Page 1

Spring 2017

3

the industrious issue Our academics discuss the nature of Industrial Revolutions • Motivation Terminal Velocity • Hidden Labour ...and much more


The barriers are not erected which can say to aspiring talents and industry ‘Thus far and no farther.’ Ludwig von Beethoven Composer


Salford Business School

This third “industrious” issue represents a significant development for Ignited and Salford Business School. In this issue we welcome our first external contributor, Tom Cheesewright; our first contributor from another School, Robin Brown from the School of Arts and Media; and our first student contribution in the form of the inside centre-spread by Jack Preston, a student on the Graphic Design programme. Alongside these contributions, our Business School colleagues highlight the range of ideas and concepts that we work with every day. The theme of “industrious” not only reflects the hard work that underpins the success of our students and our academics; it also signals the proud links we have to industry. The variety of topics and interests emphasises our commitment to making the knowledge that we produce within Salford Business School and the University accessible to a wide audience. I would like to thank all those who have contributed to the magazine. As the School continues to develop new industry collaborations and to work with thought leaders from the North West and around the world, we also take on the role of intermediary. Translating the results of complex and sophisticated research into useful practice is something in which we excel at the University of Salford. By bringing the latest research to the businesses and other organisations that we regularly work with, we are creating long term, sustainable and positive impact that adds value and creates jobs within the regional and national economy. In fact, research conducted in 2015 identified Salford Business School’s staff and students as contributing an additional £60 million of value to the UK economy and supporting 1165 jobs nationally. This support and impact goes further still. With our undergraduate placements, our postgraduate Business Innovation Projects and our MBA Business Innovation Live Projects, we continuously have students from all levels and programmes out working in industry – in a multitude of sectors – helping to solve real business problems and assisting these businesses to generate value and impact in the economy. This commitment shown by our students alone justifies the label for the School - and for this issue of Ignited - as “industrious”. Professor David Spicer Dean, Salford Business School.


BECOME A LEADER with the Salford MBA

ACHIEVE THE ULTIMATE LEADERSHIP QUALIFICATION The Salford MBA is a fully AMBA-accredited degree that will see you excel at the most senior level. Carefully connected and structured, it’s a chance to nail the latest theory and evolve your practice working on real-world business challenges. To find out more about the MBA: Visit www.salford.ac.uk/business-school Call +44 (0)161 295 2222 Be the difference. Salford Business School.


HIDDEN LABOUR IN THE DIGITAL ECONOMY

CAN INDUSTRIES LEVERAGE BIG DATA?

20

16

THE LEGACY OF GREATER MANCHESTER’S INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION

12

THE FOURTH INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION

WHAT MAKES US INDUSTRIOUS?

06

14

TERMINAL VELOCITY

10

INSIDE OUR INDUSTRIOUS ISSUE

30

FROM STUDENT TO STARTUP

26

THE NEW FRONTIER FOR FOOD SAFETY

OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT, OLYMPICS, FISH & CHIPS

DRIVING AHEAD

THE SALFORD MBA: MEET SAMUEL OTIGBA

23

24

32

A special thanks to Jack Preston, student on the BSc Graphic Design programme, who won the student competition to design the centre spread. Our thanks also to Truth Creative for offering Jack the opportunity to work with them on the production of this magazine.


WHAT MAKES US

INDUSTRIOUS?

The factors that have motivated us for 70 years. It’s widely argued that to keep people working we need to keep them motivated. Understanding the factors that influence and drive that motivation is therefore important and remains a long-standing concern of management practitioners and researchers.

The Industrious Issue

6


Salford Business School

70 YEARS OF MOTIVATION FACTORS 1 = High influencer. 10 = Low influencer.

2016

2010

2007

1992

1980

1946

Good wages

1

4

2

1

5

5

Interesting work

2

1

1

5

1

Job security

3

2

6

3

Promotion and growth

4

5

3

Full appreciation of work completed

5

3

4

MOTIVATIONS

I

’ve been engaged in an ongoing research project looking at the factors that affect and influence motivation. If we look back 70 years, we can identify ten long established factors that research shows are significant in influencing people’s motivation. The table above shows data collected earlier this year from 346 managers and compares this with data going back to 1946 from 146 managers collected in 2010 and 268 in 2007 – as well as historic data reported by Carolyn Wiley in her research paper: Wiley, C. (1997) “What motivates employees according to over 40 years of motivation surveys”, International Journal of Manpower, Vol. 18 Iss: 3, pp.263 - 280

Article

Professor David Spicer Expert in Organisational Behaviour and Dean, Salford Business School.

The Industrious Issue

MOTIVATIONS

2016

2010

2007

1992

1980

1946

Good working conditions

6

9

5

7

7

9

6

Personal or company loyalty to employees

7

6

7

6

8

8

4

4

Feelings of inclusion

8

7

8

9

3

2

4

6

7

Tactful discipline

9

8

9

8

10

10

2

2

1

Sympathetic help with personal problems

10

10

10

10

9

3

What’s interesting to me is the patterns that emerge from this data, what they tell us about how people’s motivational concerns have changed and evolved over time, and what this means for managers seeking to get the most of their employees. The big mover in this new data set is good wages – which returns to the number one spot for the first time since 1992. This might suggest a return to more materialistic concerns but it equally might be indicative of concerns about slow wage growth and the implications this has for people’s spending ability and personal economic health. The importance of good wages is also complicated by the fact that the sample has a significantly larger number of respondents under 30 who have relatively lower salary levels (and hence might reasonably prioritise this). It’s notable that with respondents aged 30 and over good wages ranks second behind interesting work, and that promotion and growth ranks fourth overall – again typically a more significant concern for those who are earlier in their careers. For the sample, as a whole, interesting work ranks second, just behind good wages. In fact these two factors (good wages and interesting work) actually score very closely and whilst the average score for good wages is slightly better there is no discernible statistical difference between this and the score for interesting work. This suggests that across the sample these two are very much in tandem and people’s priorities therefore are having employment that they perceive as worthwhile and an acceptable wage behind this. There is clear guidance for managers that comes from this. If you want to get the most from people in the workplace, ensure that they find their work meaningful and worthwhile and reward it appropriately. Part of that reward is likely to come in the form of opportunities for promotion and growth, especially for those colleagues who are earlier in their careers.

Industrious Insects Honey bees work together for the common good.

Job security is ranked third. This was a significant mover up the rankings in 2010 and remains relatively important today. Its importance is perhaps an indicator of people’s perceptions of the job market and the economy. Job security comes to the fore as an important factor when there are concerns about the security and growth of the economy. Since 2008 we have been dealing with levels of economic uncertainty that are much greater than they were in 2007 or 1992. Slow growth, business closures and limited alternative options for employment all make people more concerned about hanging onto the job that they have. For managers seeking to get the most out of employees this also suggests a clear imperative; effective communications about the company and its prospects, challenges, opportunities and successes are key. These will help direct employees’ efforts, as well as help them understand the prevailing economic conditions and give them confidence in their company’s response to these and thereby support their confidence in the security of their jobs.

7


Full appreciation of work done rounds out the top half of the table. This has been ranked more highly in the past and I have a suspicion that more pressing economically-driven concerns identified overleaf might be crowding this out. Nonetheless, recognition and appreciation remain significant factors influencing motivation. Financial rewards are themselves a form of recognition and people can and do make these links for themselves. Yet, research and experience tells us that these work best when combined with genuine and appreciative recognition. This isn’t necessarily about showy recognition schemes or having an ‘employee of the month’ programme, but can be as simple and straightforward as taking the time to say thank you for a job well done and recognising when people have gone above and beyond. The second half of the table is made up of five factors that are sometimes referred to as ‘hygiene factors’. Fredrick Hertzberg identified these in the 1940s as those factors that do not create job satisfaction but rather those that have the potential to create dissatisfaction when they are not aligned with people’s expectations. This doesn’t mean that managers should ignore these – but rather manage them effectively and ensure that they don’t have a negative impact. Like all the factors in this table, they are individual but these only become significant for the individual when they affect or impact upon them directly. This perhaps explains why ‘sympathetic help with personal problems’ was so high in 1946 (it ranked third). It is not unreasonable to expect that following the end of the Second World War there would have been a significant number of people in the workplace with challenging personal circumstances that necessitated support from their managers and companies.

The Industrious Issue

This isn’t necessarily about showy recognition schemes or having an ‘employee of the month’ programme, but can be as simple and straightforward as taking the time to say thank you for a job well done.

Overall, as interesting as the patterns observed in the data set are, it is what they tell us about how to understand people’s motivation that is really key. Firstly, as indicated overleaf, motivation and ensuring people’s actions and activities are focused on the needs and expectations of the firm ideally requires us to provide interesting and stimulating work aligned with appropriate rewards and recognition. Secondly, the changes in ranks between the surveys suggest that the environment influences motivation. Economic and social conditions and the strength and stability of the firm all affect people’s willingness to expend effort and what they prioritise in return for this. Motivation is therefore contextual and drivers and factors influencing motivation can and do vary over time. Finally, motivation is an individual factor – whilst the rankings show general preferences at different points in time, these vary between individuals; taking time to understand individuals and their drives and motivators is critical if managers are going to get the most out of them. Managers act as the key conduit for the factors identified above, and how a manager behaves is an 11th factor at least as important as the others in influencing employees’ motivation.

Managers act as the key conduit for the factors identified above, and how a manager behaves is an 11th factor at least as important as the others in influencing employees’ motivation. What motives you to be industrious?

#industrious Comment @salfordbizsch on Twitter

8


LEAD AND INSPIRE with our Professional Development’s Executive Education programmes. Our programmes equip future business leaders, executives and managers with the skills and techniques needed to successfully drive their careers forward and lead organisations. Delivered in partnership with the University of Salford’s Business School, we shape future leaders with the practical skills and knowledge to structure and lead their organisations as well as the soft skills to manage and inspire. With an extensive portfolio of programmes ranging from one day courses to comprehensive leadership programmes. We focus on sharpening the specific aspects of a future leader’s toolkit – strategy, finance, shaping culture and leadership behaviours.

To find out more about our programmes: Visit www.salford.ac.uk/onecpdexecutive-education Call +44 (0)161 295 3000

Discover the latest thinking from Salford Business School academics. • F ind out why Gordon Fletcher doesn’t believe the social media bubble will burst. • F ind out how Richard Dron correctly predicted the outcome of the US presidential election. • R  ead Simon Chadwick’s article about Manchester: Global Centre of Sport. To follow our blog visit www.blogs.salford.ac.uk/business-school


THE FOURTH

INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION

Article

Dr Andreas Tsopanikis Lecturer in Finance. The Industrious Issue

10


Salford Business School

Back in the 1990s, the famous author and visionary Jeremy Rifkin underlined the perilous future for workers due to technological innovation.

I

n his book, “The End of Work”, Rifkin provides endless examples of how automation and the introduction of technological improvements made millions of people redundant. The banking and financial services sector has been one of the most heavily affected, ever since that time. Innovation was - and still is - at the core of financial services provision, and the driving force behind the gigantic increase in the value of financial institutions and the financial products provided in the last couple of decades. The financial landscape is changing rapidly, and has been linked to the so-called, ‘Fourth Industrial Revolution’. The Third Industrial Revolution was based around the introduction of computer technology and digital solutions for the needs of customers, proving rather catastrophic for employees in a number of industries. At the same time, the introduction of technology to the finance world came as a necessary boost, allowing banks and all types of financial services firms to innovate. This provided new types of financial products on a much larger scale and at significantly reduced costs. At a time when traditional funding channels could not satisfy the global need for cash and liquidity, financial innovation came into play giving the necessary support for funding countries’ consumption and growth. Firms providing financial services technology solutions became the new ‘El Dorado’ of the financial industry. These firms were inspired by the buoyant value of financial transactions, the bank executives’ demands for innovative solutions and cost cutting technologies, and the ubiquity of internet connectivity. From algorithmic trading to mobile payment solutions, traditional banking was rapidly being replaced by tech start-ups. Online lending solutions are now widely available, as an alternative to traditional bank credit. On top of these trends, data analytics have also come to play their part; the collection of vast amounts of data, from a wide variety of sources (including social media, Google Trends etc), is easier than ever before, transforming the way financial services do business. The personalisation of financial services, according to each customer’s needs and lifestyle, is already here.

The Industrious Issue

The next phenomenon we will see is the impact of the Fourth Industrial Revolution. This is the new major challenge: beyond typical IT and computer automation processes, Artificial Intelligence (AI) and robotics will bring about a major new disruption to the way we bank. PwC identifies ten competitive technology-driven influencers for financial services future and predicts that financial technology will be the major driver of the future business model in banking and finance, while digitisation and robotics will deeply influence the way banking works. Virtual banks, bank branches and operational centres staffed entirely by robots, and personalised investment decision-making by artificially intelligent apps, are just some of the new themes and effects in this market. Kensho is a US analytics start-up, already offering its AI services to Goldman Sachs, who is also a major investor in this company. Based on AI, they expect to replace hundreds of financial analysts, so that investment decisions (and not only trading) can be made by computer-based financial analysis. Another recent study by McKinsey shows that investment banks will soon move to such solutions, since they can save 20% to 30% on their overall cost and, even more importantly, can find ways to offset upcoming regulatory constraints. This is a substantial effect on the badly hit profitability of these investment houses because of the recent Global Financial Crisis.

All these trends clearly show that we are moving towards a new way of banking. In “Bye Bye Banks?”, Haycock and Richmond clearly show that traditional banks are about to be displaced (day-to-day financial transactions will be mostly accomplished by alternative financial start-ups), diminished (as a kind of outdated business model relegated to utilities) and dis-intermediated (banks no longer at the centre of money transfers and payment transactions). In order to cope with this fatal trend for traditional banking, the authors suggest that banks should embrace these digital transformations, invest in financial technology start-ups or partner with them. The future of banking is closely tied with AI and IT technologies. The “rise of the robots” though, as nicely put by Martin Ford, is not positive for the future of employees in this industry. As more and more automation is implemented, the degree of human capital contribution will keep decreasing. Only the future will show whether IT sceptics like Rifkin are correct about the prospects for finance professionals.

Are we ready for a new industrial revolution?

#revolution Comment @salfordbizsch on Twitter

11


N 2 AQ Z A P O N P H ML C A N P I N DU S 2 G 7 H B A KG A E F 7A L E VE RAGEO O P B 2 KN A P L 5 M V 5 4O S 7 O5 3 A X Approximately 90% of all data worldwide has been generated in the last two years.

B

ig Data is a phenomenon that affects every part, process and person as business leaders strive to become successful in their industry. Nowadays, a new world of opportunities and challenges is open to them, and any area that offers great “dares� and vast prospects for supply chain management. So what are the challenges and opportunities of Big Data technology for futures industries?

The Industrious Issue

First of all, industries with Big Data can benefit from improved customer approachability and inventory reduction that will decrease costs and enhance agility. New Big Data tools transform the design of supply chains, whilst industries may face significant challenges with the process itself. The possibility of greater data accessibility is also a precondition for the decrease of (time-related) searching and processing the data. This new Big Data attribute is widely known as velocity and it is often linked with integration and quality improvement. Another characteristic of Big Data velocity is the lifecycle of products, which is increasingly shorter for industries such as automotive and fashion as a result of increased customer demand and greater pressure for individualisation. The supply chain management strategy follows the product life cycle as it adapts dynamically. As the life cycle shortens, the stages change their velocity and become faster. This results in the need for constant adaptation of the supply chain to keep pace with a situation of uncertainty. There is more pressure on companies to meet the demand for their product with adequate supply chains because the opportunity to gain competitive advantage is shortening. All these facts contribute to the pressure on the supply chain.

As consumers’ expectations have grown, the customisation of products has increased rapidly in the last decade. Manufacturers, regardless of industry, are trying to respond to the demand, this in turn increases product variety. For instance, in the United States in just 20 years (1970-1990), the number of shoe styles rose from 5 to almost 300. This process affects the complexity of logistics and the use of forecasting techniques which as a result are now becoming more challenging and less accurate. As the diversity of product rises, costs and lead times rise simultaneously. However, with more data variety, comes greater uncertainty, which in turn affects the supply chain by making it less efficient and unresponsive. Almost all industries now have the opportunity to deal with semi-structured and unstructured data, which comes in complex formats and is difficult to process and analyse.

12


H D 8 A N O A NO 2 O S T R I E SNE B L L F B N 7 A G 7 H 4 GG O B I G L DA T A AA M PP X 2 A 4 7 5 4 O7 N5 Salford Business School

TO IMPROVE SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT?

The next challenge to supply chain management is the dynamic nature of the market. Customers are continuously seeking improvements in areas such as costs, lead times and the performance of the product. If the product or service required is not provided, customers will turn to other suppliers to meet their needs. Also, because of the growing number of demanding customers, the supply chain has to provide greater service in order to achieve sustainability. The need for supply chain management to consider and match product complexity is apparent. Thus, the supply chain should be flexible and highly adaptable in order to meet the higher demand and the increase in customer preferences. This is usually associated with the term value. Nowadays, Big Data offers useful tools for industries to help them cope with increased customer preferences; it is very important for industries to extract the essence and gain value from the large amounts of data they are operating with. This feature can be categorised into two types: analytics and new business models, products and services. The past few decades have seen a significant change in industrial integration. Many companies are becoming less vertically integrated, as many nonkey activities have been handed to third parties. This diversity of owners means there is a variety of purposes and objectives, which contradicts the model of adequate supply chain management with a shared goal. In this scenario, coordinating the supply chain means facing a higher number of challenges and requires more sophisticated management in order not to adversely affect profitability.

The Industrious Issue

The supply chain must adapt in order to fit with the organisation’s strategy, which means that data should always be evaluated against accuracy, certainty and precision. The fourth challenge facing businesses is globalisation. It brings many benefits for businesses today, yet presents complications. Global trade is directly related to a wide range of risks, and industries have to mitigate these risks and secure stability. Business environments are constantly changing, and business managers have come to realise that, in order to adapt to dynamic environments, they must evaluate and appraise their data on a regular basis. This is commonly referred to as veracity. The supply chain must adapt in order to fit with the organisation’s strategy, which means that data should always be evaluated against accuracy, certainty and precision.

Do you believe Big Data is a benefit to business?

All industries should innovate using a wide range of data and tools to take into account the consumer demands for the products or services. There will always be some level of uncertainty in Big Data. The results provided from the analysis of Big Data cannot be proven; however, they can provide a certain level of probability.

Lecturer in Logistics and Supply Chain Management.

#bigdata Comment @salfordbizsch on Twitter

Article

Dr Christos Papanagnou

13


TEN

Printing Cotton created a need for many industries during the Industrial Revolution. White bleached cotton did not appeal to Victorian tastes, and so a large screenprinting industry developed throughout Greater Manchester. This demand, and the skills required to produce printed cottons, also easily translated into other forms of large-scale printing including newspapers.

1

INDUSTRIES

that build on the legacy of Greater Manchester’s Industrial Revolution Manchester is often regarded as the birthplace of the Industrial Revolution. As “Cottonopolis” and “Warehouse City”, Manchester dominated industry in the UK right up to the middle of the 20th Century. However, rather than just being a history lesson, the influence of the Industrial Revolution is still easily found in Manchester today.

Chemicals Transport and Logistics The Manchester Ship Canal and the Manchester to Liverpool passenger train line were just the start of the big infrastructure projects that were designed to get Manchester’s goods out to the rest of the world. Now, Greater Manchester has more motorways than any other UK urban centre, and the ‘Airport City’ project highlights the importance of the region for international freight. Argos, Adidas and Kellogg’s base their distribution hubs in Manchester, and in the near future, ‘Port Salford’ could soon see the return of a major UK port.

4

2

Bleaching cotton and printing it all produced a demand for a variety of industrial chemicals; however, bleach and dye works were major contributors to the pollution of the region’s rivers throughout the Industrial Revolution. The chemical industry still has a (thankfully cleaner!) presence in Greater Manchester, including the UK arm of PZ Cussons – the company behind major brands including Imperial Leather – which is now entirely based in Salford.

3

Banking and Finance As the commercial success of the Industrial Revolution progressed, there was a significant need for banking services and Manchester has been an important financial centre ever since. Sixty different banks are based in Manchester – including forty overseas-owned operations with the region’s finance and insurance sector being worth over £3 billion. Manchester is also home to the Co-operative Group, a major banking and finance company in the UK, and the world’s largest consumer-owned business.

The Industrious Issue

14


Salford Business School

Food

5

Media and Creative Industries

The Industrial Revolution brought a massive influx of population to Greater Manchester, earning the city the label of the world’s first industrial city. This population was multinational and brought many different cultures, including new types of food and drink. The “Curry Mile” in Rusholme is a thriving example of this heritage, and major food producers such as McVitie’s and Kellogg’s are also based in Greater Manchester.

The Manchester Guardian was originally the product of Manchester’s mill owners and represented their conservative interests. However, as the paper came under the editorship of C.P. Scott, it moved towards a more radical viewpoint, that eventually became The Guardian which we know today. With the development of television technology, Manchester also became the hub for ITV in the form of Granada. Programmes produced “in the north” since the 1960s have become some of the most iconic and recognisable of all UK television, such as Coronation Street. The BBC’s move to Salford Quays in 2011 revitalised the creative industries in Manchester, giving new life to the long heritage of media creativity from the region.

7

Sport With the influx of many factory “operatives” into the region during the cotton boom, the desire to break the monotony of mill work became a business opportunity in its own right. The Football League was born in Manchester in 1888, but in the first year of the competition, Blackburn, Burnley, Preston and Bolton represented the North West. These days, Manchester United and Manchester City dominate the headlines. The North West is also home to Adidas, Umbro and Reebok, and over 18,000 people are employed in the sports sector in the region.

Retail

9

Despite the low wages of mill workers, the rapid increase in population during the Industrial Revolution meant that Manchester soon became a retail hub. The concept of the ‘sale’ is claimed to have originated in Manchester, at Kendals department store on Deansgate. For a brief period in the 1920s the store was branded as Harrods, before it was returned to the more familiar name after staff and customer complaints. Now, the intu Trafford Centre is the second largest indoor shopping centre in the UK.

The Industrious Issue

6

Digital

8

Manchester has a long heritage of computing: from the first experimental “Baby” programmable computer, to Ferranti’s commercialised version, the Mark 1. This fifty year heritage also stretches back to the Industrial Revolution; jacquard-weaving looms provided the prototypes for the earliest punch card input used by computers, and Whitworth’s development of precision engineering all laid down the building blocks for the current digital industry. Now, Greater Manchester is home to a vast range of small specialist digital companies and start-ups.

Tourism

10

With such a weight of history, high international visibility through the media, the draw of regular sports, music and cultural events and a reputation as a shopping destination, Greater Manchester is the third most popular tourist destination in the UK after London and Edinburgh. Tourism contributes over £7.5 billion to the local economy, with the Lowry Theatre and Art Gallery on Salford Quays being consistently the most popular individual destination with nearly 900,000 visitors every year.

15


TERMINAL VELOCIT Y

The Industrious Issue

16


Salford Business School

The world is changing faster now than ever before.

T

his has become the trope of many marketers and technologists looking to sell whatever system they insist is going to help you to survive in an accelerated world. The result of so much marketing hype is that many of us have been inoculated against the idea. Hear something too often from the mouths of marketers and you naturally become sceptical. Such scepticism is reinforced by the analysis of smart people like Robert J. Gordon, who point out the incredible scale of technology-driven changes over the last century. The car, the washing machine and international travel were transformative for whole societies.

Have the internet and the mobile phone really done so much? I don’t think we yet have the perspective to determine the magnitude of the changes brought about by ubiquitous connectivity. It’s like trying to gauge the height of a hill from half-way up. Personally, I think it is likely that the conclusion of this climb – artificial intelligence and general purpose robotics – will be hugely transformative to all societies. But right now it’s hard to argue that the phone is more important than the car, or the internet more influential on our lives than the washing machine. We are not yet in a position to make such judgements.

Position and velocity While our ultimate position may be hard to measure, what we can determine is our velocity. The amplitude of the changes that we are now experiencing may or may not be as great as those of the last century. But there’s a strong argument to be made that their frequency is greater. We know that the cycle time for innovation and adoption is shorter now, and that this is having a very real effect on the sustainable success of enterprises.

Unfortunately, their use didn’t meet everyone’s approval. Within just a few weeks, the UK government had clarified guidance on the use of these devices in public spaces; it was not positive. What was expected to be the big Christmas hit was suddenly a no-go for law-abiding parents concerned that their kids would be chastised if they ever took the toy out of the garden. Sales collapsed. This accelerated innovation, adoption, and often rejection cycle is being played out across industries; not just software, social networks and streaming services, but hardware, processes and platforms. The result is that sustained success is harder today than at any point in history. As the economist Moises Naim puts it, “Power is harder to win, harder to use, and quicker to lose.”

Agility vs optimisation Business management has always been primarily about optimisation; doing what you do that little bit better, where ‘better’ typically means at greater volume or higher margins. In a world where business models have a life span measured in months, there isn’t a lot of time for optimisation. Agility, the ability to quickly and repeatedly find new successes, is much more important.

Power is harder to win, harder to use, and quicker to lose. Take the example of the ‘hoverboard’, or more accurately, the self-balancing scooter. Last summer, these incredible devices appeared under the feet of some of the world’s biggest celebrities. Priced at a few thousand dollars, these luxury toys combined some of the most important technical development of recent years – high-capacity Lithium-Ion batteries, micro electro-mechanical sensors, and low-cost microprocessors – to incredible effect.

The magnitude of the changes we’re facing today may, or may not, be greater than at any point in history. But the frequency of the changes that we’re facing most certainly is. Their scale may not shift whole societies, but it’s more than enough to slaughter businesses. Speed kills.

The question now is “how do you respond?”

Within a matter of weeks, the price of these products fell by an order of magnitude as Chinese manufacturers ramped up production of a variety of clones. Instead of £2500, people were paying £250 and lots of lucky kids got their hands on one.

Article

Tom Cheesewright Guest Contributor author of Book of the Future. How can we stay ahead of the curve in an ever evolving innovative climate?

#velocity Comment @salfordbizsch on Twitter The Industrious Issue

17


THERE EXIST LIMITLESS OPPORTUNITIES IN EVERY INDUSTRY. WHERE THERE IS AN OPEN MIND, THERE WILL ALWAYS BE A FRONTIER.

The Industrious Issue

18


Salford Business School

CHARLES F. KETTERING (1876 – 1958), American inventor, engineer and businessman, holder of 186 patents, Head of Research at General Motors from 1920 to 1947; developer, amongst other things, of the electrical starting motor.

The Industrious Issue

19


IN THE DIGITAL ECONOMY

A number of years ago myself and a former colleague, Frances Bell, who also happens to be an enthusiastic knitter, started talking about Etsy. Etsy wasn’t quite the poster child of e-commerce that Amazon or eBay had become and we wondered why...

The Industrious Issue

20


Salford Business School

T

he choice of beautiful goods on Etsy, the online portal for vintage and handmade items, fascinated us. Some items were either so specialised or so intricate that it would be practically impossible to find the equivalent item in a conventional retail outlet. Our initial interest in the unusual and sometimes bizarre world of Etsy rapidly shifted – as is so often the case with academic research – to the actual listed prices for the most complex items of clothing. Frances is particularly skilled at identifying the typical time it might take to stitch some children’s gloves or a jumper. Time and time again we realised that this craft marketplace was offering items at prices – which are set by the creators themselves – that represented hourly rates of labour that fell far short of the minimum wage in the UK and in some cases was just a few pennies per hour. Even more concerning, the more complex items that required longer time to create and finish to a high standard generally were valued at a lower hourly rate of labour than simpler items such as a scarf. At this point we came to the – perhaps obvious conclusion that the crafters were not considering their labour costs. We speculated that perhaps this was partly because they were just doing this for the love of their craft. Their pricing strategy was not about their labour but to be competitive against similar items already on the site – a potentially ever downwards spiral. We double checked to see if the UK minimum wage was an unfair basis for measurement. But even the possibility that the items were coming from developing economies proved untrue. While the Etsy community is international, many of the most complex items came from makers in developed economies. By being a craft market for individual makers, the hidden costs of labour were being very clearly exposed in ways that Amazon and eBay do not. Conscious of these findings, I moved on to looking at the labour in a purely digital economic activity – games. The result was a paper about the hidden labour in games such as Farmville and Puzzle Pirates (http://usir.salford.ac.uk/30677/). The labour in these games is essential for the game to function and for their commercial success. In other words, without the players labouring to achieve various goals, the entire viability and functioning of the game falls down. It is one reason why games of this type become less and less popular. Without a critical mass of players and their labour, the virtual worlds that are created can suddenly feel sparsely populated. What’s worse, in sparsely populated virtual worlds, the onus of labour falls on to smaller and smaller numbers of people. Eventually, the fun of the virtual world most consciously becomes the “grind” demanded by the game’s mechanics.

The Industrious Issue

Eventually, the fun of the virtual world most consciously becomes the “grind” demanded by the game’s mechanics.

Benefitting others from your labour within a ‘fun’ environment is now labelled “playbour” – the labour in play. Playbour isn’t just restricted to games spaces either. Social media channels also encourage your labour within a ‘fun’ environment in ways that can then be measured and monetised. Even the simplicity of clicking “like” or another similar emotion is a tiny fragment of labour that enables - through the accumulation of many of these “likes” - the measuring of brand content success and other key performance indicators for digital marketing campaign managers.

More concerning, the hypothetical highest level in the game (level 100) would take over 145,000 YEARS to reach at this pace which also presumes that this core game mechanic remained consistent for 29 times longer than recorded history. The numbers are ridiculous. Niantic’s quantification of labour costs in the game is indirect. Pokecoins can be bought in-game but these do not directly translate into experience points – labour is still required to take advantage of the items purchased with Pokecoins.

Sometimes the brands reward your moments of labour with a type of micropayment in kind. It might be entry into a competition, access to new content, a free download or some other item from the digital economy. But sometimes you receive no reward at all – although potentially you did not even recognise your moment of labour that you have just given away.

Given all of this hard work it is not surprising that the initial surge of interest for Pokemon Go has dropped away. As the grind of the game becomes obvious, the play in the game is not enough to keep people interested.

Wind forward a couple of years to the recent success story of casual gaming and the digital economy - Pokemon Go. The free to download game has earned its parent companies millions in endorsements, through in-game sales and the overall revitalisation of the Pokemon brand. The game turns the entire world into its playing space, and while this has had the positive effect of getting gamers off the couch and into the street, it has also accentuated the labour involved in games. A dedicated Pokemon Go player has data-mined the internals of the game to calculate the personal effort required to progress through all of the game’s levels (https://drive.google.com/drive/u/0/sharedwith-me?zx=15c4othmy2fm). Knowing that the game requires a consistent proportion of experience points to progress from level to level, they were able to do some straightforward maths. They calculated that if one player collected 50,000 points each day it would take 400 days to reach level 40. It is important to realise that 50,000 points is still a lot of effort and that most casual players will never gain more than 10,000 in a single day. This means it would take about six hours of daily play to reach level 40.

However, just like the passion of the knitters on Etsy, once new features are brought into Pokemon Go the most dedicated players will be back. That still means millions of playbourers are working hard to make Pokemon Go a continuing digital economy success story.

Article

Gordon Fletcher Academic Unit Head: International Operations and Information Management. Do you have a passion for ‘playbour?’

#playbour Comment @salfordbizsch on Twitter

21


CONNECT AMBITION WITH EXPERTISE with our MSc Procurement, Logistics & Supply Chain Management course.

Stand out against the competition with a CIPS and CILT-accredited programme focused on the very latest thinking. Gain an in-depth understanding of procurement, warehousing, stores management, transportation and shipping, inventory planning and contract management informed by the latest academic research. To find out more about our courses: Visit www.salford.ac.uk/business-school Call +44 (0)161 295 2222 Be the difference. Salford Business School.

A CAREER THAT ADDS UP TO MORE with our MSc Accounting & Finance course  raduate with excellent high-earning G career potential. Gain advanced level skills and knowledge in accountancy, financial and banking industries, as well as the corporate sector. You’ll gain valuable insight into accounting processes, both from in-business and external reporting perspectives. To find out more about our courses: Visit www.salford.ac.uk/business-school Call +44 (0)161 295 2222 Be the difference. Salford Business School.


SAMUEL OTIGBA The MBA kicked my start-up into gear.

I

n 2015, Samuel Otigba was working as Head of Communication and Marketing for an oil and gas firm but he quit his job and took the step of faith to start his own company.

“Most universities pride themselves on a robust course outline, triple accreditation, strong alumni base or Ivy League credentials filled with foreign and local awards. These are all great things, don’t get me wrong, and Salford certainly competes.

Hearing that Salford Business School supported entrepreneurs like himself, he signed up to do an MBA Digital Business, using the qualification as a springboard to launch an exciting web and mobile app that helps connects friends with activities and events relevant and tailored to their needs. Samuel won several awards including the Dean’s Award for Live Project Campaign. The combination of specialist expertise, personal support and broader business skills makes him confident about future success.

But all too often more important things are neglected in this large portfolio of achievements: detailed attention to one’s needs, camaraderie, incentive to study, an ecosystem of excellence based on one’s unique potentials and a true support system. Salford Business School has all of this and more. And I think it is these potentials displayed by SBS that sets it apart from its competitors.

T  he School has given me an edge in a very competitive market. The Industrious Issue

I think the greatest advantage I’ve acquired so far is the ability to learn, and put all that learning immediately to practice. From managing organisational resources to gaining the ability to be an effective leader, the School has given me an edge in a very competitive market. Another real positive is the relationships you develop – both between students and tutors, and between students and students. In my opinion Salford Business School has created a dynamic foundation where diversity is welcomed at an unprecedented level. When you come here, blending in is not an issue – I felt right at home straight away. If you’re thinking about an MBA, my advice would be to consider first what you want to get out of the experience. For me, it was the opportunity to create my dream company and watch it grow. Through the aid of our wonderful tutors and Business School’s administration team my dream is being actualised.”

23


DRIVING AHEAD

Despite the vote to leave the European Union, Britain’s automotive sector appears in good health.

The Industrious Issue

24


Easy access to power, metals and Salford ports Business were once School drivers of heavy industry’s geography, but though the sector’s heyday may be behind it in terms of overall numbers it has never been more productive. The success of these plants in the North West means the region is rich in knowledge and capacity. British car plants might find it hard to compete on cost with new factories in Eastern Europe and BRIC countries, but their productivity, innovation and geography still gives them strong advantages. In cutting-edge research, design and technology there are hi-tech opportunities in alternative fuels and autonomy that are driving change in the car industry.

I

nnovation, R&D and high productivity are good indications that the car industry can thrive in new cutting-edge technologies.

The UK is a significant market in its own right, the second largest car market in Europe, but the country remains a hub for car design.

Honda has also committed its future to the UK, with Swindon as the producer of five-door Civic hatchbacks over the life of the model. Meanwhile an explosion of Jaguar models has led to further investment in Tata-owned Jaguar Land Rover.

The Northern Powerhouse seems to be running low on fuel these days. Although the mooted HS2 is still on track, the region has endured a number of setbacks over the last 12 months. The steel industry still looks in grave shape, a number of large infrastructure projects have stalled since Brexit and the concept’s biggest cheerleader, former Chancellor George Osborne, seems consigned to the backbenches.

General Motors’ Vauxhall plant on Merseyside may be less assured, with GM skittish over Brexit due to the amount of their cars that go to Europe, but the new Ellesmere Port-built Vauxhall Astra enjoyed its best-ever month in September. BMW, who own Rolls-Royce and Mini, have been noticeably tightlipped since warning their work forces over the potential consequences of Brexit earlier in the year.

Although some parts of UK automotive are yet to commit to keeping their operations in the UK open, there has been a number of signs that foreign carmakers value their British production facilities too highly to lose them. Brexit certainly didn’t do British automotive any favours however. The industry as a whole was overwhelmingly in favour of staying within the European Union: just 3% of SMMT (Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders) members, the sector’s UK trade body, were in favour of leaving the EU when surveyed in 2014.

Despite the likelihood of increased costs for remaining in a post-Brexit Britain that may not be part of the single market, the UK remains an attractive proposition for foreign car-makers. The UK is a significant market in its own right, the second largest car market in Europe, but the country remains a hub for car design, hi-tech and assembly.

Nissan’s commitment to retain its vast manufacturing plant in Sunderland was a huge boost to the region and a feather in the cap for a government trying to soothe nerves over the economy and the country’s viability to support global business. Not only that, Nissan announced that it would build a new model on Wearside too, representing a significant reinvestment and a statement of confidence in the plant. Much political capital has been made over the news, but Nissan was always likely to remain in the UK due to the high productivity and excellent track-record of its north-east factory. When it opened in 1986 the region had little experience of car production, while Nissan had never built a plant outside the UK. 30 years later Sunderland produces half a million cars a year and constantly wins new work over other Nissan factories around the world. It will also build batteries for the company’s electric cars. It reflects the very real success that British car plants have represented for the foreign-owned car industry.

The Industrious Issue

With so much of the British car industry based in the North West and northern England - and so many universities close by - there are clear opportunities for two sectors that will need to play a leading role in a Britain outside the European Union.

Jaguar, based in the Midlands, has recently announced plans to build an electric car in the UK with Crewe-based Bentley likely to follow, while Nissan already build the Leaf EV in Sunderland. The Auris Hybrid, the first fully mass-produced hybrid in Europe, is produced in Derbyshire.

Article

Robin Brown Motoring Journalist and Lecturer in Journalism.

Are you excited about automotive growth in the North West?

#automotive Comment @salfordbizsch on Twitter

Where once there was large-scale heavy industry and assembly in the UK, today the sector is smaller in size but more versatile and innovative. UK automotive is at the forefront of low-carbon and driverless technology, driven by Higher Education and motorsport with a raft of technology-orientated universities and nine Formula One teams based in the Midlands, which remains the chief automotive hub in the UK. However the North West has a gravity of its own in the sector. Ellesmere Port is ‘the home of the Astra’ - synonymous with the evergreen family car. Toyota has an assembly plant on Deeside, while Bentley has its global headquarters in Crewe. Jaguar Land Rover builds the Range Rover Evoque and Land Rover Discovery Sport at Halewood on the outskirts of Liverpool.

25


OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT

OLYMPICS FISH & CHIPS As in many homes all over the UK, the Friday evening meal in our house is a fish and chip supper. As my wife was going to collect our meal, I thought I would catch up on some of the Olympics on TV, until our youngest asked me to explain what exactly Operations Management is... again!

The Industrious Issue

26


Salford Business School

M

y wife’s parting words were: “explain it in a memorable and interesting way before I get back with our supper,” Our youngest nodded with agreement, so I put my Olympic catch-up TV moment on hold. Operations Management is all about getting five things right: 1. The right product and/or service 2. To the right place 3. At the right time 4. In the right amount, all so it can be 5. Sold at the right price and making a profit for the business To put it simply, it is about planning the different resources and controlling the creation of the product and/or service, for the best price for both the customer and the business. “Dad, that’s not very memorable or interesting” our youngest informed me. “Can I have some sweets while we wait for Mum to come back with our tea?” “No sweets, as they will rot your teeth. Anyway, do you remember your last visit to the dentist for your new teeth? When I was your age, making new teeth was a very long and labour intensive job, and it could be weeks before we got our replacements. However, with you, the dentist uses 3D printing to make your new tooth implant, getting better results than before in a greatly reduced time. “Dad, that is quite interesting!” Praise indeed, and I thought I was making headway until she said, “but I’m not sure what this has got to do with Operations Management.” “Operations Management is all about planning and controlling what we make and what we deliver. So we do need to pay attention to the different ways of doing things and the different technologies that we could use to improve what we do and how we do it. So in the case of your new teeth, the dentist used a new technology - in this case 3D printing to improve the way he supplied a service to you. In other words, you got your new teeth faster than you would before, due to the reduction of labour intensive operations. Actually, we can see how operations management is involved in getting fish and chips for our tea tonight.” At this point, our youngest said “That’s not operations management! It’s Mum going to the shop and bringing back our tea. Isn’t that the supply chain that you tell me about, helping to get it to us?”

Operations Management is what is important for organisations today, and it is not about whether one definition is better than another. It is about the clarity of the process; the roles and responsibilities that are crucial to carry out the core business productively.

This does strike an interesting and relevant point of confusion for those learning the subject and those practicing in the industry. What is the difference between operations management, supply chain, logistics and transportation, and where do they overlap? So, in this instance, clarity is really important; the way we use words can cause confusion, and this is especially true if we consider these four areas: 1. Supply Chain considerations are much more than just the simple supply/procurement side. A supply chain needs to consider the whole journey from the raw material, to the final product and its use and consumption, to dealing with the waste post consumption. Simply put, from ‘earth to hearth to earth.’

This is what is important for organisations today, and it is not about whether one definition is better than another. It is about the clarity of the process; the roles and responsibilities that are crucial to carry out the core business productively and responsibly, in order to sell and deliver the products/services to the customer. In other words, what is essential is that we get on with the job in the best way possible. My wife had not returned with our tea, so out came the sweets, and we returned to the conundrum: what does Operations Management have to do with getting fish and chips for our tea tonight?

2. The Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport defines Logistics as, ‘the time related positioning of resources.’ Perhaps more simply put: getting, making and delivering products and/or services in the right amount to the right place. 3. Transportation is about the actual and physical movement of goods by road, sea and air. Clarity on what transport is responsible for and what logistics is responsible for is essential. Once this is clear, we can get on with the job. 4. Operations Management is really concerned with the design and operation of systems for manufacture, transport, supply or service. All of these areas are about getting the right product to the right place, at the right time, in the right quantity, of the right quality, at the right price.

Article

Jonathan Owens Senior Lecturer in Operations Management and Director of UGT International Operations and Information Management Programmes. Share your insights on operations management.

#opsmanagement Comment @salfordbizsch on Twitter

The Industrious Issue

27


WHAT DOES THE APPRENTICESHIP LEVY MEAN FOR YOUR BUSINESS?

Introduced from

April 2017

Levy will be

0.5%

of payroll bill

Employers with payroll in excess of

£3m affected

For every £1 paid in, government

will top up by 10%

For more information, please visit salford.ac.uk/higher-and-degree-apprenticeships


BE BETTER BY ALL ACCOUNTS with our BSc Accounting & Finance course

Join a course that’s the best in the UK for student satisfaction.* Develop the skills you need for a high-level career in accountancy, finance, banking, insurance or the public sector, and gain exemptions in CIMA, ACCA, ICAEW and CIPFA exams. To find out more about our courses: Visit www.salford.ac.uk/business-school Call +44 (0)161 295 2222 Be the difference. Salford Business School. 

*The Sunday Times University Guide 2015.

SHAPE YOUR DIGITAL WORLD with our MSc Digital Marketing course Get the very latest digital and social media marketing knowledge and skills, stepping ahead in the new digital global economy. Examine products and services which are highly desirable to online consumers, while running real-life digital marketing campaigns by applying search and social media marketing techniques to support competitive marketing strategies. To find out more about our courses: Visit www.salford.ac.uk/business-school Call +44 (0)161 295 2222 Be the difference. Salford Business School.


THE NEW FRONTIER FOR

FOOD SAFET Y

The why and the how. The recent announcement of the Food Standards Agency’s vision ‘to make sure that people have safe food, food they can trust, and that it is what it says it is’ epitomises views relating to an industry which is currently undertaking much self-reflection.

The Industrious Issue

30


Salford Business School

A

diverse range of challenges exist for food business operators; no longer is it sufficient to offer food safety management systems based solely on the concept of Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points (HACCP) in the hope of demonstrating due diligence. “Increasingly, food safety experts are advocating concepts and strategies which build on the foundations of HACCP, thus presenting a robust, self-regulated and competent level of food defence which will ensure that a food business is capable of delivering to consumers, food which as the FSA suggests is ‘safe’, ‘trusted’ and ‘authentic’ in nature. The global food safety chain of 2016 exists to satisfy a greater demand for food, increasing pressure on resources, climate change issues which place uncertainty on production and an ever increasing number of new food suppliers. It is the complexity of the supply chain and associated factors which raises the challenge of ensuring that food businesses offer maximum food safety assurance whilst guaranteeing food that consumers can trust. Issues such as the impending, yet-unknown effects of ‘Brexit’, together with food safety incidents such as ‘the Horsemeat Scandal’ and the realisation that food supply chains are being infiltrated by determined individuals with intent to exploit ‘vulnerabilities’; increasing encouragement to adopt a ‘self-regulatory’ approach; and a greater awareness that enhanced levels of education and competency are warranted for individuals at all levels within the food industry, are leading to a new frontier with regards to food safety assurance.

Supply chains are being infiltrated by determined individuals with intent to exploit ‘vulnerabilities‘. The horsemeat scandal of 2013 rocked the food industry to the core. The ensuing ‘Elliott Review into the Integrity and Assurance of Food Supply Networks – Final Report’ put forward recommendations with a view to combatting the opportunity for the intentional adulteration of food. Evidence to support the industry’s assumption that food crime activity might be widespread comes from a European wide collaborative effort implemented by authorities to identify and to bring to justice perpetrators of this illegal activity. Reported in the most recent Opson Operation update (Opson Operation V), it was estimated that more than 10,000 tonnes and one million litres of hazardous fake food and drink had been seized in operations across 57 countries in an INTERPOL-Europol coordinated initiative to protect public health and safety between November 2015 and February 2016. (www.europol. europa.eu – accessed 16/11/16). The food industry is working tirelessly in collaboration with a diverse range of collaborators (enforcement, industry and academics) to devise models which will go some way to combating vulnerabilities which inherently exist within a food business and which may lead to opportunities for food crime activity. In the case of unintentional food safety issues (physical, chemical, biological or allergenic contamination) which is released into the food supply chain by food businesses, legislation (EC 178/2002) requires of food businesses to ‘withdraw, and/or recall, food from the market if it is not in compliance with the food safety requirement’. Ensuring that food businesses possess effective product recall procedures which are ‘fit for purpose’ is critical. Failure to address the deviation from normal operating activity for a food business equates to a crisis unfolding. Figures collated by red24 over a five year period, tend to indicate that of the estimated 350 food-related product recall procedures reviewed, approximately 65% were considered inadequate and in need of improvement. In response to these findings, red24 food safety specialists have worked to offer support and training for food business operators.

Experts are recommending a wide range of solutions which may contribute to overcoming the challenges faced. The consideration of ‘Big Data’, for example, has been highlighted by the FSA as part of the launch of ‘Future Food Regulation’. It is suggested that making best use of available data is a positive step which should be considered by all organisations. ‘Big Data’ has and indeed, continues to be used in predictive analytics as opposed to the more typical use of data which has generally focused on retrospective food safety related associations together with the monitoring of real time processes. The main advantages of using the application of ‘Big Data’ exists in the ability to make best use of available data in root cause and retrospective analysis. This type of application is likely to become more common place in the near future. Risk specialists such as red24 incorporate predictive technology when presenting threat forecasts for food industry clients. In understanding the current landscape associated with food safety assurance and effective risk and crisis management, the University of Salford in collaboration with red24 has devised a programme of study (MSc in Risk and Crisis Management (Food Safety Assurance) which places an emphasis on areas such as: International Strategic Management, Food Fraud, Malicious Product Tampering, Business Continuity and Risk and Crisis Management. Consulting with various food businesses it appears that the course will be well received, with one food business manager saying ‘I view the course offered at Salford as a welcome step forward for the food industry. The units on offer will enhance the skills, knowledge and competency of staff working for my organisation’ David Shingler - Sales Director Towers Thompson Ltd.

Article

Grant Cropper Environmental Compliance and Training Manager, red24. Are food standards in need of a radical shake-up?

#foodsafety Comment @salfordbizsch on Twitter

The Industrious Issue

31


M

eet Jamil Khalil, Founder & CEO at Wakelet and University of Salford alumnus.

As the founder of social media platform, Wakelet, Jamil Khalil is no stranger to the industriousness required to succeed in business. After some years developing Wakelet, the company has recently received several million pounds in backing from UK and US investors. Venture capital and seed funding are still new concepts for many businesses in Greater Manchester which means that just gaining investment from experienced funders is a significant achievement in its own right.

We created Wakelet to make it easier to take control of the content that interests, inspires and excites you.

Wakelet is only the latest step in Jamil’s career; since graduating from Salford in 2003, he has also travelled the world and been through a graduate recruitment scheme. We spoke to Jamil to find out more about his journey from Salford graduate to internet start-up sensation. Why did you decide to study at Salford? The university had a new and interesting course that was created to solve a real world problem. Engineers normally lack business know-how and managers lack technical skills. The university wanted to bridge the gap by developing people who had good know-how in both areas. I felt this course would be perfect for me and would help put me in a good position in my career. I also heard great feedback from a number of people about the university, lecturers and success rate of people getting good jobs after their degrees. What did you most enjoy about your university life at Salford? For me I think it came down to the people. Like me, a number of them had wild dreams and ambition and they were always willing to help others out. The lecturers were also great, very knowledgeable and helpful. I had a few difficult moments during university and they helped me get through them. They always found time for us and that makes a big difference.

Now we can bridge the gap between humans and algorithms by empowering people to curate content in a stunning, useful and more personal way.

FROM S TO ST What did you most enjoy about your course? I really enjoyed the balance between academic teaching, coursework and practical activities. The heavy emphasis on group activities and ability to frequently present helped me develop the confidence and people skills that have helped me do well in my career. What words of encouragement would you give to a prospective student considering studying at Salford? Embrace your passions and never shy away from challenges that are outside your comfort zone. The time spent at university is a unique life experience - you really only get to do it once, and you’d be surprised at how much you can accomplish. If you build useful contacts and surround yourself with people who encourage your success, then your time at university can be one of the best and most productive of your life.

The Industrious Issue

32


How did you get from studying at Salford to where you are now in your career?

What is your biggest professional or personal achievement to date?

After university I wanted a break, so I decided to go travelling around the world. When I returned to the UK, I joined Airbus’s graduate programme working in Landing Gear Systems Procurement. I progressed pretty fast within Airbus to become the Head of Sourcing and EADS Coordination.

Funnily enough, I never feel like I’ve achieved anything significant. It’s been all small achievements, which have helped me develop, progress and stay hungry. If I had to list one, it would probably be leaving my Airbus job to set up my start-up. I had a great job and was progressing really well, so leaving when times were great was quite challenging, but I had to follow my dreams.

In December 2013, I left Airbus to set up Wakelet. From the problems I faced on the Internet whilst studying, travelling and working, I wanted to create a social media product that gives people the freedom to organise and share any content on the web, the way they want it. In December 2014, Wakelet raised £1.1m of investment, including backing from the original publishers of Angry Birds, and is now being used by students, athletes, travellers, bloggers, brands and businesses.

Why do you choose to stay in touch with Salford? I think it’s important to stay in touch with the people and places that have had a positive impact on your life. My university experience at Salford helped prime me for “the real world”, and I feel that by getting involved in what the university is doing now, I can give back and help others on their road to success.

By getting involved in what the university is doing now, I can give back and help others on their road to success.

TUDENT RT UP What tips would you give to current students and recent graduates who are entering the workplace?

Instead of looking for anywhere that will hire you, start looking for places that you would enjoy working at the most.

Extra-curricular interests and activities count for a lot more than most people think, and you are much more likely to get a job you enjoy if you display passion and an eagerness to learn. I’d also recommend a shift of thinking; instead of looking for anywhere that will hire you, start looking for places that you would enjoy working at the most. This makes you feel more confident in your abilities and gives you a greater sense of purpose for when it comes to job hunting and performing in interviews.

Do you have your own inspirational start up story to share?

#startup Comment @salfordbizsch on Twitter

The Industrious Issue

33


The enthusiasm, creativity and knowledge the interns brought to our business has proved invaluable. We have a new identity, a strong online presence and a wider audience reach all delivered by our interns. Thank you! Steve Crohill Director of North West Finance Awards

WE ARE PROUD OF OUR CLOSE LINKS WITH BUSINESS We work with companies of all sizes from large multinationals to micro organisations. Through our Employability Hub we find real projects and positions so that our students can make a difference to your company, while at the same time enhancing their own employability.

What are the benefits of using our Employability Hub? • Comprehensive and flexible graduate level recruitment support that ranges from the casual and short term, structured internships and placements through to full time professional entry level roles. • One-to-one meetings with employability officers who can advise your organisation and develop the appropriate project brief. • Build relationships with students and academics to share good practice. • Utilise the skills of the hub to identify future workforce planning requirements.

Want to work with the brightest young minds? Contact our Employablity Hub: E sbs-employability@salford.ac.uk T 0161 295 4378 W www.salford.ac.uk/business-school/employability-hub


Salford Business School An A-Z of our placement partners in industry:

Ready to work with us?

We’d love to talk things through.

Email sbs-employability@salford.ac.uk

Call 0161 295 4378


Imagination Inspiration Creativity Success Passion Ignited

Salford Business School The Crescent, Salford, M5 4WT, United Kingdom. +44 (0)161 295 2222 course-enquiries@salford.ac.uk www.salford.ac.uk/business-school @salfordbizsch salfordbusinessschool

Ignited - The Industrious Issue  

Our Salford Business School academics discuss the hidden labour in the digital economy and industries leveraging big data to improve supply...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you