanted to call a breaking ball,” Rodriguez said. “He said no.” Strasburg was promoted after dominating the minors, going 7-2 with a 1.30 ERA, 65 strikeouts and only 13 walks in 11 starts in Double-A and Triple-A. His debut came nearly a year to the day after he was drafted No. 1 overall, and one day after the Nationals — who have lost 100 games in consecutive seasons.

Gantt said. “He gave us everything we expected. He helped us get to the regionals and that was the best thing. He helped the team.” Moore’s run total was the fourth best total in a season at Catawba. His .790 slugging percentage has him ranked seventh in school history. Moore had 52 walks and a .542 onbase percentage, both of which are second all-time for a season. Moore watched the draft with his family and once the 19th round came around, the screen on his TV went blank. His dad, Dick, got a call from a friend and just as he was telling him his son hadn’t been drafted, Moore’s name came across.

“It looked so beautiful,” Moore said. “I was trying to act cool and calm because I didn’t want my family to be disappointed. But I was getting antsy.” Moore said his phone hasn’t stopped ringing or his texts haven’t stopped coming. He said three texts came in with the news before he even saw his name. Moore was asked if he would celebrate. “I’m just going to sit back with the family,” he said. Moore’s agent Ty York is also the agent for former South Rowan star and current Kannapolis Intimidator Daniel Wagner. Moore thinks he’ll be sent to a short-season team in Vermont.

“It was hooking, but it was still fair,” he said. “I left that pitch up, and I guess when you leave pitches up in Legion ball, that’s what happens.” South’s biggest concern was the weather. It led 12-4 at Stanly recently when the game was rained out before it was official. That’s why South had to return to Montgomery Park for a makeup on Tuesday. South again brought its bats, and this time Mother Nature cooperated. A sacrifice fly by Patrick Bearden and a two-out single by Basinger gave South a 2-0 lead in the first. Catawba signees Blake Hous- BASINGER ton and Zubillaga, who combined to score seven runs, set the table. Two-run singles by Maverick Miles and Tripp Cross keyed South’s eight-run second that stretched the lead to 10-0. H o g a n ’ s MILES three-run homer in the third made it 131. Hogan started slowly this summer, but he’s figured it out now. He’s homered in each of his last two games, while driving in seven. “Just better pitch selection, getting better pitches to hit,” Hogan said. “I haven’t been swinging at the junk.” Believe it or not, Stanly’s No. 9 hitter Matt Huneycutt didn’t get to plate for the first time until the bottom of the third. By then, the game was 82 minutes old. Basinger’s booming homer to left in the sixth prompted P.A. man Charles Curcio to announce that it was time to draw a half-andhalf ticket.

S. Rowan 20, Stanly 3 SOUTH ROWAN ab r h bi Hston cf 5 3 0 1 Zblga 2b 3 4 2 4 Gdmn 2b 1 0 0 0 Miles rf 3 3 2 2 Deson 3b 0 0 0 0 Hogan ss 5 2 2 4 Brden 1b 4 1 1 1 Bsngr dh 5 2 2 3 Shprd 1b 3 1 0 0 McLgn 1b 1 0 0 0 Hbbrd 3b 0 0 0 0 Freeze c 3 3 2 0 Cross lf 3 1 1 2 Wtmre lf 1 0 0 0 Knrly lf 0 0 0 0 Totals 37 20 12 17

STANLY

ab Whtly 2b 3 Hdrth ss 3 Dick 1b 3 Lisk dh 2 Rcdsn dh 1 Beck 3b 0 GSmth ph0 Fspmn lf 2 Trner ph 1 Hssell f 3 Wllms c 3 Hnyct cf 3

Totals

r 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

h 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0

bi 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0

24 3 3 3

S. Rowan 283 007 0 — 20 Stanly 012 000 0 — 3 E —Shepherd, Bearden, Hildreth, Beck, Fesperman, Robichaud, Whitley. LOB — South 6, Stanly 3. 2B — Freeze 2. HR — Basinger (2), Hogan (2), Zubillaga (3). SB — Hogan, Zubillaga. SF — Bearden. IP H R ER BB K S. Rowan WeSmth W, 1-0 7 3 3 2 1 8 Stanly 2 4 8 3 4 0 Martin L 1 ⁄3 1 ⁄3 2 4 4 3 0 Robichaud Harter 31⁄3 6 8 8 3 4 2 Huneycutt 1 ⁄3 0 0 0 0 2 WP — Austin, Harter. HBP — by WeSmith (Beck, GSmith). PB — Williams.


GRADUATION’10

WEDNESDAY

June 9, 2010

SALISBURY POST

Deirdre Parker Smith, Copy Editor, 704-797-4252 news@salisburypost.com

1C

www.salisburypost.com

All-County Scholars 2010

JON C. LAKEY/SALISBURY POST

North Rowan High School’s 2010 All-County Scholars are Lindsay Thompson, Marissa Herchler, Taylor Johnston and Jon Robertson.

East Rowan High School’s 2010 All-County Scholars are Christopher Demitraszek, Thomas Collins, Jr., Ross Oden and Jesse Wheeler.

Rowan’s high achievers earn top honors These students have been named the Salis- ter Award. Advice to freshmen: “Don’t take bury Post’s All-County Scholars. Members are chosen to their guidance department based on advanced classes unless you are grade-point average, SAT score and class rank. prepared to do the extra work.” Favorite high-school memory: Jesse Carson Eight straight hours of AP test• Joseph Armando Marquez of Salisbury, son ing. of Armando and Teresa Marquez. Proudest high-school moment: Clubs and sports: National Honor Society, Being recognized as an All-Counmarching band. ty Scholar. Volunteer work: Special Olympics 2010. Song on MySpace/Facebook Extracurriculars and honors: AkzoNobel Schol- page: “Separate Ways (Worlds arship, Scholastic Excellence Award, Princi- Apart)” by Journey. pals’/Assistant Principals’ Association Senior • Julie Laureen Tonnesen of SalScholarship, junior marshal, Carson High isbury, daughter of Phil and DebSchool Mathematics Award, Carson High bie Tonnesen. School Chemistry Award, Louis Armstrong Clubs and sports: Women’s tenBand Award. nis, National Honor Society, JuAdvice to freshmen: “Continue to do well in nior Civitans, Relay for Life, St. school and don’t slack off; there are only four John’s Lutheran Church youth South Rowan High Schools 2010 All-County Scholyears left until graduation.” group. are. Hillary Jaap, Courtney Barbee and Seth Moore Favorite high-school memory: Last year’s edVolunteer work: Mission trips (not pictured is Skylar Stamey). ucational, but always fun AP calculus class to Mexico, St. Croix and New Orwith Mr. Fink. leans, Angel Tree project, weekProudest high-school moment: Receiving nu- day church school teacher, tutoring at Carson merous awards on senior awards night. High and through Junior Civitans to prepare • Donald Ray McIntyre III of Salisbury, son China Grove Elementary students for end-ofof Chastity and Donald McIntyre Jr. and Rhon- grade tests. da McIntyre. Extracurriculars and honors: Editor-in-Chief Clubs and sports: Future Teachers of Amer- of school newspaper The Catalyst, Daughters ica, National Honor Society. of the American Revolution Good Citizen, N.C. Volunteer work: Spanish tutoring. Teaching Fellow, People to People student amExtracurriculars and honors: junior marshal, AP English Award, Catawba Presidential See SCHOLARS, 9C Scholarship, National Honor Society Charac-

Salisbury High School’s 2010 All-County Scholars are front, Madi Ralston and Catherine Parks and back, Austin Flynn and William Yip.

STAMEY

WEANT

Jesse Carson High School’s 2010 All-County Scholars are Donald McIntyre III, Joseph Marquez and Julie Tonnesen. (Ginny Weant, not pictured).

West Rowan High School’s 2010 All-County Scholars are Jesse Myers, Luke Miller, Garrett White and Thomas Langford.

Skylar Stamey of South Rowan High School and Ginny Weant of Carson, above, were not available the day photos were taken for the All-County Scholars.

More than 1,300 students to graduate from Rowan-Salisbury Schools BY KATHY CHAFFIN

kchaffin@salisburypost.com

An estimated 1,377 seniors are expected to graduate from the Rowan-Salisbury Schools in commencement exercises Friday. Though final numbers will not be available until all exams are graded and factored into students’ grades, the estimated number by high school are as follows: Carson, 256; East Rowan, 279; Henderson Independent, 5; North Rowan, 128; Salisbury, 181; South Rowan, 237; and West Rowan, 291.

In the Kannapolis City Schools, 269 students are expected to graduate from A.L. Brown High School. The graduation ceremony will be held at 6:30 p.m. Friday in the Kannapolis Performing Arts Center. Four Rowan-Salisbury schools plan to hold graduation ceremonies in Keppel Auditorium at Catawba College. The first will be South Rowan at 9 a.m. followed by East at noon, North at 4 p.m. and Salisbury at 8 pm. West Rowan will hold its graduation at 8 a.m. Friday in the football stadium, Hender-

son Independent at 11 a.m. in the auditorium and Carson at 2 p.m. in the gym. Superintendent Dr. Judy Grissom says it doesn’t matter how many years she has been involved in education, this time of year is always bittersweet. “To stand on stage and shake the hands of our graduating seniors culminates what we are all about and why we do what we do each day,” she says. “To see their smiles and knowing the adventures that await these young men and women is so exciting, and I always look forward to hear-

ing from them as the years go by.” Grissom says two of the high schools mark a first with this year’s graduating classes. “Jesse Carson High School’s senior graduates are the inaugural class that opened the brand new high school as the first freshman class in the fall of 2006,” she says. “They are the first class to complete four years at Carson. These years have flown by. “North Rowan High School will be graduating the first class of students that has participated in the iPod touch

program. Technology is changing the way students learn, and this class illustrates how our district continues to provide schools that are globally competitive. “And this is the first year that students were required to complete a graduation project, and they all did an excellent job. I am very proud of all our graduates and I wish for them the very best in their future endeavors.” Commencement speakers and junior marshals by school are listed as follows: A.L. Brown High School Speakers will be the valedic-

torian, whose name had not been announced Tuesday, and Principal Kevin Garay. Junior marshals, who earned the distinction based on their cumulative weighted grade-point averages, are Jackson Boone, chief marshal; MacKenzie Church; Austin Vernon; Kathryn Auten; Elizabeth Forrest; Austin Mincey; Vanessa Rojas; Martel Campbell; Houston Skipper; Taylor Overcash; Justin Kidd; Jennifer Williams; Erika Lessane; Renee Smith; and Kelsie Gibson.

See STUDENTS, 5C


G R A D U AT I O N

2C • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2010

SALISBURY POST

Jesse Carson High School Class of Brittany Alexander

Meredith Allen

Colton Ballard

Alex Bare

John Barringer

Jonathan Barringer

Erin Basinger

April Bates

Nicole Bates

Maria Bautista

James Bean

Patrick Bearden

Christopher Beaver

Christina Black

Kristen Blais

Michael Boone Jr

Beverly Bourn

Jessica Boyd

Hanna Bradley

Amber Brigman

Joshua Britt

Jazzmin Brown

Perrell Brown

Shawn Brown

Julie Bruce

Todd Bruce

Joshua Burr

Wesley Carlton

Michelle Casper

Linda Castillo

Alicia Castro

Jasmin Cepero

Jovani Cepero

Cori Charles

Jeremias Chonko

Tyler Christy

Heather Ciscel

John Clark

Amanda Clements

Kacey Cline

Brittany Coley

Baili Collins

Nathan Compton

Joseph Conner

Leslie Corbett

Tyler Corriher

Jessica Cox

Tyler Crossen

Hector Curiel

Joshua Daniels

Andrew Davis

Benjamin Davis

Chantel Deschaine

Salathiel Dixon

Fallon Doby

Christopher Donnell

Misty Doyle

Olivia Ellis

Christopher Facemire

Gary Feathers

Brandon Ferrare

Joshua Fiello

Dylan Fletemier

Miranda Foster

Tyler Freeze

Amber French

Lewis Funderburke

Ashlyn Garver

Joseph Gasque

Robert Gianfrancesco

Barbara Gilliam

Nicholas Golden

Mercedes Goodwin

Zachary Grkman

Luis Guerrero

Nayeli Hernandez

April Hall

Brittany Hampton

Jenson Harden

Samantha Harmon

Jacob Harris

Sarah Hayden

Brittany Gay

Westley Harkey

Andrew Goodman Christopher Goodman Dustin Goodman

Sarah Heafner

Michael Hurst Christian Hutchinson

Katelyn Heath

Courtney Hill

John Hinson

Caroline Hobart

Ethan Horne

Jennifer Hough

Nathan Hough

David Huffman

Cody Hummel

Amber Ingraham

Gabriella Ivanov

Stacey Johnson

Brandon Jolly

Brittany Jones

Jerrie Jones

Paige Jones

Oriana Kacorri

Tom Keoboupha

Holly Hunter

Robert Hunter

Darvone Keohavong

Brian Kepley

Aliyah Khan

Jonathan King

Ashlee Kirkman

Stephanie Kluttz

Taylor Knowles

Tiffany Lawson

Ashley Lefler

Dylan Lefler

Kaitlyn Leonard

Jessica Lesslie

Christina Lewis

Caitlyn Lineberry

Brandon Lipe

Kaylene Livengood

Brittany Loder

Madison Long

Sarah Long

Luke Lundy

Jenna Lyerly

Joshua Lyles

Joshua Manning

Anna Maphis

Joseph Marquez

Sarah Marshall

Corey Martin

T’Kera Mason

Kourtney McGrady

Haley McKnight

Jamie McCombs

Megan Meismer

Rosa Mejia

Anthony Melton

Israel Moore

Darius Moose

Fernando Mora

Brittany Morgan

Sarah Morgan

Sarah Morris

Justin Morrison

Samson Mount

Nicholas Murray

Jennifer Nesbitt

Steven Newton Jr Ashley Nicholson

Holden O’Brien

David O’Donnell

Matthew Olsen

Michael Olsen

Colton Overcash

Clauda Page

Jesse Park

Jessica Park

Matthew Parris

Brittany Parson

Jordan Pate

Colton Paxton

Jordan Pendergraft

Anson Phillips

Edward Pietryk III

Destiny Poole

Shelby Pregler

Kristen Propst

Zachary Reece

Alexandra Reed

Kayla Reid

Sha’Meisha Richards

Brian Riddle

Duwan Robertson

Jacob Rogers

Justice Schenck

Candice Seaford

Zachary Seaford

Trevor Seropian

Breckin Settlemyer

Derrick Sewell

Daniel Shay

Levi Shehan

McKenzie Sherrill

Brittany Smith

Colby Smith

Michael Socorro

Carlos Soto Jr

Shanna Stewart

Cecil Swain

Stacie Thomas

Madison McCombs Donald McIntyre III

Jessica Peters

Tiatoani Rosalino Jessica Rosko-Brameyer Jessica Schafer

Robert Smith

Zachary Smith

Weston Snow

James Srackangast Kaitlyn Stallings


G R A D U AT I O N

SALISBURY POST

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2010 • 3C

Jesse Carson High School Class of Justin Tidwell

Julie Tonnesen

Ashley Trexler

Ashleigh Trotter

Whitney Troutman

Benjamin Vinson

Chandelle Wallace

Emily Walser

Brandi Ward

Virginia Weant

Anthony Weaver

Zachary Welsh

Estus White IV

Zachary White

NOT PICTURED: Daniel Aldridge, Alysia Altheide, Gerson Amaya, Nicole Bostian, Michael Crouch, Brittnay Davis, David DuBose III, Christopher Euart, Dalton Eudy, Rena Evans, Christopher Franklin, Mykal Groll, Joshua Johnson, Quinton A Jones, Jairo Luna, Joshua Lyles, Cori Mayhew, Chelsie Moore, Hector Mora, Fernando Romero, Leah Moss, Joseph Patchin, Joshua Readling, Edwin Riley, Anthony Robinson, Cody Shaver, Robbie Shehan, Zachary Simmons, Brice Snuggs, Devyn Solomon, Kaleb Stallings, Tyler Starnes, Sergio Torres, David Vasquez, Kristin Vest, Kyle Wilkinson, Samuel Young Taylor Whitley

Marisa Williams Christopher Winburn Danielle Yancey

Joshua York

Justin Yost

Olivia Young-Houston

Erin Young

Julio Zubillaga

Carson High School Class of 2010 senior plans Jesse Carson High School senior plans. Appalachian State University — Meredith Allen, Ethan Horne, Anna Maphis. Averett University — Zack Grkman. Berklee College of Music — Perrell Brown. Bluefield College — Kourtney McGrady, Megan Meismer. Brevard College – Jazzmin Brown, Darius Moose. Cabarrus College of Health Science — Brittany Gay, Sarah Beth Morgan. Cape Fear Community College — Jonathan King. Catawba College — Linda Castillo, Leslie Corbett, Brittnay Davis, Fallon Doby, Cody Gasque, Christopher Goodman, Cody Hummel, Amber Ingraham, Aliyah Khan, Donald McIntyre, Derrick Sewell, Ginny Weant, Zach White, Julio Zubillaga. Carolina Bible College — Christopher Winburn. Cazenovia College — Edwin Riley. Davidson County Community College — Heather Ciscel, Jes-

sica Rosko-Brameyer. East Carolina University – Tyler Crossen, Tom Keoboupha, Dylan Lefler, Jenna Lyerly. Elon University — Julie Tonnesen. Florida State University — Robby Gianfrancesco. Forsyth Technical — Alex Bare, Kristin Vest. Guilford College — Zachary Smith, Taylor Whitley. High Point University — Luke Lundy. ITT Technical — Chris Facemire. Johnson and Wales — Shanna Stewart, Cecil Swain. Kings College — McKenzie Sherrill. Lenoir-Rhyne University — Tyler Freeze, Justin Morrison. Living Art College — Ashley Lefler, Devyn Solomon. NASCAR Techical Institute — Joseph Conner. Nashville Auto College — Jordan Pendergraft. North Carolina State University — Nathan Compton, Joseph Marquez, Ashley Nicholson, Levi Shehan.

Pfeiffer University — Brittany Loder. Philadelphia University – Erin Basinger. Rowan-Cabarrus Commnity College — Daniel Aldridge, Alysia Altheide, Chad Barringer, April Bates, Nicole Bates, Christina Black, Kristen Blais, Nicole Bostian, Beverly Bourn, Jessica Boyd, Hannah Bradley, Josh Britt, Wesley Carlton, Jasmine Cepero, Jovani Cepero, Tyler Christy, Amanda Clements, Brittany Coley, Baili Collins, Tyler Corriher, Andrew Davis, Misty Doyle, Olivia Ellis, Dalton Eudy, Miranda Foster, Chris Franklin, Amber French, Lewis Funderburke, Ashlyn Garver, Barbie Gilliam, Mercedes Goodwin, Hayeli Gutierres, April Hall, Brittany Hampton, Westley Harkey, Sarah Heafner, Caroline Hobart, Jennifer Hough, Holly Hunter, Robert Hunter, Mike Hurst, Christian Hutchinson, Gabriella Ivanov, Stacey Johnson, Brittany Jones, Jenny Keohavong, Stephanie Kluttz, Taylor Knowles, Tiffany Lawson,Kaitlyn Leonard,Jessica

Lesslie, Christina Lewis, Brandon Lipe, Madison Long, Josh Lyles, Sarah Marshall, Jamie McCombs, Haley McKnight, Fernando Mora, Brittany Morgan, Sarah Morris, Leah Moss, Nick Murray, Matthew Olsen, Michael Olsen, Jessica Park, Jessica Peters, Shelby Pregler, Joshua Readling, Alexandra Reed, Brian Riddle, Trevor Seropian, Breckin Settlemyer, Cody Shaver, Daniel Shay, Zack Simmons, Brittany Smith, Michael Socorro, Carlos Soto, Kaitlyn Stallings, Tyler Starnes, Justin Tidwell, Sergio Torres, Ashley Trexler, Ben Vinson, Chandelle Wallace, Emily Walser, Brandi Ward, Anthony Weaver, Marisa Williams, Caleb Wilson, Joshua York. St. Augustine — Olivia Young-Houston. Strayer University — Cori Mayhew. University of North Carolina at Asheville – Rena Evans, Dylan Fletemier, Caitlyn Lineberry, Zach Welsh University of North Carolina at Charlotte — Benjamin Davis, Courtney Hill, Oriana

Kacorri, Weston Snow, Whitney Troutman, Danielle Yancey. University of North Carolina at Greensboro — Michelle Casper, Hector Curiel, Brandon Jolly, Anson Phillips. University of North Carolina at Wilmington — Alicia Castro, Katelyn Heath, Ashlee Kirkman, Madison McCombs, Eddie Pietryk, Colby Smith. UTI Auto Technical — Dustin Goodman, Josh Manning, Colton Paxton, Justice Schenck, Justin Yost. Wake Technical — Chris Donnell. Western Carolina University — Brittany Alexander, Colton Ballard, Jonathan Barringer, Joshua Burr, Sarah Hayden, Nathan Hough, Kaylene Livengood, Steven Newton, Colton Overcash, Caleb Srackangast, Ashleigh Trotter. Wingate University — Jenson Harden. U.S. Air Force — John Clark, Andrew Goodman, Samson Mount, Holden O’Brien, Anthony Robinson. Army — Josh Daniels, Chris

Euart, Greg Godfrey, Joseph Patchin. U.S. Marines Corps. — Barrett Bean, Cory Martin, David Odonnell, Jacob Rogers. Navy — Nick Golden. Work force — Maria Bautista, Chris Beaver, Michael Boone, Todd Bruce, Michael Crouch, Salathiel Dixon, Brian Kepley, Rosa Mejia, Brittany Parson, Duwan Robertson, Tlatoani Rosalino, David Vasquez, Samuel Young. Undecided — Patrick Bearden, Shawn Brown, Cori Charles, Jeremy Chonko, Kacey Cline, Jessica Cox, Chantel Deschaine, Gary Feathers, Brandon Ferrare, Luis Guerrero, John Hinson, David Huffman, Jerrie Jones, Paige Jones, Sarah Long,T’Kera Mason, Anthony Melton, Chelsie Moore, Hector Mora, Jennifer Nesbit, Jesse Park, Matt Parris, Jordan Pate, Destiny Poole, Kristen Propst, Zack Reece, Kayla Reid, Candice Seaford, Zack Seaford, Jessica Schafer, Robert Smith, Kyle Wilkinson, Erin Young.

Carson High School honors students at awards ceremony Carson High School Awards Night honorees. All-County Scholars — Joseph Marquez, Donald McIntyre III, Julie Tonnesen, Virginia Weant. Matthew C. Graziadei Award — Luke Lundy. J. Michael McDuffie Memorial Scholarship — Madison Long. Salisbury Rotary Club Athletic Leadership Award — Jesse Park. AkzoNobel Scholarship — Joseph Marquez. Jean Jordan Memorial Scholarship — Shanna Stewart. Samuel R. Johhson Memorial Scholarship — Cecil Swain. Mount Zion UCC Frank and Mary Cress Scholarship — Courtney Hill. China Grove Rotary Scholarship — Sarah Beth Morgan. Waterworks Dare to Imagine — Michelle Casper. Piedmont Players Award — Virginia Weant. SECU People Helping People Scholarship — Josh Burr. F&M Bank Merit Award — Madison Long. RCCC Endowment Scholar-

ship — Beverly Bourn. Eureka Masonic Lodge Scholarship — Kaylene Livengood. Ralph Ketner & William Comer Scholarship — Brittany Smith. N.C. Teaching Fellows — Caitlyn Lineberry, Julie Tonnesen. DAR Good Citizen — Julie Tonnesen. Student Council Award — Jenson Harden, Tom Keoboupha. Catawba College Scholarships — Julie Bruce, Linda Castillo, Brittnay Davis, Cody Gasque, Chris Goodman, Cody Hummel, Amber Ingraham, Aliyah Khan, Donald McIntyre III, Virginia Weant, Zach White, Julio Zubillaga. Rowan County Veterans Council American History Award — Caitlyn Lineberry. Marine Corps Scholastic Excellence Award — Joseph Marquez, Virginia Weant. Marine Corps “Semper Fidelis” Award — Meredith Allen, Josh Burr. Marine Corps Distinguished Athlete Award — Zach Grk-

man, Kaylene Livengood. National Honor Society Leadership Award — Linda Castillo. National Honor Society Service Award — Whitney Troutman, Taylor Whitley. National Honor Society Character Award — Donald McIntyre III, Sarah Beth Morgan. True Cougar Football Scholarship — Justice Schenck. Rowan-Salisbury Principals and Assistant Principals Scholarship — Joseph Marquez. NCHSAA Clary Medal Nominee — Megan Meismer. Bradley Barnhardt Memorial Scholarship — Jennifer Hough, Shanna Stewart, Taylor Whitley. NAACP Scholarship — Jazzmin Brown, Sha’Meisha Richards. Salisbury-Rowan Home Builders Association — Wesley Carlton. Good Beginnings — Ashlee Kirkman, Madison Long. Department Award Winner • Art — Michelle Casper, Ashley Lefler, Edwin Riley. • Family and Consumer

Science — Madison Long. • Agriculture — Cori Charles, Nathan Compton. • Cabinet Making — Wesley Carlton, Nick Golden. • Foreign Language — Julie Tonnesen. • English — Donald McIntyre III. • Yearbook — Beverly Bourn, Shanna Stewart. • Newspaper — Julie Tonnesen. • Math — Joseph Marquez. • Environmental science — Meredith Allen. • Chemistry — Linda Castillo, Joseph Marquez. • Anatomy and physiology —Brittany Gay. • Social studies — Whitney Troutman. Presentation of new student body president — Dylan Eagle. Junior Marshal Medals — Leane Blais, Carol Brown, Patrick Diep, Dylan Eagle, Amanda Girelli, Brooke Hartsell, Kathryn Long, Tiffany McClure, Lianna Michael, Erica Patella, Emily Peeler, Leah Perkins. SAT/ACT Honor Roll — Erin

Basinger, Nathan Compton, Dylan Fletemier, Robert Gianfrancesco, Zach Grkman, Katelyn Heath, Caitlyn Lineberry, Brittany Loder, Joseph Marquez, Anna Maphis, Kourtney McGrady, Donald McIntyre III, Julie Tonnesen, Emily Walser, Virgina Weant, Zach Welsh, Julio Zubillaga. Girls State — Julie Bruce, Amber Ingraham. Philadelphia University Faculty — Erin Basinger. Simms (Brevard) — Jazzmin Brown Chancellors Choice (Western Carolina) — Josh Burr. Laurels (UNCA) — Dylan Fletemier. Founders (Pfieffer) — Tyler Freeze Rowan-Salisbury Association of Educators — Cody Gasque. CMC NorthEast Employee Scholarship — Brittany Gay. Florida Bright Futures Scholarship — Robert Gianfrancesco. Presidential (Averett) — Zach Grkman. Presidential (Pfeiffer) — Brittany Loder.

Milton Rose Science (Pfeiffer) — Brittany Loder. ADK Educator’s Sorority Scholarship — Luke Lundy. Chairscholars Foundation Scholarship — Luke Lundy. Curtis Eagle Scholarship — Luke Lundy. United Methodist Higher Education Foundation — Luke Lundy. First United Methodist Church Scholarship — Luke Lundy. BC Grant (Bluefield College) — Kourtney McGrady. BC Grant (Bluefield College) — Megan Meismer. Henry Hood (Guilford) — Zach Smith. Dorothy Ragsdale McMichael (Guilford) — Zach Smith. Presidential Award (Johnson & Wales) — Shanna Stewart. FCLA Scholarship — Shanna Stewart. JWU Campus Award (Johnson & Wales) — Cecil Swain. Elon Teaching Fellows Match — Julie Tonnesen. Dean’s Award (Guilford) — Taylor Whitley. Presidential (Guilford) — Taylor Whitley.

CARSON JUNIOR MARSHALS Congratulates the Salisbury Academy Class of 2006 Madi Ralston and Austin Flynn—SHS Co-Valedictorians Jordan Fuller, Glen Gray, Rachel Hardin, Carson Hatchett, Wes McNeely, Josh Paz, Molly Robinson, Sarah Shirley, Nathaniel Stout and Molly Ward

We are proud of you!

S46206

Carson High School junior marshals are, front row, Tiffany McClure, Emily Peeler, Lianna Michael, Amanda Girelli; middle row, Leane Blais, Brooke Hartsell, Leah Perkins, Carol Brown, Kathryn Long, Erica Patella; bast row, Dylan Eagle, Patrick Diep.


G R A D U AT I O N

4C • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2010

SALISBURY POST

East Rowan High School Class of Phillip Ajayi

Thomas Allen

Justin Allison

Elving Almeida

Roland Arey

Andrew Armour

Anna Ayala

Whitley Barrier

Landon Beattie

Ashley Beaver

Bradley Beaver

Larry Beck

Hunter Bell

Mary Beyer

Alexis Blakeney

Racheal Blanton

Whitney Boone

Ashley Bowers

Lauren Brady

Tawny Brazeel

Benjamin Braziel

Brittany Bright

Charlotte Brown

Justin Brown

Nicholas Brown

Joseph Bumgarner

Tara Calhoun

Nicole Callahan

Jenna Cassels

Christian Childs

Nathan Clere

Richard Cleveland

Thomas Collins

Casey Combs

Phillip Cook

Ross Cooper

Nichole Corl-Efird

Shakayla Cowan

Mark Cruse

Preston Dixon

Kathryn Doby

Kimberly Dunn

Zachary Dyer

Lindsay Eagle

Suzanne Earnhardt

Samuel Edmonds

Madalyn File

Holly Fisher

Jessica Fisher

Titus Fleming

Brandon Fortson

Patricia Foshay

Jason Fraley

Jennifer Fraley

Kala Franks

Nicholas Freeman

Joshua Garrett

Jarred Garrison

Michael Gobbel

Travis Gobble

Anthony Gonzalez

Brenna Goodman

Stacey Goodman

Gerald Gordy

Sierra Gray

Joshua Greer

Christina Griffin

Brian Grohman

Michael Gutterson

Lauren Haas

Jeffrey Haltom

Courtney Hamilton

Jason Hammond

Samantha Harkey

Starneshia Harris

Jasmine Hart

Samantha Hartle

Samantha Haviland

Sheryl Hawkins

Garrett Helms

Caleb Henley

Katie Hiatt

Caleb Hill

Justin Hill

Matthew Hill

Matthew Hilton

Leah Hines

Collin Holmes

Noah Holmes

Sara Hopkins

Bennett Hough

Hunter House

Jennifer Hughes

Josiah Hurst

Katrina Jackson

Christopher Jacobs

Justin Jacobsen

Jesse Jeffery

Jacob Johnson

Garrison Jones

Issac Jones

Blake Jordan

Joseph Kaiser

Brett Kesler

Maranda Kesler

Robert Kesslick

Kameron Khan

Andrea Kiser

Jeffrey Kluttz

Joshua Kongmany

Alex Lagler

Mark Lamb

Zachary Lambe

Kelly Leach

Cory Liggins

Brynne Lippard

Michelle Long

Katie Lowman

Natassia Lundgren

Lacey Maners

Eva Marmoutas

Travis Martin

Haley Mastranunzio

Louis Mastro

Andrew May

Kayla McCall

Bryson McHone

Tempest Means

Justin Medlin

Justin Merkwa

Shalyn Miller

Thomas Mills

Jeffrey Mims

Keri Misenheimer

Sonya Moore

Ashley Morgan

Lindsay Mullis

Rachel Nelson

Sarah Newman

Elizabeth Nichols

Ross Oden

Deanna Osborne

Taylor Owen

Holden Pace

Megan Parrish

Jacob Patch

Anna Patterson

Chloe Patton

Christopher Peeler

Markus Peeler

Scarlett Perrigan

Elena Peters

Haleigh Phillips

Leanna Pitts

Joseph Poole

Tiffany Porter

Maribel Portillo

Amanda Possidente

Kayla Potts

Adam Praechtl

Nicholas Price

Sarah Price

Rachael Rangel

Anna Reichert

Dylan Rich

Carl Riddle

Ashley Ritchie

Chelsea Ritchie

Corey Ritchie

Cristin Ritchie

Jessica Ritchie

Nathanial Robbins

Colton Rogers

Christopher Russell

Edwin Santiago

Erin Schnuit

Joseph Scrip

Natalie Scruggs

Darrice Sells

Jessica Shaver

Lindsey Sherrill

Madelyn Sifford

Matthew Small

Leigh Smith

Travis Snider

Lynnsey Starke

Jennifer Starnes

Cody Stewart

Whitney Stokes

Selena Stone

Bryson Stoner

Megan Burridge

Cody Garris

Quanesha Campbell Katherine Cassady

William Cunningham James Darawich

Ivory Davis

Mackenzie Holshouser Brittany Honeycutt

Jeremy Davis Christopher Demitraszek Brandon Devos

Branden Patterson Zachery Patterson

Barrett Stehr

Dillon Bentley

Tamika Burleson


G R A D U AT I O N

SALISBURY POST

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2010 • 5C

East Rowan High School Class of Justin Stoner

Robert Vandezande

Cassandra Strobel

Jesse Swinson

Alexandra Tarner

Charli Taylor

Derrick Thompson

Elliot Thompson

Julianna Thompson

Jodie Trexler

Taylor Wagner

Danielle Wall

Katelyn Walton

Shelby Ward

Jordan Warren

Heather Watson

Evan Webb

Riley Weber

Preston Troutman

Jasmine Tutterow

Marquise Weddington Jesse Wheeler

Jessica Utley

Marc Valley

Mary Vanderford

Jessica Wheeler

Hayden White

Regan Wike

NOT PICTURED: Mikki Anderson, Anna Ayala, Alexander Barrier, David Bartlett, Eric Beaver, Mason Brewer, Candace Cline, Katey Crisco, Angela Daniels, Allen Davis, Justin Dimarzo, Mason Elliott, Steven Everhart, Cole Frame, Daniel Hadnott, Megan Hammill, Morgan Harrison, Alea Herring, Jordan Hiatt, Cheraney Hoffman, Kimberly Johnson, Zachary Menster, Gilbert Morgan, Shannon Morgan, Quandra Morgan, Shanice Morrow, Garrett Mowery, David Newman, Ui Park, Joshuah Rowles, Leo Spencer, Justin Sprinkle, Nicholas Stanley, Billy Sutherland, Jacob Vodochodsky, John Ward, and Travis Warner. Asia Wilson

Hannah Wilson

Whitney Wood

Christa Woody

Franklin Wright

East Rowan High School Class of 2010 senior plans East Rowan High School senior plans. Air Force Academy — Barrett Baughan Stehr. Appalachian State University — Madalyn Clair File, Noah Christopher Holmes, Colton Wade Rogers, Cassandra Rochell Strobel, Preston Lane Troutman. Art Institute of Charlotte — Christina Marie Griffin. Auburn University — Thomas Patrick Collins, Danielle Evon Wall Averett University — Samuel Andrew Edmonds, Gerald Greyson Gordy. Brevard College — Phillip Sewede Ajayi III, Amanda Gail Possidente, Nathanial Tyler Robbins. Cabarrus College of Health Sciences — Ashley Nicole Beaver. Campbell University — Christopher James Sho Demitraszek, Jennifer Leigh Hughes. Cape Fear Community College — Tawny Nicole Brazeel, Marquise Dametrick Weddington. Catawba College — Christin Andrea Ritchie, Brynne Nicole Lippard. Catawba Valley Community College — Michael Parker Gobble. Central Carolina Community College — Stacey Lynn Goodman. Citadel — Franklin Max Wright. Coastal Carolina University — Brandon Cory Devos, Kayla Mechelle Potts. Central Piedmont Community College — Tamika Lasheigh Burleson, Megan Alexandria Hammill, Corey Wilson Ritchie.

STUDENTS FROM 1C

Carson High School - Junior marshals are Tiffany McClure, Emily Peeler, Lianna Michael, Amanda Girelli, Leane Blais, Brooke Hartsell, Leah Perkins, Carol Brown, Kathryn Long, Erica Patella, Dylan Eagle and Patrick Diep. East Rowan High School Co-valedictorians are Thomas Collins and Christopher Demitraszek. Amanda Possidente is the student body president, and Leigh Smith, the senior class president. Junior Marshals are Dillon Arey, Jameson Blalock, Masyn Burgess, Raven Corbett, Cameron Feriante, Christopher Fleming, Thomas Green, Rachel Hardy-Simpson, Taylor Honeycutt, Levi Huffman, Nealeigh Lefler, Brett Leslie, Avery Rogers, Luke Thomas and Taylor Young. North Rowan High School - Graduation speakers are Keely White, senior class president; Taylor Johnston, valedictorian; and Jeet Patel, salutatorian. Junior Marshals are Josh Price, chief marshal; Wesley Barker; Lauren Edds; Jessica Erwin; Kristin Harmon; Ashtyn Kepley; Evan O’Neal; Natasha Small; Austin Snider; Kevin Vang; Brittany Williams; Peter Wright; and Rhonda Cleary. Salisbury High School Graduation speakers are Cody Murphy, senior class secretary; Austin Flynn, salutatorian; Simone Wilson, senior

Davidson County Community College — Alexander Mitchell Barrier, Shelby Leigh Ward, Kimberly Michelle Johnson. East Tennessee State University — Ivory Brooke Davis. ECPI College of Technology — Garrett Ronald Helms. East Carolina University — Ross Alexander Cooper, Lindsay Anne Mullis, Sarah Elizabeth Newman, Haleigh Chantal Phillips, Natalie Shea Scruggs, Jessica Taylor Utley. Guilford Technical College — Lindsay Elizabeth Eagle, Nicholas Edward Freeman. Johnson & Wales University — Patricia Marie Foshay, Scarlett Leah Hines, Christopher James Peeler, Joseph Anthony Poole. J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College — Heather Nicole Watson. Kings College — Jason Tyler Fraley, Jeffrey Taylor Kluttz. Liberty University — Anthony Gabriel Gonzalez, Sarah Elaine Price. Livingstone College — Joseph James Scrip. Lenoir-Rhyne — Whitley Shay Barrier. U.S. Marine Corps — Zachary Tyler Lambe. Nashville Diesel College — James Michael Darawich, Leo Dean Spencer III. North Carolina National Guard — Mason Todd Elliott, Jeffrey Scott Mims North Carolina State University — Katherine Rose Cassady, Jenna Kristina Cassels, Richard Alan Cleveland III, Caleb Richard Henley, Caleb Douglas Hill, Blake Aaron Jordan, Bryson Newell McHone, Erin Elizabeth Schnuit, Leigh Mariah Smith.

class vice president; Kyaunna Shanae White, senior class president; Madaline Ralston, valedictorian; and Phil Do, senior class treasurer. Junior Marshals are Mary Margaret Mills and Marlena Murphy, co-chiefs; Roy Dixon; Carley Drye; Mallison Fisher; Zoe Gonzales; Alee Johnson; Margaret Kaufmann; Andrew McCollister; Virginia Nicholson; Steve Page; David Simons; Phillip Tonseth; Alexander Weant; and Hannah White. South Rowan High School Commencement speakers are Megan Bean and Skylar Stamey. Junior Marshals are Joel Luther, chief; Edmund Charlton; Kirstie Corriher; Kim Fesperman; Jordan Lane; Joshua Lowder; Sara Locklear; Kayla Melton; Walter Parham; Casey Raymond; Morgan Tadlock; and Christina Villegas West Rowan High School Graduation speakers are Luke Miller and Desere’ Cross, academic speakers; Katie Carscaddon, senior class president; and Olivia McSwain, Student Government Association president. Junior Marshals are Anesia Baugh, Joel Brittain, Raleigh Crater, Margaret Daniel, Adam Fessler, Moshika Finger, Chris Holmes, Breann Lambert, Amanda Matlock, Bransyn Motley, Madison Osborne, Leslie Pence, Ashlynn Perry, Douglas Petrea, Sam Porter, Kevin Robinson, Alyssa Snider, Caitlin Suire and Colin Townsend. Contact Kathy Chaffin at 704-797-4249.

Workforce — Larry Eugene Beck. Pfeiffer University — Samantha Joanne Hartle, Hunter Trent House, Elizabeth Lorraine Nichols, Zachary Adam Dyer. Phoenix University — Thomas Christopher Mills. Pitt Community College — Whitney Michelle Boone, Christopher Scott Jacobs. Randolph Community College — Kimberly Lynn Dunn. Rowan-Cabarrus Community College — Justin Pierre Allison, Anna Sewede Ayala, Landon Ryan Beattie, Bradley Ray Beaver, Eric Ryan Beaver, Alexis Nicole Blakeney, Racheal Elizabeth Blanton, Nicholas Lee Brown, Tara Hope Calhoun, Nicole Maureen Callahan, Quanesha Lambraya Campbell, Nichole Marie Corl-Efird, William Tyler Cunningham, Jeremy Cord Davis, Preston Edward Dixon, Kathryn Elizabeth Doby, Steven Max Everhart, Holly Ann Fisher, Titus Andrew Fleming, Brandon Darril Fortson, Jennifer Brooke Fraley, Kala Christine Franks, Joshua Adam Garrett, Cody Levi Garris, Brian Raymond Groham, Michael David Gutterson, Courtney Brooke Hamilton, Jason Charles Hammond, Sheryl Nicole Hawkins, Matthew Blayne Hill, Cheraney Dawn Hoffman, Collin Keyanna Holmes, Mackenzie Lee Holshouser, Josiah Patrick Hurst, Jacob Daniel Johnson, Joseph Blake Kaiser, Brett Alexandra Kesler, Maranda Jade Kesler, Robert Michael Kesslick Jr., Kameron Hailey Khan, Andrea Michelle Kiser, Kelly Renee Leach, Cory Gene Lig-

gins, Michelle Danielle Long, Katie Ann Lowman, Natassia Elizabeth Lundgren, Eva Madeline Marmoutas, Travis Shane Martin Jr., Justin Thomas Merkwa, Keri Nicole Misenheimer, Shannon Paige Morgan, Quandra T’Ericka Denise Morrison, Shanice Stormy Morrow, Rachel Elizabeth Nelson, David Anthony Newman, Deanna Marie Osborne, Taylor Austin Owen, Megan Elise Parrish, Anna Elizabeth Patterson, Branden Cory Patterson, Chloe Love Patton, Markus Blair Peeler, Scarlett Cheyanne Perrigan, Leanna Rose Pitts, Nicholas Kyle Price, Anna Nicole Reichert, Dylan Alexander Rich, Carl Franklin Riddle Jr., Ashley Nicole Ritchie, Chelsea Nicole Ritchie, Jessica Brooke Ritchie, Joshuah Kenneth Rowles, Jessica Leann Shaver, Lindsey Austin Sherrill, Travis Clay Snider, Lynnsey Jan Starke, Jennifer Lynn Starnes, Cody Alan Stewart, Whitney Lea Stokes, Selena Dawn Stone, Bryson Ray Stoner, Justin Martin Stoner, Charli Mae Taylor, Derrick Wade Thompson, Jodie Marie Trexler, Jasmine Nicole Tutterow, Marc Travis Valley, Mary Alaina Vanderford, Robert Paul Vandezande, Jacob Andrew Vodochodsky, Katelyn Nicole Walton, John William Ward III, Travis Michael Warner, Jordan Tierra Warren, Jessica Michelle Wheeler, Hayden Alexander White. Savannah College of Art and Design — Asia Charna Wilson. Shaw University — Tempest Shanell Means. Southwestern Community College — Evan Stuart Webb.

St. Andrews Presbyterian College — Hannah Elizabeth Wilson. Stanly Community College — Suzanne Michelle Earnhardt, Jordan Reece Hiatt, Taylor Ray Wagner. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill — Joshua Kongmany, Maribel Portillo, Jesse Dale Wheeler. University of North Carolina at Pembroke — Thomas Foust Allen, Elliot Chase Thompson. University of North Carolina at Charlotte — Hunter Randall Bell, Charlotte Avery Brown, Casey Nicole Combs, Lauren Elise Haas, Samantha Anne Haviland, Brittany Ann Honeycutt, Sara Christine Hopkins, Justin Alfred Jacobsen, Garrison Marshall Jones, Haley Renee Mastranunzio, Madelyn Bray Sifford, Alexandra Beth Tarner, Julianna Troi Thompson, Riley Brooks Weber, Regan Alexandra Wike. University of North Carolina at Greensboro — Shakayla Montice Cowan, Shalyn Nicole Miller, Christa Elizabeth Woody. University of North Carolina at Wilmington — Whitney Taylor Wood. Undecided — Elving Javier Almeida, Mikki Brooke Anderson, David Preston Bartlett, Mary Noelle Beyer, Lauren Taylor Brady, Justin Wayne Brown, Joseph Tyler Bumgarner, Megan Denise Burridge, Heather Kristin Byrd, Nathan Andrew Clere, Candace Rene Cline, Phillip Aaron Cook, Katey Alexzandria Crisco, Angela Robin Daniels, Allen Dean Davis, Justin Lee Dimarzo, Travis Lynn Gobble, Brenna Eliza-

beth Goodman, Sierra Christina Gray, Joshua Brian Greer, Daniel Ray Hadnott, Jeffrey Carl Haltom Jr., Samantha Lee Harkey, Starneshia Nete Harris, Jasmine Moriah Hart, Alea Lesan Herring, Justin Brian Hill, Matthew Caleb Hilton, Bennett Harmon Hough, Mark Elliot Lamb, Louis Edward Mastro, Kayla Leigh McCall, Justin Wayne Medlin, Zachary Todd Menster, Sonya Michelle Moore, Ashley Nicole Morgan, Gilbert Justin Morgan, Holden Scott Pace, Ui Jeong Park, Elena Anne Peters, Tiffany Michele Porter, Adam Alexander Praechtl, Corey Ray Robbins, Christopher Thomas Russell, Darrice Craig Sells, Matthew Thomas Small, Justin Ray Sprinkle, Nicholas Shay Stanley, Jesse Lee Swinson. United States Air Force — Katrina Rae Jackson, U.S. Army — Mark Allen Cruse Jr., Cole Isenhour Frame, Jarred Daniel Garrison, Morgan Chase Harrison, Katie Scarhlett Hiatt, Jesse Wayne Jeffery, Issac Adam Jones, Jacob Richard Patch, Zachery Clyde Patterson, Edwin G. Santiago, Billy Joel Sutherland. University of South Carolina Upstate— Ross Jay Oden. Western Carolina University — Ashley Nicole Bowers, Benjamin David Braziel, Roland Hunter Arey. Wilkes Community College — Brittany Renae Bright. Wingate University — Dillon Matthew Bentley, Christian Luke Childs, Jessica Ruth Fisher, Lacey Paige Maners, Andrew Joseph May, Rachael Feliz Rangel.

EAST ROWAN JUNIOR MARSHALS

Chief Marshals Raven Corbett, Brett Leslie and Luke Thomas. Back row, (left to right), Brett Leslie, Chris Fleming, Avery Rogers, Cameron Feriante, Luke Thomas, Jamey Blalock, Thomas Green, Levi Huffman, Dillon Arey; front row (left to right), Rachel Hardy-Simpson, Taylor Young, Raven Corbett, Masyn Burgess, Taylor Honeycutt, Nealeigh Lefler.


G R A D U AT I O N

6C • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2010

SALISBURY POST

North Rowan High School Class of Juan Almazan-Arellano Tenasia Archie

Thomas Baker

Tatiana Banks

Corbin Bennett

Keasha Best

Olivia Bethea

Shakiya Bridges

Lauren Brown

Natisha Bruce

Charity Daugherty Walter Daugherty

David Bush

Cody Butchart

Demetri Caldwell

Holly Cameron

Brittany Davis

Cordarril Davis

Janaka Dawkins

Toni Dotson

Ryan Campbell

Stacey Carver

Briceida Castro

Rachel Cloos

Caitlin Crawford

Rahjan Crawford

Tyler Cross

Drew Crowell

Misti Elliott

Joseph Fife

Michael Fox

Dondre Gaither

Hilda Garcia

Marilyn Goodman

David Gulledge

Dustin Guthrie

Courtney Hall

Andrew Hallett

Maurice Harrison

Marissa Herchler

Emmett Hipp

Diamond Jackson

Myiesha Jiles

Taylor Johnston

Bryce Jones

Tiffany Keitt

Carly Landreth

T'keyah Latimore

Jessica Lince

Gabrielle Littleton

Emilio Locklear

Tyler Mahaley

Amanda Martin

Ashley Martinez

Robert Mauldin

Dominique Meade

Gregory Melton

Jose Mendoza

Jeremy Miles

Melinda Mitchell

Meredith Moore

Amy Morgan

Kayla Morgan

Kyle Munday

Amanda Munoz

Jeffrey Nelson

Jeet Patel

Justine Patterson

Trenton Puckett

Keith Reid

Haley Ridenhour

Symphony Roberts

Jon Robertson

Casey Robinson

Eric Robinson

Marince Sanchez

Kyle Sharp

Vincent Shropshire

Jessica Sifford

Latoya Sifford

Scarlett Simmington

Greg Sims

Amber Sipes

Amanda Sisco

Brittany Sloan

Roneisha Smith

Reginald Smyre

Lauren Snider

Miller Sokolowski

Nevin Spohn

Michael Standard

Latricia Stinson

Scott Strachan

Sheneqa Suber

Matthew Taylor

Chia Thao

Daija Thompson

Lindsay Thompson

Hope Troutman

Erika Turner

Jasmine Turner

John Vang

Karina Velazquez

Haustin Walser

William Webb

Keely White

Augustine Wiggins

Maria Williams

Danielle Young

Hunter Zweep

NOT PICTURED: Shaquille Bagley, Kioshja Bellamy, Marshall Boling, Amanda Brogdon, Kimberly Coburn, Katherine Cordell, Andrea Cornelius, Carlos Ellis, Martin Frey, Haywood Graham, Ge’Aire Hendrick, Justin Lambert, Garrett Loftin, Esdras Lozano, Shanekia Mcconnaughey, Stephanie MottElkins, Danielsson Oliva-Zambrano, Untavion Pemberton, Samantha Roberts, Joseph Shinault, Mariah Turner, Trey Whitfield, Trevor Wilson

North Rowan High School Class of 2010 senior plans North Rowan High School senior plans. Appalachian State University — Andy Hallett. Art Institute of Charlotte — Natisha Bruce, Misti Elliott. Campbell University — Lindsay Thompson, Jasmine Turner. Catawba College — Toni Dotson, Chia Thao, Scarlett Simmington. East Carolina University — Haustin Walser. Elizabeth City State University — Corbin Bennett, Dominique Meade. High Point University — Sheneqa Suber. Johnson & Wales University — Amanda Martin. King’s College — Kioshja

Bellamy, Katherine Cordell, Rahjan Crawford. North Carolina A&T State University — Tifany Keitt, Keely White. North Carolina State University — Courtney Hall, Marissa Herchler, Jeet Patel, Symphony Roberts, Jon Robertson, Miller Sokolowski. Queens University of Charlotte — Caitlin Crawford. Saint Augustine’s College — Dondre Gaither. Shaw University — Brittany Davis, Diamond Jackson. University of North Carolina at Asheville — Lauren Brown, Danielle Young. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill — Taylor Johnston, Meredith Moore, Lauren

Snider. University of North Carolina at Charlotte — Rachel Cloos, Maurice Harrison, Amanda Sisco, Hope Troutman, Maria Williams. University of North Carolina at Greensboro — Drew Crowell, Marilyn Goodman, Kayla Morgan, Karina Velazquez. University of North Carolina at Pembroke — Casey Robinson. Virginia State University — Myiesha Jiles. Western Carolina University — Charity Daugherty, Tyler Mahaley, Sam Mauldin, Daija Thompson, John Vang. Wingate University — Tatiana Banks, Roneisha Smith, Augustine Wiggins. Winston-Salem State Univer-

sity — Shaquille Bagley, Demetri Caldwell, Walter Daugherty, Jeremy Miles, Justine Patterson, Vincent Shropshire, Latoya Sifford, Jessica Sifford. Catawba Valley Community College — Kyle Munday. Davidson County Community College — Te’keyah Lattimore, Melinda Mitchell. Guilford Technical Community College — Greg Sims. ITT Technical Institute — Jessica Nelson. McLennan Community College — Amanda Brogdon. NASCAR Technical Institute — Reginald Smyre. Rowan-Cabarrus Community College — Juan Almazan-Arellano, Tenasia Archie, Keasha

Best, Marshall Boling, Cody Butchart, Holly Cameron, Stacey Carver, Tyler Cross, Janaka Dawkins, Roberto Espinoza, Justin Lambert, Carly Landreth, Emilio Locklear, Garrett Loftin, Shanekia McConnaughey, Greg Melton, Amanda Munoz, Trent Puckett, Keith Reid, Haley Ridenhour, Eric Robinson, Kyle Sharp, Nevin Spohn, Michael Standard, Latricia Stinson, Erika Turner, William Webb. Universal Technical Institute — Jeffery Nelson. U.S. Air Force — Patrick Bush U.S. Army — David Gulledge, Joseph Fife, Dustin Guthrie, Hunter Zweep. U.S. Marine Corps — Ryan

Campbell, Emmett Hipp, Danielsson Oliva-Zambrano, Matthew Taylor. Work force — Thomas Baker, Kimberly Coburn, Andrea Cornelius, Cordarril Davis, Martin Frey, Jessica Lince, Jose Mendoza, Stephanie Mott-Elkins. Undecided — Olivia Bethea, Ashley Bracken, Shakiya Bridges, Briceida Castro, Carlos Ellis, Michael Fox, Dondre Gaither, Hilda Garcia, Haywood Graham, Bryce Jones, Gabrielle Littleton, Esdras Lozano, Amanda Martin, Amy Morgan, Untavion Pemberton, Samantha Roberts, Marince Sanchez, Amber Sipes, Brittany Sloan, Scott Strachan, Mariah Turner.

North Rowan High School honors students at awards ceremony North Rowan High School awards. U.S. Army Scholar Athlete Award — Symphony Roberts, Jon Robertson. U.S. Marine Corps Scholastic Excellence Award — Marilyn Goodman, Demetri Caldwell. U.S. Marine Corps Distinguished Athlete Award — Lauren Snider, Samuel Starks. U.S. Marine Corps Semper Fidelis Band Award — Carly Landreth, Jeremy Miles. Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Grant — Tiffany Keitt; Keely White. Akzo-Nobel Science Scholarship — Lindsay Thompson. AMVETS Post 845 Rockwell — Marilyn Goodman. Bryan Bailey Memorial Scholarship — Marissa Herchler, Sam Mauldin.

Bryan Scott Smith Scholarship — Marilyn Goodman. Cabarrus Family Medicine Scholarship — Lindsay Thompson. Civitan of Salisbury Clifford Peeler Humanitarian Scholarship — Taylor Johnston. Daughters of the American Revolution Good Citizen Award — Taylor Johnston. Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Scholarship — Courtney Hall, Daija Thompson, Augustine Wiggins. Dorothy Click Fesperman Scholarship — Jeffry Nelson. F&M Bank Scholarship — Carly Landreth. Food Lion Scholarship —Taylor Johnston, Georgia Food Industry Association Scholarship — Taylor Johnston.

Jessie Young Earnhart Class of 1917 Spencer High Scholarship — Lindsay Thompson. Samuel R. Johnson Memorial Scholarship — Daija Thompson, Augustine Wiggins. Key Club Core Values Scholarship — Caitlin Crawford. Kiddie Land Kindergarten Scholarship — Sheneqa Suber, Keely White. Robert L. Mauldin Memorial Scholarship — Courtney Hall, Jeffrey Nelson. J. Michael McDuffie Memorial Scholarship — Augustine Wiggins. NAACP Scholarship — Symphony Roberts, Jasmine Turner, Tiffany Keitt, Courtney Hall, Keely White, Sheneqa Suber, Demetri Caldwell, Greg Melton.

North Carolina Jaycees 2010 Outstanding Teenager Scholarship — Taylor Johnston. North Carolina Retired School Personnel Scholarship — Chia Thao. N.C. State Elks Association Scholarship — Taylor Johnston. North Carolina State Employees Credit Union Scholarship — Jeet Patel. North Carolina Veterans Commission Scholarship — Marilyn Goodman. NRHS Alumni Association Scholarship — Taylor Johnston, Jeet Patel; NRHS Class of 1973 Memorial Scholarship — Marissa Herchler, Jon Robertson, Miller Sokolowski. Pilot Club of Salisbury Anchor Scholarship — Chia Thao.

Principals’/Assistant Principals’ Association Scholarship — Marissa Herchler. Thomas R. & Laura Ridge Scholarship — Taylor Johnston. Rowan Business Alliance Award — Taylor Johnston Rowan-Cabarrus Community College Endowed Scholarship — Michael Standard; Rowan County Masonic Scholarship — Lauren Brown, Jon Robertson; Rowan-Salisbury Association of Educators Scholarship — Marissa Herchler. Rowan-Salisbury Schools 2010 Outstanding CTE Student of the Year — Keely White. Salibury Elk’s Lodge 699 Donald Stout Memorial Scholarship — Jeet Patel, Symphony Roberts.

Salisbury Post All-County Scholars — Marissa Herchler, Taylor Johnston, Jon Robertson, Lindsay Thompson. Salisbury Rotary Club Scholarship — Taylor Johnston, Jeet Patel, Lindsay Thompson. Salisbury-Rowan Home Builders Association Scholarship — Jon Robertson. SAT/ACT Academic Wall of Fame Scholarship — Lauren Brown, Marissa Herchler, Taylor Johnston, Meredith Moore, Stephanie MottElkins, Jon Robertson, Lauren Snider, Miller Sokolowski, Lindsay Thompson, Haustin Walser, William Webb.

See NORTH, 7C


G R A D U AT I O N

SALISBURY POST

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2010 • 7C

Salisbury High School honors students at awards ceremony iah Whitaker. Wingate University Trustee Scholarship — Mi Linh Mai Tran, Alexanderia Yarborough. J. Michael McDuffie Memorial Scholarship — Chy’Keyla Caldwell. Lion’s Club Clyde H. Harris Scholarship — Joshua Childers. Lion’s Club Outstanding Student Award — TaylorDowns, Austin Flynn. Army ROTC Tuition Scholarship — Carson Hatchett. Charles Johnson Y Club Scholarship — Lewis Walker Thompson. AXA Scholarship — Wesley McNeely. Catawba College Full Tuition Grant — Kathryn Davidson. Catawba College Access Grant, Catawba Music Scholarship and Rowan County Scholarship — Spencer Ann Bowden. Catawba Access Grant and Rowan County Scholarship — Thomas Benton. Graham Scholarship — Mi Linh Mai Tran, Quinn Scarvey. Jack Campbell Memorial Scholarship — Cody Murphy. PTA Council Scholarship — Taylor Downs. Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Scholarship — Kyaunna White. Mount Zion Baptist Church

Salon tour bus comes to RCCC The Rowan-Cabarrus Community College Cosmetology Center in Kannapolis will host the TIGI “Livin’ the Dream” Traveling Salon Tour Bus from 12:30 to 8:30 p.m. June 16. The public is invited. The traveling salon bus will be easy to spot, with bold graphics of TIGI Bed Head and Rockaholic products and young rockers. The tour bus is making stops at rock concerts and music festivals across the U.S., hosting hair styling events and product sampling opportunities. When the tour bus rolls into the Cloverleaf Plaza,

home of the RCCC Cosmetology Center, on June 16, students will conduct a haircuta-thon and bake sale, with proceeds benefitting the Susan G. Komen Foundation. Entertainment will included DJ Wes Sellers, Damsel Down, We Shout Goodnight and Smile Charlatan. Refreshments and special discounts will be on hand from local retailers. “Enjoy yourselves. That’s what it’s all about. Grab hold of the spirit of rock ‘n’ roll, hair and fashion on TIGI Livin’ the Dream Traveling Salon Tour,” said Anthony Mascolo, international creative director, TIGI.

Samuel R. Johnson Memorial — Lewis Walker-Thompson. Helen S. and Julius L. Goldman Scholarship — Alexanderia Yarborough. AkzoNobel Science Scholarship — Molly Robinson. Johnson & Wales Culinary Essentials Scholarship — Ashley Rajkumar. Johnson & Wales University Scholarship — Phil Do. Alpha Delta Kappa Mu Chapter Scholarship — Taylor Downs. Beta Phi Chapter of Alpha Delta Kappa Scholarship — Taylor Downs. Norman Ingle Science Award — Quinn Scarvey. Kiddie Land Kindergarten Scholarship — Lewis Walker Thompson, Kyaunna White. U.S. Marines Outstanding Musician Award — Kathryn Davidson, David Dixon. U.S. Marines Distinguished Athlete — Dominique Phillips, Shanequa Phifer. U.S. Marines Academic Excellence — Sarah Shirley, William Yip. U.S. Army Scholar/Athlete Award — Austin Flynn, Madaline Ralston. Zeta Phi Beta Scholarship — Kyaunna White, Simone Wilson. Kiwanis Club Scholarship — Sarah Shirley.

NORTH

FROM 6C

SAT Most Improved Scholarship — Rachel Cloos, Marilyn Goodman, Jon Robertson. John Philips Sousa Music Award — Jeremy Miles. Spencer Civitan Sedberry & Troutman Memorial Award — Marilyn Goodman. Spencer Jaycees Outstanding Teenager Award — Taylor Johnston, Lindsay Thompson; Tau Gamma Delta Sorority Scholarship — Toni Dotson, Sheneqa Suber. Sam Walton Community Scholarship — Taylor Johnston.

Gail Detty Yost Mathematics Award — Wesley McNeely. N.C. Teaching Fellows Scholarship — Quinn Scarvey, Emily Yelton. Robert S. Goodwin Key Club Scholarship — Catherine Parks. Radford University Academic Excellence Award — Sarah Shirley. Dominion Memorial Scholarship — Madaline Ralston. Campbell University Scott Ellis Scholarship — David Dixon. Alpha Kappa Alpha — Kyaunna White, Katherine Hope Yates. Centre College Brown Fellow — Catherine Parks. Law Offices of Michael A. DeMayo Scholarship Program — Sarah Shirley. Wake Forest University Scholarship — William Yip. NCAE Scholarship — Taylor Downs. SHS Seven of Seven Art Award — Emily Yelton. John Brown Excellence in English Award — Phil Do. Raemi Evans Writing Scholar — Catherine Parks. Barbara K. Richards Writing Scholar — Charayna Walker. Ralph W. Ketner and William L. Comer Family Career and Technical Scholarship Fund — Larry Bonilla. Clemson University Academ-

WSOC-TV 2010 Carolinas’ Outstanding Graduate — Jon Robertson; Zeta Phi Beta Scholarship — Corbin Bennett, Keely White. Campbell University Scott-Ellis Scholarship, J.A. Campbell Circle of Distinguished Scholars, Campbell Administrative Scholarship — Lindsay Thompson. Catawba College Presidential Scholarship & Ketner Scholarship — Scarlett Simmington. Catawba College Access Grant — Chia Thao; Queens University of Charlotte — Caitlin Crawford. Wingate University Student Engagement Scholarship — Roneisha Smith. Wingate University Student Engagement Scholarship & Track Scholarship — Augustine Wiggins.

ic Scholarship — Madaline Ralston. E.R. and Lillian Dimmette Scholarship — Phil Do. Future Teachers of America Scholarship — Jasmin Cowan. CSM Excellence Scholarship — Courtne’e Knox. North Carolina Scholars — Justin Adkins, Thomas Benton, Joshua Childers, David Dixon, Phil Do, Taylor Downs, Austin Flynn, Jeremy Forbis, Rachel Hardin, Laura Hinkle, Parker Johnson, Anne Knauf, Krysten Lane, Hannah Lebowitz, Matthew Marshall, Wesley McNeely, Erin Moore, Joshua Mowery, Luke Mowery, William Mowery, Catherine Parks, Benjamin Peach, Erica Postlewaite, Madaline Ralston, Molly Robinson, Karen RojasAguilar, Quinn Scarvey, Sarah Shirley, Michael Swenson, My-Linh Mai Tran, Charayna Walker, Braxton Whitaker, Simone Wilson, Alexanderia Yarborough, Emily Yelton, William Yip. Veterans Scholarship — Laura Hinkle. U.S. Air Force Math and Science Award — Catherine Parks.

Ann Powlas White Memorial Science Award — Alexanderia Yarborough. John O. Reynolds SHS Scholarship — Austin Flynn. Google Technology Scholarship — Justin Adkins, Charayna Walker, Alexanderia Yarborough, William Yip. Principal’s and Assistant Principal’s Scholarship — Kim Nguyen. Cap It Off Scholarship — Nicholas Summers, Mi Linh Mai Tran. Sam Walton Community Scholarship — Wesley McNeely. Mayor’s Award for Education al Excellence — Thomas Benton, Joshua Childers, Phil Do, Taylor Downs, Austin Flynn, Rachel Hardin, Laura Hinkle, Parker Johnson, Anne Knauf, Kyrsten Lane, Hannah Lebowitz, Matthew Marshall, Wesley McNeely, Erin Moore, Luke Mowery, William Mowery, Catherine Parks, Madaline Ralston, Molly Robinson, Quinn Scarvey, Sarah Shirley, Michael Swenson, Mi Linh Mai Tran, Charayna Walker, Braxton Whitaker, Alexanderia Yarborough, Emily Yelton and William Yip.

Reading:

June 21, 22, 23

Writing:

June 28, 29, 30

Cost: $60.00 Camp available for: Rising 2nd, 3rd, 4th graders Space is limited. Register at Creative Teaching Aids Registration deadline is the Thursday before each session Please come by or call to register.

These camps will be taught by certified teachers with successful reading and writing experience. Instruction and activities will be fun, challenging, and rewarding. Emphasis will be placed on stimulating student interest while improving test scores. Camp size will be limited to 18 students and all ability levels will be welcomed and challenged. Snacks will be provided.

Times: 9:00-11:30 am 310 S. Main St., Downtown Salisbury 704-633-8836 www.creativeteachingaids.com

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Salisbury High School had its Community Awards Assembly May 12 at the school. Elsie B. King Valedictorian Award — Madaline Ralston, Austin Flynn. All-County Scholars — Austin Flynn, Catherine Parks, Madaline Ralston, William Yip. F&M Bank Scholarship — Rachel Wood. SECU Foundation People Helping People Scholarship — Taylor Downs. Civitan Scholarship — Madaline Ralston. Civitan Citizenship Award — Sergio Aragon, Quinn Scarvey. Brad Michael Patrick Scholarship — Alexanderia Yarborough. Rotary Athletic Award — Joseph Figueroa, Hannah Lebowitz. Rotary Service Award — Cody Murphy, Madaline Ralston. Rotary Scholarship — Austin Flynn, Wesley McNeely, Catherine Parks, Madaline Ralston, Sarah Shirley, Alexanderia Yarborough, William Yip. Sacred Heart Alumni Scholarship — Anne Knauf. Lenoir-Rhyne Cromer Award — Quinn Scarvey. Lenoir-Rhyne Scholar — Isa-

Sacred Heart Class of 2006

Congratulations on your

2010 High School Graduation!

After 128 years, we know education. Come and see what we are about!

Academics ** Faith ** Tradition

Catholic Schools *99.1% high school Nationally graduation rate *84% advance to four-year college (compared to 44% in public schools) Catholic Schools *100% high school graduation rate Locally *99.9% advance to college

Don't you wish all of your investments had this strong of a return?

Sacred Heart Catholic School

Graystone High School Valedictorian SHS Honor Graduate NRHS Honor Graduate NC School of Math and Science Graduate Rowan Rotary Scholarship Award St Mary’s College Presidential Scholarship RCCC Scholarship SHCS PTO Scholarship Award Independent Film Maker with NC Premieres Governor’s School SGA Treasurer National Honor Society Mayor’s Award for Educational Excellence Salisbury High School PTSA Scholar NC Scholar Award AP Scholar Award Civics Award Technology Award

*100% passage of EOG tests in Reading and Math 2010 *All classes performing at least 2 grade levels above national averages *Teacher to student ratios in math and language arts 1:13 (K-8th grades) *NC State Certified Curriculum *Accredited by AdvancED/SACS-CASI District Accreditation *New school campus and 21st Century Classrooms *Daily physical education classes *Competitive sports offered in elementary and middle school *Rosetta Stone Language Software Program and Curriculum *Part of Mecklenburg Area Catholic School System with 18 schools, including 2 high schools

Spanish Honor Society Social Studies Honor Society DECA Club – State Competition Art Club Student Scholar Athlete All County Pole Vault State Finalist in Track (Pole Vault) Varsity Men’s Soccer Captain Varsity Girls Soccer Varsity Girls Tennis – State Finalist Varsity Volleyball – Coaches Award Varsity Golf Team Varsity Swim Team Special Olympics Counselor Head Altar Server Diocesan Youth Advisory Council Middle School Sunday School Teacher Church Retreat Peer Group Leader

SACRED HEART CATHOLIC SCHOOL

385 Lumen Christi Lane, Salisbury 28147 • 704-633-2841 www.salisburycatholic.org

SACRED HEART CATHOLIC SCHOOL

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385 Lumen Christi Lane, Salisbury 28147 • 704-633-2841 www.salisburycatholic.org We are currently accepting applications for the 2010-2011 school year, in preK through 8th grades. Catholic or non-Catholic...EVERYONE is welcome. Summer office hours are 9am-1pm

Algebra II Award Geometry Award Salem Academy Theater Awards Piano Guild Awards Sonatina Award 2009 Paderweski Award 2010 Eagle Scout Award Spanish Award SAT Hall of Fame Scholar Award Marching Band – Percussion Captain All County Band All State Band Alternate UNCG Honors Band Art Club President Junior Civitan Club Vice President SADD Key Club Spanish Club


G R A D U AT I O N

8C • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2010

SALISBURY POST

Salisbury High School Class of Travis Adams

Justin Adkins

Jasmaine Allison

Sergio Aragon

Niya Argrett

Thomas Benton

Latiffa Bestman

Larry Bonnilla

Malcolm Butner

Mario Cabrera

ChyKeyla Caldwell Jeremy Canzator

Maricela Carrillo

Shelby Carrion

Stephen Carter

Nicholas Cauthen

Makeela Clodfelter

Jason Croce

Stephen Dale

Maria Daniels

Nakia Daniels

Kathryn Davidson

David Dixon

Anh Do

Taylor Downs

Mary Ducksworth

Joseph Figueroa

Catherine Fink

Austin Flynn

Jeremy Forbis

Justin Franklin

Jordan Fuller

Jasmine Garcia

Roger Garcia

Casey Graham

Carson Hatchett

Terrell Hemphill

Katy Hicks

Laura Hinkle

Adriel Hortiales

Courtnee Knox

Kendra Knox

Marion Kox

Paul Kollie

Kyle Lane

William Mowery

Cody Murphy

Bria Neely

Jason Nunez

Victor Nyae

Tyree Oglesby

Erica Postlewaite

Iris Powers

Jatara Propst

Damien Pruitt

Ashley Rajkumar

Ronette Robinson Karen Rojas-Aguilar

Lewis Thompson

Karen Santamaria Samantha Saulters

Marissa Triplett

Rachel Wood Alexanderia Yarborough

Thea Allison

Alexandria Hudson Christian Hughes William Humphries

Cenquarius Lawing Hannah Lebowitz

Jared Inglis

Spencer Ann Bowden Dominique Bratcher

Bryson Brown

Christopher Bruce

Donovan Bush

Brandon Conkel

Angel Corry

Bernice Cortez

Jasmin Cowan

Jasmine Craig

Brooke Duncan

Andrew Evans

Jacqueline Fedele

Loraine Ferguson

Asia Figueroa

Glen Gray

Edward Hailey

Rachel Hardin

Brian Harris

Katrail Harris

Darius Johnson

Parker Johnson

William Jones

Jasmine Jordan

Anne Knauf

Xiong Lor

Matthew Marshall

Wesley McNeely

Richard Mesimer

Aaron Miller

Joshua Mowery

Luke Mowery

Catherine Parks

Benjamin Peach

Domnique Pearson

Marlen Perez

Terri Phifer

Carmen Phillips

Dominique Phillips

Ronald Phillips

Madaline Ralston

Vincent Ramirez

Jonthan Ramsey

Kiontae Rankin

Norris Rankin

Alisa Renten

Katherine Reyes

Chester Robinson

Molly Robinson

Quinn Scarvey

Sarah Shirley

LaDonna Shore

Kelvia Skeen

Marco Sosa

William Sparks

Velerie Ware

Marissa Watson

Braxton Whitaker

Isaiah Whitaker

Si Vue

Charayna Walker

Debra Walker

Jamel Wallace

Katherine Yates

Emily Yelton

Lacresha Young

Keairra Zafr

Jeremiah Stockdale Mitchell Strobel

Kyaunna White

Aaron Wilks

Nicholas Summers Michael Swenson

Imon Wilson

Simone Wilson

Salisbury High School Class of 2010 senior plans Salisbury High School senior plans A&T University — Aaron Devon Wilks, Jeremy Deon Canzator, Stephen James Carter, Dominique Jamal Phillips, Samantha Rosa Kiara Saulters. Appalachian State University — Brooke Amanda Duncan, Jeremy Scott Forbis, Matthew Taylor Marshall, Joshua Dean Mowery. Art Institute of Atlanta — Cherrika Onia Angle, Courtne’e Cierra Knox. Art Institute of Charlotte — Shanekwa Danielle Long, Ciera Seymone McNeair. Bloomfield — Jabriel Carter Kelly. Cabarrus College of Health and Science — Makeela LaShawn Clodfelter, Charayna Michelle Walker. Campbell University — David Henry Francis Dixon.

Catawba College — Thomas Zachary Benton, Spencer Ann Elizabeth Bowden, Kathryn Leanna Davidson. Catawba Community College — Bernice Cortez. Central Piedmont Community College — Nyia Argrett, Si Vang Vue. Centre College — Catherine Grace Parks. Clark Atlanta University — Jasmin Mahogany Cowan. Clemson University — Madaline Alexia Ralston. Coastal Carolina University — Linares Deshaun Pagan. East Carolina University — Malcolm Wade Butner III, Chy’keyla Chrishelle Synquis Caldwell, Jordan Michael Fuller, Erin Nicole Moore, Molly Elizabeth Robinson, Marissa Elizabeth Triplett, Emily Warner Yelton. Elizabeth City State Universi-

ty — Jasmine Nachelle Allison. Gardner-Webb University — Justin Devonte Adkins. Johnson & Wales University — Anh Phi Nguyen Do, Ashley Ann Rajkumar. Johnson C. Smith University — Edward Jahaan Hailey. King’s College — Ronald Lill-Green Phillips. Lenoir-Rhyne University — Quinn Susannah Scarvey, Isaiah Whitaker. Livingstone College — Kiontae Arthur Marquece Rankin. Louisberg College — Christopher Eugene Bruce, Justin Terrell Franklin. North Carolina State University — Taylor Linn Downs, Anne Kathleen Knauf, Wesley Rowe McNeely, Luke Wagoner Mowery, William Andrew Mowery, Cody De’Shawn Murphy, Michael

Robert Swenson, Braxton Tant Whitaker. North Georgia College & State University — Carson Calhoun Hatchett. Pfeiffer University – Shelby Marie Carrion. Radford University — Sarah Catherine Shirley. Rowan-Cabarrus Community College — Thea Sarell Allison, Latiffa Nicole Bestman, Larry Bonilla, Dominique Bratcher, Walkeshia Annette Chambers, Joshua Caleb Childers, Jason Anthony Croce, Stephen Matthew Dale, Nakia La’Shai Daniels, Andrew Harrison Evans, Jacqueline Calista Fedele, Loraine Ann Ferguson, Jasmine Janet Garcia Rodriquez, Maricela GonzalezCasey Boncile Rae Graham, Kiara Armoni Grant, Glen Elizabeth Gray, Kristen Abril Hammond, Katy Nicole Hicks,

Jasmine Yvette Jordan, Kendra Alexis Knox, Marion Uvona Knox, Cenquarius Nicole Lawing, Xiong Lor, Dy’Sheka Lasha`e Lyles, Richard Lee Mesimer, Aaron Monroe Miller Jr., Dayana Dalia Molina, Bria Lashay Neely, Kim Yen Thi Nguyen, Dominque Alexia Pearson, Jayvon Xavier Phifer, Terri Renee Phifer, Iris Wakita Powers, Shadonna Danielle Price, Norris Mitchell Rankin II, Ronnette Robinson, Karen Nicole Rojas Aguilar, Sadina Salcinovic, Marco Antonio Sosa, Destiny Tramaine Steele, Mandashia Shemees Steele, Mitchell Adam Strobel, Si Vang Vue, Debra Marie Walker, Lewis Jordan Walker Thompson, Velerie Nichole Ware, Rachel Joy Wood. Triad Barber School — Terrell Emanuel Hemphill.

Undecided — Mario Alexander Martinez Cabrera, Nicholas Jeffrey Cauthen, Asia Sharel Figueroa, Roger Garcia Celedon, Adriel Hortiales-Lynch, Sharail Dazzmen Lynn, William Henry Humphries, Darius LaQuan Johnson, Paul Kollie, Kyrsten Michele Lane, Cenquarius Lawing, Samuel Dewayne McKenzie Jr., Antwann Montgomery, Marlen Perez, Carmen Anika Phillips, Katherine Reyes, Heberth Ronaldo Montero Rodas, Kelvia Danielle Skeen, Jeremiah RaShawn Stockdale, Yasmine Nichole Williams, Lacresha Shaniece Young. U.S. Air Force — Kyle Michael Lane, Phillip Anthony Ledbetter, Kejuan Dishad Lamont Sweat.

See SALISBURY, 9C


G R A D U AT I O N

SALISBURY POST

bassador. Advice to freshmen: “Manage your time wisely, but have fun! High school goes by way too fast! Don’t save college applications for the last minute!” Favorite high school memory: Senior prom at Carson. Proudest high school moment: The first issue of The Catalyst I published as editor-in-chief. Song on MySpace/Facebook page: Anything by Train. • Virginia Anne Weant of Salisbury, daughter of Drew and Wendy Weant. Clubs and sports: Drama Club, National Honors Society, Latin Club. Volunteer work: Piedmont Players Youth Theater, Carillon Living Center, First Presbyterian Youth work at Rowan Helping Ministries, Salisbury Symphony. Extracurriculars and honors: Dance, voice and piano, art shows, Piedmont Players Scholarship Winner, Catawba Chorale, Community Music High School Chorale, First Presbyterian Church Choirs, International Thespian Society. Advice to freshman: Don’t be scared to find who you are: Try new things, meet new friends, even if you have to leave the old ones behind. Find the one thing that you truly love to do and let it SHINE....or you can join theater! Favorite high school memory: All the shows that I've been in at Salisbury, Carson and the Meroney Theater. Proudest high school moment: When I found out I was a part of Carson’s first sell-out show, “Footloose.” Song on your Myspace: “Defying Gravity,” from the musical “Wicked.”

ar, All-County, All-Conference, All-Region, cross country and track MVP, Rookie of the Year, Most Athletic senior superlative. Favorite high school memory: The day that Tom Collins won his first wrestling match. Proudest high school moment: Winning the county 2-mile with a 5:19 first mile and a 5:04 second mile. Song on MySpace/Facebook page: “Israel’s Son” by Sliverchair. • Jesse Dale Wheeler of Granite Quarry, son of Erica and Aaron Raiti of Granite Quarry and Greg and Katie Ferguson of Boise, Idaho. Clubs and sports: Wrestling, YCI, Sigma Phi Gamma, Art Club. Volunteer work: St. Jude’s Children’s Hospital Trike-AThon fundraiser, local nursing home volunteer, Habitat for Humanity, Camp Discovery counselor, Morgan Elementary School math tutor. Extracurriculars and honors: Intersections science program at Pfeiffer University, junior marshal, nursing home employee, Corbin Hills Golf Course employee, Civitan Scholar, summer internships at pediatric office and oncology office, artwork displayed at Waterworks and Salisbury Civic Center. Advice to freshmen: “Take as many upper level classes as a freshman and sophomore so that you do not fall behind early.” Favorite high-school memory: The entire experience itself compiles to one huge favorite memory. Proudest high-school moment: When I found out I was accepted at all four colleges I applied including Wake Forest and UNC Chapel Hill, where I will be attending. Song on your MySpace/Facebook page: N/A — too busy studying!

East Rowan

North Rowan

SCHOLARS FROM 1C

• Thomas P. Collins Jr. of Salisbury, son of Tom and Clair Collins. Clubs and sports: Wrestling, bowling, Junior Civitans, Sigma Phi Gamma, concert band. Volunteer work: Adopt-AHighway, Rowan Museum Youth History Camp counselor, microbiology research at Pfeiffer University. Extracurriculars and honors: AP Scholar with Honor, Granite Quarry Civitan Scholar, junior marshal. Advice to freshmen: “Don’t screw up.” Favorite high school memory: The flood day of 2010. Proudest high school moment: Winning my first wrestling match. Song on MySpace/Facebook page: “Colors” by Trocadero • Christopher James Demitraszek of Salisbury, son of John and Kanako Demitraszek. Clubs and sports: Varsity football, wrestling, track, National Honor Society, Sigma Phi Gamma. Extracurriculars and honors: American Chemical Society national test taker, All-Decade East Rowan football, All-County football, All-Conference wrestling twice, 3A Midwest Regional wrestling champion, state qualifier in wrestling twice, fourth place in the state in wrestling, Fox Charlotte Scholar-Athlete of the Week. Advice to freshmen: “Stick with it, don’t give up. You will hit your rough spots in life, but don’t quit, never quit.” Favorite high school memory: Being able to fully enjoy my high school career with my best friends. Proudest high school moment: Defeating South Brunswick 14-11 in overtime at home in football. • Ross Jay Oden of Salisbury, son of Mark and Lorin Oden. Clubs and sports: Cross country, indoor track, outdoor track, Sigma Phi Gamma, National Honor Society, Drafting Club. Extracurriculars and honors: junior marshal, Civitan Schol-

• Marissa Herchler of Salisbury, daughter of Michelle and Jeff Swing and Jeff Herchler. Clubs and sports: National Honor Society secretary, Key Club, FTA, junior varsity and varsity volleyball, Cavs for Christ, marching band. Volunteer work: Special Olympics, Lorain County Food Bank, American Red Cross blood drives, Elizabeth Hanford Dole Elementary, Relay for Life. Extracurriculars and honors: Junior marshal, honor roll, honor graduate, N.C. Scholar, SAT Wall of Fame, N.C. Scholar Athlete, Principal’s Association Scholar, Class of 1973 Memorial Scholarship, Brian Bailey Scholarship, RSAE Scholarship. Advice to freshmen: “It pays to do your best all the way through high school. Never take an easy semester!” Favorite high school memory: Learning how to play spades. Proudest high school moment: Getting into N.C. State. • Taylor Scott Johnston of Salisbury, son of David and Teresa Johnston. High school clubs and sports: Varsity wrestling (four years), cross country (two years), baseball (three years) and swimming (one year), Junior Civitans, Key Club, Cavaliers for Christ /Youth Christian International, vice president, secretary and treasurer in Student Government Association, Spanish Club homecoming representative, North Rowan Boosters Club. Volunteer work: American Cancer Society Relay for Life, ARC of Rowan Challenger Baseball, Special Olympics, Rowan Helping Ministries, School Improvement Committee, Team Effort and Youth Works mission projects. Extracurriculars and honors: N.C. Scholar Athlete, valedictorian, N.C. Scholar, chief junior marshal, Mr. North Rowan (best all-around) senior superlative, Outstanding Senior, National Honor Society vice president, Spencer Presbyterian Church member, lector

and session member, Central United Methodist Church Youth Group, Daughters of the American Revolution Good Citizen Award, 2010 North Carolina Jaycees top three teenagers award. Advice to freshmen: “Take advantage of every opportunity in high school. Be involved in your school and community and make a difference.” Favorite high school memory: Going to Carowinds with the Key Club. Proudest high school moment: Making a perfect score on the geometry EOC. • Jon Donohoe Robertson of Salisbury, son of Nelson and Ellen Robertson. Clubs and sports: National Honor Society, Key Club, football, golf. Volunteer work: Three youth mission work trips. Extracurriculars and honors: Eagle Scout, Boy Scouts of America, Central United Methodist youth president, Central United Methodist hand bells. Advice to freshmen: “Work hard and be your own person.” Favorite high school memory: Winning our first football game in more than a year. Proudest high school moment: Getting into N.C. State. • Lindsay Michelle Thompson of Salisbury, daughter of Mark and Debbie Thompson. Clubs and sports: Varsity softball, National Honor Society, Key Club, Junior Civitan Club, Spanish Club, Youth Commission International. Volunteer work: North Rowan Elementary, Special Olympics, Red Cross, Rowan Helping Ministries, Good Shepherd’s Clinic, Operation Christmas Child, Summer Work Camp, Missions Trip to Cherokee, reading tutor, church nursery. Extracurriculars and honors: Church youth group, recreational league softball, junior marshal, honor graduate, N.C. Scholar, Jaycees Outstanding Teenager, Campbell University Scholar, SAT Wall of Fame, AkzoNobel Science Scholarship, Rotary Club Scholarship, Cabarrus Family Medicine Scholarship. Advice to freshmen: “Work hard, stay focused and never settle for anything less than your best.” Favorite high school memory: Learning how to play spades. Proudest high school moment: Receiving a scholarship to Campbell University.

Salisbury

• Austin Lloyd Flynn of Salisbury, son of Ames and Jennifer Flynn. Clubs and sports: FBLA, Key Club, Junior Civitans, varsity tennis, DECA. Volunteer work: Teens with a Mission Mexico and Washington, D.C., mission trips, homeless shelter. Extracurriculars and honors: National Honor Society, Student Government Association president, John D. Reynolds III Scholarship, Mayor’s Award. Advice to freshmen: “It’s all about time management and staying busy.” Favorite high school memory: Storming the field at homecoming. Proudest high school moment: State semi-finals in tennis. • Catherine Grace Parks of Salisbury, daughter of Charles and Lynne Parks. Clubs and sports: Varsity women’s golf, president of Key Club and Spanish Club, vice president of National Honor Society, secretary of Political Science Club and FBLA. Volunteer work: Ran own golf camp for local children, Rowan Helping Ministries, hosted fundraiser events with Key Club including tailgating parties and a Hornet Hunk contest. Extracurriculars and honors: Daughters of the American Revolution Good Citizen, Veterans Council U.S. History Award, Raemi Evans Award, U.S. Air Force Math and Sci-

ence Award. Advice to freshmen: “Get involved in sports and clubs, and extracurricular activities are a great way to meet interesting people while also serving your community.” Favorite high school memory: Hosting my own children’s golf camp. Proudest high school moment: Walking on stage to receive my Brown Fellows Scholarship from Mrs. Steele. • Madaline Alexia Ralston of Salisbury, daughter of Dr. Jeffrey and Mandi Ralston. Clubs and sports: Key Club, varsity swim team, National Honor Society, Junior Civitans, varsity track team, Political Science Club, math team, Student Government, Class Government. Volunteer work: Cap it Off project, Operation Christmas Child, Voices of Hope charity, math tutoring, school freshman orientation, assistant swim coach, Meals on Wheels, senior shirts, prom committee, swim lessons, “At Home” mission, vacation Bible school, Rowan Helping Ministries. Extracurriculars and honors: Rotary Club Outstanding Student, Channel 9 Outstanding Graduate, 2010 Mayor’s Award, AP Scholar with Distinction, All-State swimmer, state champion swimmer, USA Junior National Team member, chief junior marshal, valedictorian. Advice to freshmen: “Even though you won’t see immediate, dramatic results from your hard work, one day it will pay off.” Favorite high school memory: Trip to Europe the summer before senior year. Proudest high school moment: Winning states senior year. Song on MySpace/Facebook page: “American Baby” by Dave Matthews. • William Kashing Yip of Salisbury, son of Muoi and Keung Yip. Clubs and sports: Key Club, Junior Civitans, Political Science Club, math team, Spanish Club. Volunteer work: 50 hours of community service at local hospital. Extracurriculars and honors: Member of Community Baptist Church. Advice to freshmen: “Manage time wisely. Keep a journal of the wonderful moments that occur. Read voraciously as often as possible. Learn from both successes and failures. Lastly, high school is a long four years. Spend them in a positive manner.” Favorite high school memory: Telling and learning inappropriate jokes during class. Proudest high school moment: Discussing with and learning from people from all walks of life and with completely different mindsets. Song on MySpace/Facebook page: “Party in the U.S.A.” by Miley Cyrus.

South Rowan

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2010 • 9C demic letter, N.C. Scholar, U.S. Marine Corps Academic Excellence Award. Favorite high school memory: Tying the school record for the lowest score for 9 holes in women’s golf. Proudest high-school moment: Getting accepted into N.C. State University College of Engineering. Favorite song: “Always” by Saliva. • Skylar Jonathan Stamey, son of Rick and Debbie Stamey. Clubs and sports: Football, wrestling, Raider Challenge, National Honors Society, Spanish Club, American Patriots Club, JROTC, The Awesome Club. Volunteer work: JROTC community clean-up and Farmers Day set-up, and lots of tutoring. Extra-curricular activities, honors: Gardening, boarding horses. Advice to freshmen: Keep on keepin’ on. Favorite high school memory: Can’t choose a specific memory but beating A.L. Brown in football was pretty sweet. Proudest high school moment: Finishing. Favorite song: “In the Air Tonight,” Phil Collins • Hillary Elise Jaap: of China Grove, daughter of Patrick and Annelise Jaap. Clubs and sports: SCA, Art Club, NHS, Spanish Club, swimming. Volunteer work: Horse Protection Society, Service South Rowan, Service Committee Leader. Extracurricular and honors: Academic letter, athletic scholar, N.C. Scholar. Advice to freshman: “Believe in half of what you see and none of what you hear.” Favorite high school memory: Playing the Queen of Hearts in “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.” Proudest high school moment: Receiving my acceptance letter from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Song on MySpace/Facebook page: “The Book of Love,” by Peter Gabriel. • Seth Carson Moore of Landis, son of Jimmy and Crystal Moore. Clubs and sports: National Honor Society, Science Club, JROTC (SASAI), Raider Challenge Team captain, wrestling team captain, cross country team. Volunteer work: Camp New Hope, Relay for Life, Farmer’s Day, Landis Baptist Church ladies meeting. Extracurriculars and honors: Landis Baptist Church junior/senior usher, youth group, youth choir, master’s quartet and CYF Quiz Team. N.C. Scholar, honor graduate with distinction, individual and team scholar athlete; lettered in academics, cross country, wrestling and track and field; numerous wrestling awards including 2009 county wrestling champion/all county honors and most improved wrestler; honors in JROTC, including first place, JROTC Fort Bragg multistate Best Raider Competition and 20092010 superior cadet award and more. Advice to freshmen: “To thine own self be true.” Favorite high-school memory: Going to Spain and France, Favorite high-school mome nt: Going undefeated in the NPC for wrestling. Song on MySpace/Facebook: “Total Eclipse of the Heart y Bonnie Tyler.

• Courtney Jesilyn Barbee of China Grove, daughter of Craig and Christi Barbee. Clubs and sports: National Honor Society, Student Council representative, Spanish Club, varsity golf and softball, JV volleyball and basketball. Volunteer work: Salkehatchie Summer service, Rowan’s One Church-One Child, Rowan Helping Ministries, Operation Christmas Child, Angel Tree, Main Street Mission, Corriher-Lipe Middle School Golf Project, Salkehatchie Coat Drive for First United Methodist Church, China West Rowan • Thomas Glenn Langford of Grove. Extra curricular and honors: member of China Grove First United Methodist Church, handbell choir and youth. Works at Cabarrus Eye Center. N.C. State Park Scholar nominee, SECU Scholarship recipient, chief junior marshal, lettered in golf and softinterest ball, Scholar Athlete, Coach’s for 24 months or Award in Golf, All-Conference Golf, honor graduate with distinction, all-A honor roll every semester all four years, acafor 48 months

Salisbury, son of Glenn and Patty Langford. Clubs and sports: marching band, jazz band, Junior Civitans, YCI. Volunteer work: Guatemala Mission Trip, CrossBridge mission trip, 30-Hour Famine participate, Briggs Road cleanup, Camp Discovery. Extracurriculars and honors: Venture Crew 402, First United Methodist Youth Group, honor graduate, AP Scholar, 2009 third chair trombone, Western Carolina University High School Honors Band; Semper Fidelis Marine Award for Musical Excellence. Advice to freshmen: Learn early on how to manage your time so you have time to hang out with friends and still have time to do schoolwork. Favorite high-school memory: Marching on the N.C. State football field at the State Championship game. Proudest high-school moment: Making third chair trombone at Western Carolina University High School Honors Band. • Garrett Dale White, of Back Creek Church Road, son of Dale and Debbie White. Clubs and sports: JV baseball, varsity baseball, NHS president, Crazies, Relay for Life, FFA, Young Life. Volunteer work: Rowan Helping Ministries, landscaping at West Rowan Middle School Cystic Fibrosis for NHS, Main Street Missions. Extracurriculars and honors: FFA Greenhand, Envirothon, second in region; junior marshal, All-County Scholar. Advice to freshmen: Work hard and get involved in a lot of clubs so you can enjoy your senior year. Favorite high school memory: Being able to get up every morning before going into school to go turkey hunting. Proudest high school moment: Raising more than $8,000 for Rowan Helping MinistriesWest. Song on MySpace/Facebook page: “This Ain’t Nothing,” by Craig Morgan and “Free” by Zac Brown Band. • Luke Harrison Miller of Salisbury, son of Frances ad Doug Miller. Clubs and sports: JCL, Chess Club, NHS, wrestling. Volunteer work: ReStore, Rowan Helping Ministries, mission work. Extracurriculars and honors: Eagle Scout, N.C. JCL Secretary. Advice to freshman: Don’t be shy! Let loose and have fun. Favorite high school memory: Painting T on my chest and cheering at the SalisburyWest football game. Proudest high school moment: Holding out for six minutes in a wrestling match against Anson Phillips to win the team match against Carson. Song on MySpace/Facebook page: “Kryptonite,” by 3 doors down. • Jesse Myers of Salisbury, son of Dickie and Kim Myers. Clubs and sports: Tennis, NHS, YCI. Volunteer work: Maranatha Bible Church missions, 30hour famine, Support the Kids cancer fund. Extracurriculars and honors: honors graduate, church praise band, AP Scholar, Governor’s School East. Advice to freshmen: High school is easy if you make school one of your top priorities. Favorite high-school memory: All-County scholar picture session. Proudest high-school moment: Going to regionals in tennis and All-County Scholar award.

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SALISBURY FROM 8C

U.S. Army — Jared Jamaal Inglis, Christian Anthony Hughes, Tyree Lamont Oglesby, Jamal Alexander Wallace. U.S. Navy — Damien Markese Pruitt, La’Donna Latrice Shore. University of North Carolina at Asheville — Nicholas Stephone Summers. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill — Laura Katherine Hinkle, Hannah Leah Lebowitz.

University of North Carolina at Charlotte — Benjamin Warner Peach, Erica Renee Postlewaite. University of North Carolina at Greensboro — Sergio Antonio Aragon, Bryson Deon Brown, Jasmine Symone Craig, Mary Alexandra Ducksworth, Alexandria Belle Hudson, Kyaunna Shanae White. University of North Carolina at Pembroke — Joseph Jarel Figueroa, Katherine Elizabeth Hope Yates. University of North Carolina at Wilmington — Rachel Kay Hardin, Catherine Taylor Fink.

University of the South West — Victor Powuloh Nyae. Wake Forest University — Austin Lloyd Flynn, Parker O’Neal Johnson, William Ka Shing Yip. Western Carolina University — Simone Raquel Wilson. Wingate University — MyLinh Mai Tran, Alexanderia Victoria Yarborough. Winston-Salem Barber School — Chester Hosch Robinson Jr. Winston-Salem State University — Brian Wesley Harris, William Joseph Jones, JaTara Nicole Propst. Work force — Travis

Adams, Donovan Bush, Karen Lizzeth Santanaria Castillo, Sabrina Clodfelter, Angel Sharday Corry, Maria Lorraine Daniels, Erick Omar Sanchez Garcia, Katrail Demetrice Harris, Christopher Ryan Javis, Alicia Lee, Jason Joseph Nunez, Edgar Ivan Organista, Vincent Ray Ramirez, Johnathan Michael Ramsey, Alisa Beth Carolyn Renten, Christian Eduardo Salazar, Karen Lizzeth Santamaria Castillo, William James Sparks, Charles Dwayne Sykes Jr., Ismael Cruiel Vivero, Marissa Michelle Watson.

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G R A D U AT I O N

10C • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2010

SALISBURY POST

South Rowan High School Class of Chris Adkins

Alana Allman

Nathan Allman

Zachary Allman

Walter Archie

Arlex Arguelles

Whitney Ashley

Hillari Atkinson

Harley Atwell

Hector Ayala

Victoria Bailey

Jacob Baker

Nelly Banda

Courtney Barbee

Christian Barringer

Jordan Bartlett

Jackson Bates

Bradley Beach

Megan Bean

Zachery Beasley

Patricia Benitez

Laiani Benjamin

Blake Bettis

Dawn Black

Jerry Blakeslee

Crystal Blalock

Jesse Brantley

Jonathan Bringle

Austin Brown

Jamie Brown

Madison Brown

Tiffany Brown

Tessa Burrow

Brittany Byars

Amber Bynum

Amber Caldwell

Michael Call

Orlando Cardenas

Georgia Carlton

Kasey Carpenter

Jennifer Carter

Cory Caudill

Rebecca Chobat

Corey Christy

Kyle Christy

Andrew Clark

Anthony Clements

Maddison Cook

Marissa Cook

Joshua Cox

Tiffany Cox

Amanda Coy

Heather Crider

Randall Culbertson

Paulino Curiel

Jeffrey Daniel

Brittany Davis

John Davis

Samantha Davis

Katherine Dennard

Kevin Dise

Tyler Draughn

Michelle Dube

Patrick Durant

Aaron Efird

Nathan Efird

Ronald Erwin

Cody Evans

Emiziah Everwine

Rebecca Ferguson

Hillary Fields

Jonathan Foster

Kristen Frederick

Dillon Freeman

Elizabeth Freeman

Jacob Freeman

Leslie Freeze

Heather Furr

Kristin Furr

Ryan Furr

Stacey Gagnier

Hannah Gainey

Jessica Gainey

Rikki Gainey

Kimberly Galloway

Nicholas Gibson

Quaqavius Glaspy Michael Gonzalez McKinley Goodnight Savannah Goodnight

Keith Grant

Jonathan Greer

Kevin Griffin

Nicholas Grimmett

Eduardo Gutierrez

Trevor Guyaux

Lyndsey Haley

Justin Hall

Kayla Haralson

Kierra Hardin

Michael Harrell

Dandre Harris

Taylor Hartsell

Melissa Hartwell

Kristin Head

Joshua Heady

Gavin Hensley

Arcenia Hernandez

Regina Hixson

Madison Hobbs

Justin Hoce

Stephanie Hogge

Jasmine Hollis

Darren Holloway

John Honeycutt

Ashley Hood

Jolisa Hooper

Ryan Hopkins

James Horne

Hugh House

Blake Houston

Zackery Howell

Kaitlyn Hubbard

Justin Huffman

Alexander Ingold

Hillary Jaap

Jacob Jester

Dalton Johnson

Matthew Johnson

John Jones

Jeremi Jordan

Lindsay King

Emily Kinney

Miracle Kirks

William Lambert

Tabitha Laursen

Ariel Lawson

Madeleine Lawyer

Hunter Leazer

Taylor Lookabill

Catherine Mabry

Cadarreus Mason

Curtis McCluney

Kayla McClure

Stephen Melton

Maverick Miles

Darian Miller

Andrew Moody

Rebekah Moore

Seth Moore

Kayla Morrow

Branden Mullis

Wesley Mullis

Jacob Nance

Tiffany Nix

Kayla Noblitt

Shelby Nunn

Cody Overcash

Jack Overcash

Logan Owens

Sarah Palmer

Finesse Parks

Devin Patrick

Taylor Patterson

Darah Pennell

Kody Peterson

Megan Philemon

Cody Plott

Joshua Poole

Meghan Powers

Meghan Proctor

Zack Ritchie

Tyler Roberts

Jasmine Robinson

Lucas Rodgers

Nolan Rodgers

Kyle Rolla

Julie Rose

Hilary Rowland

Tonya Russell

Bryan Scercy

Jacob Self

Joshua Severt

Jamie Sexton

Steven Sexton

Brittney Shaffer

Bryson Shehan

Elizabeth Sides

Mixi Sierra

Alex Smith

Hillary Smith

Kevin Smith

Reba Smith

Tayler Smith

Skylar Stamey

Kaitlin Steen

Dmitri Stokes

Amber Strickland

Patrick Sturm

Joshua Suber

Amber Sullivan

Schuyler Surkosky

Caleb Swift

Amy Therrell

James Speake

Candelario Rivera Juan Rivera-Dominguez

Melquan Thomas Heather Thompson Nathaniel Thompson


G R A D U AT I O N

SALISBURY POST

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2010 • 11C

South Rowan High School Class of Tamara Thompson

Heaven Thorpe

Kristina Trexler

William Triplett

Breanna Tucker

Taylor Upright

Morgan Utley

Jose Villalta

Amber Wagoner

Amber Waldroup

Benjamin Walker

Dylan Walker

Autumn Walter

Shelby Watt

NOT PICTURED: James Beasley, Randall Carter, Steven Dessasore, Lauryn Frey, Justin Fullam, Jose Garcia, Jonathan Gibbs, Rashad Lipscomb, Jonathan Morton, German Ocampo. Nicholas Porcello, Codi Purvis, Samantha Price, Mitchell Smith

Caleb Weaver

James Whitley

Rebecca Whittier

Ashlynn Williams

David Wilson

Jennifer Wilson

Kaley Wilson

Nathaniel Winslow Jennifer Woodall

Mark Wooten

Brittney Wright

Doris Wright

South Rowan High School Class of 2010 senior plans South Rowan High School senior plans Appalachian State University — David Archie, Jacob Baker, McKinley Goodnight, Melquan Thomas, Amber Waldroup, Shelby Watt, Averett University — Jennifer Woodall. Brevard College — Georgia Carlton, Dalton Johnson. Cabarrus College of Health Sciences — Crystal Blalock, Kimberly Galloway, Miracle Kirks. California State University — Schuyler Surkosky. Campbell University — Magen Allman, Nathaniel Winslow. Carteret Community College — Lauryn Frey. Catawba College — Christian Barringer, Megan Bean, Rebecca Chobat, John Everwine, Savannah Goodnight, Ashley Hood, Blake Houston, Jacob Jester, Lindsay King, Anne Mabry, Amber Strickland. Central Piedmont Community College — Ryan Furr, Stacey Gagnier, Morgan Utley. Clarion University of Pennsylvania — Jacob Freeman. Davidson Community College

— Sarah Palmer. East Carolina University — Rebecca Whittier. Embry Riddle Aeronautical University — Nolan Rodgers. Florida College— Blake Bettis. Gardner-Webb University — Hilary Rowland. High Point University — Maverick Miles. ITT Technical Institute — Steven Sexton, Reba Smith. Johnson & Wales University — Michael Harrell, Tonya Russell. Lee University — Justin Huffman. Lenoir-Rhyne College — Leslie Freeze, Kayla Morrow, Shelby Nunn, Kaitlin Steen. Mars Hill College — Justin Hall, Jacob Mills, Amber Wagoner. Marshall University — Ryan Hopkins. Methodist College — Madeleine Lawyer. Motorcycle Mechanic Institute — Branden Mullis. North Carolina Central University — Thomas Lowe. North Carolina State University — Courtney Barbee, Jesse Brantley, Chris Durant,

Justin Hoce, Kody Peterson, Skylar Stamey, Mark Wooten. North Georgia College & State University — Jacob Nance. Pasco-Hernando Community College — Melissa Hartwell. Pfeiffer University — Kristina Trexler Pikeville College — Tamara Thompson. Rowan-Cabarrus Community College — Ivan Arguelles, Hillari Atkinson, Hector Ayala, Victoria Bailey, Nelly Banda, Bradley Beach, Dawn Black, Austin Brown, Madison Brown, Tiffany Brown, Tessa Burrow, Brittany Byars, Michael Call, Kasey Carpenter, Jennifer Carter, Cory Caudill, Corey Christy, Anthony Clements, Maddison Cook, Tiffany Cox, Amanda Coy, Heather Crider, Paulino Curiel, Brittany Davis, Samantha Davis, Katherine Dennard, Tyler Draughn, Aaron Efird, Steven Erwin, Rebecca Ferguson, Kristin Frederick, Dillon Freeman, Elizabeth Freeman, Justin Fullam, Kristin Furr, Hannah Gainey, Jessica Gainey, Rikki Gainey, Nicholas Gibson, Michael Gon-

zalez, Kevin Griffin, Trevor Guyaux, Kayla Haralson, Taylor Hartsell, Regina Hixson, Stephanie Hogge, Jolisa Hooper, James Horne, Zachery Howell, Matthew Johnson, Tabitha Laursen, Kayla McClure, Stephen Melton, Rebekah Moore, Jonathan Morton, Wesley Mullis, Tiffany Nix, Kayla Noblitt, Cody Overcash, Finesse Parks, Darah Pennell, Joshua Poole, Meghan Powers, Hanna Proctor, Jasmine Robinson, Bryan Scercy, Jacob Self, Britney Shaffer, Bryson Shehan, Kevin Smith, Patrick Sturm, Heather Thompson, Nathaniel Thompson, William Triplett, Breanna Tucker, Taylor Upright, Autumn Walter, Caleb Weaver, David Wilson, Jennifer Wilson, Kaley Wilson, Brittney Wright, William Zurita. Saint Paul’s College — Quan Glaspy Savannah College of Art & Design — Jonathan Foster. Stanly Community College — Alexander Ingold. Surry Community College — Taylor Lookabill. Tidewater Community Col-

lege — Steven Dessasore Undecided — Jordan Bartlett, Laiani Benjamin, Orlando Cardenas, John Davis, Michelle Dube, Jose Garcia Figueroa, Keith Grant, Kierra Hardin, Joshua Heady, Arcenia Hernandez, Darren Holloway, Jasmine Hollis, Joshua Jacques, Rashad Lipscomb, German Ocampo, Devin Patrick, Candelario Rivera, Juan Rivera Dominguez, Jamie Sexton, Mixi Sierra, Mitchell Smith, Dmitri Stokes, Tyler Whitley, Dylan Walker. University of Miami — Emily Kinney. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill — Hillary Jaap, Seth Moore. University of North Carolina at Charlotte — Zachery Beasley, Kevin Dise, Hillary Fields, Jonathan Greer, Kristin Head, Hugh House III, Kaitlyn Hubbard, Curtis McCluney Jr., Andrew Moody, Taylor Patterson, Tyler Roberts, Kyle Rolla, Julie Rose, Hillary Smith, Benjamin Walker. University of North Carolina at Greensboro — Amber Cald-

well, Tayler Smith. University of North Carolina at Pembroke — Cadarreus Mason. University of North Carolina at Wilmington — Joshua Cox. University of Pheonix —John Jones IV. U.S. Air Force — Jerry Blakeslee, Kyle Christy, Brittney Rosebure, James Speake, Joshua Suber. U.S. Army — Chris Adkins, Nathan Efird, Cody Evans, John Honeycutt. U.S. Coast Guard — Zach Allman. U.S. Marines — Randall Culbertson. U.S. Navy— Jonathan Bringle. Western Carolina University — Heather Furr, Darian Miller, Elizabeth Sides. Wingate University — Whitney Ashley. Winston-Salem State University — D’Andre Harris. Work force — Nathan Allman, Patricia Benitez, Amber Bynum, Jeffrey Daniel, Gaven Hensley, Madison Hobbs, William Lambert, Hunter Leazer, Logan Owens, Samantha Price, Joshua Severt, Jose Villalta, Doris Wright.

South Rowan High School honors students at awards ceremony South Rowan High School Senior Awards Night was held May 20. South Rowan Class of 1964 Scholarship — Anne Mabry. South Rowan Alumni Scholarship — Kimberly Galloway, Kayla Noblitt, Curtis McCluney Jr., Taylor Patterson. China Grove Rotary Club Scholarship — David Archie. J. Michael McDuffie Memorial Scholarship — John Everwine. AkzoNobel Science Scholarship — Skylar Stamey. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Governmental Retirees Association — Dalton Johnson. Rowan-Salisbury NCAE — Thomas Lowe. NAACP Scholarship — Curtis McCluney Jr. Salisbury Rotary Club Scholarship — Seth Moore, Skylar Stamey. Salisbury Rotary Club Athletic Award — Cadarreus Mason. Pilot Club of China Grove/Landis Jean Jordan Memorial Scholarship — Kristin Head. Mount Zion United Church of Christ Talbert & Dorothy Howell Scholarship — Mark Wooten Mount Zion Missionary Baptist Church Samuel R. Johnson Memorial Scholarship Award — Thomas Lowe. Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Scholarship — Curtis McCluney Jr. Veterans of Foreign Wars Voice of Democracy Competition — Shelby Nunn. Bradley Barnhardt Memorial Scholarship — Anne Mabry. Steve Lee Memorial Scholarship — Blake Houston. Katie Smith Memorial Scholarship — Kayla Morrow. PFLAG Scholarship — Christian Barringer. Matthew C. Graziadei Award — Megan Bean. Catawba College Academic Awards • Academic Competitiveness Grant — Christian Barringer. • Performing Arts Scholarship — Christian Barringer. • West Scholars Scholarship — Christian Barringer, Savannah Goodnight, Lindsay King, Anne Mabry, Amber Strickland. • Presidential Scholarship — Megan Bean. • Academic Excellence Scholarship — Megan Bean • Rowan County Scholarship — Megan Bean, Jacob Jester. • Presidential Scholarship — Rebecca Chobat.

• Rowan County Scholarship — Rebecca Chobat, John Everwine. • Catawba College Access Grant — John Everwine, Blake Houston,Jacob Jester. • Catawba College Grant — John Everwine. • Baseball Scholarship — Blake Houston. • Music Scholarship — Jacob Jester. •CrossCountry—AnneMabry. • Tar Heels Girls State Scholarship — Anne Mabry. The RCCC Endowed Scholarship — Rebekah Moore Dai Nippon Scholarship — Heather Thompson. F&M Bank Merit Scholarship — Autumn Walter. State Employees Credit Union “People Helping People Scholarship” — Courtney Barbee South Rowan PTSA Scholarship — Kimberly Galloway. Veterans Council American History Award — Megan Bean. “Wild” Bill Corriher JROTC Scholarship — Madeleine Lawyer. Paul & Estelle Ofsanko Memorial Scholarship — Madeleine Lawyer. Millbridge Ruritan Club Scholarship — Taylor Patterson, Autumn Walter. South Rowan Y Service Club Scholarship — Mark Wooten. Salisbury Post All-County Scholars — Courtney Barbee, Hillary Jaap, Seth Moore, Skylar Stamey. Semper Fidelis Award for Music Excellence — Darian Miller. U.S. Marine Corps Scholastic Excellence Award — Courtney Barbee, Skylar Stamey. U.S. Marine Corps Distinguished Athlete Award —Blake Houston, Kayla Morrow. National Merit Scholarship — Megan Bean. Gallaudet National Essay Contest — Megan Bean. James H. Donnell Jr. Scholarship — Kody Peterson, Amber Strickland, Tamara Thompson. Advanced Placement Calculus Award — Skylar Stamey. Clyde Corriher Memorial FFA Scholarship — Kody Peterson. South Rowan FFA Alumni Scholarship — Megan Bean, Rebecca Moore. Ketner Comer Scholarship — Rebekah Moore. Rowan County Holstein Club Scholarship — Rebekah Moore. Rowan County Fair Scholarship — Rebekah Moore. Office Assistant Award of the

Kody Peterson, Tamara Thompson, Skylar Stamey, Amber Waldroup, Nathaniel Winslow. North Carolina Scholars — Megan Allman, Zachary Allman, David Archie, Whitney Ashley, Jacob Baker, Courtney Barbee, Christian Barringer, Megan Bean, Crystal Blalock, Jesse Brantley, Kasey Carpenter, Rebecca Chobat, Maddison Cook, Hillary Fields, Jonathan Foster, Kristen Frederick, Leslie Freeze, Stacey Gagnier, Kim Galloway, McKinley Goodnight, Savannah Goodnight, Jonathan Greer, Kristin Head, Trey House, Blake Houston, Katie Hubbard, Hillary Jaap, Jacob Jester, Dalton Johnson, Lindsay King, Miracle Kirks, Madeline Lawyer, Taylor Lookabill, Anne Mabry, CJ McCluney, Seth Moore, Kayla Morrow, Jacob Nance, Shelby Nunn, Taylor Patterson, Kody Peterson, Tyler Roberts, Nolan Rodgers, Julie Rose, Tayler Smith, Skylar Stamey, Amber Strickland, Schuyler Surkosky, Melquan Thomas, Tamara Thompson, Kristina Trexler, William

Year — Kristen Frederick. Health Occupations Student of the Year — Magen Allman, Hillari Atkinson, Maddison Cook, Tamara Thompson. Advanced Placement Social Studies Award — Megan Bean. Woodman of the World U.S. History Award — Megan Bean. Spanish 2 Award — Megan Bean, Lindsay King. Spanish 3 Award — Christian Barringer. Spanish 4 Award — Shelby Nunn. Rowan-Salisbury PTA Council Scholarship — Kimberly Galloway. Principal & Assistant Principal’s Scholarship — Seth Moore. Dr. Alan King Exemplary Leadership Award — McKinley Goodnight. SCA Leadership through Service In Honor of Dr. Alan King — Julie Rose. SAT Scholarships — Megan Bean, Rebecca Chobat, Joshua Cox, Hillary Fields, Jonathan Foster, Ashley Hood, Hillary Jaap, Emily Kinney, Miracle Kirks, Thomas Lowe,

Triplett, Amber Wagoner, Amber Waldroup, Nathaniel Winslow, Mark Wooten. Brevard College • Leadership Scholarship — Georgia Carlton. • Angier B. Duke Scholarship — Dalton Johnson. • Honors Program Scholarship — Dalton Johnson. • Leadership Scholarship — Dalton Johnson. • Music Scholarship — Dalton Johnson. Campbell University • Presidential Scholarship — Magen Allman. • Scott-Ellis Scholarship — Nathaniel Winslow. Florida College Soccer Scholarship — Blake Bettis. Lenoir-Rhyne College • Honors Student Scholarship — Kayla Morrow. • Volleyball Scholarship — Kayla Morrow. • Lenoir-Rhyne Scholars — Shelby Nunn. • Methodist University Presidential Award — Madeleine Lawyer. • North Carolina Central

University Football Scholarship — Thomas Lowe. Pfeiffer University • Stokes Scholarship — Kristina Trexler. • University Scholarship —Kristina Trexler. Pikeville College Academic Scholarship — Tamara Thompson. Savannah College of Art and Design Academic Scholarship — Jonathan Foster. University of Miami Dean’s Scholarship — Emily Kinney. University of North Carolina at Pembroke football scholarship — Cadarreus Mason. Wingate University Scholarship — Whitney Ashley. Bowling Scholarship — Tamara Thompson. Conway Trucking Company Scholarship — Kayla Morrow. Hardee’s Scholarship — Schuyler Surkosky. VFW Otis N. Brown Scholarship — Shelby Nunn. VFW Post 8989 — Seth Moore, Skylar Stamey. DAR Good Citizen Award — Mark Wooten.

Honors Six Area Graduates

SIX AREA HIGH SCHOOL SENIORS RECEIVED THE F&M BANK MERIT AWARD IN RECOGNITION OF THEIR SCHOLASTIC ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND CIVIC CONTRIBUTIONS. EACH WINNER RECEIVES A $500 SCHOLARSHIP TO ROWAN CABARRUS COMMUNITY COLLEGE.

C Rachel Wood Salisbury High School

ONGRATULATIONS

Madison Long Jesse C. Carson High School

Cody Stewart East Rowan High School

& BEST WISHES

Autumn Walter South Rowan High School

Janise Lingle West Rowan High School

Carly Landreth North Rowan High School

S46887


G R A D U AT I O N

12C • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2010

SALISBURY POST

ROWAN-SALISBURY SCHOOLS

Congratulations TO THE FOLLOWING

TEACHERS F THE YEAR for 2010-2011

RSS District Teacher of the Year

J u l i e S t o l z e , Rowan County Early College Wendy DiStefano

Thelma Banks

Jaime Pacilio

Amie Furr

Mary Ann Novins

Pamela Rutherford

Bostian Elementary School Carson High School

Ken Hartman

China Grove Elementary School

Gerry Steedley

China Grove Middle School

Natalie Currie

Cleveland Elementary School

Carrie Cross

Corriher-Lipe Middle School

Kathy Cranford

East Rowan High School

Tonya Kepley

Enochville Elementary School

Tina Barkley

Erwin Middle School

Eric Overcash

Faith Elementary School

Michelle Cassell

Granite Quarry Elementary School

Crystal Ellis

Hanford-Dole Elementary School

Henderson Independent High School Hurley Elementary School

Jessica Whitson Isenberg Elementary School

Melissa Conrad

North Rowan Middle School Overton Elementary School

Susan Lamarre Rockwell Elementary School

Knollwood Elementary School

Julie Stolze

Knox Middle School

Diane Hill

Koontz Elementary School

Lynn Plummer II

Landis Elementary School

Christine Blackwell

Rowan Early College

Susan Stubbs

Salisbury High School

Juli Alfieri Kendall Fulham Paula Sloop

Shive Elementary School Southeast Middle School

Millbridge Elementary School

Ashley Lanning

Aaron Raiti

South Rowan High School

Morgan Elementary School

Danielle Webb

Lori Rabon

Mitzi Rusher

Kristi Miller

Amy Wells

Melanie Blount

Mt. Ulla Elementary School

North Rowan Elementary School North Rowan High School

West Rowan Middle School West Rowan High School

Woodleaf Elementary School

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GRADUATION’10

WEDNESDAY

SALISBURY POST

Deirdre Parker Smith, Copy Editor, 704-797-4252 news@salisburypost.com

June 9, 2010

13C

www.salisburypost.com

Taking responsibility in life B Y K ATHY C HAFFIN

kchaffin@salisburypost.com

Augustine Wiggins had to grow up quickly. At age 6, his father was in prison and his mother would go out partying at night, leaving Augustine to care for his two younger brothers and two younger sisters. “I would fix food on the stove for me and my brother, and I had to fix baby formula for the younger ones,” he says. “I changed diapers, did homework ...” This continued until Augustine was 8. “The neighbors heard a noise,” he says, “and so they came over one night and asked if my mom was at home. I said no, and they called the police.

“The police came over and took us to my grandparents’ house.” The Rowan County Department of Social Services got involved, and Augustine and his siblings were adopted by various family members. His father’s parents, Vera and Ernest Wiggins, adopted him and his younger brother, Joseph, a rising senior at North. His mother’s parents in Gastonia adopted his younger brother and sister, who are twins, and his youngest sister lives with her father. “She had a different father,” he says. When he went to live with his grandparents, Augustine says he had a difficult time transitioning to a more nor-

mal childhood. “I felt like they took my responsibilities away,” he says. “I started to cope with it after a while.” Ten years later, Augustine is preparing to graduate from North Rowan High School with a 3.2 grade-point average. He will be attending Wingate University this fall on an academic and track scholarship with plans to major in marketing and sports management. “My career goal is to become a sports agent,” he says. Augustine was also selected as the J. Michael McDuffie Memorial Scholarship recipient at North Rowan. The scholarship is given to JON C. LAKEY/SALISBURY POST students who have experi- North Rowan High School senior Augustine Wiggins poses with his grandparents, Vera and

See TAKING, 14C

Ernest Wiggins, at their home in Salisbury.

Third strike and he’s still in BY KATHY CHAFFIN

kchaffin@salisburypost.com

JON C. LAKEY/SALISBURY POST

Salisbury High School senior Chy’Keyla Caldwell, flanked by Phil Do and Justin Adkins, during rehearsel of a recent talent show at the school.

No matter how tough life is, move on BY KATHY CHAFFIN

kchaffin@salisburypost.com

No matter how tough life gets, Chy’Keyla Caldwell says there’s always someone out there who is struggling more. “So you should always use that as a reason to push forward because there’s no reason you can’t do anything,” she says. Chy’Keyla has faced several challenges during her education, including moving from Salisbury to Iredell County and then South Carolina be-

fore returning to her home. “I’m happy to be back,” she says. Though she lives with her father, Walter Brotherton, Chy’Keyla was living with her mother when she moved. The custody battle between her parents ended up with a judge allowing Chy’Keyla to decide with whom she wanted to live. It was the summer before the fifth grade when it happened. “It was real stressful,” she says, “because that would determine how the rest of my life would be. It was such a

young age and a big decision.” Chy’Keyla chose to live with her mother, then changed her mind and moved back to Salisbury to be with her father. The experience made her a stronger person, she says, “and taught me how to make good decisions.” Despite the stress of changing schools, she managed to keep her grades up

See TOUGH, 14C

A mother who believed in him and an attorney who challenged him to do better made a good student out of Emiziah “John” Everwine. Before that, he’ll be the first to tell you he was anything but. “I started out as a third-time freshman,” he says. What that means, John explains, is that he literally spent three years in the ninth grade at South Rowan High School. “I just never went to class,” he says, “didn’t do my homework, never did the classwork. I was rebellious and argued with the teachers.” Looking back, John says he and the friends he had at China Grove Middle School, where he had made good grades, drifted apart after a couple of months at the high school. Getting involved with the wrong crowd while trying to fit in contributed to his bad attitude, he says. John’s problems escalated his third year as a freshman when he was charged with assaulting a teacher. “I pushed him out of my face,” he says. “I raised my voice and said some foul language I know I shouldn’t have. “As a teenager like that, you don’t care.” John says the intervention specialist at South tried to get him to drop out. “She said that would probably be my best op-

JON C. LAKEY/SALISBURY POST

South Rowan senior John Everwine found inspiration from his brush with the law. tion,” he says. “I said I’d rather not. That kind of drove me to want to graduate. “Everybody was like, ‘You’re not a good kid,’ but my mother was like, ‘You’re a lot smarter than that.’ ” Cecil Whitley, the Salisbury attorney his mother hired to represent John, also saw who he could become. Whitley offered him an internship with his law firm if he would pull his grades back up to As and Bs. John, who was sentenced to six months of supervised probation and ordered to complete 24 hours of community service work at the school and attend an anger management course, accepted the challenge.

“After the assault charge, I just started doing my school work,” he says. John managed to make good enough grades to pull his grade-point average up to 2.93 and will graduate Friday only a year behind schedule. He completed his internship with Whitley last semester, helping with office work, running errands in the courthouse and getting a chance to meet the judges and other attorneys. John’s experience with the court system at an early age and his internship with Whitley influenced his decision to pursue law as a career.

See THREE, 14C

JON C. LAKEY/SALISBURY POST JON C. LAKEY/SALISBURY POST

West Rowan senior Sadie Chuor reclines in the principal’s chair.

All the way from California BY KATHY CHAFFIN

kchaffin@salisburypost.com

Sadie Chuor left all her friends behind when her family moved from California to western Rowan. “It was definitely hard just starting all over,” she says, “new friends, new school, new place.” Sadie started eighth grade at West Middle School not knowing anyone. There was also a major

difference between California and Rowan County. There wasn’t as much to do here, she says. To make matters worse, what was to be a new beginning for her family took a turn when her parents separated a few months later and then divorced. “It’s kind of sad,” Sadie says, “but divorce is like a common thing these days. It was hard dealing with that.”

The family split geographically as well. Steve Chuor returned to California with Sadie’s older brother, Damian. Sadie says she was very close to her father and the separation was very difficult. Though she could have gone with him, she chose to remain in Rowan with her mother, Tracy Doan, and little sister, Haley. “The only

See WEST, 14C

East Rowan senior Brynne Lippard was the unanimous choice for the scholarshop.

Overcoming physical adversity BY KATHY CHAFFIN

kchaffin@salisburypost.com

Being born with spina bifada may require Brynne Lippard to walk on crutches, but it hasn’t slowed her down. “I still do basically everything that everybody else does,” she says. “I don’t let my disability get me out of doing things at school and stuff.” East Rowan High School guidance counselor Laura Marlow says Brynne was the

unanimous choice of the school’s scholarship committee as the nominee for the J. Michael McDuffie Memorial Scholarship, which is awarded to students who have overcome hardships and excelled in school. “She’s very well respected by her peers and her teachers,” she says. “Everybody respects her because she doesn’t view herself as having this disability.” Brynne, who has a 3.8

grade-point average, says she didn’t know anything about the scholarship until she was announced as the winner at the school’s Senior Awards Night. She also received a $500 Margaret Basinger Scholarship and two scholarships to Pfeiffer University — a Presidential Scholarship for $8,000 and a Scopes Scholarship for $2,000. Her current plan is to com-

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THREE FROM 13C

In addition to the J. Michael McDuffie Memorial Scholarship for students who overcome adversity and excel in school, he received $9,000 in scholarships to Catawba College, where he plans to major in pre-law and continue on to law school. As a lawyer, John says he hopes he can make the same kind of impression on the youths he represents as Whitley did on him. Ashley Tomlinson, guidance counselor at South, says Kathy McDuffie, the director of secondary education for the

TOUGH FROM 13C

and will graduate from Salisbury High on Friday with a 3.5 grade-point average. Chy’Keyla says leaving the high school will be emotional. “I’ve grown to appreciate a lot of the people there,” she says. “They’ve helped me through a lot.” Chy’Keyla says Mildred Chinaka, who serves as faculty adviser for the TRU (Tobacco Reality Unfiltered) Club, has been especially helpful to her. “She’s provided me with a lot of good insight along the way,” she says. “She’s always there if I need her.” It was Chinaka, intervention specialist at the school, who nominated Chy’Keyla for the J. Michael McDuffie Memorial Scholarship for students who overcome adversities and excel in school. Chinaka can’t say enough good things about Chy’Keyla. “She is a very strong young lady who is committed to whatever she’s doing,” she says. “Adversities that we

WEST FROM 13C

other relatives we have here is my mom’s mother and my mom’s sister,” she says. It didn’t take Sadie long to adjust to living in the West Rowan district. “I’m used to it now,” she says, “not just the location, but the people in general. The people here are a lot nicer. I’ve grown to like it a lot.” In the meantime, Sadie’s mother remarried and had another son, Devin. What started out as a difficult transition has turned into a success story for Sadie. She will graduate from West Rowan High School Friday with a 4.43 grade-point average, having taken honors and AP classes. Sadie was selected as the recipient of the J. Michael McDuffie Memorial Scholarship for West Rowan, which is awarded to one student at every Rowan-Salisbury high school who has faced significant hardships in their lives. “Life is hard,” Sadie says. “You’re going to go through things, but it will only make you stronger. You’ve just got to push through it, and I per-

TAKING FROM 13C

enced and persevered through significant hardships in their lives, have successfully completed high school and have a plan for their future. One thing Augustine says he learned from his childhood is that “you can go through bad things in the beginning, but as long as you strive and work hard in school and choose to be a positive person, you can achieve your goals.” An important factor in doing that, Augustine says, is to surround yourself with positive people. “You can’t be around negative people,” he says. “I’d rather have people around me that push me to reach for my goals.” Looking back, he says his experience as a young child

school system who started the scholarship in memory of her husband, suggested John as a nominee after talking with him during a luncheon at South. Tomlinson says it was a pleasure nominating him. “I wish that every student would grow up the way he did during high school,” she says. “It’s just amazing for him to come from where he was and make such a positive change.” John says he and the teacher he assaulted are now friends. Tomlinson says he is a wonderful student. “He comes to school and tries his best and still helps his family,” she says. John works with his mother, Teresa Everwine, in the op-

eration of her trucking company, Bowers Trucking. He also helps her around the house. They worked together to create a lawn filled with beautiful flower beds and intricate walkways. Tomlinson says John also tries to be a positive role model for his younger sister, Tabitha. He also has an older brother and sister. John’s devotion to his mother is evident by how many times he brings her up in conversation. He says she paid off their house working as a waitress before starting the trucking company. “She’s a heck of a woman, I’ll give you that,” he says. Contact Kathy Chaffin at 704-797-4249.

have in life can propel us in a positive way or hold us back. What she has done in her life is to let them propel her in a positive way.” As vice president of the TRU Club, Chy’Keyla moderated a recent Wheel of TRU event at Salisbury Mall. Afterward, Chinaka says parents came up to her wanting to know who she was. “A lot of people praised her and said she did an excellent job.” Chy’Keyla was also among three masters of ceremony at a Salisbury High talent show sponsored by the TRU Club, Me Time and the Key Club. “She will go far in life,” Chinaka says. “I think she has good values, even though she had the disruptions in her life that she’s had. She has good values and morals that she stands by and adheres to.” Chy’Keyla says she was surprised when she heard her name announced at the school’s community awards program as the winner of the McDuffie scholarship. “I knew I had been through some hardships,” she says, “but I knew there were also other people out there that

were also deserving. ... I was really excited because I know there are going to be some difficulties coming up with funding for school, and that will be a big help.” Chy’Keyla has two younger brothers and two younger sisters. “I feel like I’ve become a better role model for them,” she says. She also helps out younger kids in the community. “There’s a girl waiting on me now to help her with something,” she says. Chy’Keyla plans to study biochemistry at East Carolina University. “I want to work in forensics and that would pretty much cover the entire field,” she says. The whole aspect of “finding out why something happened or how” is fascinating to Chy’Keyla. Her role model is President Barack Obama, and she recites one of his quotes as her philosophy in life: “Change will not come if we wait for some other person or some other time. We are the ones we’ve been waiting for. We are the change that we seek.” Contact Kathy Chaffin at 704-797-4249.

sonally just try to stay positive about everything ... I’m grateful for what I have, and I work hard for what I have.” She was also accepted into the Access Program at Appalachian State, which means that most of her tuition and costs will be paid for by the university. Sadie also received a $500 National Honor Society scholarship. While at West, Sadie has been a member of the soccer and swim teams. She served as executive treasurer of the Student Government Association this year and vice president of the National Honor Society, having served as a representative last year. She’s also on West Rowan’s Relay for Life team and served as team captain last year. Sadie was a Junior Civitan her freshman and sophomore years, is a member of the Young Life Christian organization and copy editor of the school newspaper. Sadie says she is grateful to guidance counselor Laura Fry and English teacher and newspaper adviser Lydia Richmond. In her first year at West, she says Fry helped her with college applications. “Any questions I had, she was

there to answer,” she says. “I’m very thankful to have had her.” Richmond served as kind of a second mother, Sadie says. “Whether it had to do with school or home stuff, I knew I could talk to her about anything and it not be awkward.” Fry says Sadie goes way beyond what is expected of her in all her endeavors. “I’ve certainly considered it a pleasure and privilege to work with her and get to know her this year,” she say. In addition to maintaining her high grade-point average and participating in two sports and numerous clubs and organizations at West, Sadie works as a cashier at Food Lion. “I don’t think there could have been a more worthwhile recipient of any scholarship that she’s been awarded,” Fry says. Sadie plans to major in biology on a pre-med path at Appalachian. I’ve always known I wanted to do something in the medical field,” she says. “Right now, I’m kind of leaning toward radiology, so we’ll see how that goes.” Contact Kathy Chaffin at 704-797-4249.

helped make him a better person. “It made me more mature and responsible among my peers.” Going to North Rowan High School has been a positive experience for Augustine. “It’s a relatively small school,” he says, “and it’s more focused. The teachers can give you more advice ... They can not only build you as a student in the classroom, but can help build your character outside the classroom.” William Tenborg, senior guidance counselor at North, says Augustine is one of the most polite young men he has ever known. “He’s got a pretty good direction of what he wants to do and how he wants to get there,” he says, “and he’s focused on those things ... He’s just a great young kid.” Augustine joined the track team when he started

riding home with a senior member of the girls’ track team during his freshman year and would have to wait for her to finish practice. “I got tired of sitting in the car,” he says, “so I started participating.” He also runs cross-country. Augustine and his family attend Mount Zion Baptist Church, where he is a member of the mime ministry. “People in the church influence me to stay focused and set goals that I can reach only through hard work and dedication,” he says. He’s a member of the Key Club and Spanish Club at North and is president of the DECA Marketing Club. Augustine participates in the Teen Court program and volunteers at Rowan Regional Medical Center in the summers, transporting patients in wheelchairs. Contact Kathy Chaffin at 704-797-4249.

Junior Marshals

Caitlyn Suire, Colin Townsend.

West Rowan High School Junior Marshals for 2009-2010 school year: Aneisha Baugh, Chris Holmes, Ashlynn Perry, Joel Brittain, Breeann Lambert, Douglas Petrea, Raleigh Carter, Amanda Matlock, Sam Porter, Margaret Daniel, Bransyn Motley, Kevin Robinson, Adam Fessler, Madison Osborne, Alyssa Snider, Moshika Finger, Leslie Pence,

Salisbury High School Junior Marshals for 2009-2010 school year: Roy Dixon, Carley Drye, Mallison Fisher, Zoe Gonzales, Alee Johnson, Margaret Kaufmann, Andrew McCollister, Mary Margaret Mills, Marlena Murphy, Virginia Nicholson, Steven Page, David Simons, Phillip Tonseth, Alexander Weant, and Hannah White.

SALISBURY POST

Scholarship awards those who overcome Kathy McDuffie, director of secondary education and career technical education for the Rowan-Salisbury School System, says her family and friends established the J. Michael McDuffie Memorial Scholarship as a way to honor her late husband’s memory and his love of children. The $500 scholarship is awarded to a graduating senior from each RowanSalisbury high school who has experienced and persevered through a significant hardship in life. Their hardship could be physical, emotional or environmental.

OVERCOMING FROM 13C mute to Pfeiffer and study accounting. “I’m not really sure what I want to do and thought I might like something like that,” she says. Brynne is vice president of the East Rowan Student Council and a member of the National Honor Society. She has been a Junior Civitan for four years and a member of the Future Business Leaders of American (FBLA) for three years. In addition, Brynne served as scorekeeper for the girls’ track team her freshman, sophomore and junior years. Marlow says Coach Laurie Wyrick says students would try to give her a ride around the track or to the bus when they were traveling, but Brynne always turned them down. “She was like, ‘I’ll do it myself,’ ” Marlow says.

This is the second year the scholarship has been awarded. “Through Mike's 21month battle with cancer, he never gave up or gave in,” Kathy McDuffie says. “He was always positive and enjoyed life and every day he was given. “When faced with a setback or another medical issue, he would say, ‘This is just a bump in the road.’ He believed it was all part of the Lord’s plan for his life. He set a wonderful example for our children and me as well as for many others whose path he crossed.”

McDuffie’s family asked each school’s scholarship committee to select a student for the scholarship. The purpose of the scholarship, she says, “is to support students who have faced difficulties and through perseverance and determination, they have successfully completed high school and have a plan for their future. “This should be a student who has lived by the motto of the Jimmy V Foundation for Cancer Research,” Kathy McDuffie says, “which is ‘Don’t give up. Don’t ever give up.’ ”

“She has a positive attitude, and she’s always willing to help other students.” Brynne says all of the staff and students at East have been very kind in offering to help her. “But I pretty much take care of everything on my own,” she says. Even as a young child, she accepted spina bifada — a condition that occurs when the backbone and spinal canal do not close before birth —as being a part of her life. Brynne says Charlotte Cherry, law and justice teacher and Student Council adviser at East, has had a positive influence on her educational career. She has worked with Cherry since being elected to the Student Council her sophomore year. She says it hasn’t quite hit her yet that she’ll be graduating Friday. “I’m kind of nervous about col-

lege,” she admits. “I don’t know if I’m ready.” The daughter of Julie and Mike Lippard, Brynne has an older brother, Derrick Preston, who lives in Philadelphia; an older sister, Kara Preston, who is a third-grade teacher; and a younger brother, Reid Lippard, who is a sophomore at East. Her family is very supportive, she says, and has encouraged her throughout her school years. As for hobbies, Brynne says she likes to shop, spend time in her family’s swimming pool and hang out with friends. She is a member of the Youth Group at Grace Bible Church, where she has attended her whole life. Her family’s going to celebrate Brynne’s graduation with a trip to Disney World. Contact Kathy Chaffin at 704-797-4249.

First United Methodist awards scholarships

First United Methodist Church awarded 14 scholarships to church members on June 6. Renewing their scholarships are Parker Cox, son of Gary and Lugene Cox, rising senior at Western Carolina University; Ryan Disseler, son of Tom and Shirley Disseler, rising senior at Appalachian State University; Ellen Emerson, daughter of Coleman Emerson, rising senior at UNCChapel Hill; Elizabeth Kraft, daughter of Skip and Lisa

Kraft, rising senior at UNCChapel Hill; Chandler Johnson, son of Craig and Lynne Johnson, rising junior at NC State University; Spencer Scarvey, daughter of Dave and Katie Scarvey, rising junior at University of Georgia; and Julia Kraft, daughter of Skip and Lisa Kraft, rising sophomore at UNC-Charlotte. First time awards were presented to the following rising freshmen: Alex Hudson, daughter of John Hudson, UNC-Greensboro;

Thomas Langford, son of Glenn and Patty Langford, High Point University; Luke Lundy, son of Melanie Miller, High Point University; Luke Miller, son of Doug and Frances Miller, UNC-Chapel Hill; Max Parker, son of Rick and Janet Parker, East Carolina University; Quinn Scarvey, daughter of Dave and Katie Scarvey, Lenoir-Rhyne University; and Lauren Watts, daughter of Rob and Jean Watts, East Carolina University.

Teens retrace the steps of many legendary civil rights icons CHARLOTTE — This summer, 12 area students will take a seven-day bus tour through the south to study the civil rights movement. The tour is part of the Stratford Richardson YMCA’s Creating a Usable Past program for middle and high school students, which focuses on critical thinking skills, writing, leadership, community service and educational advancement. Pfeiffer University history professor Dr. Michael Thompson began planning for the trip following a tour he took two years ago with civil rights leader Julian Bond. He also created a curriculum for students to study. Since April, students have been meeting on Thursdays to learn about the civil rights movement, key figures and historic places. They also kept a journal, watched documentaries and discussed past and current events. In addition, students who went on the tour last year served as peer mentors to this year’s participants. The group talked about race and identity, equality and cultural differences. More than 50 students applied for the 12 available spots. “I feel this generation of young people who are at the cusp of adulthood face an interesting crossroads where the issue of race and race relations reveals itself in our country,” said Thompson, who was granted a sabbatical by Pfeiffer officials to pursue the project. “I firmly believe that providing students opportunities to engage their past outside the classroom can make the learning experience both

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valuable and meaningful. Fortunately, the YMCA leadership in Charlotte warmly received my idea to support this important initiative.” The tour will take place June 13-19 across nine cities. The sites include the Dexter Avenue Church in Montgomery, Alabama; the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, Tennessee, and the University of Mississippi. Students will also meet and photograph historians and who participated in the civil rights movement. Their pictures from the trip will be displayed in a photo exhibit when they return. The students will also blog daily about their experiences at www.creatingausablepast2010.blogspot.com Transportation and accommodations have been provided by the Stratford Richardson YMCA and the YMCA of Greater Charlotte so there is no cost to students. CMS students who will participate in the tour include: Ayana Daniel and Nevahl Dixon of West Char-

lotte High; Vandell Jackson and Tiarra Price of Midwood High; Bryanna Norwood of Butler High, Breanna Washington of Northwest School of the Arts; Marlon Dunlap and Lazaro Guiterrez of Wilson Middle and Sydney Espy and Keith Miller III of Alexander Graham Middle. Former and present students in the program will address the media during a press conference Tuesday, June 8, 10:30-11:30 a.m. at the Stratford Richardson YMCA, 1946 West Blvd. The students will also take the media on a tour of the photo exhibit from the 2009 civil rights tour. The Stratford Richardson YMCA is located on the west corridor in Charlotte. The branch was named after Charlotte civil rights activists Willie J. Stratford, Sr. and Jim Richardson. The Stratford Richardson YMCA teen programs provide students with better choices to empower them to become the best they can be.

Congratulations 2010 8th Grade Class

From L to R: Front Row: Sam Washko, Mackenzie Beaver, Samantha Wright 2nd Row: Olivia Smith, Drew Pethel, Eleanor Alcorn, Anna Flynn 3rd Row: Ian Lins, Lucas Capito, John Latimer, Thacher Shields, Philip Simons 4th Row: Madeline Hoskins, Alexandra Drye, Taylor Rodenhuis, Lindsay Bearss, Maria Weber, Nathaniel Greene Last Row: Jon Mark Petty and Ryan Uliana S46207


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SALISBURY POST

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2010 • 15C

West Rowan High School Class of Altariq Abraham

Ashleigh Adams

Chase Adkins

Ravon Adkins

Melissa Aguilar

Tiffany Aistrop

Johnnikka Allison

Justin Allison

Katie Barbee

Melissa Barbee

Kayla Barnett

Jonie Bautista

Caroline Beaver

Dagan Beaver

Jessica Beaver

Kaylee Beaver

Toni Blackshire

Dale Bogle

Mark Boles

Mariah Bond

Andrea Bost

Ezra Brawley

Dylan Brinson

Perry Brooks, Jr.

Ethan Brown

Derek Buchanan

Natalie Burns

Ariel Burton

Benjamin Carlton

Katie Carscaddon

Joshua Childers

Melissa Choi

Sadie Chuor

Stephen Clark, Jr.

Darrius Clayton

Rodney Cline

Aaron Cobb

Shakiyla Colson

Dangela Connor

John Cook, Jr.

Travis Cordial

Lauren Cornelison

Micah Cottingham

D'Quante Cowan

Melisa Cranfill

Desere' Cross

Jonathan Crucitti

Laura Culbertson

Isaiah Cuthbertson

Khristy Dale

Rochelle Dalton

Steven Daniel

Shane Davidson

Jordan Davis

Melissa Day

Sarah Denaux

Martin Denton

Lindsey Dionne

Asmir Dizdarevic

Amanda Doby

Bree Draughn

Ashley Durham

Kayla Durham

Ashley Dutton

Kyle Eades

Ryan Edwards

Brittany Ellis

Jocelyn Espinoza Carbajal

Tommie Estes

Bridget Etheridge

Tiffany Eberhart

Ashley Firman

Jennifer Flagg

Justin Flint

Hayden Foster

Heather Foster

Clinton Frost

Mackel Gaither

Jessica Garrison

Ashley Gaston

Lexis Gill

James Goodnight

Jerry Goodnight

Elizjah Goodson

Maxxwell Gore

Courtney Gover

Chelsea Graham

Keria Gray

Jacqueline Gregoire

Nicholas Guertin

Amber Guinn

Derek Gummo

Brandy Harris

Raquel Hartsell

Rebecca Hartsell

Miranda Hatfield

Shelton Hellard

Nikki Hepler

Thomas Hester

Kimberly Holland

Wilson Holloway

James Hopkins, Jr.

Mary Allison Horton

Daniel Hosch

Quinton Huffman

Sara Hutchinson

Rose Irvan

De'Shonda James

John Jancic

Kimberly Jenkins

Aida Karat

Alexandria Kepley

Avery Kepley

Dawnisha Kerr

Noah King

Tyler King

Dillon Kluttz

Kaitlyn Knepp

Megan Knox

Erica Landaverde

Thomas Langford

Johnathan Laws

Moriah Leach

Janise Lingle

Ktlyn Livengood

Lindsay Livengood

Michael Livengood

Landon Locklear

Adam Lomax, II

William Lopez

Alex Lowe

Jordan Lucas

Nicole Lucente

Ethan Marsh

Amburr McClarty

Olivia McSwain

Corey McVay

Richard Meek

Dalton Melton

Marissa Metcalf

Alisha Miller

Austin Miller

Desalique Miller

Luke Miller

Nathan Miller

Alexandria Mills

Tyler Mistretta

Kirsten Morgan

Matthew Morgan

Christine Mosser

Stephanie Mowery

Rodney Murphy, Jr.

Brandon Myers

Drew Myers

Jesse Myers

Tiffany Nance

Christopher Neal

Jordan Newman

Vicki Nichols

Timothy Pangburn

James Parker

Kevin Parks, Jr.

Matthew Pavelko

Coleman Phifer

Jacob Phifer

Kajuan Phillips

Adnan Podzic

Darshanna Poe

Joshua-David Poe

Jacob Pond

Jessica Poole

Justin Presnell

Vinlisa Price

Laquasia Privette

Devan Puckett

Joshua Pyle

Mackenzie Radford

Dezire Rankin

Dara Reasbeck

Lucas Redmond

Diane Remes

Skylaray Revels

Katherine Ritchie

Luis Rivera-Bonilla

Ni-Yarna Roberts

J'Airahmai Robinson

Jennifer Roig

Zachary Rosario

Craig Roseman

Jessica Roth

Joy Roysdon

Macon Russell

Rachel Russell

Nelson Safrit

Yaffa Samuel

Kyle Saunders

Zachary Simpson

Kara Skinner

Christopher Smith

Jessica Soto Mejia Brittany Stallings

Orlando Blackwell, Jr. Nakira Blakeney

Juana Amezquita

Jamie Bailey

Alanna Barbee

Miranda Blankenship Robert Blankenship Brandon Boardman


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16C • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2010

SALISBURY POST

West Rowan High School Class of Meriah Stamper

Claire Steele

Laiton Steele

Jasa Stephens

Sabrina Stephens

Phillip Stringer

Nicholas Taggart

Brandon Talbert

Johanna Tansey

Sarah Teel

Krystol Thomas

Leah Thompson

Alicia Turner

Antionette Turner

Hayden Untz

Candice Vanhoose

Kayla Vanhoy

Amber Vaughn

Xiomara Villatoro

Caleb Walton

Christopher Ware

Jacob Warner

Michael Warner

Olivia Watkins

Ellen Watts

Lauren Watts

Briana Weaver

Dennis Webb, Jr.

Garrett White

Kenyatta White

Ronisha White

Spencer White

David Whitley, Jr.

John Whitley

Ashley Wietbrock

Ershawn Wilder

Caroline Wilfong

Teresa Wilhelm

Brittany Williams

Heather Williams

Reid Williams

Sara Willis

Quamesha Witherspoon Kellie Womble

Ashley Wood

Austin Wood

Roy Wood

Brandi Wrights

Jerrod Youker

West Rowan High School Class of 2010 senior plans West Rowan High School senior plans. U.S. Air Force — Krystol Alexandera Thomas. Appalachian State University — Alanna Lee Barbee, Sadie Doan Chuor, Clinton Dean Frost, Wilson Kent Holloway, Mary Allison Horton, Lindsay Michelle Livengood, Nicole Christine Lucente, Jacob Paul Phifer, Mackenzie Gail Radford, Sabrina Ellen Stephens, Sarah Ashley Teel, Ershawn Dewone Wilder, Roy Franklin Wood. U.S. Army — Derek David Robert Gummo, Shelton James Hellard, Dalton Alan Melton. Army National Guard — Ryan Earl Edwards, Brandi Monroe Wrights. Aveda Institute Charlotte — Drew Elizabeth Myers. Barry University — Shakiyla Jáquez Colson. Bellas Artes, Mexico D.F — Francisco Jassiel ArzateBaños. Berklee the College of Music — Christine Dee Mosser. Campbell University — Lindsey Marie Dionne, Kimberly Michelle Jenkins, Teagen J. Wance. Cape Fear Community College — Jonie Bautista, Hayden Michael Foster. Carteret Community College — Adam Alison Lomax II, Macon Gray Russell. Catawba College — Katie Nicole Barbee, Lauren Paige Cornelison, Micah Stephanie Cottingham, Elizjah Jasean Goodson, Timothy Matthew Pangburn, Adnan Podzic, J’Airahmai Dequan Robinson, Leah Ruth Thompson, Dennis Mark Webb Jr. Central Piedmont Community College — Dagan Reese Beaver, Miranda Nicole Blankenship, Dara Rose Reasbeck, Amber Kaylyn Vaughn, Spencer Maxwell White. Coastal Carolina Community

College — Catherine Rashail Miller. College of Charleston — Katherine Virginia Ritchie. Davidson County Community College — Fabiola Hernandez, Stephanie Marie Mowery. Davidson County Community College Davie Campus — Keria Shant’a Gray, Johanna Beth Tansey. Daytona College — Alisha Danielle Miller. East Carolina University — Shane Lewis Davidson, Asmir Dizdarevic, Nicholas Spencer Guertin, Matthew Zachary Morgan, James Maxwell Parker, Kara Sloan Skinner, Lauren Cate Watts. Empire Beauty School — Desalique Artesia Miller. Fayetteville State University — Ni-Yarna Mercedes Roberts. Georgia State University — Ashleigh Noel Adams. Guilford Technical Community College — Jacob Dean Warner. High Point University — Thomas Glenn Langford. Johnson & Wales University — Kirsten Marie Morgan. Johnson C. Smith University — Joshua-David Brian Poe. King’s College — Mark Anthony Boles, Kimberly Dawn Holland, Johnathan Wesley Laws, Kaitlin Mischele Rohl, Caroline Elizabeth Cook Wilfong. Lenoir-Rhyne College — Rodney Eugene Cline, Tyler Mark King. Liberty University — Jacqueline Anneliese Gregoire, Austin Jeffrey Miller, Jesse Michael Myers. Livingstone College — William Sylvester Lytle Jr., Andrew Clinton Salley Jr. U.S. Marines — Jamie Allen Bailey, Dylan Andrew Brinson, Jose Guadalupe Garcia Carbajal, Noah Turner King. Meredith College — Katie Marie Carscaddon. Mitchell Community College

— Tiffany Tania Chaffone Eberhart, Brittany Danielle Ellis, Lexis Sade Gill, Amanda Gomez-Doby, Alexandria Nicole Kepley, Tiffany Nicole Nance, Rachel Alene Russell, Brittany Michelle Williams, Heather Marie Williams. U.S. Navy — Brandon Alexander Myers, Skylaray Darlene Revels. N.C. A&T University — Altariq Ali Abraham, De’Shonda Annette James, Vinlisa Antonia Price. N.C. State University — Ashley Ann Durham, Matthew John Pavelko, Coleman Trent Phifer, Garrett Dale White. North Carolina Central University — Ravon Henry Adkins, Johnnikka Je’Diamond Allison, Laquasia Graceland Privette, Alicia Renee Turner, Jeanisha Mariah Vaughn, Olivia Denise Watkins. Peace College — Caroline Elizabeth Beaver. Pfeiffer University — Sara Marie Hutchinson. Pitt Community College — Ariel Britni Burton, Hayden Gibson Untz, Kellie Renee Womble. Queens University — Orlando Jammal Blackwell Jr., James Anthony Hopkins Jr. Rowan-Cabarrus Community College — Melissa Karen Aguilar, Justin Clay Allison, Juana Elizabeth Amezquita, Kaylee Arressa Beaver, Dale Ellis Bogle, Mariah Chelsea Bond, Andrea Brooke Bost, Ethan Cameron Brown, Benjamin Watt Carlton, Santiago Carrillo-Gonzalez, Rosa Catalina Castellon, Mernisa Celebic, Joshua Franklin Childers, Melissa Jin Choi, Darrius Ravon Clayton, Aaron John Cobb, Travis Andrew Cordial, Melisa Ashley Cranfill, Laura Marie Culbertson, Khristy Ann Dale, Steven Derrell Daniel, Sarah Katherine Denaux, Kayla Nicole Durham, Jocelyn Adriana Espinoza Carbajal, Brid-

get Nicole Etheridge, Ashley Marie Firman, Heather Anne Foster, Ashley Katrice Gaston, Peter Justin Gibbons, Chelsea Brianne Graham, Brandy Brianna Harris, Raquel Elizabeth Hartsell, Rebecca Marie Hartsell, Miranda Lynn Hatfield, Nikki Jo Hepler, Quinton Thomas Huffman, Rose Marie Irvan, John Aaron Jancic, Avery Ashlyn Kepley, Elizabeth Rene Kilburn, Megan Nicole Knox, Janise Elizabeth Lingle, Ktlyn Amber Livengood, Michael David Livengood, Jordan Christopher Lucas, Amburr Michelle McClarty, Corey James McVay, Marissa Nicole Metcalf, Tyler Edward Mistretta, Rodney Antoine Murphy Jr., Christopher James Neal, Vicki Christina Nichols, Darshanna Morgan Poe, Jessica Renee Poole, Brandon William Powers, Devane Leigh Puckett, Dezire Shamel Rankin, Lucas Foster Redmond, Michael Lee Richardson Jr., David Edward Richer, Jennifer Magan Roig, Luis Miguel Rivera-Bonilla, Tereysha Marie Robles Torres, Craig James Roseman, Joy Marie Roysdon, Nelson James Safrit, Christopher Stephen Schenk, Jessica Paulina Soto Mejia, Brittany Ann Stallings, Meriah Reighanne Stamper, Nicholas George Taggart, Brandon Phillip Talbert, Candice Marie Vanhoose, Caleb Andrew Walton, Christopher Wayne Ware, Amber Nichole Weatherholtz, Briana Nicole Weaver, Kenyatta Rochelle White, John Dylan Whitley, Teresa Megan Wilhelm, Ashley Nicole Wood, Austin Eugene Wood, Jerrod Jordan Youker. Salem College — Xiomara Elizabeth Villatoro. Sandhills Community College — Isaiah Aaron Cuthbertson, KaJuan Rashard Phillips.

Southern Adventist University — Joselline Iveth Garcia. Southern Weslyan University — Dillon Scott Kluttz, Ethan Jay Marsh. Surry Community College — Alexandria Nicole Mills. The Art Institute of Charlotte — Derek Clyde Buchanan. Tidewater Community College — Perry McCles Brooks Jr. University of North Carolina at Asheville — Jasa Rain Stephens. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill — Desere’ Simone Cross, Thomas Ethan Hester, Kaitlyn Caroline Knepp, William Michael Wilson Lopez, Luke Harrison Miller. University of North Carolina at Charlotte — Jessica Collette Beaver, Terrence Lervener Brockington Jr., Ashley Layne Dutton, Tommie Lamont Estes Jr., Jessica Elizabeth Garrison, Courtney Leigh Gover, Erica Landaverde, Landon James Locklear, Olivia BreeAnn McSwain, Claire Frances Steele, Reid David Williams. University of North Carolina at Greensboro — James Bailey Goodnight, Jacob Allen Pond, Ronisha Leigh-Ann White. University of North Carolina at Pembroke — Dangela Jamise Connor. University of North Carolina at Wilmington — Richard Kesler Meek, Ellen Kaylee Watts. Undecided — Chase Jordan Adkins, Brandon Richard Boardman, Stephen Glenn Clark, Jr., D’Quante Raheem Cowan, Kyle Wayne Eades, Justin Eugene Flint, Daniel Jordan Hosch, Moriah Caressé Leach, Jordan Leah Newman, Justin William Presnell, Diane Elizabeth Remes, Yaffa Briana Renisha Samuel, Nicholas Janelle Sanchez, Zachary Tyler Simpson, Ryan Gregory

Tester, Antionette Sharday Turner, William Basil Wilson IV. Universal Technical Institute — Martin Alexander Denton. University of Arkansas — Christopher Matthew Smith. University of Tuskegee — Phillip Kemp Stringer. University of Virginia — Kevin Anthony Parks Jr. U.S. Military Academy at West Point — Jonathan Neil Crucitti. Wake Forest University — Ashley Elizabeth Wietbrock, Sara Rose Willis. Wells College — Jessica J. Marie Hanyon Roth. Western Carolina University — Tiffany Lynne Aistrop, Melissa Anne Day, Jennifer Michelle Flagg, Jerry Allman Goodnight, Quamesha Taniah La’Kwayn Witherspoon. Wingate University — Kayla Ariela Barnett, Robert Eric Blankenship, Natalie Lynn Burns, Alex Mack Lowe, Laiton Reid Steele. Winston-Salem State University — Takeisha Annette Ellis, Mackel Hiram William Gaither, Maxxwell Gilbert Gore, Dawnisha Nicole Kerr. Work force — Michael David Akers Jr., Melissa Ann Barbee, Toni Marie Blackshire, Nakira Michele Blakeney, Ezra Ezekiel Brawley, John Wayne Cook Jr., Jordan Anthony Davis, Brandy Elizabeth Gallimore, Amber Leigh Guinn, Michael Wayne Jones, Wil Coleman Jones II, Aida Karat, Jose Manuel Martinez, Nathan Chase Miller, Jessica Holli Nichols, Joshua Christopher Perkins, Joshua Beatty Pyle, Erick Andres Samano Caballero, Kyle Everitt Saunders, Destin Lamar Sloan, Glenda Sue Sola, Vilma Nohemi Valladares-Escobar, Kayla Dawn Vanhoy, Michael Joseph Warner, Norman Michael Weaver, David Lee Whitley Jr., Daniel Cole Wilson.

West Rowan honors students at awards assembly West Rowan 2010 senior awards recipients. Salisbury Civitan Michael Yang Scholarship — Kaitlyn Knepp. Akzo Nobel Science Scholarship — Sara Willis. West Point Military Academy Award — Jonathan Crucitti. R.A. Clement Scholarship — Ronisha White, Ershawn Wilder, Shakiyla Colson. George C. Knox Scholarship — Kayla Barnett. All-County Scholars — Thomas Langford, Luke Miller, Jesse Myers, Garrett White. Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Scholarship — Desere Cross, Kimberly Jenkins. SECU Foundation Scholarship — Desere Cross. NAACP Scholarships — Desere Cross, Ronisha White, DaShonda James. Zeta Phi Beta Sorority Schol-

arship — Ronisha White. Samuel R. Johnson Memorial Scholarship — James Hopkins Delta Sigma Theta Inc. Award — Ershawn Wilder. Teaching Fellow Awards — Jerry Goodnight, Luke Miller. Helen S. and Julian L. Goldman Scholarship — Xiomara Villatoro. Rowan Masonic Scholarship — Luke Miller. Cleveland Lions Club Joe Hall Memorial Scholarship — Claire Steele, Ronisha White. Salisbury Rotary Club Scholarships — Lindsey Dionne, Luke Miller, Thomas Langford, Sarah Willis, Ashley Wietbrock, Thomas Hester. Salisbury Rotary Athletic Award — Chris Smith. West Rowan PTA Scholarships — Claire Steele, Sara Willis.

Rowan-Salisbury PTA Council — Ronisha White. Rowan-Cabarrus Community College Endowed Scholarship — Melissa Choi. F&M Bank Scholarship — Janise Lingle. Woodleaf Civitan Scholarship — Moriah Bond. Distinguished Athletes — Timmy Pangburn, Nicole Lucente. Academic Award — Luke Miller, Lindsey Dionne. Band Award — Thomas Langford, Janise Lingle. U.S. Army Scholar Athlete Awards — Jonathan Crucitti, Ellen Watts. Rowe McNeely 4H Scholarship — Phillip Stringer. J. Michael McDuffie Memorial Scholarships — Sadie Chuor. Millbridge Ruritan Club Scholarship — Wilson Holloway, Claire Steele.

Rowan County Veteran’s Council American History Award — Jacqueline Gregoire. William “Billy” T. Cohen Award — Kevin Parks Jr., Jonathan Crucitti, Chris Smith, Kaitlyn Knepp. Mt. Ulla 21st Century Scholarship — Nicole Lucente. RSS PAPA Scholarship — Thomas Langford. Ralph Ketner and William Comer Family Career and Technical Education Scholarship — John Dylan Whitley. DAR Good Citizen — Sarah Teel. Perfect Attendance Recognition — one year, Melissa Day, Ethan Brown; four years, Caroline Wilfong. Falcon Success Awards — Katie Barbee, Kayla Barnett, Rosa Castellon, Melissa Choi, Rodney Cline, Isaiah Cuthbertson, Melissa Day, Erica Landaverde, Nicole Lucente,

Jacob Pond, Claire Steele, Ellen Watts, Ronisha White, Ershawn Wilder, Roy Wood. Brad Patrick Scholarship — Matthew Pavelko. Wendy’s High School Heisman Award — Jonathan Crucitti, Sarah Teel. West Rowan High School Athletes of the Year — Kevin Parks Jr., Desere Cross. RSAE Scholarship — Claire Steele. NHS Scholarships — Alex Lowe, Sadie Chuor. Jr. Civitan Scholarships — Sarah Teel, Melissa Day, Lindsey Dionne, Kaitlyn Knepp, Sara Willis. Spanish Award — Kyle Eades, Nakira Blakeney. Social Studies Award — Desere Cross, Austin Miller. Science Award — Kaitlyn Knepp, Luke Miller, Ashley Durham. Art Awards — Katherine

Ritchie, Jasa Stephens. Latin Awards — Xiomara Villatoro, Jacob Pond, Luke Miller. Mathematics, Calculus Awards — Desere Cross, Lindsey Dionne, Kaitlyn Knepp, Thomas Langford, Xiomara Villatoro. English Awards — Kaitlyn Knepp, Desere Cross, Jacqueline Gregoire. Journalism — Newspaper, Desere Cross, Sadie Chuor, Sara Willis, Lauren Watts, Ricky Meek; Yearbook, Alana Barbee, Kaitlyn Knepp, James Maxwell Parker, Ashley Wietbrock. Cabinetmaking Award — Santi Carrillo. Masonry Awards — John Jancic, Justin Allison, Dale Bogle, Johanna Tansey, Ethan Brown

See WEST, 21C


G R A D U AT I O N

SALISBURY POST

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2010 • 17C

Gray Stone Day School Class of Sarah Almond

Charlie Ambrose

Brooke Armstrong

Greg Asciutto

Nirval Benny

Mygel Bergstresser

Katelyn Collier

Amber Cranford

Savanna Culp

Caitlin Curtis

Tony De Santis

Andra Dolniak

Ashley Harrington

Hunter Harvey

Jordan Hatley

Ashley Honeycutt

Ric Huneycutt

Brittany Kepley

Kaleb Medlin

Garrett Mullis

Peter Nasuti

Dillon Parker

Sejal Parmar

Joseph Sutlive

Zach Torrence

Mike Wall

Dalton Wally

Molly Ward

Dejah Broussard

Kaitlin Burris

Christa Canup

Josh Casper

Christina Eller

Lindsey Eudy

Laura Evans

Ariana Ledbetter

Ian Levine

Amanda Lovett

Jessie Lowder

Chandler Maness

Molly Peele

Michael Pierce

Allison Pope

Andrew Pribble

Ryan Rosier

Steven Rothenberg

Taylor Woods

Megan Yost

Jacob Earnhardt

Kenny Caspers

Rosemary Chapmon

Josh Clayton

Corey Cleghorn

Maggie Grathwohl

Ashley Grubbs

Jake Mauldin

Cameron McAulay

Alexandra McCollister

Jazmine Shepherd

Emily Staley

Blair Streater

Kaleigh Featherstone Jason Fesperman

Henderson High School Class of NOT PICTURED:

Jordan Long, Brandon Russell Tyiea Jefferies

Johsua Lewis

Pierce Peeler

North Hills Christian School Class of Catherine Ardion Spencer Bevis, Jr.

Kristen Bush

Patrick Michael

Daniel Misner

Dustin Pruitt

Sarah Starnes

Rockwell Christian School Class of Tyler Hall

Matthew Hoehman

Tiffany Hoffman

Anthony Odom

Megan Petrea

Rowan County Homeschool Association Class of Caleb Deitz

Corey Hamm

Ethan Livengood

Kennedy Nesbitt

Elisa Sanchez

Aspen Yule

Gray Stone Day School graduation and senior plans Gray Stone Day School will hold its sixth graduation commencement ceremony on Friday at 7 p.m. The ceremony will be held in Merner Gymnasium on Pfeiffer University’s Misenheimer campus and a reception honoring the seniors and their parents will follow. Gray Stone Day School alumna Gretyl Kinsey will provide

the music. The commencement speaker will be Pat McCrory. McCrory is the former mayor of Charlotte. He voluntarily ended his 14-year term as Charlotte’s longest serving mayor in December 2009. During his record breaking tenure, more than 200,000 new jobs were created, crime was reduced to a 30-year low

and his leadership of Charlotte’s 25-year transportation and land use plan, including the Carolinas’ first light rail system, gained national recognition. In 2010, former mayor McCrory continues to be a partner with McCrory & Company, a sales and client development consulting firm, and he is also senior di-

rector of strategic initiatives for Moore & Van Allen, PLLC, headquartered in Charlotte. McCrory serves on the Board of Directors of Lending Tree and Kewaunee Scientific Corp. After a close defeat as the Republican nominee for governor in 2008, McCrory’s name is often mentioned as the leading can-

didate for many political offices, including governor in 2012. This year 63 area graduates will complete their high school careers as they prepare to go on to college. It is the fifth year seniors have completed a service project as part of their graduation requirements. The students have worked hours in their

communities helping to implement new programs or to benefit established ones. Student commencement speakers are Greg Asciutto, Christina Eller, Ric Huneycutt, Molly Peele, Blair Streater and Megan Yost. Junior marshals are Rachel Bangle, Candace

See GRAY STONE, 22C


G R A D U AT I O N

18C • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2010

SALISBURY POST

G R A D U AT I O N

SALISBURY POST

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2010 • 19C

The Rowan-Salisbury Board of Education congratulates the following students for having perfect attendance for the 2009-2010 school year Bostian Elementary John Freeman Anna Rymer Brandon Barrera-Gutierrez Kimberly Barrera-Gutierrez Juan Espinoza Imer Andaya-German Jacob Barringer Jordan Kirk Adam Lyles Beauford Huneycutt Blanca Perez Autumn Asbury Brieanna Bauer Jared Lamb China Grove Elementary School Alma Cruz Makyna Graham Alexander Griffith Aleksis Parker Arnold Roberts Mariano Bautista Cameron Brawley Megan Mauzy Austin Peacock Erin Simerson Jeremiah Cloninger Alexis Craig Emilio Garduno Heather Mauzy Leslie Molina Rosa Bautista Cameron Brady Kelsey Brown Strider Christman Brooke Corriher Benjamin Quintana III Marc Rivaz Maritsa Salazar Casey Hunter Karla Maldonado Hayley Rimer Ali Vang We Vang Daniel Cuevas Evonna Parker Cleveland Elementary School Hailey Hall Joshua Noble Samantha Phelps Justin Currie Jamie Alviter Skylar Eller Hannah Shoaf Sarah Steele Hannah Annas Elijah Barrier Parker Greene Phillip McDaniel Heather Stewart Toby Brown Brandy Crawford Christiana Sims Amber Talbert Fredrick Wall Timothy Wilmot

China Grove Middle School Morgan Allen Freda Beatty Miranda Belk Sylvetta Bost Cody Boulware Jacob Clearwater Meredith Clearwater Mayra Garcia Haley Hardeman Vongpasit Keopaseut Amarantha Ortiz Kasey Scarborough Jonathon Shuping Michaella Simmons Corriher Lipe Middle School Angelica Banda Kaseim Black Hunter Butler Jarett Jordan Kylie Labbe Bessy Oliva-Munguia Mason Roark Hayley Roberts Brittany Walter Yeimy Zelaya James Butler Marissa Chavis Jennifer Compton Lauren Cooke Daphne Davis Tatana Dillard-Sims Katie Figueroa Eric Finger Dakotah Lambert Katari Posey Qwantarius Rhyne Allyson Safrit Kameron Sherrill Jacob Sykes Kristin Trammell Caitlin Waters Brittany Buffington Sandra Gonzalez Johnathon Miller Leah Morton East Rowan High School Micah Bostian Kimberly Goodell Hunter McClintock Mattison Miller Brian Lentz Matthew Lentz Christopher Walton Richard Cleveland III Enochville Elementary School Caroline Brooks Michael Caskey Carson Crainshaw Mackenzie Fornshell Trevor Freeman Jonas Greene Micahel Link Braxton Parker Parker Caden

Richardson Tenae Suggs Elora Brett White Ethan H. Shive Elementary School Nicholas Hill Jordan Mikoski Bradon Mitchell Gage Jackson Luke Morrison Tyler Seamon Cheng Vang Samuel Blankenship Vincent Keoboupha James Bryant Nathan Hill Gavin Jackson Gabrielle Keyes Erwin Middle School Andrew Adcock Laura Agner Sarah Brady Chance Brown Jennifer Earnhardt James Emerson Alex Fink Susan Fowler Maggie Havner Donnie Hill Lana Jackson Jackson Justus Montana Kimrey Rashied Lane Jocelyn Lowe Heather Lyerly Donna Marze Brody Nielsen Caroline Plyler Brittany Riddle Kaylie Shore Brittany Small Lychia Vang Ilya Wang Joseph Cornacchione Paula Goodman Alec Hamilton Garrett Hatley Cody Holshouser Alexis Lambert Kanah Lopes Haley Lyerly Samantha Marshall Holly Miller Darren Moody Austin Owens Joseph Peeler Ashton Rogers Taylor Rogers Taylor Starnes Ashley Stubbs Jason Troutman Destiny Tucker Rebecca Agner Justin Allen Josie Bailey Jason Basso James Bowers William Burroughs Francisco Cuadra Thanh Dang

Draven Jackson Daniel Kelly Christopher Sihler, Jr. Jalen Borders Navaya Sion Kymani Tarver

Nancy Ha Dylan Karow Jennifer Le Dalton Nelson Chelsey Peeler Evan Rogers Kishan Shields Jason Shuping Lauren Thomas Sydney Turner Jessisca Yelland Faith Elementary School Ellie Wilhelm Brandon Melton Timothy Driver Jared George Hunter Lund Crystal Kardys Raven Shue Morgan Smithey Julian Whaley Shana Hudson Abigail Romero Zachary Huddleston Cody Miller Logan Ridenhour Hannah Barringer Granite Quarry Elementary School Nicholas Jacobs Nicholas Saulters Bradley Jones Alexes Estrada Isaac Hinceman Azaria Jones Erik Perez-Rodriguez Devon Watson Julian Frazier Gabriel Hinceman Megan Leonard Mason McMillin Trey Dula Lila Kongmany Zhyaun Lane Emily Daubenmire Dakota Lear Hurley Elementary School Jennifer Garrido-Juarez Morrietta Sianneh Kwekeh Kevin Matthew Sullivan) Makayla Grace Bringle Dalton Lee McLimore Samantha Olivia Stowe Maurice Dunlap Isenberg Elementary School Isaiah Clay Tyler Follas Keith Shaw Yakira Chapman James Metz, Jr. Matthew Moore Lillian Lane Liliana Phillips Larry White Davita Johnson Zadarius Phifer

Jesse Carson High School Brandon Barbee Shane Huffman Nickolas Thornton Derrick Lawson Hilda Martinez Matthew Miller Alex Pinion Daniel Walser Maegan Livengood Evan Rittenhouse Patra Tate Maria Bautista Anthony Weaver Knollwood Elementary School Richard Musselwhite Francisco Mondragon Briceida Lopez-Rodriguez Lamberto Pichardo-Bautista Vanessa Villanueva Alvaro Acevedo-Roque Hugo Pina-Reyes Ada Wong Thairell Parks Julian Ortiz-Hernandez Emilia Cervantes Cade Bernhardt Sarah Musselwhite Andrea Cervantes Leonardo Vega-Silva Juan Meza-Correa Kimberly Vazquez-Leon Marcus Montes Braydon Bowlin Knox Middle School Claudia Cervantes Lluliana Guerrero Bryanna Caldwell Ronald Robinson Jr Tony Krider Brianna Propst Zachary Tucker Koontz Elementary School Jenifer Martinez-Soto Kevin Vang Gisell Angeles-Santana Aniyah Ingram Bradley Jimenez-Reyes Anthony Finger Tyshia Miller Corbin Menius Jabore Beaty Aldaneli Canela Tania Bernard Raven Gaines Annie Corpening Karen Bailon Tori Miller Makalya Woodson

Mya Davis-Young Jaydon Brown Dezja Bernard Alexander Landaverde Dejuan Davis Kiilantra Mashore Kallia Yang

Morgan Elementary School Colbie Perry Hannah Efird Hunter Smith Alex Catoe Dylan Stubbs

Landis Elementary School Zander Allen David Benitez Brian Benitez-Beltran Bryston Biles Karrigan Brown Laquita Chavis Macayla Corder McKinley Faw Juan Figueroa Brenden Finger Abby Hall Nicholas Holmes Jacob Huebner Bryson Jefferson Isaiah Kime Ezequiel Landaverde Elizabeth Law Kasey McQueen Patel Miller Bryce Peterson Mikayla Roark Zana Smith Gabriela Villafana Logan Weaver

Mt. Ulla Elementary School Dylan Salter Austin Martin Luis Vasquez-Martinez Kaley Honeycutt Kevin Botello-Paz Alex Cardwell Khara Fesperman Hallie Howard

Millbridge Elementary School Julia Watson KaitlinI Whitesell Blake White Elizabeth Hamilton Skylar Mills Brandon Curry Emmanuel Amezquita Cardoso Kate Hartsell Dylan Hobday Dawson Mushala Katelynn Morrison Payton Sloop Courtney Taylor Jordan Watts Clayton Lewis Elijah Hamilton Makina Toler Aaron Kendall Jaxon Miller Marquis Rhyne Veronica Sanchez Brennen Manus Brandon Patterson Chloe Bolick Braxton Atwell Tyler Belk Bailey Clayton Salena Harris Justin Hill Daisy Ortega-Compean

North Rowan Elementary School Marlali Alonso Clemente Alyssa Bates Harley Bowman Haley Boyer Myles Cannon Keith CarrollJr. Terry Cathcart Malachi Chambers Kiara Davis Desiree Ellis Allaysia Ellis Spencer Everhart Xavier Haley Orion Harris Nuna Herh Ninee Herh Madeline "Grace" Howell Jakara Jefferies Ayanna Kerns Olivia McCray Ever Mendoza-Garcia Naquez Reid Corbin Smith Ethan Smith Jonathan Spry Tiana Turner Tashari Turner North Rowan High School Laura Barker Cristen Blanding Britney Callahan Stacey Carver Latajia Cato Daniel Chambers Eugene Coney Jalquan Cuthrell Charity Daugherty Shelby Davis Hunter Feezor Lashonna Geter Marilyn Goodman Javon Hargrave Sachai Hicks Maya Holland Rebekah Holland Tobi Holland Dakota Honeycutt Mason Jennings Brandon Johnson

Jamone Kelly Warren Massey Jeremy Miles Valerie Miller Jeffrey Nelson Regnal Parker Untavion Pemberton Neegbeah Reeves Natasha Small Cal Smith Kahlil Stockton Chia Thao Kenyata Thomas Lindsay Thompson Lavonne Troutman Latosha Tulloch John Vang Kevin Vang Liping Zhang North Rowan Middle School Blake Gallimore Jose Garcia Richard Stoner Tabitha Tulloch Lida Vang Qui Zhang Caroline Billingsley Morgan Bruce Dianna Canon David Carranza Arnold Lezama-Turcios Akron Massey Alexis Rice Taeya Teasley Indya Wiggins Alex Billingsley Michael Bowman Laura Burton Kasaun Coney Jaylynn Ellington Kiara Gladden Davonta Tucker Elizabeth Velazquez Katina White Overton Elementary School Kailan Oglesby Blake Clark Ian Walser Cristian Gonzalez-Hernandez Jordan Jones Danariae Livingston Rockwell Elementary School Kylie Harrill Lani Isley Brianna Bradford Alex Earnhardt Dave Guo Cristal Bautista Carrillo Jeremey Lopez Delaney Nielsen Owen Overcash Ashlyn Seamon Steven Brown Sabrina Horn Sean Incardona

Cade Harrill Ryan Moore RSS Early College Suzanne Ayala Connor Bost Bryson Call Phillip Colvin Jessica Gibson Joseph Lingle Amanda McClure Payden Mitchell Kristen Robinson Belinda Sayavong Spencer Thomas Tremaine Thomas Winne Wang Kristopher Wood South Rowan High School Karl Benz Jr Jeremiah Bradshaw Seth Brown Isaiah Cornelius Daniel Evans Hailey Grillo Taylor James Brandon Joplin ManningAlexandra McconneaugheyAriana JamesParham Eric Tyler Zachary Clark Kayla Corriher Tyler Pless Ciarra Talford Tyler Corriher Joshua Herring Sherri Mills Alana Allman Megan Bean Southeast Middle School Laura Cheshire Bradie Cofer Kayln Ellenburg Garrett Ingold

Katlyn Menius Autumn Pace Ashton Palmer Fallon Ritchie Zechariah Roberson Julian Shumaker Joseph Ward Jakala Bell Caitlyn Blais Gabriela Gallardo Daniel Head Geovani Hidalgo Ciera Kardys Kaycee Kennedy Aaron Lippard Juan Macias Amelia Martinez Aaron McClure Jessica Mejia Adolfo Ortega Domingo Romero Katherine Wolfe Mary Wray Kevin Barrett, Jr. Elizabeth Cardona Chance Cauble Sydney Cole Dillon Johnson Brock Miller Matthew Miller Jon Overby Tyreese Paul Jamond Phillips Austin Taylor Zachary Taylor Cody Trexler Jordan Vanvoorhis Megan Yates Edwin Zuniga Woodleaf Elementary School Kaylin Dowling Zeb Burns Branson Barber Kyalana Hill Alexander Torrence Elizabeth Morris

is a partnership program between businesses, educators and parents to reward outstanding school attendance.

www.education.com

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AULL PRINTING & COPY PLUS, INC.

“Our Name Says It All” Downtown Salisbury • 704-636-8661

JEFF MORRIS - Attorney at Law

FISHER INS. AGENCY

121 W. Council St., 2nd Floor Salisbury, NC • 704-647-0808 jeffmorris28144@hotmail.com

Home • Auto •Life • Business Granite Quarry, NC • 704-279-7234

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LOVE’S AUTO REPAIR John S. Love, Owner/Operator Faith, NC • 704-279-2582

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SALISBURY FLOWER SHOP Ketner Center Salisbury, NC • 704-633-5310

MCLAUGHLIN’S FARMHOUSE COUNTRY STORE Fresh Livermush & Country Sausage 15725 Mooresville Hwy. Mooresville, NC • 704-660-0971

SALISBURY VENETIAN BLIND CO. “Your Home and Window Specialities.” Salisbury, NC • 704-636-4641

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H.C. & JANE DANIEL

Granite Quarry, NC Congratulations to All the Students! S46559


G R A D U AT I O N

20C • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2010

SALISBURY POST

A.L. Brown High School Class of Gilberto Adame

Katie Adcock

Oscar Aguillon

Brittany Alexander

Daniel Alexander

Michael Armstrong

Tavis Bailey

Taylor Bailey

Lizbeht Ballesteros

Saquentia Barnes

Jeremy Beaver

Ruby Benitez

Autumn Beaver

William Biggerstaff

Joshua Black

Dana Boger

Garrett Boone

Lauryn Bradley

Tiffany Broome

Brett Brown

DiAsia Brown

Paul Brown

Jesse Bullard

Sharonica Burgos

Jasmine Campbell

Sha’Kwisha Clark

Sheneal Clifton

JoEttie Clinton

Whitney Coggins

William Collins

Erica Cooper

Sarah Cooper

Holly Craddock

Emily Cruse

David Dale

Ashlyn Doby

Michael Ellison

Alric Emanuel

Megan Emerson

Stephen Emminger

Zachary Erwin

Jennifer Estrada

Spencer Falls

Zachary Fesperman

James Fink

Zachary Fink

Rodney Finley

Iesha Fisher

Cristina Flores Barrera

Paul Flowe

Anthony Ford

Britton Ford

Carmen Fortner

Ja’Marius Fortson

Aniah Franklin

Tanara Funderburk

Cameron Gainey

Matthew Gainey

Ian Garcia

Joseph Gibson

Tyler Gilmore

Juan Gonzalez

Carlos Gonzalez

Jasmine Goss

Isamar Grado

Tabatha Graham

Joseph Grant

Desmond Gray

Katie Gray

Kasey Grayer

Jane Gribble

Michael Gutierrez

Aaron Habrack

Christy Hall

Joshua Hall

Travis Hall

Emily Halstenberg

Andi Hancock

Alex Hancock

Kira Harmon

Ryan Hartsell

Jill Hayes

Andrew Heath.

Justin Hege

Megan Helms

David Henriquez

Melissa Hernandez

Raven Hill

Caitlin Hite

Andre Holmes

Alisha Holt

Wesley Honeycutt

Kuylain Howard

Anthony Hunter

Karen Ibarra

Najla Jaafar

Phylicia Johnson

Antwoine Jordan

Latosha Jordan

Benjamin Key

Corey Klepper

Maria Lagunas

Tyrone Langley

Cua Lao

Hua Lao

Mauriah Lennon

Jasmine Littlejohn

Jana Loos

Matthew Maine

Kala Martin

Whitney Martin

Jasmine McCauley

Fredy Medina

India Miller

Emily Mingo

Coty Moody

Beverly Moore

Robert Moose

Christopher Moreland Brittany Morgan

Jacquabia Moser

Nadia Nava

Joshua Needham

Whitney Nickelson

Trenton Nobles

Christian Oleska

Miguel Olivares

Estefania Orduno

Jessica Ortiz

Kadi Paden

Jason Patrick

Tiaira Phifer

Barbara Pinales

Caitlin Ponder

Alexxa Posey

India Rattler

Hillary Reece

Karley Reed

Areli Reno

Brianna Rhames

Ariel Rhyne

Willie Rice

Breana Ridges

Elizabeth Roberts

Michael Robinson

Ian Rogers

Dinamar Roman

Jacqueline Romero

Drexton Russell

Elizabeth Safrit

Paulino Sanchez

Dora Santibanes

Katelyn Sawyer

Larry Scaggs

Kara Seabolt

Carrie Sears

Takera Sheelor

Anthony Sheffield

Molly Sherrill

Coral Silva

Ivory Simiton

Jeremy Sloop

Robyn Smith

Samantha Smith

Jatana Spencer

Kaylan Stamey

Kaeli Steagall

Sarah Teal

Avery Thompson

Joshua Thompson

Maria Toledo

Howard Torrence

Allison Tresslar

Keeli Tucker

John Tuttle

Jazmin Vasquez

Michael Vece

Frank Villa

Quantarius Ward O’ceana’ Washington Devante Watkins

Jabari Watts

Markeisha Weaks

Raven Wenner

Stephanie Wetter

Carson Stewart

Trevor Summerford Dominique Sutton

Davarius Walker

Summer Ashley

Meredith Austin

Christopher Blackmon Tylivia Blackwelder

Maria Mosqueda Jacquelinne Murillo

Lynsey Banks

Monia Barber

Justin Bradshaw Chatoya Bridgeforth

Breanna Barnes

Jeanie Brooks

Matthew Griffin Cameron Griffiths-Heath Stephanie Gullette

Danielle Wilcox Emmanuel Williams Zackery Winecoff

Zachary Wright


G R A D U AT I O N

SALISBURY POST

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2010 • 21C

A.L. Brown High School Class of Pachia Xiong

Haihoua Yang

Lee Yang

A.L. Brown High School Class of 2010 senior plans A.L. Brown High School senior plans. Appalachian State University — Taylor O’Brien Bailey, Megan Rachel Emerson, Matthew Aaron Griffin, Ryan Jeffery Hartsell, Cua Lao, Barbara Pinales, Robyn Lois Smith, Karley Elizabeth Reed, Howard Donald Torrence II, Allison Paige Tresslar, Rodney LaBrice Walker, Danielle Renee Wilcox, Haihoua Yang. Art Institute — Anthony Jacoby Ford. Campbell University — Summer Nicole Ashley. Cabarrus College of Health Sciences — Autumn Ranay Berry. Catawba College – Paul Andrew Brown, Sharonica Delores Burgos, India Jade Rattler, Brianna Nicole Rhames, John Cloyd Tuttle Jr., Frank Villa Hernandez. Central Piedmont College — Kasey Kentrell Grayer, Aaron John Habrack, Jonathan Sigfredo Joya, Dominique LaKeeyera Sutton. Davidson College — Lauryn Alyxe Bradley, Jane Elizabeth Gribble. Early graduates — Justin Clay Bradshaw, Jose De Jesus Cardosa, Jonathan Carranza, Xavier Jaquan Carter, Chelsea Antoinette French, Jill LeAnn Hayes, Karen Maricela Ibarra, Emily Nicole Mingo, Saulo Ramirez Diaz, Ignacio Toledo Paredes, Maria Del Rosario Toledo Paredes, Jacob Michael Tyre. East Carolina University — Diasia Divine Brown, Tyler Lee Gilmore, Raven Lynette Hill, Mary Najla Jaafar.

Elon University — Kuylain Chansel Howard. Empire Beauty College — Latosha Darshay Jordan. Work force — Gilberto Adame Medina, Oscar Aguillon Cervantes, Breanna Lynn Barnes, Saquentia Rochell Barnes, Dulce Arly Bautista Luna, Christopher Darrion Junior Blackmon, Pershana Chaquella Brown, Jasmine Shanell Campbell, Erica Ann Cooper, David Cornell Dale II, Jacques Lazarro Deese, Iesha Michel’Le Fisher, Joseph Logan Gibson, Erica Gonzales Sierra, Isamar Grado, Joseph Anthony Grant, Darryl Kendell Green, Christy Michele Hall, Antonio Michael Hannah, Shaquan Tyreik Hargrove, Kira Rose Harmon, Brandon Hunter Holbrook, Terrance Jeffrey Johnson, Elena Christine King, Jonique Alise Klutz, Kiana Sherai Knox, Maria Soledad Lagunas Renteria, Whitney Nicole Martin, Robert Anderson Moose, Jacquabia Alise Moser, Maria Gualalupe Mosqueda Santa Cruz, Dana Denzel Moss, Whitney Hope Nickelson, Miguel Angel Olivares Robledo, Estefania Orduno, Jessica Ortiz, Michael Wayne Ramsey, Ariel Demetrius Rhyne, Derrell King Roberts, Michael DeAngelo Robinson, Dinamar Roman Cuadra, Jacqueline Carolina Romero Mendez, William Lydell Rucker Jr., Alberto Sanchez Bravo, Olivia Victoria Scott, Amber Diane Searles, Anthony Logan Sheffield, Ivory Darnell Similton, Samantha Rae Smith, Gregory Delano

Smith Jr., Joshua Dakota Thompson, Michael Ray Thorne, Laura Jannet Torres Rumualdo, Jazmin DJesus Vasquez, Desmond Stephen Walters, Quantarius Rashead Ward, Jabari Elon Watts, Zachery Taylor Winecoff. Ferrum College — Desmond Jarmaine Gray. Fruitland Bible College — Matthew Ryan Gainey. Gardner Webb University — Hillary Adell Reece. Guilford College — Breana Chantel Ridges. High Point University — Kaylan Rae Stamey. ITT Tech — Cameron Matthew Gainey, Jason Noah Patrick. Johnson and Wales University — Andrew James Heath. King’s College — Hali Morgan Carter. Lenoir-Rhyne University — Tavis Patrick Bailey, Lynsey Kay Banks, Whitney Blake Coggins, Spencer Ray Falls, Zachary Lee Fesperman, Carmen McKenzie Fortner, Emily Nicole Mingo, Willie Justine Rice, Devante Jareem Watkins. Living Arts College — Tabatha Shea Graham, Louisburg College – Joshua Darques Black, Tyrone Langley Jr. Montreat College — Wesley Ray Honeycutt. N.C. A&T State University — Phylicia Nicolle Johnson. N.C. Central University — Chatoya Shantell Bridgeforth, Mekeva Chevon Farewell, Jasmine Tenae McCauley, India Monique Miller, Coty Nonet Moody, Jessica Shaw, Markeisha Trenchelle

WEST

Livengood, Landon Locklear, Adam Lomax, William Lopez, Alex Lowe, Nicole Lucente, Ethan Marsh, Richard Meek, Luke Miller, Jesse Myers, James Parker, Matthew Pavelko,Jacob Phifer, Jacob Pond, Laquasia Privette, Katherine Ritchie, Luis Rivera, Joy Roysdon, Claire Steele, Laiton Steele, Jasa Stephens, Sabrina Stephens, Sarah Teel, Xiomara Villatoro, Teagen Wance, Ellen Watts, Amber Weatherholtz, Dennis Webb Jr., Garrett White, Ronisha White, Ashley Wietbrock, Sara Willis, Roy Wood. Honor graduates — Ashleigh Adams, Tiffany Aistrop, Alanna Barbee, Katie Barbee, Jessica Beaver, Caroline Beaver, Nakira Blakeney, Robert Blankenship, Mariah Bond, Ezra Brawley, Ethan Brown, Derek Buchanan, Natalie Burns, Katie Carscaddon, Rosa Castellon, Melissa Choi, Sadie Chuor, Rodney Cline, Travis Cordial, Micah Cottingham, Desere Cross, Jonathan Crucitti, Laura Culbertson, Shane Davidson, Lindsey Dionne, Asmir Dizdarevic, Ashley Durham, Ashley Dutton, Kyle Eades, Jennifer Flagg, Clinton Frost, Joseline Garcia, Jessica Garrison, Amanda Gomez-Doby, Jerry Goodnight, Courtney Gover, Jacqueline Gregoire, Thomas Hester, Wilson Holloway, James Hopkins, Mary Horton, Deshonda James, Kimberly Jenkins, Michael Jones, Aida Karat, Tyler King, Kaitlyn Knepp, Erica Landaverde, Thomas Langford, Lindsay Livengood, Landon Locklear, Adam Lomax, William Lopez, Alex Lowe, Nicole Lucente, Ethan Marsh, Olivia McSwain, Richard Meek, Luke Miller, Austin Miller, Alexandria Mills, Christine Mosser, Stephanie Mowery, Jesse Myers, Jessica Nichols, James Parker, Matthew Pavelko, Jacob Phifer, Coleman Phifer, Jacob Pond, Laquasia Privette, Mackenzie Radford, Katherine Ritchie, Luis Rivera, Joy Roysdon, Laiton Steele, Claire Steele, Sabrina Stephens, Jasa Stephens, Phillip Stringer, Sarah Teel, Xiomara Villatoro, Teagen Wance, Ellen Watts, Lauren Watts, Amber Weatherholtz, Dennis Webb Jr., Garrett

White, Ronisha White, Ashley Wietbrock, Teresa Wilhelm, Sara Willis, Roy Wood. West Rowan High School Academic/Athletic Awards from Colleges/Universities and other Awards Wingate University — Alex Lowe, Natalie Burns, Kayla Barnett. Catawba College — Timothy Pangburn, Micah Cottingham, Katie Barbee, Leah Thompson, Adnan Podzic. Campbell University — Lindsey Dionne, Kimberly Jenkins, Teagan Wance. N.C. State — Matthew Pavelko; also received: Sam Walton Community Scholarship, Brad Patrick Memorial Scholarship. Liberty University — Jacqueline Gregoire; also received Ralph Ketner Academic Award. Southern Wesleyan University — Ethan Marsh. Salem College — Xiomara Villatoro. UNC-Chapel Hill — Luke Miller; also received Ernest Curtis Eagle Scout Award, First United Methodist Church Award. Wells College — Jessica Roth. High Point University — Thomas Langford. University of Virginia — Kevin Parks Jr. University of Arkansas — Chris Smith. UNC-Charlotte — Claire Steele; also received George Bartlett Scholarship, Maidt Girl Scout Award, South River UMC, RICCE. Peace College — Caroline Beaver. Meredith College — Katie Carscaddon Tuskegee University — Phillip Stringer. Pfeiffer University — Sara Hutchinson Johnson C. Smith University — Joshua Poe.

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Allied Health Sciences Awards — Tiffany Aistrop, Kaylee Beaver, Sabrina Stephens, Aida Karat, Jessica Soto, Kayla Durham, Amanda Doby, Rachel Russell, Claire Steele, Candice Vanhoose, Ronisha White, Amburr McClarty, Brooke Bost, Raquel Hartsell. Red Cross Awards — Tiffany Aistrop, Jessica Soto, Kaylee Beaver, Kayla Durham, Sabrina Stephens, Amanda Doby, Aida Karat, Rachel Russell, Claire Steele, Candice Vanhoose, Ronisha White, Amburr McClarty, Brooke Bost, Raquel Hartsell, Dawnisha Kerr, Katie Barbee, Lindsay Livengood, Kayla Barnett, Courtney Gover, Ashley Firman, Ashley Durham, Janise Lingle, Kara Skinner, Vicki Nichols, Michael Richardson. SGA Awards — Ashleigh Adams, Olivia McSwain. SAT Wall of Fame — Alanna Barbee, Micah Cottingham, Jonathan Crucitti, Lindsey Dionne, Ashley Durham, Clint Frost, Jessica Garrison, Jerry Goodnight, Jacqueline Gregoire, Thomas Hester, Kaitlyn Knepp, Erica Landaverde, Thomas Langford, Nicole Lucente, Luke Miller, Christine Mosser, Jesse Myers, James Max Parker, Lucas Redmond, Katherine Ritchie, Sabrina Stephens, Sarah Teel, Ryan Tester, Ellen Watts, Garrett White, Ashley Wietbrock. SAT Improvement — Katie Barbee, Alex Lowe. North Carolina Scholars — Tiffany Aistrop, AlannaBarbee, Katie Barbee, Jessica Beaver, Mariah Bond, Natalie Burns, Katie Carscaddon, Melissa Choi, Sadie Chuor, Travis Cordial, Desere Cross, Jonathan Crucitti, Laura Culbertson, Shane Davidson, Lindsey Dionne, Ashley Durham, Ashley Dutton, Jennifer Flagg, Joselline Garcia, Jessica Garrison, Jerry Goodnight, Courtney Gover, Jacqueline Gregoire, Thomas Hester, Wilson Holloway, James Hopkins, Mary Horton, Kimberly Jenkins, Kaitlyn Knepp, Erica Landaverde, Thomas Langford, Lindsay

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Weaks. N.C. State University – Katie Ann Adcock, Ashlyn Rae Doby, Hua Lao, Jacquelinne Murillo Figueroa. N.C. Technical College — Antwoine Marquette Jordan Jr. Peace College — Lee Yang. Pfeiffer University — Caitlin Christine Hite, Carson Lulie Stewart. Rowan-Cabarrus Community College — Daniel Thomas Alexander, Michael Luke Armstrong, Meredith Christy Austin, Adriana Rose Ayala, Jeremy Taylor Beaver, Crystal Benitez, William James Biggerstaff Jr., Dana M. Boger, Brianna Michelle Boone, Tiffany Lynn Boone, Justin Clay Bradshaw, Jeannie Frances Brooks, Jesse Dean Bullard, ShaKwisha Shantelle Clark, Sheneal Tiara Clifton, William Gaston Collins, Sarah Ann Cooper, Ashley Nicole Corriher, Jesus Alejandro Diaz Caspeta, Micheal Adam Ellison, Stephen Thomas Emminger, Jennifer Estrada, Rodney Daiquon Finley, Cristina Nallely Flores Barrera, Britton Benjamin Dupree Ford, Tanara Shanel Funderburk, Juan Carlos Gonzalez-Perez, Jasmine Lynn Goss, Katie Elaine Gray, Stephanie Kathleen Gullette, Joshua Cody Hall, Justin Dean Hege, Megan MaKenzie Helms, Cynthia Melissa Hernandez, Cody Shay Hilton, Andre Maurice Holms, Chase Erin Hunter, Karen Maricela Ibarra, Kenyatta Armoni Kavon Jackson, Benjamin Gary Key, Mauriah Dionne Lennon, Jas-

mine Janee Littlejohn, Matthew Roland Maine, Kala Marie Martin, Hannah Elizabeth McIver, David Medina Munoz, Nadia Nava Espinoza, Christian Logan Oleska, Kadi Ann Paden, Anthony Jerome Palmer, Tiaira Monique Phifer, Ian Rashad Rogers, Toni Michele Ross, Brittany Michelle Russell, Paulino Guadalupe Sanchez, Dora Santibanes, Katelyn Mae Sawyer, Kara Lee Seabolt, Carrie Ella-Lubs Sears, Takera Chanae Sheelor, Molly Elisabeth Sherrill, Coral Lucero Silva, Jatana Miche Spencer, Kaeli Jane Stegall, Alexander Preston Stofanik, Trevor Ryan Summerford, Sarah Anni Teal, Keeli Danielle Tucker, Jazmin DJesus Vasquez, Michael Joseph Vece, Raven Lestat Wenner, Zachary Rae Wright. Savannah College of Art — Ian Louis Washington Garcia. Shaw University — Deshawn Danale Pough, Oceana Jana Washington, Tylivia Omeyasha D. Blackwelder. South Carolina State University — JoEttie Randi Clinton. Stanly Community College — Brittany Marie Morgan, University of Mexico — Lizbeth Barrera Ballesteros. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill — Emily Patrice Cruse, Zachary Brad Erwin, Emily Ruth Halstenberg, Toni Alexandria Hancock, Andrea Jordan Hancock, Avery Rebecca Thompson. University of North Carolina at Charlotte — Ruby Benitez, Garrett Dillon Boone, Aniah Noree Franklin, Carlos E. Gonzalez-Rodriguez, Alisha

Renae Holt, Amelianna Lamontasia McDonald, Fredy Frankie Medina, Caitlin Rae Ponder, Alexxa Morgan Posey, Drexton Lamar Russell, Jeremy Andrew Sloop, Pachia Xiong. University of North Carolina at Greensboro — Monia Calene Barber, Beverly LaShae Moore. University of North Carolina at Pembroke — Jana Renee Thomas Loos, Shelby Nicole Marie Shaw. University of North Carolina at Wilmington — Holly Dawn Craddock, Paul Christian Flowe. Universal Technical Institute — Joshua Allen Needham. U.S. Military — Brett Allen Brown, Alric Emanuel Jr., Zachary Lee Fink, Ja’Marius Sharod Ford, Corey Duyane Goodnight, Cameron J. Griffiths-Heath, Michael Ray Gutierrez, Travis Lee Hall, David Angel Henriquez, William Kevin Hodge Jr., Branden Lee Hudson, James Cory Klepper, Christopher Michael Moreland, Henry Seth Mullis, Trenton Lee Nobles, Areli Deuel Reno, Larry William Scaggs, Taylor Michael Thorpe, Davarius Qutae Walker, Stephanie Maxine Anette Wetter, Emmanuel Maurice Williams; University of South Carolina at Columbia — Elizabeth Scott Safrit. Western Carolina University — James Arlie Fink, Anthony Scott Hunter, Elizabeth Ann Roberts. Wingate University — Winston Drysdale Johnson, James Cory Klepper.

Henderson Independent senior plans Henderson Independent High School graduating seniors include Tyiea Jeffries, Joshua Lewis, Jordan Long, Pierce Peeler and Brandon Russell. Graduation will be Friday, 11 a.m. at Henderson Independent High School Auditorium. There will be no junior marshals for the program. Graduation practice will be Thursday at 12:15 p.m., in the auditorium.

The commencement address will be given by Pierce Peeler Tyiea Jeffries’ plans are to attend Forsyth Tech and be admitted to the nursing program. She plans to enter the field of neonatal nursing. Joshua Lewis’ plans are to enroll at Rowan-Cabarrus Community College and major in business management, then start his own retail

business. Jordan Long wants to attend the Art Institute of Charlotte and major in fashion management with a minor in business. Pierce Peeler will attend Rowan-Cabarrus Community College where he plans to study radiography and become a radiologist and work for the hospital. Brandon Russell will enter the work force.

North Hills Christian School senior plans North Hills Christian School senior plans. Campbell University — Catherine Ardoin. Gardner-Webb University — Spencer Bevis Jr. Pfeiffer University — Kristen Bush.

Guilford Technical Institute — Patrick Michael. Rowan-Cabarrus Community College — Daniel Misner. Mitchell Community College — Dustin Pruitt. University of North Carolina at Greensboro — Sarah Starnes.

The North Hills Christian School Commencement Ceremony was June 8 in the Helen Kelley Gymnasium. The guest speaker was David Whisenant. The junior marshals were Caley Boggs and Janice Parks.

Homeschoolers and their senior plans The Rowan County Homeschool Association held a graduation ceremony for its 2010 graduates on May 15 at Grace Bible Church, Rockwell. Each of the six graduates invited individual speakers to deliver brief messages during the ceremony. Peter and Renee Gray presented the 2010 Morgan Gray Scholarship to Elisa Marie

Sanchez. Emily Bame, Victoria Byers, Anna Childers, Andrew Kelley, Damon Lilly, Will McKinzie, Will Merrick and Scarlett Speaks served as junior marshals. Graduates, their home schools and future plans are: Catawba College — Caleb Aaron Deitz, Grace Christian Academy. Central Piedmont Community College — Kennedy Lee Nes-

Rockwell Christian School has five 2010 graduates Rockwell Christian School has five graduates. Graduation was June 4 at Bethel Baptist Church, Rockwell. Student speakers were Anthony Odom and Matthew Hoehman.

Rowan-Cabarrus Community College — Tyler Hall, Tiffany Hoffman and Megan Petrea. Liberty University — Matthew Hoehman. Pensacola Christian College — Anthony Odom.

bitt, Summerside School. Rowan-Cabarrus Community College — Corey Douglas Hamm, Plantation Christian Academy; Ethan Wade Livengood, Livengood Christian Academy. University of North Carolina at Charlotte — Elisa Marie Sanchez, Sanchez Academy. Undecided — Aspen Rose Yule, Solomon’s Bow Christian Academy.


22C • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2010

Leadership, service award Matt Fleming of Rockwell has been named a U.S. National Leadership and Service Award winner by the U.S. Achievement Academy and will be included in the academy’s nationally published yearbook. Fleming, a student at Erwin Middle School, is the son of Angie and Jeff Fleming. His grandparents are James and Sherry Corriher of Cornelius and Ray and Deane Fleming of Salisbury. The academy recognizes fewer than 10 percent of all American high school students. Selection is based on a student’s academic performance, interest and aptitude, leadership qualities, responsibility, enthusiasm, motivation to learn and improve, citizenship, attitude and cooperative spirit and dependability.

National band award

Cory Matthew and Crystal Miranda Kluttz of China Grove have been awarded educational scholarships from the N.C. National Guard Association Education Foundation. The awards are for the 2010-2011 academic year at a college of their choice. Matthew received the National Guard Citizenship Award based on his character, leadership and community involvement. A rising junior music education major at Catawba College, he is involved with youth in the tennis program at Catawba and volunteers in area high schools’ marching band programs. Kluttz received the Capt. Chris Cash Memorial Scholarship given annually in honor of Christopher S. Cash, Company Commander of Alpha CO 1-120th Infantry, N.C. Army National Guard, who was killed June 24, 2004, after an ambush during a pre-dawn patrol of a main supply route in Baqubah, Iraq, and the subsequent attempt to secure two critical bridges in the center of the city. Kluttz is a rising junior nursing major at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. She was recently recognized as a member of Sigma Alpha Lambda, a national leadership and honors organization at the university.

Chris Fleming of Rockwell has been named a student of excellence in band by the U.S. Achievement Academy and will be included in the academy’s nationally published yearbook. Fleming, a student at East Rowan High School, is the son of Angie and Jeff Fleming. His grandparents are James and Sherry Corriher of Cornelius and Ray and Deane Fleming of Salisbury. U.S. House page The academy recognizes Leland M. Chapman, a junfewer than 10 percent of all American high school stu- ior at Carson High School, was recently selected to represent dents. North Carolina as a page for Rio Grande dean’s list the U.S. House of Representatives in Washington, D.C., durDouglas Ray Campbell Jr. ing the summer session. has been named to the spring Pages assist members with semester dean’s honor list at legislative duties, deliver corthe University of Rio Grande respondence, answer phones in Rio Grande, Ohio, where he in the member cloakrooms is majoring in information and prepare technology/networking. the House A 2007 graduate of Salis- floor for sesbury High School, he is the sions. They son of Douglas R. Campbell are selected and Sandra Sims-Campbell of and sponSalisbury. sored by a member of Congress. Chapman was National Guard sponsored by CHAPMAN scholarships U.S. Rep.

G R A D U AT I O N Melvin L. Watt of the 12th District. He is the son of Donna and Brian Rucker of Salisbury and Leonard A. Chapman Sr. of Kannapolis. He is the grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Chapman Jr. of Kannapolis and Joseph Similton of Concord and the great-grandson of Mattie Chapman and Lurie Clowney of Kannapolis.

Shores joins Montreat College staff Jonathan Shores, a Salisbury native, has joined the staff of Montreat College as vice president for adult studies. Shores assumed the responsibility for the administration of the School of Professional and Adult Studies June 1. While working closely with the Charlotte and Asheville campuses, he SHORES will be based at the Black Mountain campus. Son of Jonathan and Susan Shores of Salisbury, he and his wife and two daughters are relocating from Fuquay-Varina to the Asheville area. He previously was director of the Research Triangle Park campus of Mount Olive College, where he oversaw more than 900 non-traditional (adult) students and worked as an adjunct professor of marketing at Mount Olive College. He joined the Air Force National Guard as a non-commissioned officer in 2000 and has served three deployments in Iraq and Afghanistan since Sept. 11, 2001, supervising as many as 45 airmen at a time. After receiving a bachelor of science degree in trust and wealth management from Campbell University in Buies Creek, he earned a master of business administration degree with a concentration in marketing management, also from Campbell. He is currently completing work on a Ph.D in marketing through Northcentral University in Prescott Valley, Ariz.

Students inducted into Beta Gamma Sigma Sixty students and a prominent High Point attorney were inducted into the Beta Gamma Sigma national honor society at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro’s Bryan School of Business and Economics during the 2010 spring semester. Beta Gamma Sigma (BGS) is a national honor society for business students. Qualifying for membership is the highest scholastic honor a student

in business can obtain. To be eligible, students must rank in the upper 10 percent of their junior class, the upper 10 percent of their senior class or the upper 20 percent of their graduate class. Students who receive a BGS award must attend schools that are accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB International). James F. Morgan, partner

at Morgan, Herring, Morgan, Green & Rosenblutt, LLP in High Point, was inducted as an honorary member of the honor society. Morgan is chair of the UNCG Bryan School Business Advisory Board, chairman of the Piedmont Triad Partnership, and has been a leader in more than 60 organizations. Iredell County – Samantha Sweet, Mooresville Rowan County – John Freeze, Salisbury

Western Carolina University dean’s list A total of 1,721 students have been named to the Western Carolina University dean’s list for spring semester 2010, according to Kyle R. Carter, WCU provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs. To qualify for the dean’s list, students must achieve at least a 3.5 grade-point average out of a possible 4.0 on a regular semester’s work of not less than 12 hours, excluding remedial courses, with no grade of D or F. Kannapolis —Brandi LuAnn Coley, Angelica Nicole Goodman, Christopher Ray Goodnight, Katie Marie Hosack, Olivia Danielle Jacobs, Jestin D. Jennings, Stephanie R.

Trigg. Mocksville — Tracey Brooke Brown. Mooresville — Andrew Arthur Alpizar, Jennifer Lynne Annas, Valorie Renee Arrowood, Amanda Elizabeth Barkiewicz, Mary Nicole Barnes, Alison Leigh Bruce, Anna Marie Byers, Christopher Thomas Carlucci, Carl Cole Drawdy, Sidney Linn Henry, Courtney M. Howes, Ashley Nicole Malone, Cory Michelle McCormick, Cayli Jo Meizel, Danielle Lynn Patinka, Brandon Charles Rupinski, Brittany Noelle Stogner, Meredith Nicole Oakley. China Grove — Ryker Allen Helms, Mark Robert Sides.

Gold Hill — Regina Michelle Cline. Granite Quarry — Ellie Elaine Scoggins. Rockwell — Colleen Clara Cowie, Holly Bryanne Overcash, Adam Jared Stewart. Salisbury — Courtney Tyler Allen, James Thomas Beaver, Garrett Daniel Fisher, Donnielle Christina Foster, Elisabeth Margaret Hall, Phillip Richard Harris, Stacy Leanne Izze, Taylor David Jones, Lara Claire Karriker, Heather Marie Krause, Melani R. Lippard, Kayla Michelle Overcash, Kelsey E. Stover, Stephanie S. Strobel, Casey Lynn Wellmon. Woodleaf — Joshua Robert Pond.

Area graduates of Cannon School The 82 members of Cannon School’s Class of 2010, who received their diplomas in a May 21 graduation ceremony at Cannon School’s campus, have received approximately $4.5 million in merit-based scholarship funds for the next four years. Cannon School devotes itself to academic excellence through a challenging curriculum that includes various Advanced Placement courses and a range of academic electives that prepare students for the rigors of col-

lege. “The Class of 2010 has been successful in receiving wonderful offers from colleges to continue their education and growth,” says Anne Shandley, Cannon’s director of college counseling. “We are so proud of these young people as individuals and proud of their many accomplishments as a class.” Area graduates: Mooresville — Taylor Byrnes,University of Notre Dame; Ally Gartner, University of South Carolina; Royden Goode, University of

Denver; Andrew Gordon, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo; Patrick Hennigan, Southern Methodist University; Jian Jin, University of North Carolina at Charlotte; Paige Sipe, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Sterling Swygert, University of South Carolina. Salisbury — Cala Cocca, Wofford College; Kimpton Langford. Sewanee: The University of the South; Carleigh Rose, Meredith College. Kannapolis — Meredith Parker, College of Charleston.

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Three receive Masonic awards The Rowan County Masonic Scholarship Fund has awarded its 2010 scholarships to Jon Robertson, Lauren Brown and Luke Miller. The scholarship awards are for $1,000. Jon is the son of Nelson and Ellen Robertson. He attends North Rowan High School, where he is a member of the National Honor Society. He has played varsity golf and football at North. He is an active member of Central United Methodist Church, having served on several mission trips to Georgia, Florida and Tennessee. Jon is also an Eagle Scout. He plans to attend North Carolina State University to study engineering. Lauren is the daughter of Wayne and Elizabeth Brown. She, too, attends North Rowan High School, where she is a member of the National Honor Society and Key Club. As a member of Central United Methodist Church, she has participated in many activities, including mission trips to Georgia and Tennessee, CROP Walk, and various outreach ministries. Lauren will attend Uni-

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Jon Robertson, Lauren Brown and Luke Miller. versity of North Carolina at Asheville to pursue a degree in biochemistry with the goal of becoming a neonatologist. Luke is the son of Doug and Frances Miller. He attends West Rowan High School, where he is a member of the National Honor Society, has captained the varsity wrestling team, has run cross country track, and does peer tutoring. Luke is also statewide secretary for the North Carolina chapter of the Junior Classical League and president of the local chapter. As a member of First United Methodist Church he runs the sound system. Luke is an Eagle Scout. He will attend the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill to study Latin and one day hopes to teach it at West Rowan. The Rowan County Masonic Scholarship Fund is an endowment administered by the

six Masonic Lodges in Rowan County: Fulton 99 and Andrew Jackson 576 in Salisbury, Scotch Ireland 154 in Cleveland, Eureka 283 in China Grove, Spencer 543 in Spencer, and Keller Memorial 657 in Rockwell. The scholarship, awarded in April each year, is available to any resident of Rowan County pursuing higher education at an accredited institution. Applications can be obtained from any lodge secretary or through area high school guidance counselors. Since its inception in 1988, the fund has awarded 64 scholarships valued at $33,500. The Rowan County Masonic Scholarship Fund is a 501(c) corporation and tax deductible contributions may be made through any of the county’s Masonic lodges or through David Potts, P.O. Box 971, Salisbury, NC 281450971.

Connecticut school board to appeal church grad ruling HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — A Connecticut school board has voted to appeal a federal court ruling that would keep the town’s two high school graduation ceremonies out of a megachurch. Tuesday night’s 5-4 vote by Enfield’s Board of Education reverses a board deci-

sion last week to let stand the temporary injunction issued by U.S. District Court Judge Janet Hall. Hall found that holding the June 23 and 24 graduations at First Cathedral Baptist Church in Bloomfield would amount to an unconstitutional government endorsement of religion.

Attorney Vincent McCarthy, who’s representing the school district, plans to file with the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. American Civil Liberties Union attorney David McGuire says he’s disappointed by the decision but believes the injunction will be upheld.

Brady wins Randall Gore Memorial scholarship Lauren Taylor Brady of Gold Hill has won the Randall Gore Memorial Scholarship at East Rowan High School. The daughter of Phil and Sandra Brady, she plans to attend Wingate University and study elementary education. Brady has been a cheerleader all four years and was co-captain one year. BRADY She was an All-American

UNCA honors lists

The following students from North Carolina have been named to University of North Carolina at Asheville’s fall chancellor’s list and dean’s list. They are listed by their hometown. The chancellor’s list is made up of full-time students who have achieved a 4.0 grade point average. The dean’s list is made up of full-

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Barnes, Katherine Barrows, Abbie Goodman, Gillian Gulledge, Brooke Harward, Harrison Latimer, Erika Medlin, Laura Ruble and Eldon Zacek. Students at Gray Stone Day School will graduate with honors according to their cumulative grade point averages determined after the last day of school. Students with a GPA of 4.30-4.44 will graduate with honors, 4.45-4.59 with high honors, and 4.60 and above with highest honors. Gray Stone Day School 2010 senior plans. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill — Maggie Grathwohl, Kaleb Medlin, Sejal Parmar. North Carolina State University: Chandler Maness, Steven Rothenberg, Dalton Wally. University of North Carolina at Charlotte — Andra Dolniak, Ryan Rosier. University of North Carolina at Wilmington — Christina Eller, Laura Evans, Ashley Harrington, Alexandra McCollister, Garrett Mullis. University of North Caroli-

Cheerleader at N.C. State University camps and on East Rowan Competitive Cheerleading Squad. She has been secretary of HERO, and is in FHA and Organ Lutheran Church Youth Group. She works part-time at Unique Repeats Consignment Shop and has worked with kindergarteners at Shive Elementary School. The $500 scholarship was established in 1994 in memory of Randall Gore, who was a rising senior at East. It is sponsored by Organ Lutheran Church.

time students who have achieved between 3.5 and 3.99 grade point average. China Grove: Hannah Marie Roseman, dean’s list. Denton: Katherine Elise Bunting, chancellor’s list. Kannapolis: Adam Cable, dean’s list. Mooresville: Danielle Ariana Baker, dean’s list; Amanda Leigh Berry, chancellor’s list; Cortney Cather-

ine Cogar, dean’s list; Katherine M. Knutsen, dean’s list; Clair Nicole Powell, dean’s list; Kelsey Danielle Ridenour, chancellor’s list. Salisbury: Adam Logan Carter, dean’s list; Paul McKayne Hill, dean’s list; Matthew Scott Mitchell, dean’s list; Katelyn Noelle Patterson, dean’s list; Daniel Ray Resner, dean’s list.

na at Greensboro — Kaitlin Burris, Jessie Lowder. Appalachian State University — Josh Clayton, Corey Cleghorn, Peter Nasuti, Mike Wall, Megan Yost. Western Carolina University — Katelyn Collier, Jason Fesperman, Ric Huneycutt. East Carolina University — Caitlin Curtis. University of North Carolina at Pembroke — Tony De Santis, Ashley Grubbs. U.S. Military Academy at West Point — Andrew Pribble. Virginia Military Institute — Hunter Harvey. Campbell University — Kenny Caspers. Elon University — Joseph Sutlive. Catawba College — Cameron McAulay. Pfeiffer University — Amber Cranford, Savanna Culp, Lindsey Eudy, Kaleigh Featherstone, Ian Levine, Jake Mauldin. Wingate University — Josh Casper, Jordan Hatley, Dillon Parker. Lees-McRae College — Molly Ward. Gaston College — Amanda Lovett. College of Charleston — Ashley Honeycutt. Princeton University — Blair Streater.

Centre College — Charlie Ambrose. Wofford College — Zach Torrence. University of Southern California — Greg Asciutto. Virginia Commonwealth University — Brooke Armstrong. University of Maine — Dejah Broussard. University of Tennessee at Knoxville — Michael Pierce. Cottey College — Taylor Woods. Covenant College — Molly Peele. Averett University — Emily Staley. Queens College, N.Y. — Nirval Benny. Liberty University — Allison Pope, Jazmine Shepherd. Rowan-Cabarrus Community College — Mygel Bergstresser,Christa Canup, Brittany Kepley. Stanly Community College: Jacob Earnhardt, Ariana Ledbetter. Berean Bible Institute of South Africa — Rosemary Chapmon.

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G R A D U AT I O N

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2010 • 23C

Lost. (How most kids feel about preparing for college.)

Without the help of an adult, it may be confusing for students to find their way to college. If you know a student with dreams of a higher education, do your part and help lead the way. Learn how at...

KnowHow2G0.org

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Congratulations Graduates!

John Alden Lee

for a job well done!

John Alden Lee graduated summa cum laude from the University of Georgia with a Bachelor of Science in Cellular Biology. His future plans include medical school. Congratulations, John! We are so proud of you! Love, Your Grandparents, Bruce and Margaret Ketner. S44318

ShaNaé White

David Shirley

Kyaunna ShaNaé White of Salisbury is graduating from Salisbury High School June 11, 2010, at which time she will also receive her CNA certification. She is the daughter of Keisha Drye and Harvey White, both of Salisbury, and the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Drye and Mr. and Mrs. Hardy White, all of Salisbury. An honor roll student, ShaNaé’s honors include Senior Class President; Homecoming Queen 2009; Scholar Athlete Award; and serving as captain of the Varsity Cheerleading Squad. She has received scholarships from Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Inc.; Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Inc.; Zeta Phi Beta Sorority Inc.; Kiddie Land Kindergarten Inc.; NAACP; and SAT Scholarship. ShaNaé plans to pursue a career as crime lab analyst at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, where she will major in chemistry.

David Andrew Shirley of Salisbury graduated with honors from Virginia Tech on May 15, 2010. He received a Bachelor of Science in Accounting and Information Systems with concentration in Accounting. At VT, David was a member of Beta Alpha Psi Accounting Honor Society and a member of Zeta Beta Tau Fraternity, also serving as the fraternity treasurer for four years. The son of Steve and Nancy Shirley of Salisbury, David is a 2006 graduate of Salisbury High School. He will attend Virginia Tech graduate school this fall to pursue his Master of Science in Accounting.

CONGRATULATIONS to our Beautiful Daughter and Sister!!

Avery Kepley We are Very Proud of You!! We Love You Very Much!

Mom, Dad & Bailey

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Congratulations, ShaNaé, on all your achievements. We can’t believe this time has come for you to journey on to the next level of your life. Continue to keep God first in all that you do, and you will continue to be successful. As you walk in your blessing that God has placed upon your life, know that nothing is impossible for your to achieve. Always remember, “I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” We love you and wish you the best. May God continue to bless you in all that you do. Love, The Drye and White Families S44325

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AccuWeather® 5-Day Forecast for Salisbury Tonight

An afternoon thunderstorm

Friday

Thursday

A thunderstorm Times of clouds Some sun, a around early and sun t-storm possible

High 89°

Low 72°

High 91° Low 68°

High 92° Low 74°

Saturday

Sunday

Some sunshine, hot and humid

A thunderstorm possible

High 91° Low 73°

High 96° Low 74°

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Regional Weather Boone 83/64 Knoxville 89/70 Hickory 88/69 Franklin 86/66

Asheville 84/66

Danville 90/67 Winston Salem Durham 89/71 88/68 Greensboro 90/69 Raleigh 90/71 Salisbury 89/72

Spartanburg 92/67

Charlotte 90/70

Greenville 92/71

Columbia 92/71

Atlanta 90/71

Sunrise today .................. 6:06 a.m. Sunset tonight .................. 8:37 p.m. Moonrise today ................ 3:34 a.m. Moonset today .................. 6:03 p.m.

New

First

Full

June 12 June 19 June 26

Augusta 93/68

Allendale 96/68

Last

July 4

Savannah 92/68

Goldsboro 90/72

Morehead City 82/74

Southport 81/72

Wilmington 88/72

World Cities

Thu.

Hi Lo W

Hi Lo W

60 72 69 70 68 73 62 48 70 39 46 47 55 57 39 54 48 54 54 56 64 66 78 66 39 63 57 57 52

r s s s s pc r pc s r pc pc t s pc r sh t r r sh c sh pc pc s pc pc c

Data from Salisbury through 8 a.m. yest. Temperature High .................................................. 81° Low .................................................. 57° Last year's high ................................ 86° Last year's low .................................. 61° Normal high ...................................... 85° Normal low ...................................... 62° Record high ...................... 101° in 1899 Record low .......................... 44° in 1977 Humidity at noon ............................ 43% Precipitation 24 hours through 8 a.m. yest. ........ 0.00" Month to date ................................ 4.68" Normal month to date .................. 1.04" Year to date ................................ 27.06" Normal year to date .................... 19.39"

Today at noon .................................... 91°

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2010 -10s -0s 0s

Seattle 62/51

20s

Statistics are through 7 a.m. yesterday. Measured in feet.

Hilton Head 86/73 Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

74 87 84 73 96 93 72 59 97 48 63 60 66 76 58 64 64 86 64 74 72 84 90 87 61 75 72 69 74

The patented AccuWeather.com RealFeel Temperature is an exlcusive index or the effects or temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure and elevation on the human body.

Air Quality Index Charlotte Yesterday .............. 90 ...... Mod. ............ Ozone Today's forecast .... Moderate N. C. Dept. of Environment and Natural Resources 0-50 good, 51-100 moderate, 101-150 unhealthy for sensitive grps., 151-200 unhealthy, 201-300 very unhealthy, 301-500 hazardous

AccuWeather.com UV Index

TM

Highest today ......................... 9, Very High Noon ...................................... 9, Very High 3 p.m. ............................................. 6, High 0-2, Low; 3-5, Moderate; 6-7, High; 8-10, Very High; 11+, Extreme The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9

10s

LAKE LEVELS

Lake

Hi Lo W

® REAL FEEL TEMPERATURE RealFeel Temperature™

Billings 76/54

Minneapolis 80/56 Chicago 78/60

40s

Charleston 89/70

Thu.

Hi Lo W

Almanac

30s

Myrtle Beach 87/73

Today

City

Amsterdam 68 60 sh Atlanta 90 71 pc 93 72 t Athens 85 72 c Atlantic City 66 60 r 80 57 pc Beijing 83 67 c Baltimore 71 59 r 81 57 pc Beirut 72 71 s Billings 76 54 pc 67 47 t Belgrade 83 66 s Boston 70 52 pc 61 52 r Berlin 84 70 sh Chicago 78 60 pc 76 64 s Brussels 68 58 sh Cleveland 70 57 pc 81 62 pc Buenos Aires 55 41 pc Dallas 88 75 t 95 79 t Cairo 93 71 s Denver 90 62 pc 96 59 pc Calgary 53 42 r Detroit 75 60 pc 80 62 pc Dublin 61 48 sh Fairbanks 75 48 sh 72 49 sh Edinburgh 58 45 sh Honolulu 86 75 s 87 75 s Geneva 81 59 sh Houston 89 77 t 93 78 t Jerusalem 73 56 s Indianapolis 82 62 pc 83 68 s Johannesburg 62 38 s Kansas City 86 70 pc 88 72 t London 70 54 r Las Vegas 101 75 s 97 72 pc Madrid 66 48 r Los Angeles 77 62 pc 74 60 pc Mexico City 84 55 t Miami 91 78 t 90 77 t Moscow 70 48 c Minneapolis 80 56 pc 77 64 t Paris 67 61 r New Orleans 92 77 pc 93 78 pc Rio de Janeiro 73 64 s New York 68 58 r 74 59 pc Rome 83 66 s Omaha 84 68 pc 88 70 t San Juan 90 77 pc Philadelphia 66 59 r 80 59 pc Seoul 90 63 pc Phoenix 105 78 s 103 74 s Sydney 63 43 c Salt Lake City 90 59 pc 77 49 pc Tokyo 72 64 r San Francisco 65 52 pc 70 51 pc Toronto 68 54 r Seattle 62 51 r 61 50 sh Winnipeg 60 47 pc Tucson 102 72 s 101 71 s Zurich 81 52 pc Washington, DC 75 67 r 82 66 pc Legend: W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

Source: NWS co-op (9 miles WNW)

Cape Hatteras 82/72

Darlington 91/71

Aiken 97/68

SUN AND MOON

Kitty Hawk 80/72

Lumberton 91/70

Today

City

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Today

National Cities

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24C • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2010

Above/Below Observed Full Pool

High Rock Lake .... 654.00 ...... -1.00 Badin Lake .......... 540.40 ...... -1.60 Tuckertown Lake .. 594.90 ...... -1.10 Tillery Lake .......... 277.70 ...... -1.30 Blewett Falls ........ 177.80 ...... -1.20 Lake Norman ........ 98.75 ........ -1.25

50s 60s

San Francisco 65/52

New York 68/58

Denver 90/62

Washington 75/67

Kansas City 86/70

70s 80s

Los Angeles 77/62

90s 100s 110s Precipitation

Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice

Detroit 75/60

Atlanta 90/71

El Paso 101/73

Cold Front

Houston 89/77 Miami 91/78

Warm Front Stationary Front

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are given for selected cities.


Wednesday, June 9, 2010 | 50¢

Carson student overcomes adversity to graduate BY KATHY CHAFFIN

that,” she says. “I really, really needed support because my mom was so sick. “I kind of fell for him.” Life had never been easy for Madison. “My parents fought,” she says. “It showed me what I do and don’t want out of a relationship.” Just 10 days before Madison’s 15th birthday, her mother died. She went to live with her grandparents, Elizabeth and Leon Long, while two of her sisters, Amanda and Sarah, found other living arrangements. Her sister, Amy, was already living on her own. Madison’s grandparents lived in the Carson district, so she transferred there from East Rowan High School, leaving her friends behind. Gary already went to Carson, and seeing each other every day, they grew even closer. Madison had been

kchaffin@salisburypost.com

Madison Long was only 14 when her parents died. She was helping to care for her mother, who had cirrhosis of the liver and Hepatitis C, when her father died of a drug overdose. Madison says it was her boyfriend, Gary Scott, who helped her through it. Gary was her cousin’s best friend, and she had met him at her grandparents’ house. “We talked for about four months and had starting going out with friends,” she says. Madison says she became so overwhelmed taking care of her mother after her father died that she began to neglect herself. “Gary made sure I was taking a bath every day and getting something to eat and stuff like

going to Carson for about six months when she found out she was pregnant. “I cried,” she says. Madison told her sisters that night, and Gary told his mother, Rhonda Wells. “They were all upset and disappointed,” she says, “but they were there for me.” It was more difficult for Madison to tell her grandmother. “I didn’t tell her until I was about three months,” she says. As it turned out, her grandmother already suspected that Madison was pregnant. “She was very, very upset that I didn’t tell her as soon as I found out,” she says. Soon afterward, Madison moved in with Gary and his mother and grandmother. “My grandmother didn’t want KATHY CHAFFIN/SALISBURY POST

See ADVERSITY, 2A

Carson High School senior Madison Long and Gary Scott stand on the stairs to their apartment with son Sage.

COMMISSIONER FORUM

Woman sentenced in rat poison case Attempted murder charges result in 23-year prison term Staff report

JON C. LAKEY/SALISBURY POST

Tina Hall, right, answers questions during a political forum in advance of a runoff election between Hall and Chad Mitchell, left, for seats on the Rowan County Commission. Both are current members of the board.

Hall and Mitchell focus on education, budget BY KARISSA MINN

kminn@salisburypost.com

Two county commissioners running for re-election focused on budget and education issues in a candidate forum Tuesday. Rowan County Commissioners Chad Mitchell and Tina Hall addressed voters during a candidate forum Tuesday at Catawba College. In the June 22 second primary election, the two will compete for a spot on the November ballot Mitchell and Hall finished third and fourth, respectively, in the May 4 Republican primary race for county commissioner. Mitchell didn’t receive a large enough share of the votes to avoid a runoff election. He is running for a third term on the board of commissioners, and Hall is seeking a second. Dr. Michael Bitzer, associate professor of political science and history at Catawba, served as a moderator. He asked the candidates several questions on different topics, some of which came from Post readers. The first question addressed the topic of school funding, fresh in many people’s minds from the county’s public hearing on the budget Monday evening. A Post reader asked if the candidates were willing to support meeting Rowan-Salisbury Schools halfway in making up the $3 million gap in its funding request. Mitchell, 34, is a teacher at East Rowan High School. He replied that while the county could fund half or even all of the request for one year, it

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likely wouldn’t be able to sustain that funding. A smaller increase, he said, may be the best option. “We have to fund the schools at a level where they can operate and do what they’re supposed to do at a level of sustainability that the county can continue funding,” he said. Hall, 59, is retired from the RowanSalisbury Schools, where she had been a teacher, assistant principal, director and principal. She said the county couldn’t come up with $3.3 million as a continuing item, but commissioners should work to provide some of that increase. She said there is a good chance the state will give more responsibilities to counties in order to balance its budget in future years, leaving counties with even less money. “As a commissioner, I have to look at the big picture,” Hall said. Another question asked how infrastructure repairs and maintenance at Rowan-Cabarrus Community College fit into the candidates’ budgetary priorities. Hall said the school has dire needs, but the county will have a hard time coming up with the $3 million to $10 million it would take to address those needs. She suggested putting an item on the November ballot, similar to one recently passed to pay for a jail annex, that would propose a temporary tax increase to pay for RCCC’s capital needs. “I know we have a very kind and understanding community in Rowan

Please recycle this newspaper

Deaths

A Salisbury woman will spend at least 23 years in prison for trying to murder her boyfriend with rat poison. On Monday, Superior Court Judge Ted Royster sentenced Debora Kay Nelson to 23 to 281⁄3 years in prison for the attempted first-degree murder of her boyfriend. A Rowan County jury convicted Nelson Thursday of using rat poison to try and kill Richard Whitling, the man she was living with at 350 Old Wood Lane. Royster made his decision on the NELSON sentence after the jury found that an aggravating factor existed — that Nelson took advantage of a position of trust or confidence to commit the crime. Nelson is 49; Whitling, 76. The Rowan County Sheriff's Office charged Nelson in 2007 after following up on an anonymous tip that she had been putting rat poison in Whitling's coffee over an extended period of time. He was hospitalized after her arrest. A January 2009 trying of the case was declared a mistrial when the jury could not reach a verdict. Nelson has been in jail since April 2007. Assistant District Attorney Karen Biernacki prosecuted the case last week.

Arson suspected in Salisbury Auto Spa blaze Chad Mitchell answers questions during the forum. County, and they support the community college and the students that go there,” Hall said. “We can’t just come up with $3 million to $10 million, but I think our voters will be able to help us.” Mitchell said that the county should work on stepping up its funding to RCCC, because the current rate per full-time student is one of the lowest in

Jessica L. Livengood Lucille H. Lippard Jimmie L. Gooden

See FORUM, 2A

Modene C. Head Carl M. Overcash

Contents

An arson investigation is under way in a fire that destroyed a Jake Alexander Boulevard business. Salisbury Auto Spa, a car detailing business at 1500 Jake Alexander Blvd., was destroyed in the blaze around 3 a.m. Monday. Deputy Police Chief Steve Whitley said two people have called police to report seeing a older model — possibly a late 1990s white Ford pickup in the area. The callers said the vehicle made three or four trips through the adjacent Jake Alexander Auto Sales and by the detail shop. The callers said that after the vehicle passed by a final time there was a loud pop and then flames. Salisbury Police are working with the city fire investigators and the SBI. Anyone who has any information is asked to call 704-638-5333. The auto detailing shop and adjacent auto sales business are owned by Mark Honeycutt.

Bridge Classifieds Comics Crossword

11B 4B 10B 10B

Deaths Horoscope Opinion Food

4A 11B 10A 7A

Second Front 3A Sports 1B Television 11B Weather 24C


CONTINUED

2A • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2010

ADVERSITY FROM 1A

me to,” she says, “but at the time, she had to work all the time. It was easier for me to get back and forth to the doctor.” Though she had only been going to Carson for a short while, Madison says she had developed two or three close friendships with students. “When they found out I was pregnant, they were supportive,” she says, “but you could tell it put space between us.” Four months into her pregnancy, Madison heard that one of her best friends at East named Holly was also pregnant. “So we went through our pregnancies together,” she says. Madison was able to complete her sophomore year at Carson and gave birth to Sage on July 18, 2008. Holly was there for the delivery, and Madison says she was with Holly when she gave birth to her son, Kyle. They have remained good friends and get together with their sons for “little park dates,” she says. Gary’s mother took time off from her job when Sage was born to help Madison and

Gary with him. She took care of him during the day when they returned to Carson. When Sage got older and Gary’s mother returned to work, Madison says they tried leaving him with three or four different babysitters. “But it never worked out,” he says. “Finally, at the end of my boyfriend’s senior year, he dropped out and starting watching the baby full time.” Madison says Gary plans to return to school at some point to earn his high school equivalency. They have rented an apartment together in Granite Quarry. “We have disagreements like all couples,” Madison says, “but we sit down and talk about them. We know that we have a little boy, so we work through it and talk about it. That helps a lot.” Brooke Misenheimer, guidance counselor at Carson, has worked with Madison since she transferred there her sophomore year. “I have truly been amazed at how she has overcome so many obstacles and so many challenges,” she says. “I am just so, so proud of her. “Words just can’t express how happy I am for her and just how amazed I am at what she’s been able to accomplish despite the challenges that

JON C. LAKEY/SALISBURY POST

Chad Mitchell and Tina Hall answer questions during a political forum at the Tom E. Smith Auditorium on the Catawba College campus. The forum is in advance of a runoff election between Mitchell and Hall for seats on the Rowan County Commission. Both are current members of the board. see fit. “Sometimes, we get the idea that development is bad, and no development is allowed on farmland,” Mitchell said. “That is where I do not believe a county-wide plan is in the best interest of citizens.” Hall said that a land use plan, while not the same as a farmland preservation plan, has worked well for western Rowan County and will likely be expanded to

the rest of the county. “The plan is not all that some folks wanted, and it’s more than other folks wanted, but it’s a good start,” she said. Other questions asked the candidates about their long-term vision for Rowan County, and what they would like to see funded once revenues improve. Hall stressed open government, saying that the best decisions are made

when discussions are public. With more revenue, she said she would like to see more work done on RCCC and the county airport. She also has long held a dream of an International Baccalaureate program in the county to draw the “best minds” and businesses here. Mitchell said his three main priorities were financial stability, full employment and a great school sys-

tem. He said he would like to see RCCC’s needs addressed, and lottery money — currently used to pay down the county’s bond debt — transitioned to the schools for capital needs. If all service levels are adequate, he said, he would then seek to cut taxes. Catawba College, the Salisbury Post and the Rowan County Chamber of Commerce sponsored Tuesday’s forum.

have come her way over the last few years.” Misenheimer says Madison may be the most resilient young woman she has ever known. “She has been able to maintain this positive attitude and has stayed so motivated.” Madison, who will graduate from Carson on Friday with a 3.6 grade-point average, received the $500 J. Michael McDuffie Memorial Scholarship for students who persevere through a significant hardship and excel in school. She also received a Good Beginnings for Teen Parents Scholarship for $500 and an F&M Bank Scholarship for $500. Madison plans to attend Rowan-Cabarrus Community College and earn her RN degree in the two-year program there. “I’ve wanted to be a nurse for a long, long time,” she says, “since I was about 5. Once my mom got sick, I was like ‘This is what I have to do. This is what I love to do.’ ”

Her career goal is to become a labor and delivery nurse. Madison says Misenheimer was always there for her when she had a question or needed to talk about problems at home and school. “She would help me to figure it out and help me not to be so stressed.” Misenheimer says Madison went through some major life changes at Carson. “I think a lot of times, she just needed somebody to listen to her. Madison is very open and honest and very willing to share. That’s something I really respect about her is she’ll tell you exactly what’s she’s thinking.” Madison says all of the teachers and staff at Carson have been very supportive of her. When it comes to issues she faces as a young mother, Madison says she receives support through the Parents as Teachers Program sponsored by the Rowan County Adolescent and Family En-

richment Council. As part of the program, a parent educator is assigned to each teen parent. Mary Burrage is currently assigned to help Madison. “She comes out to my house every two weeks,” Madison says, “and she shows me different things that I can do with Sage and makes sure he’s doing what he’s supposed to do at different ages.” Sage, for example, at almost 23 months, is a little delayed in speech. “He’s not bad,” Madison says, “but I was concerned about that, so she gave me different handouts showing me ways I could work with him and try to get him to talk to me.” Orrie Bowes previously worked with Madison as a parent educator. “She’s not my educator anymore,” she says, “but she and I still talk daily and she gives me advice. She’s like my best friend.” When asked what she would say to a young teenager who just found out she’s

pregnant, Madison says she would encourage her not to drop out of school. “There are resources that can help you,” she says. “You just have to seek them out and not give up.” Madison says she believes that “God doesn’t put too much on you, so when you feel like you can’t go on, remember He knows you can handle it.” Though she doesn’t attend church regularly, Madison says she went to church faithfully with her grandmother until she was 7 years old. ‘I still go every once in a while,” she says, “and I pray.” After giving birth to Sage, a cute little boy with blonde hair, Madison says she knew she really had to put her mind to doing well in school. Knowing that she has to be able to provide for him is what keeps her going. “I want his life to be a lot better than mine was when I was little,” she says. Contact Kathy Chaffin at 704-797-4249.

704-425-4454

J

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Clarification • The last five words of the story, “Hunters of men,” was omitted from Monday’s Post. The full sentence should have read: “What they don’t see is waiting in the woods in the rain all day for someone to come home. Or lying on the frozen ground in the dead of winter, your body heat melting out a place in the ground, working to return a person to justice.”

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the state. He said before any repairing or rebuilding work starts, though, there needs to be a plan in place. “We have to work with RCCC, Rowan-Salisbury Schools and Rowan County general government and know exactly what buildings we need in Rowan County, when we need them and... how we intend on paying for them,” Mitchell said. When asked what the key difference was between them, Hall and Mitchell both said that while their voting records are quite similar, distinctions can be found in their governing style. “I’m a full-time commissioner,” Hall said. “I’m retired, so I am able to devote 100 percent of my time to being a county commissioner.” Hall also said that she and Mitchell differed on a key vote on the tax rate in 2007. She voted for revenueneutral rate, and Mitchell did not. Mitchell said that while he isn’t a full-time commissioner, his time spent in the schools and the community gives him a different perspective than someone might get by staying in the county office. “I think I get a better understanding of what citizens of Rowan County need, want and deserve from talking with them outside of the context of an official capacity,” Mitchell said. One question Tuesday asked about candidates’ priorities when balancing the county budget. “Is it raising revenues, cutting county staff, cutting county programs such as li-

Dedicated to the memory of four “special friends”: Billy Mesimer – A.D. Powell Ezra Gilliam – Richard Perkins R124319

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FROM 1A

braries and parks, and/or cutting education funding?” Bitzer asked. Mitchell answered that he does not support increasing revenue in the form of raising taxes or fees. Fortunately, he said, the county hasn’t had to make major cuts to county programs or education funding, because it has used the savings in its fund balance to sustain services. Hall said the county has cut staff, changed its insurance carrier and made other changes to reign in spending. In the future, she said, the county may have to look into cutting hours at the parks and libraries in order to remain financially sound. The candidates were asked how much the county should dip into its $22 million fund balance to continue to fund requests from schools and other county agencies. Mitchell said that the county already has dipped into its fund balance for $1 million last year, and it likely will do so again this year for $1.5 to $3 million. If revenues don’t improve significantly, another $3 million hit the following year could bring it down to $16 million. Mitchell and Hall both agreed that commissioners should follow the advice of County Manager Gary Page not to fall below the $16 million mark. Beyond that, bond rating agencies will view the county as fiscally irresponsible and increase its interest rates. The candidates also were asked if a county farmland preservation plan would be a priority. Mitchell replied that while agriculture is important to the county, people generally should be able to do with their land what they

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SALISBURY POST


SECONDFRONT

The

WEDNESDAY

June 9, 2010

SALISBURY POST

3A

www.salisburypost.com

Landis, Mecklenburg County enter into 9-year recycling contract BY SHAVONNE POTTS

spotts@salisburypost.com

LANDIS — Town residents will be able to recycle under an agreement approved by the Board of Aldermen this week. The board voted Monday to enter into a nine-year recycling contract with Mecklenburg County. The service will begin in August. The service won’t mean an additional cost to residents although the town will be respon-

sible for transporting recyclables to the Metrolina Recycling Center in Charlotte. Mecklenburg, which normally would charge a tipping fee if the town’s recyclables reached a certain limit, will sell the recyclable materials and won’t charge Landis for taking them as long as the center’s revenue exceeds its operating costs. “They’re excited to receive our recyclables,” Town Manager Reed Linn said. The town would have to

share in Mecklenburg’s cost to dispose of non-recyclable waste mixed in with recyclables if the waste reaches a particular percentage. Alderman Tony Hilton said the program will help the environment and save money on tipping fees. He also asked that residents be informed about the program via media outlets and inserts in the utility bills. The town board discussed offering curbside recycling during its earlier budget work-

shops, though Monday’s discussion didn’t specify whether residents will have curbside bins under the approved plan. Town leaders didn’t discuss how much it would cost to deliver the recyclables to Mecklenburg County. The board also: • Denied a request from True Homes, developers of the Oaks of Landis subdivision along U.S. 29, to reduce square footage in some new homes. The developers asked the

board to drop the minimum size from 1,400 square feet to 1,170 square feet because they want to market to retirees who want less space. Planning board members expressed concern at their May and June meetings about mixing smaller homes with existing larger homes, the potential effect on property values in the area and questions about whether families would be allowed to buy the smaller homes if retirees don’t.

See LANDIS, 5A

Truck driver struck by train in fair condition

“Everyone she touches seems to benefit from knowing her; she’s a very positive force in our community.” LINDA

The planning board suggested a separate “retirement cluster” to be built along North Chapel Street. • Approved a resolution to apply for a grant with the N.C. Rural Economic Development Center to assist in a wastewater or water conservation project. The grant is for a planning program that would help the town engineer create a 10year capital outlay plan.

JONES

Salisbury Symphony Orchestra executive director about Susan Trivette

BY MARK WINEKA

mwineka@salisburypost.com

Susan Trivette, far left, performs with the Salisbury Symphony Orchestra during the 2008 Pops at the Post concert. Trivette has been a flutist in the orchestra since she was a junior in high school in 1969.

The driver of a tractor-trailer struck Monday morning by a westbound train near Shaver Wood Products was listed in fair condition today at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. The N.C. Highway Patrol identified the driver as Ronald Lee Shoemaker, 47, of Statesville, a driver for American Cartage. Trooper J.N. Horton charged Shoemaker with careless and reckless driving. Horton reported that two eyewitnesses said Shoemaker’s rig, which was leaving Shaver Wood Products and heading toward U.S. 70, approached the tracks slowly but continued into the rail crossing without stopping. The rig was hit by a westbound Norfolk Southern freight train. The collision sent the tractor-trailer down an embankment and onto its side, where it caught on fire. Passing motorists and three men from Shaver Wood Products — a couple of whom were mowing grass — helped free Shoemaker from the cab of the truck. One of the workers, William Trull, was treated at Iredell Memorial Medical Center for smoke inhalation. Shoemaker initially went to Iredell Memorial, but was flown later to Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem. Horton said the driver’s injuries included a neck injury and cuts to his face. Shoemaker doesn’t remember what happened, Horton said. The crossing leaving Shaver Wood Products is marked by both a stop sign and a rail crossing sign, according to Horton.

WAYNE HINSHAW / FOR THE SALISBURY POST

One note at a time Susan Trivette uses music, teaching to serve the community Watching Susan Trivette’s fingers dance along the keys of the flute as she plays “Simple Gifts,” it’s obvious she loves performing. “Every time you play it’s a different experience,” she said. “It’s not like listening to a recording, which is the same every time you listen to it. “Live music is always a new experience.” The Rowan County native has been performing as a flutist in the Salisbury Symphony Orchestra since her junior year of high school in 1969. She began playing the instrument in sixth grade and

auditioned for the orchestra at the suggestion of her piano teacher. “It was very intimidating to do that,” she said. “But it got me ready for the college auditions.” Trivette took a four-year hiatus from the orchestra to attend the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, where she received her Bachelor of Music Education with a concentration in flute and secondary in organ. After graduating, she returned to Rowan County with plans to teach high school band, but with no positions available at the time she accepted a job as an elementary music teacher. Trivette fell in with love with teaching elementary music and

ended up holding the position in the Rowan-Salisbury School System for 31 years. It was a position she found both rewarding and valuable. “(Music) is a way for students to excel when they can’t excel academically,” she said. “It gives them self confidence, improves their self esteem and they learn that you have to work for things to happen — you just can’t go straight to class and not practice. “You have to work at it and sometimes it takes a while to see results.” Her dedication to education earned her the honor of Granite Quarry Elementary’s Teacher of the Year in 1998. Trivette’s commitment to ed-

ucation extends far beyond the classroom. After retiring in 2008, she took on the role of director of education with the Salisbury Symphony Orchestra. She is responsible for running the after-school strings program and collaborating with the school system to offer special programs and workshops throughout the year. “She has been a wonderful partner from day one; she’s marvelous to work with,” Linda Jones, executive director of the orchestra, said. “From the beginning she was always asking what she could do.”

No tax hike in Spencer BY SHELLEY SMITH

ssmith@salisburypost.com

See TRIVETTE, 4A

Wife of internationally known philanthropist dies at 67 BY MARK WINEKA

mwineka@salisburypost.com

Josephine “Josie” Tucker Robertson, wife of Salisbury native and internationally known hedge fund manager and philanthropist Julian Robertson Jr., died Tuesday at her home in New York City. She was 67 and had put up a long fight against breast cancer. It was in his wife’s honor — and

as a surprise — that Julian Robertson gave $25 million to New York’s Lincoln Center in 1998. The plaza outside the Lincoln Center bears her name. Robertson said at the time it’s one of New York’s most beautiful spots, and it was lucky to have his wife’s name. With an $18 million initial endowment, Julian Robertson Jr. established the Blanche and Julian

Robertson Family Foundation in 1997 in honor of his late parents, longtime Salisbury residents. The foundation, overseen by a mostly local board of directors, has become Rowan County’s foremost charitable organization over the past dozen years. David Setzer, executive director

See WIFE, 5A

Come Support our local farmers!

See SPENCER, 4A

JOSEPHINE TUCKER

Every Thursday 4:00 pm-Dusk

Healthy Harvest

Farmers’ Market

The Spencer Board of Aldermen approved the town’s fiscal year 201011 budget during its Tuesday meeting, which includes no tax increase. The current tax rate of $0.60 per 100 dollars will remain for 2010-11. No merit raises were granted, however, cost of living raises of 2.5 percent were included in the budget. Spencer has a budget total of about $2.4 million to work with starting in July. Some departments saw cuts, while others saw increases in budget allocations: • Governing Body — a decrease of $41,982 to $46,134. A contingencies fund of $39,097 was cut from departmental operating budgets in FY 200910, and the cut is being extended to

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BY SARAH CAMPBELL

scampbell@salisburypost.com


AREA/OBITUARIES

4A • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2010

CRIME ROUNDUP Family members charged with intimidating witness Family members of a man charged with stealing a woman’s medication are now facing charges of intimidating a witness. Maracella Merie Goble, 30, and her husband, Kim M. GOBLE Delain Goble, both of 1375 Percy Lane, Rockwell, were charged Sunday with felony intimidating or interfering with witnesses. Deputy Chief Steve Whitley of the Salisbury Police Department, said Marcella Goble is the sister of Joshua Craig, who K. GOBLE was previously charged with stealing medication and awaiting a court date on July 1. According to the police report, the victim in the larceny case was at a bus stop in downtown Salisbury on May 30. She reported to police that the Gobles were in a car that pulled up. The victim and witnesses told police that Gobles cursed the victim and told her “you’re a dead b----, if you go to court.” Additional threats were also reported.

Man charged with manufacturing marijuana The Rowan County Sheriff’s Office has arrested and charged a China Grove man with manufacturing marijuana. Kevin Lynn Eaton, 19, was arrested and placed in the Rowan County Detention Center on June 7 under $2,500 secured bond, pending a court date of June 16. Deputies with the sheriff’s office were notified that mari-

SPENCER FROM 3A

FY 2010-11. • Administration — an increase of $12,446 to a total of $375,712. Includes estimated upgrades to rear parking area security and the anticipated salary of a summer grant writing intern. • Police — a decrease of $16,254 to $777,272. Includes savings and costs that will be associated with the take-home vehicle policy that becomes effective July 1. Also includes two in-car camera upgrades. • Fire — an increase of $7,579 to $286,098. Includes increased salary associated with an increase in calls, increased maintenance and repairs on a brush truck. • Streets — a decrease of $40,648 to $368,405. The decrease is because of no proposed capital expenditures or replacements in the upcoming year.

TRIVETTE FROM 3A

Jones said Trivette was immediately met with challenges upon taking on her new role. When the school system cut funding for the afterschool strings program, Trivette didn’t accept the news, instead, she got busy writing grants and searching for options to keep the program intact. Her enthusiasm encouraged people to go online to vote in the Pepsi Refresh Project, which landed the program a $5,000 grant. “We got that grant because she got the community involved and excited.” Jones said. “That (money) is going to make our after-school strings program strong again. “(Trivette) just fanned the flames until the fire built back up.” Although Trivette has spent most of her life as an educator, she also finds time to use her skills to serve the community. “She’s been in the community a long, long time and she’s very much a part of it,” Jones said. She performs at several lo-

juana plants had been located growing in a wooded area behind 425 Goodman Road on May 15. Detectives from the Sheriff’s Special Investigations Unit responded and found 42 marijuana plants growing in the woods. Investigators followed a footEATON path from the plants to 425 Goodman Road, and found an additional marijuana plant growing beside the front porch. Investigators received permission to search the residence and found additional items related to growing marijuana. Investigators later interviewed Eaton who admitted that the plants belonged to him.

Teen shoots himself in toe

$2,250, from behind a building at 4955 Sherrills Ford Road. The items were taken between noon and 3:30 p.m. on June 3. • James Billy Gragg of Landis reported the theft of a Tom Tom GPS device and a .38-caliber Smith & Wesson revolver from a vehicle parked on Ney Street in Kannapolis. • Jerry Robert Christie, Farm House Road, reported the theft of $1,800 in cash from his residence. The theft occurred on June 4. • Clifford Phillip Brady of Gold Hill reported his 2000 blue Dodge Dakota pickup truck was damaged $500 while parked at East Rowan High School. • Tiffany Leanne was charged with felony possession of drugs at 1250 Chow Drive, Rockwell.

Salisbury couple charged with child abuse

A Mount Ulla teenager sustained a minor gunshot wound to this toe when a gun accidentally discharged. Zachery Howard Krivanek, 16, of Joe Rankin Road sustained a minor wound to his right big toe in the mishap June 4 at a residence on Parks Road. Capt. John Sifford of the Rowan County Sheriff’s Office said Krivanek picked up a .38caliber revolver with the trigger in the cocked position. The teen didn’t think the gun was loaded, but it was. Krivanek was charged with possession of a firearm by a minor. Other reports or charges from the Rowan County Sheriff’s Office: • Jamie Yates, Bee Tree Lane, reported the theft of her dog, a shih-tzu, valued at $1,000. The dog was taken between 3:30 p.m. June 2 and 9:30 a.m. June 3. • Angela Sheppard, Concord, reported the theft of a York air conditioning unit valued at $5,000 from a house at 8600 Archer Road, Kannapolis. The unit was taken between June 3 and June 5. • James Barkley Summit reported the theft of hydraulic cylinders and a plow, valued at

A Salisbury couple has been charged with child abuse after they left three small children home alone. Raynard Lamont Bookhart, 25, and Starla Dawn Rea, 23, both of 200 N. Martin Luther King Jr. Ave., were charged with misdemeanor child abuse. According to Salisbury Police, Rea’s three children were left alone Saturday morning while Bookhart drove her to her job in China Grove. Bookhart was arrested after the children were picked up by their grandmother. In other reports or charges from the Salisbury Police Department. • Mickey Jerome Harrison, 32, 130 Stoneybrook Road, Salisbury, was charged on June 5 with driving while impaired. Police were dispatched to 330 Holly Ave. where they found a Oldsmobile Alero on its top in the front yard. According to the police report Harrison was nearby and had several bruises and cuts. The officer reported that when he asked Harrison to take a sobriety test, Harrison replied, “there is no way I will pass any tests, I am too drunk.”

• Solid/yard waste — a decrease of $7,971 to $311,283. The decrease is due to amended proposal requests for capital expenditures. A replacement tractor is budgeted, however, a replacement truck has been delayed. • Land management — a decrease of $15,686 to $109,321. The decrease is due to not having to pay anticipated demolition costs for a dilapidated downtown commercial structure. • Library — an increase of $49,053 to $68,364. The increase reflects the anticipated November opening of the library, as well as the first payment on loan proceeds for the repair project. • Recreation — an increase of $6,700 to $22,575. Includes an anticipated “sensory trail” construction project in the Rowan Avenue Park. Projected revenues and expenditures for FY 2010-11 are nearly $2.4 million. The Powell Bill Fund has projected revenues and expenditures of

$98,838. The general fund is made up of current year and prior year ad valorem taxes, tax penalties and interest, sales tax proceeds, other taxes and proceeds and miscellaneous revenues. “Other taxes” include privilege licenses that include the sweepstakes cafe privilege/ occupational license fee of $1,000 per machine. Spencer has anticipated a $5,000 revenue in privilege license fees. In other news: • The board voted to keep its membership with the Centralina Council of Government. • Two Spencer fire fighter are now certified EMTs. • The public comment section was moved from the end of regularly scheduled board meetings, closer to the beginning of the agenda, between committee reports and unfinished or new business. The board will hold its next meeting at 7 p.m. Tuesday, July 13.

Get to know Susan Trivette • Education — Bachelor of Music Education from UNC-G • Career — Taught elementary music for Rowan-Salisbury Schools for 31 years, current director of education for the Salisbury Symphony Orchestra, has played flute in the orchestra since 1969, serves as organist at First United Church of Christ • Children — Daniel Trivette and Kathryn Wear • Husband — Bobby Trivette

cal nursing homes, provides accompaniment to students at Catawba College, serves as the organist at First United Church of Christ and has previously participated in productions put on by the Piedmont Players and the Uwharrie Players. The Rev. Mike Childress of First United Church of Christ said Trivette has worked tirelessly with music directors

throughout the years to provide leadership and guidance. “As a staff member of the church, she has contributed extensively to the music program … and went beyond the expectations of the church,” he said. “Her dedication to excellence has underscored her rich and varied repertoire. “Simply put, the music program at First Church is the beneficiary of her extraordinary talent and will be forever grateful for her faithful service.” Trivette said it just seems natural to be involved in a variety of activities, combining her zest for music, teaching and community. “I always have something that I’m working on whether it’s a concert, musical theater or playing with the church,” she said. “There’s always something new to be working on.” Jones said Trivette continues to play a vital role in the community, offering a helping hand whenever needed. “She’s much more likely to say ‘how can I help you,’ than to say ‘see you later,’” she said. “Everyone she touches seems to benefit from knowing her; she’s a very positive force in our community.”

Modene Creason Head

MOCKSVILLE — Mrs. Modene Creason Head, 81, formerly of Highway 601 South, died Saturday, June 5, 2010, at Remmington House Assisted Living Facility in Kingsport, Tenn., where she had lived for the past year. She was born May 3, 1929, in Davie County to the late Wilburn and Essie Shoaf Creason. Mrs. Head had attended Cooleemee First Baptist Church and was retired from B&F Manufacturing. In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by her husband of 62 years, Clarence William “Bud” Head; a son, Gerry W. Head; and a son-in-law, Douglas Lloyd. Survivors include two daughters, Carolyn H. Newell (Charles Rest) of Tennessee and Crystal H. Lloyd of Mebane; six grandchildren, Mike Newell (Sherrie), Melissa Ealey (Tommy), Eric Head (Amanda), Randi-Sue Head, Brett Lloyd and Chad Lloyd; and three great-grandchildren, Logan Ealey, John Lloyd Newell and Kaliska Head. Service: A cryptside service will be conducted at 2 p.m. Thursday, June 10 at Rowan Memorial Park Mausoleum Chapel in Salisbury with Mr. Doll Foster officiating. Visitation: The family will receive friends from 7 to 9 p.m. Wednesday, June 9 at Eaton Funeral Home. Memorials: They request that memorials be considered for Hospice and Palliative CareCenter, 377 Hospital St., Suite 103, Mocksville, NC 27028. Online condolences may be made at www.eatonfuneralservice.com.

SALISBURY POST

Lucille Hendrix Lippard

CLEVELAND — Lucille Hendrix Lippard, age 99, of Cleveland, passed away Monday, June 7, 2010, at The Laurels of Salisbury. Born May 17, 1911, in Rowan County, she was the third child of the late Dennie Linnet Hendrix and Frances (Fannie) Myers Hendrix of Salisbury. She was a 1929 graduate of Boyden High School and was a lifelong resident of Cleveland. She was an active member of Cleveland First Baptist Church as long as her health permitted. Mrs. Lippard was a homemaker and was well-known for her excellent cooking, especially her delicious chocolate pies. She enjoyed watching baseball, with the Atlanta Braves being her favorite team. She was a dedicated servant to the church and to her community. She was a member of the Maddie Tolbert Sunday School Class. In addition to her parents, Mrs. Lippard was preceded in death by her husband, Ralph Clinton Lippard, on Dec. 23, 1991; a son, Walter Ralph Lippard, on Sept. 13, 2009; a granddaughter, Rebecca Dianne Lippard, on Aug. 18, 1968; a step-grandson, Frankie Wrights, Jr., on April 15, 2008; and two brothers, Lester and Hoyle Hendrix. Those left to cherish her memory are her children, Frances Lippard Barber (Charles) of Cleveland, Helen Lippard Wrights (Frank) of Salisbury, Harvey Clyde Lippard (Faye) of Davenport, Fla., Harry Edward Lippard (Susan) of Salisbury; daughter-in-law Flaydene Lippard of San Antonio, Texas; and special friend Wanda Sheek. Mrs. Lippard is survived by the following grandchildren: Richard Barber (Vickie), Patricia Peacock (Darrell), Jack Davis (Blanca), Barbara Lippard, Wanda Colbert (Donald), Tim Lippard (Dawn), Cynthia Glasser, Henry Lippard (Cindy), and Harriet Michael (Brian); and a step-granddaughter, Patricia Dorsey (Carl). She is survived by 12 great-grandchildren; seven stepgreat-grandchildren; eight great-great-grandchildren; and 13 step-great-great-grandchildren. She is also survived by two sisters and one brother, Mildred Poteat of Salisbury, Clara Poteat of Salisbury and Robert Hendrix of Raleigh; and several nieces and nephews. Service: Services honoring Mrs. Lippard's life will be held at Cleveland First Baptist Church at 2 p.m. Thursday, June 10 with the Rev. Glenn Dancy, III and the Rev. Bobby Seagroves officiating. She will lie in state 30 minutes prior to the service. Interment will follow in the church cemetery. Visitation: The family will receive friends at Summersett Funeral Home Wednesday from 6-8 p.m. Memorials: In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Cleveland First Baptist Church, 200 Maple St., P.O. Box 325, Cleveland, NC 27013; or Enon Baptist Church, (DL Hendrix Library Fund) 1875 Enon Church Road, Salisbury, NC 28147. The family would like to express their thanks to Dr. Thompson and the entire staff at the Laurels for the love they showed to our mother and the wonderful care, love and kindness they gave her each and every day. Summersett Funeral Home is serving the Lippard family. Online condolences may be made at www.summersettfuneralhome.com.

Jimmie Lee Gooden

CHARLOTTE — Jimmie

Carl McElwee Overcash Lee Gooden, 55, died Friday,

CLEVELAND — Carl McElwee Overcash, 83, of Cleveland, passed away on Monday, June 7, 2010, at Autumn Care of Statesville. Born on March 16, 1927, in Iredell County, he was the son of the late George Ulyesses and Molly Christy Overcash. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by his wife, Nettie Lucille Overcash; son, Carl Ricky Overcash; son-in-law, Kevin Brown; great-granddaughter, Faith Hall; sister, Edith London; brothers, Hoyle Overcash, Gilbert Overcash, and Keever Overcash. Survivors include his daughters, Patty Hall and husband Kenneth of Statesville, and Sylvia Brown of Salisbury; sister, Opal Simms of Mooresville; grandchildren, Brian Hall and Leslie, Bradley Hall and wife Wanda, Shannon Nichols and husband Billy, and Matthew Fox; great-grandchildren, Andrew Hall, Carlee Hall, Morgan Hall, and Bethany Fox. Funeral services: 11 a.m., Thursday, June 10, at Amity Lutheran Church with Rev. Gene Bruce officiating. Burial will follow the service in the church cemetery. The family will receive friends following the burial in the church sanctuary. Memorials: In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Amity Lutheran Church, 1367 Amity Oswalt Road, Cleveland, NC 27013 and/or Hospice & Palliative Care of Iredell County, 2347 Simonton Road, Statesville, NC 28625. Cavin-Cook Funeral Home, Mooresville, is serving the Overcash family.

Jessica L. Livengood

SALISBURY — Jessica Lynn Livengood, 20, of Salisbury, passed away Saturday, June 5, 2010, in Yadkin County, as the result of an automobile accident. Arrangements are incomplete with Cremation Concepts, LLC in charge.

Stephen E. Blanton, Sr. Correction

SALISBURY — Stephen Eric Blanton, Sr., who died June 2, 2010, in Baltimore, Md., is survived by an aunt, Sandra E. Boger of Salisbury, who was omitted from an earlier obituary. Services are entrusted to Hairston Funeral Home, Inc.

June 4, 2010, at Hefner VA Medical Center, Salisbury. Service: Wednesday, June 9, 2 p.m., Thrift Baptist Church, 8415 Moore's Chapel Road, Charlotte, NC 28214. The family extends special thanks for the outstanding care to the Staff at Salisbury Medical Center. Online condolences at: crownfuneralservice.com

Mrs. Lucille Hendrix Lippard 2:00 PM Thursday First Baptist Church of Cleveland Visitation: 6-8 PM Wednesday

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AREA

Centralina Council of Government asks Rowan to keep membership BY KARISSA MINN

kminn@salisburypost.com

Representatives from the Centralina Council of Government (CCOG) asked county commissioners Monday to keep Rowan County’s membership to the group. At its first budget workshop last week, the Rowan County Board of Commissioners asked County Manager Gary Page to evaluate the costs and benefits of membership in CCOG and two other partnerships. Commissioners have talked previously about pulling out of the group, but the proposed budget still includes about $34,000 in dues. Al Sharp, executive director of CCOG, spoke during the county’s public hearing on the proposed budget Monday. “We have just conducted a blue-ribbon panel, and Centralina is refocusing on needed regional policy issues that will affect us all,” Sharp said. Those issues include air quality, water resources and transportation planning — including the Yadkin River Bridge, he said. “In economic development, we’ve been working with infrastructure issues,” Sharp said. “We’ve brought more than $10 million to the region. Regretfully, none of this is to Rowan County because you’ve not

WIFE FROM 3A

of the foundation, said he learned of Josie Robertson’s death Tuesday afternoon in an e-mail from Julian’s sister, Wyndham. He informed members of the board of directors after receiving that notice. The Robertsons had been married for 38 years and had three boys: Spencer of Brooklyn, Jay of Hawk’s Bay, New Zealand; and Alexander of Manhattan. The daughter of Robert and Josephine “Pimmie” Spencer Tucker, Josie Robertson was born May 16, 1943, in San Antonio, and graduated from Saint Mary’s Hall there in 1961. She later attended Briarcliff College and graduated from the University of Texas in 1965. Before her marriage to Robertson in 1972, Josie Robertson and her sister-inlaw started and managed Tuckertown, a business designing and producing Christmas-tree ornaments sold to leading department stores. Known throughout her life for her artistic talents and creativity, she collaborated with her husband to build two

LANDIS FROM 3A

According to the resolution, the town wants to plan for the construction or rehabilitation of a publically owned treatment works or alternate wastewater system or wastewater collection system, water conservation projects and water supply systems. Hilton said if such projects brought new businesses to

been active in this program.” Also speaking for CCOG was the council’s aging program administrator, Gayla Woody. “I have been working in Rowan County now for more than 25 years,” Woody said. “We’ve seen a number of services and programs for older adults built during those 25 years.” More than half of the county’s membership dues, she said, allow the allocation of $755,000 in grant funds for programs like adult day care, inhome aide services, senior center operation and congregate meals. The council also helps provide funding for older adult job training, evidence-based health promotion, a family caregiver program and an ombudsman program for those in long-term care. Woody said that in 20 years, 75 percent of North Carolina’s counties will have more older adults than people under 17 years old. “It’s very important that we work together to look for ways to provide and accommodate for our older population, so that they can stay well and active and involved members of the community,” she said. Sharp told commissioners that if the county pulled out of CCOG, it would cost $16,000 to

apply for the grants the county normally receives. He said having a voice in regional issues through membership with the council can help bring additional benefits to Rowan County. “While aging is our most important and popular program,” he said, “it’s being at the table that makes a difference for Rowan to have a voice in the region.” At last Wednesday’s budget workshop, Commissioner Jon Barber was the first to request a cost-benefit analysis for memberships in CCOG and the North Carolina Association of County Commissioners. Others agreed and added the Charlotte Regional Partnership to that list. “I would like to see, for those annual membership dues, what are we getting for them?” Barber said. He and Chairman Carl Ford both brought up concerns about the administration fees necessary to continue applying for grant money. “We still have to go through CCOG, because that’s the way it’s set up with the state, to make sure that we get our grants and keep senior services flowing,” Ford said. Commissioner Chad Mitchell said the fees would be worth paying to save the difference in the cost of the dues.

golf-course resorts in New Zealand, which they designed from scratch, beginning in the 1990s. According to a press release, hers was the eye behind the impeccable style of the two award-winning lodges built near the golf courses. An avid golfer, she was the 2006 women’s champion at Sebonack Golf Club in Southampton, NY. She also was a wizard with flowers and loved arranging them when entertaining friends and family. Described as gracious, lighthearted and kind, she masked a formidable set of organizational skills which she put to work as a mother of three sons and as a volunteer in New York City. Josie Robertson joined the Women’s Board of The Boys’ Club of New York in 1978, served as its president, and in 2000 was elected to its board of trustees. In 2007, when she was the honoree at its annual spring dance, a group of friends raised money in her honor for the Boys’ Club’s Josie Robertson School of Music and Art. She also was on the Board of Overseers of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center since 2004 and was a director of Classroom Inc. from 1999-2008, before serving as an honorary director and

chairing the Classroom Inc. Council. In 1996, the Robertsons established the Robertson Foundation which supports education, medical research, religion and spirituality, and environmental causes. She and her husband were leading supporters also of the Central Park Conservancy, where she joined the board of the Women’s Committee in 1997. In 1998 they funded the restoration of the 59th Street Pond and its surrounding landscape. In addition to her husband and sons, she is survived by Spencer’s wife, Sarah, and their three children, Hollis, Hart and Wyndham; two sisters, Mary Cassell of Albuquerque and Julia Rasmussen of Houston; and two brothers, Robert Tucker of San Antonio and George Tucker of Midland. The funeral will be at 11 a.m. Friday at St. Bartholomew’s Church, 325 Park Ave., N.Y. Visitation will be from 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m. and 5-7 p.m. at Frank Campbell Funeral Home, 1076 Madison Ave. Thursday. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Boys Club of New York, Memorial Sloan Kettering Hospital, and PAVE Academy Charter School.

the downtown area, the town should proceed with the grant application. • Heard from Recreation Director Julie Noblitt, who will continue her talks with the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission about the town’s plans to allow fishing at Lake Corriher. The town has already outlined in the upcoming budget fishing permits and plans to develop the area for residents to use. The Wildlife Resources Commission has agreed to

test the area’s fish and offered to help the town build a fishing pier with boat access if needed. Noblitt said she would tour Lake Corriher and Lake Wright with someone from the commission to discuss plans for those sites. Linn said there has been some interest from residents who want to fish at the lake. • Approved closing town hall June 30 so staff can close out the books for this fiscal year.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2010 • 5A

Posters • Simmons reunion — descendants of Lemuel Paige “Lem” Simmons’ annual reunion, 11 a.m., Saturday group shelter at Watson Mill Bridge State Park, between Carlton and Comer, Ga. Many family members moved to Cabarrus/Rowan to work at Cannon Mills. For reunion information or to pass along family information, contact Nathan Simmons at 704-4670585. • Shady Grove Baptist Church children’s fitness camp, 2-6 p.m. daily, Monday-Friday June 21-August 13. For children ages 6 to 12. $30/week with $15 registration fee. Paul Lawrence Dunbar Center, East Spencer. Applications available at Shady Grove Baptist Church, S. Long St., every Saturday or Sunday. Director: Mary Cooper, assistants: Tim Walker, Sandra Campbell , Gwen Cuthberson. Registration information: 704-4330956. • United House of Prayer for All People, 501 Old Concord Road, dinners sold from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. today. Call in orders to 704-637-1528.

Village Park in Kannapolis to screen ‘Princess Bride’ BY EMILY FORD

eford@salisburypost.com

KANNAPOLIS — The cult classic film “The Princess Bride” will play outdoors Friday night in Kannapolis. Village Park will screen the movie at 8:45 p.m. Before the film, the park will host a cornhole tournament starting at 6 p.m. “The Princess Bride,” a 1987 American film, comes in at No. 50 on Bravo’s list of “100 Funniest Movies” and No. 88 on the American Film Institute’s 100 greatest film love stories of all time. The movie combines comedy, adventure, romance and fantasy. It’s about a beautiful woman, the hero who loves her and the evil prince who wants to marry her. The Kannapolis Regulators will run a cornhole tournament prior to the movie. Sign-in starts at 6 p.m. and games being at 6:30 p.m. The entry fee is $5.

To register or learn more, call 980-521-6957. Blankets, lawn chairs and picnics are permitted at Village Park, 700 West C St., but pets, alcohol, grilling and glass bottles are forbidden. In other live entertainment this week in Kannapolis, Thursdays on Main are back with the Acoustic Supershow featuring Joey, Johnny & Kenny from Superglide. The show begins at 11:30 a.m. Thursday under the oak trees at Veterans Park, the corner of Main Street and First Avenue in downtown Kannapolis. Lunch is available for purchase from Restaurant 46.

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Express your love and gratitude with a greeting in our special Father’s Day section. Please send this ad with your greeting and check payable to:

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To place your greeting by phone, please call 704-797-4220, Mon.-Fri. 8 AM-5 PM. Photos and text may be emailed to classads@salisburypost.com Text only may be faxed to 704-630-0157

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Deadline for submission is Wednesday, June 16, 2010 What A Dad will appear in the Post on Sunday, June 20, 2010!

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S TAT E

6A • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2010

SALISBURY POST

N.C. Democrats complain about petition drive tactics Whalen said the party would e-mail Democrats advising them that they can call county election offices and ask that their signatures be removed. “We are trying to make sure that people are being honest with the registered voters of the 8th District,” Whalen said in an interview. North Carolina First is being funded by the Service Employees International Union and its local, the State Employees Association of North Carolina. It must turn in petitions to county election board offices in the 8th District by Thursday in order to so the signatures could be verified. The group needs nearly 17,000 verified signatures from registered voters so Wendell Fant, who used to work in Kissell’s office, can run if he chooses. North Carolina First Chairman Chuck Stone said in an

interview there’s “been no distortion in informing people of why we’re trying to create a third party and put another candidate on the ballot.” He called it typical of the two major parties to try to discredit those who would try to give voters more options. The group is unhappy with Kissell’s voting record, particularly his opposition to the Democatic-penned health care legislation approved by Congress and signed by President Obama. Kissell defeated GOP incumbent Robin Hayes in 2008. “Apparently Larry Kissell and the Democratic Party will do or say anything to keep voters from having another choice in the district,” North Carolina First spokesman Greg Rideout added. North Carolina First was unsuccessful in obtaining the more than 85,000 signatures it needed to become an offi-

cial new political party in North Carolina this year so it could field candidates in at least two other congressional races. The group decided instead to focus on collecting signatures to help Fant become a candidate in the 8th District against Kissell; a Republican challenger yet to be decided; and Libertarian Thomas Hill. Stone said he expected the group will turn in a number of signatures this week that would exceed the threshold for an independent candidate. Democrats were worried about a third party’s ability to cut into votes for incumbents, which could lead to Republicans winning seats. The union groups have “failed in their effort to create a new party and are now continuing to waste their member’s hard-earned dues in this foolhardy and shortsighted attempt to place a

candidate on the November ballot,” Whalen said in a news release. The barrage between the unions and the party is surprising because SEIU gave more than $1 million to the state Democratic Party for

the 2008 elections, and the State Employees Association’s political arm generally has supported Democratic candidates. The association did endorse Republican gubernatorial candidate Patrick Ballantine in 2004.

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RALEIGH (AP) — A fight between the state Democratic Party and a union over a swing congressional district got tougher Tuesday as party officials accused a group trying to qualify an independent candidate of misleading voters into signing petitions before a key deadline. Party leaders contend voters in the 8th Congressional District that paid representatives of the group North Carolina First aren’t explaining when they go door-to-door that they’re trying to put another candidate on the ballot to challenge Democrat incumbent Larry Kissell. Instead, they’ve been saying the petition is for “better jobs,” according to Andrew Whalen, the party’s executive director, citing media reports and phone calls from Democrats in the district who have received knocks on their doors.

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Liquor law changes approved by House panel J.A. FISHER RALEIGH (AP) — Local ABC boards would have to meet financial and customer service standards in its liquor sales or they could face closure, and all its members would be subject to a gift ban and other ethics rules in legislation approved Tuesday by a state House panel. The bill that left the House’s Alcoholic Beverage Control Committee went beyond the recommendations of a special study commission completed last month before the session began. The state ABC Commission also would receive more power to monitor the activities of the local, largely independent boards that sell liquor in cities or counties. The study commission examined the ABC rules following news reports about the high salaries of local board administrators and meals paid for by liquor companies to local ABC leaders. Gov. Beverly Perdue had sought changes, too. “It puts the ABC Commission in a new role in providing more direct oversight and setting performance standards,” said state commission Chair-

man Jon Williams. a Perdue appointee. “All told, it looks like that we will emerge with a much stronger, more reliable ABC system and the public will have more assurance these public enterprises are run with the high ethical standards that the public deserves.” North Carolina is among 18 “control” states where government directly controls wholesale and retail liquor distribution, but it’s the only one where local ABC boards sell the spirits and essentially run their own operations. The measure went beyond the study commission’s recommendations to require the state’s nearly 170 local ABC boards to create their own ethics codes. It also would prohibit local board members from accepting gifts from contractors doing business with their panel or stores and to avoid conflicts of interest that could financially benefit themselves or family members. Each local board would be subject to performance standards set by the state ABC Commission, including store operating efficiency, solven-

cy and customer service and enforcement of the alcohol laws. Lawmakers avoided the word “profitability” although some poorly performing stores don’t make money. Other lawmakers and advocates of the current system argue the purpose of the nearly 75year-old ABC system and its more than 400 stores is to control liquor sales, not to make a profit. The state ABC Commission could close stores or force a local board to merge with one nearby if standards aren’t met, but the local board could have up to 20 months to fix the problems. An amendment offered by Rep. Pryor Gibson, D-Anson, raised that period of time from 12 months. “On balance, having more time is a very important part of the proposal,” said Jon Carr, lobbyist for the North Carolina Association of ABC Boards. “We’d ask for time to improve.” Rep. Edgar Starnes, RCaldwell, said 12 months was already enough time: “If you don’t meet your performance standards, there needs to be a consequence.” The measure, which now

A R O U N D T H E S TAT E Tests negative for envelope found at state Capitol

odor, which might have sickened employees. Immigration officials say operations were back to norRALEIGH (AP) — More mal by Tuesday afternoon. state lab tests show the white powder found in an envelope Former N.C. gov opened in North Carolina’s old Capitol building this week is- takes leave from n’t hazardous. Va-based law firm The Department of Crime RALEIGH (AP) — Former Control and Public Safety confirmed on Tuesday additional North Carolina Gov. Mike tests performed on the pow- Easley has taken a leave of abdery substance showed no sence from the law firm he signs of things like anthrax, joined before investigations surrounding him surfaced. toxins and viruses. William Allcott with the An assistant for Gov. Beverly Perdue’s chief of staff McGuire Woods firm in Viropened the envelope Monday ginia confirmed Tuesday that afternoon, leading to an evac- Easley took leave several uation. The building houses of- weeks ago but didn’t say why. fices for Perdue and others and An attorney for Easley didn’t the old House and Senate respond to a request for comment. chambers. The News & Observer of While employees returned to work Tuesday, the 170-year- Raleigh first reported the deold building in Raleigh re- parture. Easley and two ex-aides mained closed to the public but joined the firm in Raleigh afshould reopen Wednesday. The State Capitol Police and ter the Democrat left office in the FBI are investigating. The early 2009. One of the three — envelope was addressed to the Ruffin Poole — no longer state Capitol and contained a works at the firm. He pleaded guilty earlier this year to fedletter inside. eral tax evasion. Federal prosecutors have Suspicious parcel sought information about sickens 3 transactions around Easley immigration workers and his associates. Easley hasn’t been charged with any DURHAM (AP) — Three crimes. employees say they felt sick after a strange envelope with Workers rally an oily residue was delivered to a federal immigration office at Legislature in North Carolina. against layoffs WRAL-TV reports that RALEIGH (AP) — North Durham police evacuated the U.S. Bureau of Citizen and Im- Carolina state employees have migration Service office on gathered to oppose a pending Tuesday after employees re- state budget that threatens ported nausea and irritated some jobs and freezes pay and benefits. eyes. Hundreds of blue-shirted Three workers were taken to a local hospital as a precau- members of the State Employtion. Initial tests on the enve- ees Association of North Carlope did not find hazardous olina rallied on Tuesday in Raleigh. The association says chemicals. It’s been sent to the state Di- its 55,000 members want lawvision of Public Health for makers to approve a budget friendlier to working families. more tests. Kim Stewart of Franklin Durham Police Captain D.C. Allen says the envelope had an County says the budget cuts

mean she’s facing layoff after more than 28 years of work and just over a year before retirement. Stewart’s work as a vocational rehabilitation specialist keeps people like Mildred Bartley-Fox of Rocky Mount out of nursing homes. BartleyFox is a multiple sclerosis victim who also spoke against the budget cuts.

Troops celebrate Army birthday with run FORT BRAGG (AP) — North Carolina-based soldiers joined in the celebration of the Army’s 235th birthday with a four-mile run and some cake. The Fayetteville Observer reports that Tuesday’s run was sponsored by the 18th Airborne Corps, stationed at Fort Bragg. An estimated 8,000 soldiers participated. Post commander Lt. Gen. Frank Helmick set the pace during the run and led the pack. After he finished, he climbed onto a reviewing stand and cheered on the runners who had followed him.

Inmate in 1985 child death faces new charge RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — A man imprisoned for sexually assaulting and killing an 8year-old girl in North Carolina 25 years ago is being charged with the death of a 7year-old girl. Multiple media outlets reported that George Richard Fisher was arrested Tuesday in the 1984 death of Carrie Wilkerson. The girl was discovered strangled and sexually assaulted in a burning mobile home in Carrboro. Police have linked Fisher to the case using DNA evidence that was not available during the original investigation. Fisher is serving life in prison for the 1985 killing and attempted rape of 8-year-old Jean Fewel in Chapel Hill.

goes to another House committee, would require local boards to follow the same rules local governments do in carrying out their annual budgets, including making their spending proposals public records. Local boards also would have to hold a public hearing before it can be adopted. The bill also would: — limit the compensation of local ABC general managers to the pay that local Clerks of Superior Court receive, up to $112,607 in the most populous counties. But pay can go higher if a county commission or town council approves it. — prohibit an employee from having direct supervision over a family member in a local ABC board. The two changes are in response to reports that the father-and-son store administrators in New Hanover County received more than $400,000 in combined compensation.

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FOOD

WEDNESDAY

June 9, 2010

SALISBURY POST

Katie Scarvey, Lifestyle Editor, 704-797-4270 kscarvey@salisburypost.com

7A

www.salisburypost.com

WHERE THERE’S SMOKE, THERE’S FATHER Father’s Day is occasion to light the torch, pass it on BY GRETCHEN MCKAY Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

I don’t know about you, but I sort of freak out when something I’m grilling catches fire and dinner, quite literally, goes up in a plume of black smoke. But my husband? No barbecue flame is ever too big, too hot or too scary for him to manage. Call it a guy thing. Since the first prehistoric man discovered that woolly mammoth tasted a heck of a lot better roasted than bloody and raw, men have been cooking over fire and loving every sizzling, potentially dangerous minute of it. “It’s primal,” my husband, a grillmeister if there ever was one, tells me. “We see a fire and get the urge to throw something big and juicy on it.” And if that “something” accidentally ignites? That’s why they invented squirt bottles, 18-inch tongs and insulated oven mitts, dummy! In the kitchen, notes Bob Sloan, author of “Dad’s Awesome Grilling Book,” it always feels as though something could go wrong. The pace is a bit more frenetic, there’s more margin for error and the end product (even if it’s delicious) is naturally compared with Mom’s version. “No matter how hard I try, whatever I make is either ‘not as good as Mom’s’ or ‘just as good as Mom’s,’ “he writes. “Either way, I’m deep in her gastronomic shadow.” But the grill? That’s a man’s special domain, his oasis from the vicissitudes of being a dad, Sloan says. Other than the lid and the burner knobs, there’s not a whole lot of moving parts on a grill, he says, so men feel more in control — of the heat, of the food, of their culinary abilities. They appreciate the simplicity of grill cooking. “Ultimately, it’s Step A and then Step A again,” Sloan says in a phone interview. Men also get to be outside while grilling. With that in mind, it’s completely understandable why dads all across the country will be firing up the grill in celebration of Father’s Day on June 20. And why Mom will be hovering happily in the background. His day, his say, his way. “What’s the joke ... where there’s smoke, there’s father?” quips Sloan. Most likely, legions of sons also will be watching and learning, so when the time comes for the ceremonial passing of the tongs, they’ll be ready. Not that that’s a problem, as grilling has come a long way from its humble roots in the past few years. When Sloan was a kid, for instance, homemade sauces still were fairly unheard of, and the Asian section at the grocery store consisted of soy sauce, water chestnuts and baby corn. So the Chinese-style, sweet-andsour steaks his father cooked were — well, he can’t really say if they were good or not. “But it was fun and he was deft on the grill.” Today? More dads than ever are trying their hand at new techniques — plank grilling and smoking are increasingly popular — and they’re stretching beyond the traditional burgers, steaks and brats. That’s part of the reason Sloan, who worked as a caterer for many years in Manhattan, cooked up this sixth cookbook: to encourage them to further expand their repertoire with some easy yet incredibly tasty recipes, all written in a language that Dad can understand (with honesty, brevity and humor). Consider his recipe for barbecued leg of lamb, which marries the smoky heat of chipotle chilies with garlic, tomatillo and cinnamon. Many guys might say, “What’s ‘butterflied’ mean?” or better yet, “What’s a leg of lamb?” Yet show ‘em how that particular piece of meat is no different from a cut of beef, he says, and the mystery is gone. (In case you’re wondering, ‘butterflied’ means to cut open and spread flat.) “In a way, it’s like a giant hamburger. You’re cooking it the same way,” says Sloan. The following recipes were all tested by the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

METRO CREATIVE CONNECTION

On Father’s Day, dads can usually be found behind the grill. More dads than ever are trying their hand at new grilling techniques.

Stir-grilled coconut shrimp

Honey-glazed spareribs

Stir-frying on the grill is easier than you might think. You just have to remember to drain the excess marinade before you place the wok on the grates.

These sticky-sweet ribs are precooked, so they only require a short time on the grill. Be sure to use tongs instead of a fork to turn them or you’ll release the precious juices from the meat.

2 green onions, thinly sliced on the diagonal 11⁄ 2 C. coconut milk 1 Tbsp. finely minced jalapeno pepper 1 Tbsp. finely minced serrano pepper Grated zest and juice of 1 lime 1 pound large shrimp, peeled and deveined 1 ⁄2 C. unsweetened shredded coconut 1 C. black or jasmine rice, cooked Special equipment: 12-inch metal grill wok or basket with perforations Prepare marinade by whisking together green onions, coconut milk, jalapeno, serrano, lime zest and lime juice. Rinse shrimp under cold running water and pat dry. Place shrimp in a large sealable plastic bag and pour in 3/4 of the marinade. Seal, toss to coat and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes or up to 8 hours, tossing occasionally. Cover and refrigerate the remaining marinade until ready to use. Meanwhile, prepare a medium-hot fire in your grill. Place grill wok over the kitchen sink and pour in shrimp mixture, draining the marinade. Sprinkle shrimp with coconut. Set wok on baking sheet and carry out to grill. Place wok on grill. Grill, tossing with long-handled wooden spatulas every 3 to 4 minutes, for 12 to 15 minutes, or until shrimp are pink and opaque. Toss rice with the reserved marinade and serve with the shrimp. Serves 8 as an appetizer or 2 to 3 as an entree. — “300 Big & Bold Barbecue & Grilling Recipes” by Karen Adler and Judith Fertig

1 1

⁄ 2 C. white wine ⁄ 2 C. soy sauce

1 bunch scallions, green parts only, finely chopped 3 Tbsp. finely chopped fresh ginger 8 cloves garlic, coarsely chopped 6 Tbsp. brown sugar 1 Tbsp. Chinese five-spice powder Pinch ground cayenne pepper 3 to 4 pounds spareribs (about 2 slabs) cut into individual ribs Honey glaze (see following recipe) Preheat oven to 350 degrees. In a large bowl, combine the wine, soy sauce, scallions, ginger, garlic, brown sugar, five-spice powder and cayenne. Place the ribs in the bowl with the wine mixture, tossing them gently so they are all coated evenly. Transfer the ribs and liquid to a baking pan, cover with foil and bake in the center of oven for 1 hour. Let ribs cool, then transfer them to a plastic container and refrigerate for up to 2 days. To finish ribs on the grill, prepare enough coals for a medium-hot charcoal fire, or preheat gas grill on medium-high for 10 minutes with the lid closed. When coals are ready or gas grill is hot, grill the ribs until heated through, about 15 minutes, turning and mopping them several times with the Honey Glaze so they are nicely coated. Serve immediately with a lot of napkins. Serves 4. — “Dad’s Awesome Grilling Book” by Bob Sloan

Honey glaze

⁄3 C. honey ⁄2 C. fresh orange juice 1 ⁄4 C. fresh lemon juice 2 1

3 Tbsp. soy sauce 2 Tbsp. Dijon-style mustard 1 Tbsp. sesame oil 1 tsp. curry powder 1 tsp. ground ginger

In a medium bowl, stir together all ingredients. Set aside until ready to use, or refrigerate, covered, for up to 1 week. Let the glaze come to room temperature before using. Makes about 2 cups. — “Dad’s Awesome Grilling Book” by Bob Sloan

Amber cayenne-citrus marinade Dad probably loves to drink it, so why not use beer in your cooking, too? This easy marinade can be used on beef or lamb. 2 12-ounce bottles amber ale 1 Tbsp. red wine vinegar 2 Tbsp. fresh orange juice 1 tsp.grated orange zest 1 ⁄2 C. canola oil 1 Tbsp. grated horseradish 1 ⁄2 C. minced onion 2 Tbsp. minced garlic 2 tsp. salt 1 tsp. cayenne pepper (or more, to taste) Mix all ingredients together in a blender, pureeing until onions and garlic are liquefied. Reserve 1 cup for basting, and use remainder as a marinade for beef or lamb (shoulder or leg cut). Marinate meat for at least 2 hours for best flavor. Makes about 2 cups of marinade. — Grillingwithbeer.com Gretchen McKay can be reached at gmckay@post-gazette.com.

Profile: Meet longtime Farmers Market vendor Duard Cress BY SUE DAVIS

For the Salisbury Post

Cress Farm has been part of the Salisbury-Rowan Farmers Market since its beginning. When I asked Duard what keeps bringing him back to the market each year, he said, “People.” At 89, Duard still keeps beef cattle, grows a variety of popular local vegetables and cut-to-order lumber. His favorite crop is tomatoes. If you want to see Duard’s face light up, mention birds, fishing or baseball. Birds, like the one nesting in one of his chocolate cherry tomato plants or the hummingbirds outside his back door, make him smile. He takes time every day to enjoy the birds. He loves to saltwater fish, but does not find time to fish often. And mention South Rowan American Legion baseball, which has supported since it began, and he’ll tell you about the most recent games and the team’s standings. Duard always has a good story to tell. His

daughter, Mary, looks after customers while the story gets told.

Local corn available Local corn, green beans, hot peppers and okra are available this week. Last Saturday morning Miller Farms brought two small loads of corn; it didn’t last very long. This week corn should be available from several vendors. Cress Farms may have a few baskets of blueberries. Correll Farm has fresh local garlic. Try it in your favorite tomato sauce or as an addition to any of the varieties of summer squash available throughout the market. Wild Turkey Farms has fresh pepperoni made from their pasture-fed meats. Their sausage offerings are very tasty. If pepperoni sounds interesting, ask for a sample. The Bread Basket has a very rich and moist Oatmeal Apple Bread with a nice natural sweetness. Emma Ruth developed the recipe for us to enjoy.

She is now making fresh hamburger rolls. The idea of a freshly baked roll, holding a hamburger made with locally grown beef and a slice of local tomato is too good to pass up. T&D Beef has added chicken to their offerings. The pasture raised chickens have a lot of flavor. You can buy a whole uncut chicken or leg and breast quarters. Stop by the Farmers Market booth and learn how to make a credit card or debit card purchases at the market. Farmers Market manager Harry Agner will also be able to help you with using Food Stamps, WIC and Senior Vouchers. For more information about the Farmers Market visit www.salisburyfarmersmarket.c om. The Farmers Market is located in downtown Salisbury at the corner of South Main and Bank streets. Visit the Farmers DARRELL BLACKWELDER/FOR THE SALISBURY POST Market on Wednesdays from 7 Duard Cress welcomes customers at the Farmers Market. a.m. until 1 p.m. and Saturdays from 7 a.m. until noon.


COLUMNS

8A • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2010

SALISBURY POST

Ask Amy: You need a degree to handle all these situations

Quick tricks add up to kitchen savings If you ever have loaded up on groceries one day only to wonder where all the food went the next, you might be ripe to learn easy ways to make food go further. Today’s collection of great reader tips will do just that, while they make you smile. MARY • Precious HUNT peaches. We bought a case of peaches. After assembling six pies, we still had plenty left over, so I blanched them to remove the skins. Then I dipped them in limeade to keep them from turning brown. I froze them for later use. The combination of the lime and peach flavors is really tasty. — Zoe, e-mail

• Secret sauce. My wife can’t tolerate artificial sweeteners, but sugar dissolves slowly in iced drinks. Instead, I make her a batch of simple syrup that she can add to her

tea as needed. I heat 1 cup each of water and sugar in a saucepan until the sugar dissolves. When the solution has cooled, I put it in a squeeze bottle. — James S., e-mail

• Selective scooping. Instead of purchasing a mango cutter, I found that using my grapefruit knife works perfectly. The gentle curve of the blade hugs the seed without slicing into it, maximizing the amount of mango that actually remains on the skin. We also use the grapefruit spoon to scoop out every delicious bite! — Joni,

silks are easier to remove after they’ve been microwaved. — Wendy, e-mail

• Ground gratification. I pride myself on being a savvy shopper, and I found the best deal yet. This week, my local supermarket had boneless chuck on sale for $1.59 a pound. At the meat counter, I asked the butcher to grind two packages for me. My quality ground beef ended up costing $2 less per pound than the regular price of ground beef. Most butchers gladly will grind meat for you when it is on sale. — Dick, New Hampshire

Texas

• Corn creativity. I have a tip that saves time, electricity and heat in summertime cooking. Instead of boiling fresh corn, I stick the entire husk in the microwave to cook it. I cook four ears for four minutes. Then I flip them and cook for another four minutes. They cook in their own steam and come out perfectly. Plus, the husks and

• Simple seasoning. I make my own all-purpose seasoning with this combination of spices: 1 part salt, 1 part pepper, 1 part garlic powder. I’ve found this mixture works well with almost any food. — Margie, California

• Veggie delight. I love grilled zucchini and yellow summer squash. I wash

them and slice them without peeling them. Then I put them in a bowl with just enough olive oil to coat. I add a dash of salt and pepper and some shakes of Italian seasoning and stir. After a few minutes on the grill, they are ready to eat. I use a grill pan that has openings of squares or circles rather than horizontal slits so they don’t fall through. — Naomi L., e-mail

Would you like to send a tip to Mary? You can e-mail her at mary@everydaycheapskate.com, or write to Everyday Cheapskate, P.O. Box 2135, Paramount, CA 90723. Include your first and last name and state. Mary Hunt is the founder of www.DebtProofLiving.com and author of 18 books, including “Debt-Proof Living” and “Tiptionary 2.” To find out more about Mary and read her past columns, please visit the Creators Syndicate website at www.creators.com. CREATORS.COM

Largest festival of disabled artists opens in D.C. WASHINGTON (AP) — Jesse Higman’s paintbrush isn’t a brush at all. With limited mobility in his hands because of a car crash 27 years ago, this Seattle-based artist created a method all his own. To control his colors, Higman built intricate tables with weights that bend his wooden canvas. Then he carefully pours pigment and water on the surface and watches them swirl to a small hole. The paint is like light being sucked into a black hole in space, he said. Left behind is a design he calls “Bone Orchid.” “I think of it like I’m playing with nature on this tabletop,” said Higman, 42, who has been in a wheelchair since age 15. His table and the painting went on display Tuesday at the Smithsonian Institution as part of the world’s largest festival of artists with disabilities. While Higman had wanted to focus more on fine art after working for years in the music industry, the idea of joining the 2010 International VSA Festival in Washington gave him pause: Would he gain a permanent label as a disabled artist? How would he be perceived? But he decided to go with it.

“It’s a legitimate art show, which I was a little bit skeptical of at first,” Higman said. “I wondered if it was going to be to champion people with disabilities, to give them a pat on the back.” Instead, he found dozens of pieces of vibrant, interesting art. The festival, hosted by the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts at sites across the nation’s capital, runs through June 12 and features many free daily performances, films and visual arts. A juried exhibit, “Revealing Culture,” that includes Higman’s work among 130 pieces at the Smithsonian will remain on view through Aug. 29. Renowned glass artist Dale Chihuly contributed a large-scale installation. Performances will feature singer Patti LaBelle, as well as Josh Blue, who won season four of “Last Comic Standing.” Organizers brought in more than 600 artists, performers and educators from around the world, including students from every state who competed to have their work shown at Washington’s Union Station. Taylor Bernard, 8, of Richmond, Va., who has cerebral palsy, was among

the winners selected from 5,500 entries for her watercolor painting, inspired by the sunset at her grandmother’s Virginia Beach home. She was with big company Tuesday as Jean Kennedy Smith, the last living sibling of President John F. Kennedy, met the students as their artwork went on view. “We’re big believers that the arts are for everybody,” said Smith, who founded VSA (formerly Very Special Arts) in 1974. The festival was timed to coincide with the 20th anniversary of the Americans With Disabilities Act. The exhibits are designed to be more accessible to disabled audiences than ever before. They include touchable examples of artworks, audio descriptions and labels written with Braille, curator Stephanie Moore said. One installation, “Sight Unseen,” is the first major exhibit of the most-accomplished photographers with visual impairments. One section includes images with raised ink to allow blind visitors to feel the shape and dimension of the photograph. Another exhibit features the work of Judith Scott, who was kept in an institution for 35 years with Down syn-

drome but began creating sculptures from yarn, paper towels and other simple materials almost constantly for 18 years once she was released to her sister’s custody. “What I really want people to see is that, indeed, artists with disabilities play a major role in the arts community,” said Kennedy Center President Michael Kaiser. “It is crucial that we not disenfranchise that segment of our population.”

Dear Amy: I received an announcement for a friend’s daughter’s graduation from college. There is a statement at the bottom that, unfortunately, there wouldn’t be tickets available. Included with the invite was a self-addressed, stamped envelope. I had no intention sending this young person a gift and felt that this was a blatant solicitation. What do you think? — Wondering Dear Wondering: If this graduation event is already oversubscribed and there is

no RSVP required, I can’t figure out what the self-addressed, stamped envelope is for, unless it is the blatant gift solicitation you suggest. Because that concept is too awful to contemplate, you should assume it is the result of an envelope-stuffing error. All the same, it’s a shame to waste a stamp these days. Perhaps you could write a note to the graduate, congratulating her on her achievement, pop it in the supplied envelope and set it free. Send questions via e-mail to askamy@tribune.com or by mail to Ask Amy, Chicago Tribune, TT500, 435 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, IL 60611. Amy Dickinson’s memoir, “The Mighty Queens of Freeville: A Mother, a Daughter and the Town that Raised Them” (Hyperion), is available in bookstores. TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES

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Dear Confused: Your sister kicked you out of her life. But that doesn’t mean you have to kick her out of yours. You can’t control her choices or behavior. You can only make your own choices, based on what you want. Because you love her children and want to try to stay in their lives, you should invite them to this event. Because your sister is their mother and most likely controls their transportation and social calendar, you should include her too. If she attends this event to try to stay close to your son, then good for her. This might be the beginning of a

reconciliation. Don’t worry about drama. It takes at least two people to pitch a good drama. If you decide ahead of time to be cordial, kind and focused on the celebration, your sister’s attempts at theatrics won’t find an audience.

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son’s special day! How should I handle this and similar situations in the future? It makes even sending a Christmas card complicated! — Confused Sis

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Dear Amy: I come from a

family of seven children. About six months ago, my sister “Janet” kicked four of her siblings, including me, out of her life. Janet has two children, ages 15 and 18, whom I love dearly. This summer I’m having a graduation party for my son and don’t know what to do about inviting my niece and nephew. Do I send an invitation with just their names on it? Or should I invite my sister as well, since she still seems to want to have a relationship with my children? My son is fine with however I want to handle it, but I really can’t decide what to do. This party will be held at another sister’s house (whom Janet also kicked out of her life) and she is fine with whatever I do. I don’t want drama on my

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Dear Confused: Don’t look for a specific protocol to cover every situation. Depending on the occasion

and your relationship to the person celebrating the occasion, you and your husband will want to give a gift and sign the card “From Aunt Bitsy and Uncle Bob and all your ‘Smith’ cousins.” Sometimes you’ll include your offspring, and sometimes you won’t. Your children can then separately choose to congratulate the person in their own way. I’d think that a 27-yearold would get a little embarrassed by having mom and dad handle all of life’s occasions on her behalf. You don’t describe your daughter’s situation, but if she’s able she should give her cousin a small gift. This doesn’t have to be monetary; a card and a favorite book, a CD or a copy of the classic movie “The Graduate” would be appropriate.

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Dear Amy: My husband and I are attending a graduation party for my nephew. My daughter, who is 27, is still living with us. She is also going to this party. Is she obligated to give a separate monetary gift to her cousin? At what time in our ASK life should we AMY stop including our children as part of “our” gift? I also have a son living with us who just graduated from college and another son who lives elsewhere. — Confused

Unclaimed Photos If you have submitted photos to the Salisbury Post of loved ones for Birthdays, Engagements, Anniversaries, Weddings, Obituaries, etc., and the photos were not picked up, please do so. All unclaimed photos will be discarded June 30th, 2010. Thank you! S45584

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SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Gary Coleman’s will names a friend and former manager as executor of the late child star’s estate and specifies that he wanted to be cremated. The will was filed Tuesday in 4th District Court in Provo, where the 42-year-old Coleman died May 28 after suffering a brain hemorrhage. Coleman appointed friend Dion Mial as his executor. Coleman says in the 1999 will that he wanted to be remembered in a wake conducted by people who had no financial ties to the star of the sitcom “Diff’rent Strokes.” The will was written years

before Coleman met Shannon Price on a movie set in 2006. The couple married in 2007 and divorced in 2008. A representative says Price believes she has a claim to the estate and planned to meet with her lawyer Tuesday. Although the couple was divorced, they still lived together in Santaquin, about 55 miles south of Salt Lake City. It was Price — who was named in an advanced health care directive — who ordered that Coleman be taken off of life support. Price referred to Coleman as her husband when she called 911, saying Coleman

had fallen and was bleeding severely from the back of his head. Coleman was still conscious when he was taken to a hospital in Provo, but slipped into unconsciousness the next day and was placed on life support for a day. Coleman starred for eight seasons on the sitcom “Diff’rent Strokes,” starting in 1978. The tiny 10-year-old’s “Whachu talkin’ ’bout?” became a catch phrase in the show about two AfricanAmerican brothers adopted by a wealthy white man. He played Arnold Jackson, the younger of the two brothers.

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Gary Coleman’s 1999 will filed in Utah court


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SALISBURY POST

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2010 • 9A

Officials: Fishermen caught mustard gas off N.Y. BOSTON (AP) — State and federal officials worked Tuesday to decontaminate a clam boat anchored in isolation off Massachusetts after it dredged up old munitions containing mustard gas, severely sickening a crewman. The Coast Guard was trying to locate the two military shells, which the crew tossed overboard in about 60 feet of water about 45 miles south of Long Island, said Coast Guard Petty Officer James Rhodes. He acknowledged finding the shells will be difficult. The military used the ocean as a dumping ground for munitions from after World War II through 1970. While the tons of old chemical weapons in offshore waters present a danger to fishermen, experts don’t believe they are a possible source of weapons for terrorists. The Atlantic City, N.J.based vessel was fishing Sunday in a charted munitions dumping zone, but the designation is just a warning and carries no fishing restrictions, Rhodes said. The two shells — about a foot long and three inches in diameter — came aboard in a haul of clams. The Coast Guard believes one of the shells cracked or otherwise leaked its contents. On Tuesday, a National Guard team boarded the vessel, the ESS Pursuit, to test for contamination, while the Coast Guard worked to secure the ship in waters off New Bedford so that it can be moored and decontaminated. The captain and first mate have declined to leave the

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The ESS Pursuit is tied up about a half-mile off Fort Taber to undergo inspection from the Coast Guard in New Bedford, Mass. The U.S. Coast Guard says a Massachusetts-based fishing boat dredging for clams off New York pulled up 10 canisters, including one that broke open and caused two crew members to experience blistering and difficulty breathing. 145-foot dragger, fearing it could run aground, the Coast Guard said. The boat had returned to New Bedford early Monday after one of its six crewmen, Konstantin Burndshov, reported blistering and shortness of breath. Hours later, another crewman was brought ashore after he reported feeling lightheaded. He was examined and released. Two other crewmen left the boat late Monday, with one reporting nose and eye irritation. Burndshov had painful

blisters about three-quarters of an inch high on an arm and a leg, said Dr. Edward Boyer, a toxicologist who is treating the man at UMass Memorial Medical Center in Worcester. Boyer suspected exposure to mustard gas, used most frequently during World War I, given Burndshov’s telltale symptoms: blistering and the onset of his symptoms about 24 hours after exposure. On Monday night, blood and urine tests confirmed the diagnosis. Boyer said even though Burndshov was wearing protective clothing, in-

cluding oil skins and elbowlength gloves, the mustard gas still penetrated to his skin. “It literally pulls the top of the skin off the layer underneath it,” Boyer said. The doctor said Burndshov was “handling it very well,” and Burndshov was listed in good condition at UMass Memorial. The Defense Department began using the ocean as a dumping ground for chemical and conventional munitions after World War II. The military says it stopped in

1970, and two years later Congress banned waste disposal in oceans, including chemical weapons. Officials say it’s impossible to know exactly how much and what type of weapons have been dumped in the ocean because of incomplete records. A 2001 Army report found 74 past instances of ocean disposal — 32 off U.S. shores and 42 off foreign coasts. For example, in 1967 the Army dumped 4,577 one-ton containers of a mustard agent and 7,380 sarin rockets off the New Jersey shore, according to Army records. Only some of the ocean dumps were mapped, and chemical munitions have been found in areas they weren’t supposed to have been dumped, such as just a few miles off Hawaii, said Craig Williams of the Chemical Weapons Working Group, a Kentucky-based organization. In 1976, a fisherman in Hawaii was burned after bringing up a mortar round filled with mustard gas. A mustard gas-filled artillery shell was found in Delaware in 2004 after it was dredged up by a clam boat off New Jersey and remained intact after being sent through a crusher that was making clamshell driveway fill. Three bomb disposal experts were injured dismantling it. Mustard gas, also called sulphur mustard, is usually not a gas at all, but a thick, odorless and colorless liquid that turns solid in temperatures over 58 degrees. It

looks brown when mi