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JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY

SCHOOL OF ADVANCED INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

SAISmagazine

WINTER 2016

Johns Hopkins SAIS welcomes the next generation of faculty.


WELCOME Next Gen Faculty

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In this issue of SAIS Magazine, you will find that the school’s already unmatched global reach is widening in academic year 2015–16. Our dynamic faculty is strengthening in areas of strategic importance, including international political economy, the politics of energy, regional studies, governance and development, global food and agriculture, and interdisciplinary collaboration. 

Kissinger Center Launch

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The launch of the Henry A. Kissinger Center for Global Affairs will expand the school’s cadre of scholars focused on global strategy.


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SAIS Europe Celebrates 60 The transatlantic heritage of SAIS Europe has been front and center as we celebrate its 60th year of scholarship and unveil an endowed professorship commemorating SAIS Europe’s rich history while also embracing its cultural and academic vitality into the future.

Nanjing Center Turns 30

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The Hopkins-Nanjing Center will mark the 30th anniversary of our groundbreaking academic partnership in modern China.

These and many other developments signal a transformative period at Johns Hopkins SAIS. We hope you enjoy the insights in this issue as we continue to redefine the study of international affairs and how to address global challenges. And as always, we are grateful for the support of our alumni as we move forward. Warmly, 

Vali Nasr, Dean

Johns Hopkins University | 1


HAPPENINGS AT SAIS Lazard CEO Kenneth M. 4 Jacobs discussed global

FACULTY INK published books 32 Recently from Johns Hopkins SAIS faculty

economic issues

Former Secretary of State Madeline Albright & Former National Security Advisor Stephen Hadley spoke on Middle East security crises

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STUDENTS ON THE GO & Desperate 36 Displaced Studying pregnant Syrian refugees in Beirut

SAIS VOICES Draghi: The Most 8 Mario Powerful Man in Europe

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ECB president does “Whatever It Takes” to safeguard the Euro Moment 14 AThenewCuba and improved U.S.–Cuba relationship — how long will it last?

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Europe 20 SAIS Celebrates 60 Events throughout 2015 recall six decades of SAIS Europe history

NEXT GEN FACULTY Hopkins SAIS 38 Johns welcomes new faculty STRATEGIC INITIATIVES 48 HA.enry Kissinger Center for Global Affairs launched

of Arts in 25 Master Global Policy New degree program for working professionals

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Johns Hopkins 28 The SAIS–FINCA Connection Andree Simon ’00 leads strong partnership

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SAIS Magazine

ALUMNI LIFE Anderson B’81 54 James Joins JHU Board of Trustees

54 Reflections & Spotlights 56 Elif Nazmiye Yavuz B’03, ’04 Fellowship: Honoring Life & Legacy

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Philip Robertson ’87: The Human Rights Messenger

Meredith Giordano ’93 N’94: A Career Focused on Water

Martin Eitchtinger ’85: Global Ambassador

61 Alumni in Print Center 66 Hopkins-Nanjing Turns 30 68

68 Around the Globe 74 Legacy Elfriede Sobernheim ’45 endows Public Health dual-degree program

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76 Keeping the Connection 78 News and Noteworthy

SAIS Magazine is published for the alumni and friends of the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies of the Johns Hopkins University. Managing Editor Margaret Hardt Frondorf Contributing Editor Mary Dempsey Editorial Committee Shamila Chaudhary Jordi Izzard Sidney Jackson Kathryn Knowles Martina Leinz Julie Micek Noemi Crespo Rice Madelyn Ross Lindsey Waldrop Emily Walz Contributors Lena Abdin Shamila Chaudhary Mary Evans Jordi Izzard Erik Jones Kathryn Knowles Martina Leinz Liz Levine Dan Markey Guadalupe Paz Riordan Roett Francesca Torchi Jennifer Varney Lindsey Waldrop Rui Zhong Design Beth Singer Design, LLC, Arlington, VA Letters and inquiries should be sent to SAISMagazine@jhu.edu or 1717 Massachusetts Ave. N.W. Washington, D.C. 20036 © 2016 by the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies of the Johns Hopkins University. All rights reserved. Printed in the United States of America. sais-jhu.edu @SAISHopkins #SAISAlum #SAISAlumni Cover photos: Bill Dennison Photos throughout: Kaveh Sardari

Johns Hopkins University | 3


HAPPENINGS Anne Patterson SEPTEM BER 17, 2015

A S S I S TA N T S E C R E TA RY O F S TAT E F O R N E A R E A S T E R N A F FA I R S , F O R M E R U. S . A M B A S S A D O R T O E GY P T, PA K I S TA N , C O L O M B I A , A N D E L S A LVA D O R

Anne Patterson delivered an address on challenges and priorities for U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East followed by a Q&A moderated by Ambassador Shirin Tahir-Kheli, senior fellow at the Foreign Policy Institute.

ASEAN Diplomats

SEPTEMBER 21, 2015

SOUTH E AST ASIAN GROUP VISITS HOPKINS-NANJING CENTER

A delegation of ASEAN diplomats from Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, and Vietnam met with students of the Hopkins-Nanjing Center to discuss politics and diplomacy in East and Southeast Asia.

Kenneth M. Jacobs OCTOBER 1, 2015

CHAIRMAN AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER OF LAZARD

Kenneth M. Jacobs joined John Lipsky, senior fellow at the Foreign Policy Institute, to discuss the global financial crisis and global economy as part of the “Evolution or Revolution? Restructuring Finance for a New Global Economy” speaker series.

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EU Migration Crisis OCTOBER 8, 2015

FOREIGN POLICY I NSTITUTE H O S T S PA N E L D I S C U S S I O N

Michel Gabaudan, president of Refugees International, Hungary’s Ambassador to the United States Reka Szemerkenyi ’95, and the Federal Republic of Germany’s Ambassador to the United States Peter Wittig joined a panel discussion to address the ongoing humanitarian crisis in the EU. The panel was moderated by Maureen White, senior fellow at the Foreign Policy Institute.

OCTOBER 19, 2015 C E O O F S O N Y E N T E R TA I N M E N T AND CHAIRMAN AND CEO OF S O N Y P I C T U R E S E N T E R TA I N M E N T

Michael Lynton

Michael Lynton joined Dean Vali Nasr for a conversation on cybersecurity and global challenges facing multinational corporations.

DEPUTY CHAIRMAN OF THE R OT H S C H I L D G R O U P

Paolo Scaroni OCTOBER 21, 2015

Paolo Scaroni discussed the future of oil prices and implications for the global economy and emerging trends in global energy as part of the Energy, Resources and Environment program’s Global Leaders Forum.

Johns Hopkins University | 5

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AT SAIS


HAPPENINGS OCTOBER 22, 2015 F O R M E R U. S . S E C R E TA RY O F S TAT E & F O R M E R U. S . N AT I O N A L S E C U R I T Y A DV I S O R

Albright & Hadley Former U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright and former U.S. National Security Advisor Stephen Hadley hosted the fourth public hearing of the Middle East Strategy Task Force, presented in partnership with the Atlantic Council and the Brookings Institution, to address the development of the region’s compounding security crises and avenues for resolution. Kenneth Pollack of the Brookings Institution and Rami Khouri of the American University of Beirut also joined.

Jan Eliasson

NOVEMBER 5, 2015

D E P U T Y S E C R E TA RY G E N E R A L O F T H E U N I T E D N AT I O N S

Jan Eliasson spoke on the role of the United Nations and how it must adapt to face the realities of today’s complex global landscape, including challenges to its mandate to maintain international peace and security.

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AT SAIS Bertrand Badré NOVEM BER 12, 2015

MANAGI NG DI RECTOR AND WORLD BANK GROUP CFO

Bertrand Badré joined John Lipsky, senior fellow at the Foreign Policy Institute, to discuss restructuring finance for a new global economy.

NOVEMBER 17, 2015

William J. Burns

P R E S I D E N T, C A R N E G I E E N D O W M E N T F O R I N T E R N AT I O N A L P E A C E

William J. Burns addressed the Johns Hopkins SAIS community on the future trajectory of U.S. foreign policy and national security.

Catherine L. Mann

NOVEM BER 26, 2015 CH I EF ECONOM I ST, ORGA N I SATION FOR ECONOM IC CO - OP ER ATION A N D DEVELOP M ENT, FR A NCE

Catherine L. Mann spoke about recent work from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development as part of the “Emerging Trends in International Commercial Policy” speaker series.

Johns Hopkins University | 7


“WHAT EVER IT TAKES.” MARIO DRAGHI

THE MOST POWERFUL MAN IN EUROPE

Erik Jones B’89, ’90, PhD ’96, Professor of European Studies and International Political Economy, Director of European and Eurasian Studies

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SAIS VOICES Johns Hopkins University | 9


July 26, 2012, the president

of the European Central Bank (ECB), Mario Draghi, gave a speech before the financial community in London. Several countries that share the euro as a common currency were deep in the throes of a sovereign debt crisis. Three of the smaller ones—Greece, Ireland, and Portugal—were already in bailout programs. The Spanish government had requested help in shoring up its banks. The European Council offered some financial assistance, but it looked likely to prove too little and too late. Worse, Italy appeared to be next on the list. Europe’s political leaders were powerless to calm the markets. Draghi moved in to fill the vacuum, promising to do “whatever it takes” to safeguard the euro as a common currency. For those in the finance community who doubted his resolve, Draghi underscored the message. “Believe me,” he said, “it will be enough.” And it was. Success was not guaranteed. Previous European central bankers had made similar commitments that failed spectacularly. The first ECB president, Wim Duisenberg, threatened to intervene in support of the euro as it fell in value relative to the dollar in September 2000 and quickly had to eat his words. He later complained that central bankers should never talk about exchange rates. Duisenberg’s successor, Jean-Claude Trichet, sent a “secret” letter (co-signed by Draghi in his role as governor of the Bank of Italy) to then Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi offering support in the bond markets in exchange for reform—only to see the bond markets move against them faster than either the ECB or the Italian government could act. Both of Draghi’s predecessors were hamstrung by restrictions 10 | SAIS Magazine Winter 2016


written into the ECB’s mandate. Draghi’s hands were similarly tied. Indeed, he qualified his commitment to do ”whatever it takes” with the phrase “within our mandate.” Nevertheless, he succeeded where others tried and failed. Draghi’s success was immediate. It is hard to imagine any other European leader making a similar pledge without meeting incredulity from the press. The president of the European Council, Herman van Rompuy, could never promise to do “whatever it takes” to reform Europe’s institutions; High Representative for the Common Foreign and Security Policy Catherine Ashton could never promise to do ”whatever it takes” to resolve an international crisis; the president of the European Commission, José Manuel Barrosso, could never promise to do “whatever it takes” to coordinate member state policies; and European Parliament President Martin Schultz could never promise to do “whatever it takes” to pass a critical piece of legislation with anything near the same degree of credibility. Within days of Draghi’s speech, the difference in interest rates demanded by investors to hold Italian or Spanish and German sovereign debt instruments began to diminish. Within weeks, that spread fell below crisis levels. Within months, the cost of issuing Italian and Spanish sovereign debt was at or below historic lows.

The explanation for Draghi’s believability is two parts good fortune and one part careful planning. The good fortune can be found in critical moments in his career trajectory. Draghi became governor of the Bank of Italy in 2005 when the post holder, Antonio Fazio, was embroiled in a scandal

about the takeover of a mid-sized Italian bank. Draghi became president of the ECB in 2011 because the heir-apparent, Bundesbank Chairman Axel Weber, resisted pressure from the German government to stand for office (and resigned from his position at the Bundesbank in protest over ECB policies). If Fazio had remained at the Bank of Italy or Weber had accepted to run the ECB, Draghi would not have achieved his current level of influence. Careful planning is what made the critical difference. Draghi demonstrated the potential for the ECB to influence markets almost as soon as he took office. Whether this was accidental or intentional is unimportant. His speech to the European Parliament in early December 2011 employed words that Johns Hopkins University | 11

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The markets moved against Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi faster than either the ECB or the Italian government could act.


suggested the ECB would engage in massive asset purchases similar to the quantitative easing pursued by the Federal Reserve in the United States. A few days later, he used his inaugural monetary policy press conference as ECB president to explain that his words had been misinterpreted and that such a policy was not under consideration. European bond markets moved massively in response to both statements, first buying peripheral country sovereign debt instruments in anticipation of ECB intervention and then selling them back again once it was clear that such intervention would not take place. These actions demonstrated the

capacity of the ECB to move markets. What Draghi needed to acquire was the capacity to move the ECB. During the months that followed, Draghi worked within the ECB Executive Board and its main decision-making body, the Governing Council, to establish his authority and to mollify or, if necessary, isolate opposition. This was a challenging political project. The ECB president has authority, yet the national central bank governors have more votes on the Governing Council, they have more resources in their home institutions, and they have closer ties to domestic politics. Such assets are not always 12 | SAIS Magazine Winter 2016

favorable, as Draghi knew from his tumultuous relationship with Berlusconi. But they meant that a powerful central bank governor from a large member state able to draw concerted national support could rival the ECB president—particularly if that governor presided over the Bundesbank. Draghi had to find a modus vivendi with Weber’s successor at the Bundesbank, Jens Weidmann. Draghi’s great asset was that he was well known to the other members of the Governing Council for both his economic judgment and his political independence. The tension between Draghi and Berlusconi worked to his advantage in that respect. Draghi also cultivated a reputation for innovation, generosity, decisiveness, and determination. He is a collegial chairman, yet a commanding presence. His first major policy action was the introduction of a program of long-term refinancing operations to provide three-year, ultra-low interest rate loans to euro-area banks to help ease their funding constraints. This program brought some relief in the early months of 2012, but it was short lived. The weaknesses of the Spanish banks were too great, and the cost of shoring up the banks was bringing down the Spanish government. The Italian government and its €2 trillion sovereign debt markets were caught up in the contagion. Draghi responded by pressuring the member state


governments to act more decisively to put the markets at ease and to reassure his colleagues on the Governing Council that the ECB would remain true to its mandate. This combined approach worked only until it became clear that Europe’s politicians could not act decisively. The turmoil in European financial markets began to threaten the ECB’s ability to act as a central bank for the whole of the euro-area economy Draghi did not consult all of his colleagues before making his July 26, 2012, promise to do whatever it takes, and many of them were uncomfortable with the commitment. Nor did the staff at the ECB have a fully fledged plan to translate that commitment into a policy. Nevertheless, Draghi was able to bring along almost all of his colleagues and to provide enough reassurance to encourage market participants to wait for the details of the policy (some of which are still forthcoming). Weidmann objected, and in a rare breach of ECB convention, Draghi openly acknowledged Weidmann’s opposition to the policy. German Chancellor Angela Merkel chose not to back her Bundesbank chairman and, instead, threw her support behind Draghi.

into uncharted territory. Critics abroad may complain that Europe’s central bank is moving too slowly, and by international comparison that may be the case. The point to note, however, is that the ECB has evolved more extensively under Draghi’s presidency than under that of either of his predecessors. It has also proved more effective than any other European institution. European economic performance would be far worse had that not been the case. Indeed, it is possible that the euro would have lost one or more of its members. By that measure, Draghi is the most powerful man in Europe (but not the most powerful “person” because the competition in that category is more intense). The recent history of European integration owes much to his strength.

Since that day, Draghi’s strength has been tested repeatedly both in the markets and on the Governing Council. He has prevailed in each of these contests with the result that ECB policymaking has moved ever further Johns Hopkins University | 13

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German Chancellor Angela Merkel chose not to back her Bundesbank chairman and instead threw her support behind Draghi.


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How long will it last?

Riordan Roett Professor & Director of the Latin American Studies Program

Johns Hopkins University | 15

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Cuba Moment The


SIXTY-FIVE years

President Barack Obama made the sudden and dramatic announcement on Dec. 17, 2014, of plans to normalize relations between the countries. The deal had been brokered over preceding months in secret negotiations in Canada and the Vatican City, with the direct assistance of Pope Francis.

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after the United States and Cuba broke diplomatic relations, the flags of the two nations again fly over their re-opened embassies in Havana and Washington, D.C. President Barack Obama made the sudden and dramatic announcement on Dec. 17, 2014, of plans to normalize relations between the countries. The deal had been brokered over preceding months in secret negotiations in Canada and the Vatican City, with the direct assistance of Pope Francis. The agreement led to the lifting of some U.S. travel restrictions, fewer limitations on remittances, U.S. banks’ access to the Cuban financial system and, on July 20, 2015, the reopening of the embassies. It has been a long and tortured process to try to end this historical impasse. Relations were broken in 1961 after the regime of Fidel Castro nationalized all U.S. businesses on the island without compensation. In retaliation, the United States imposed a trade embargo. The United States supported the 1961 Bay of Pigs invasion by Cuban exile dissidents, an incursion that failed miserably. The same year, Castro declared that Cuba was a communist state and entered an alliance with the Soviet Union. As a result of the Bay of Pigs, Cuba signed a secret agreement with Moscow to allow the Soviet government to build a missile base on the island. The U.S. discovery of those plans in October 1962 led to a 14-day standoff: U.S. ships imposed a naval quarantine around the island and President John F. Kennedy demanded the destruction of the sites. The Cuban Missile Crisis ended with


As a result of the more open

The succeeding decades were played out in the context of the Cold War with Cuban troops taking a prominent role in the wars of liberation in Africa and in the conflicts in Central America. As a result of the Cuban intervention in Central America, the U.S. Department of State designated Cuba a “sponsor of state terror” in 1982. The first positive move toward the normalization of relations took place during the administration of President Jimmy Carter when there appeared to be a possibility of reopening embassies, but that hope was derailed by another crisis surrounding the mid-term elections in 1978. The next positive move came during the Clinton administration when travel restrictions were eased to allow cultural exchanges. A two-game exhibition series between the Baltimore Orioles and the Cuban national baseball team took place. The Reagan-Bush eras saw no improvement in bilateral ties. Not until Obama’s 2008 election did the possibility of a rapprochement appear feasible. In April 2009, the Obama administration lifted restrictions on family travel and remittances to the island. At that time the president stated that he was open to dialogue. There was a setback in 2011 when the Cubans detained U.S. contractor Alan Gross on charges of spying. But the dialogue continued. In October 2011 Cuban spy René González was released from prison, one of five men sentenced in 2001. President Raul Castro, in July 2012, said the Cuban government

relations between Cuba and the United States during the Carter administration in 1979, the Johns Hopkins SAIS Latin American Studies Program (LASP) negotiated the first U.S. university exchange

SAIS VOICES

an agreement to dismantle the sites if the United States pledged not to invade Cuba. The United States also secretly agreed to remove nuclear missiles from Turkey.

with the University of Havana. Four delegations of students traveled to the island and Cuban counterparts spent time at Johns Hopkins SAIS. The exchange ended with the election of Ronald Reagan.

Travel restrictions eased to allow cultural exchanges, including exhibition baseball games between the Baltimore Orioles and the Cuban national team.

Johns Hopkins University | 17


Piero Gleijeses Awarded Katz Prize for Cuba Book Piero Gleijeses, professor of American foreign policy, was awarded the American Historical Association’s Friedrich Katz Prize for his book Visions of Freedom: Havana, Washington, Pretoria, and the Struggle for Southern Africa, 1976-1991 (University of North Carolina Press, 2013). The prize is awarded annually to the best book published in English focusing on Latin America, including the Caribbean. Based on monumental research in archives on three continents, including Cuban archives that no other foreign scholars have been allowed to use, Visions of Freedom puts Cuba’s long military mission to Angola at the center of the fight against apartheid and at the heart of Cuba’s self-image as a revolutionary nation. Defying both the Soviets and the United States, Cuba emerges in this absorbing narrative as relatively autonomous and as powerfully influential on the global stage of the Cold War. The South African edition of Visions of Freedom was published in Johannesburg by Wits University Press in 2013. The Spanish edition was published in Havana by the Editorial de Ciencias Sociales in June 2015 and the French edition is forthcoming.

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was willing to hold talks with Washington, D.C. At the state memorial service for Nelson Mandela in South Africa in December 2013, the two leaders shook hands. Secret talks opened in 2013 and resulted in Obama’s statement in December 2014. The two presidents met again in April 2015 at the Summit of the Americas in Panama City. Cuba was removed from the “sponsor of terrorism” list the same month. The two presidents, in light of the progress in the talks, spoke on the phone in September 2015 to discuss normalization of relations before the arrival in Havana of Pope Francis, on his way to his first visit to the United States. According to a White House press release, Obama and Castro “discussed steps that the U. S. and Cuba can take, together and individually, to advance bilateral cooperation.” In the same month, the White House announced wide-ranging changes to loosen travel, commerce, and investment restrictions with Cuba. The rules will allow U.S. companies, including telecommunications and internet providers, to open locations and hire workers in Cuba, facilitate financial transactions between the two nations, and remove limits on the sums that can be taken to the island. U.S. Treasury Secretary Jacob J. Lew said “a stronger, more open U.S.-Cuba relationship has the potential to create economic opportunities for both Americans and Cubans alike.” U.S. corporations worked quietly behind the scenes with the Obama administration for months in support of normal-


“A stronger, more

Despite improved U.S.-Cuba relations, lifting the outstanding trade embargo will require U.S. Congressional action. Washington had strengthened the embargo with the 1992 Cuba Democracy Act and the 1996 Helms-Burton Act which state that the embargo may not be lifted until Cuba holds free and fair elections and transitions to a democratic government that excludes the Castro Brothers. (Fidel Castro has retired and Raul Castro has said he will leave office in 2018.) Given U.S. political realities, there appears to be little likelihood of a positive decision anytime soon.

open U.S.-Cuba relationship has the potential to create economic opportunities for both Americans and Cubans alike.” —Jacob J. Lew, U.S. Treasury Secretary

At present, the actions of the Obama administration have already begun to have a role in the Republican Party’s race for the White House, with a majority of the party’s candidates vehemently opposed to liberalization. Every effort will be made by the GOP to undo the progress made to date. The next Congress will also need to consider whether to lift the embargo or not. The “Cuba Moment” could last but a second if an anti-Cuba candidate receives the GOP’s nomination and wins the presidency in November 2016. Johns Hopkins University | 19

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ization. The new regulations will, for the first time in decades, open the way for U.S. companies to do business directly in Cuba, setting up subsidiaries or opening offices or warehouses there, and allow Americans to have bank accounts in Cuba and Cubans to maintain bank accounts outside of their country. Cruise ships will be able to travel to Cuba without making a stop in a third nation. And close relatives will be able to visit family members in Cuba for a wider array of purposes.


ALUMNI, FACULTY, STUDENTS, AND FRIENDS JOIN TOGETHER IN 2015 AS

SAIS EUROPE

CELEBRATES

ABOVE: A night view

of the SAIS Bologna Center, Via Belmeloro 11, at the opening of Alumni Weekend 2015. RIGHT: The Bologna Class of 2010 celebrating its fifth class reunion in the library garden.

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Daniels, JHU president, Michael G. Plummer, SAIS Europe director and Vali R. Nasr, SAIS dean, in Bologna, last spring during Alumni Weekend 2015, for the 60th anniversary celebrations. Former classmates meeting up again in Bologna during the Alumni Weekend 2015. Director Plummer welcoming Italy’s Economy and Finance Minister Pier Carlo Padoan in February 2015. Bologna night skyline.

Johns Hopkins University | 21

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60

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Ronald J.


THE CELEBRATIONS BEGAN on Feb. 21, 2015 with an event designed to thank the local community for its hospitality and vital support over the past six decades. Some 200 guests, including the mayor, prefect, and the University of Bologna rector, gathered in the SAIS Europe Fondazione del Monte–UniCredit Group Auditorium for a keynote address by Italian Minister of the Economy and Finance Pier Carlo Padoan.

Padoan’s remarks carried substantial policy relevance, and he reflected on landmark reforms of the Italian labor market and the just-negotiated extension of the Greek assistance package by the Eurogroup.

ABOVE: Italian Min-

ister of the Economy and Finance Pier Carlo Padoan speaking at SAIS Europe in February 2015. RIGHT: Adrian Little-

ton, associate fellow at SAIS Europe, and Veronica Pye, former director of student affairs at the Bologna Center.

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Padoan’s address was preceded by a welcome from SAIS Europe director and Eni professor of international economics, Michael G. Plummer B’82, and from Senior Adjunct Professor of International Economics Vera Negri Zamagni, who delivered a show-stopping account—accompanied by a rich collection of images—of her four decades teaching in Via Belmeloro 11. Plummer retraced the center’s founding by Professor Grove C. Haines and recalled some of the 440 faculty and scholars who have helped shape its intellectual foundations, among them Antonio La Pergola, Federico Mancini, and Alfred Grosser, followed by Reimut Jochimsen, Pierre Hassner, and Altiero Spinelli, founder of the European Federalist Movement. He also cited Robert Mundell, a colleague in Bologna in 2000, whose earlier work at the Bologna Center in the 1960s contributed to his 1999 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences. The festivities continued in April during SAIS Europe’s annual alumni weekend. Participation reached record levels with 12 classes and 450 registered guests from 31 countries in attendance. One of the original eight students from the first Bologna Center class, Mary Lee Lincoln McIntyre B’56, ’57, received a special certificate of recognition, together with 19 alumni from the class of 1965 who gathered to mark their 50th class reunion. Oral histories

were recorded, with many guests recalling the journey to Europe by steamer and recounting vibrant moments in the city’s political history.


ABOVE: Alumni gather-

ing in front of the SAIS Europe building.

The weekend’s activities included a conference on “Diplomacy, Strategy, Nationalism and the Outbreak of the Great War” to mark the centenary of World War I, a State of the University address by Johns Hopkins University President Ronald J. Daniels, and a lecture on “Opportunities and Uncertainties in the Middle East” by Johns Hopkins University SAIS Dean Vali Nasr. The guest of honor, Alphabet Inc. (formerly Google Inc.) Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt, delivered Saturday’s keynote address (see sidebar on page 24). In line with the transatlantic heritage of the Bologna Center, the anniversary year continued in October in Washington, D.C., with the Annual Symposium and Celebration organized by the Amici di Bologna

on “Looking Over the Horizon— Global Strategic Opportunities and Challenges Facing the Next U.S. Administration” moderated by Mary Kissel B’03, ’04, host of Opinion Journal at Wall Street Journal Live and member of the WSJ Editorial Board. Panelists included Deborah Bräutigam, professor of international development and comparative politics; Mark Gilbert, professor of international history at SAIS Europe; and John McLaughlin B’66, ’66, the Distinguished Practitioner-in-Residence at the Philip Merrill Center for Strategic Studies. A silent auction with generous donations from “made-in-Italy” sponsors raised funds to support SAIS Europe.

alumni group. Nearly 300 guests

gathered at the Italian embassy for a Johns Hopkins SAIS faculty panel Johns Hopkins University | 23

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LEFT: Italian Economy and Finance Minister Pier Carlo Padoan, guest of honor at the 60th anniversary celebrations in early 2015.


THE NEW WILSON E. SCHMIDT CHAIR AT SAIS EUROPE ERIC SCHMIDT HONORS HIS FATHER WITH $5 MILLION GIFT The executive chairman of Alphabet Inc. (formerly Google Inc.) has strong ties both to the school and to Bologna, the city he called home from 1963 to 1965 when his father, Wilson Emerson Schmidt, taught graduate courses in economics and international development at the Bologna Center. Eric Schmidt returned last April to SAIS Europe, where he was welcomed by JHU President Ronald J.

Daniels, SAIS Dean Vali Nasr, and SAIS Europe Director Michael G. Plummer and was presented with a “memory box” from the Europe archive that contained photos, letters, and documents written by his father during their time in Italy. Later in the evening, Schmidt delivered a keynote address, “The Importance of Humanity in the Computer Age.” Tracing the relationship between

humans and technology over the past 20 years, Schmidt told an audience of more than 500 guests that every revolution in industrial history—including the digital one—has produced anxiety, and what we are witnessing today is merely a repetition of history. He encouraged the audience not to fear the impact that technology is having on employment but, rather, to embrace the changes and progress that lie ahead.

The keynote address was preceded by the announcement of a $5 million gift from Schmidt and his wife, Wendy, to establish the Wilson E. Schmidt Distinguished Professorship at the new Henry A. Kissinger Center for Global Affairs at Johns Hopkins SAIS. The Schmidt Professorship will support a senior faculty member at SAIS Europe in Bologna who will collaborate with other Kissinger Center faculty members.

WILSON E. SCHMIDT TAUGHT ECONOMICS AND DEVELOPMENT AT SAIS BOLOGNA CENTER IN THE ’60S.

ON THIS PAGE: Eric Schmidt speaking at SAIS Europe last April. Black and white photos show his father at work.

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Global Policy for Working Professionals

“Are you telling me, with all the critical issues now facing the United States and China, that the secretary of state should advise the president to discuss a joint venture in East Africa?” –Dan Markey, Academic Director of the Global Policy Program

“That is precisely what we are saying.” –Amy Hissrich, Master of Arts in Global Policy candidate

Johns Hopkins University | 25

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New Master of Arts in


Without missing a beat, Amy Hissrich fired back across the room: “Cooperation in East Africa offers a positive opportunity for Washington and Beijing and an area where they can advance their mutual interests while also promoting economic growth and security.” Roughly 30 hours earlier, Hissrich, along with two classmates in Johns Hopkins SAIS’ new Global Policy Program, had been assigned to research, write, and brief a policy memo on the

“implications of the Lamu Port Southern Sudan–Ethiopia Transport in East Africa.” Late Saturday afternoon, at the end of the GPP’s first international policy residency, a faculty panel quizzed eight teams over more than two hours. Students tackled policy challenges related to nuclear nonproliferation, Chinese economic statecraft, and Iran’s role in Afghanistan.

Staffers from the U.S. State Department Office of Policy Planning suggested the topics and met briefly with each of the student groups to help refine their ideas. “It was truly a special opportunity to have Edward J. Lacey, the deputy director of policy planning, come –Michelle Jamrisko, Bloomberg in and talk to us… News, reporter and GPP student It was tremendously valuable,” said Michelle Jamrisko, who reports on the U.S. economy for Bloomberg News.

“. .. to have the deputy director of policy planning talk to us… it was tremdously valuable.”

Jamrisko and Hissrich, along with 25 other experienced professionals, are 26 | SAIS Magazine Winter 2016

all part of the inaugural cohort of the Master of Arts in Global Policy. The GPP is the first graduate degree program of its kind in the field of global policy. Because GPP students remain employed during their studies, courses are taught on an alternating-weekend (Friday/ Saturday) schedule. Three multiday residencies meet in the D.C. area, and a global residency will connect students with an overseas client during their second year. All told, the program runs 16 intense months. During the first residency, Dean Vali Nasr led the agenda with a warm introduction to the school and a discussion of its tradition of excellence in preparing students for global leadership. Welcoming GPP students to campus for the first time, GPP Academic Director Dan Markey explained, “This is a historic moment for SAIS, a new chapter.” Then Christian A. Herter Professor of American Foreign Policy Michael Mandelbaum previewed his latest book on America’s post-Cold War foreign poli-


SAIS VOICES

“I appreciated how pragmatic the education was.” –Geoff Orazem, GPP student

cy and set the stage for the policy exercise to follow. With an average of 11 years work experience, the students in the inaugural cohort form a diverse and impressive group, representing the public, private, and nonprofit sectors. For them, the residency’s strong emphasis on practical application was valuable. “I appreciated how pragmatic the education was,” said Geoff Orazem. “I left the residency feeling like I learned a tangible skill.” The residency also aimed to prepare GPP students for coursework in a curriculum designed to mirror many of the school’s traditional strengths, from economics to strategic studies and almost everything in-between. Lectures from Tom Keaney, associate director

of the Philip Merrill Center for Strategic Studies, on how to deliver an effective briefing and from Adam Garfinkle, editor of The American Interest, on political writing, will come in handy in class and on the job. As GPP student Kristina DeMain concluded at the end of the residency, “I learned something that I could use every day.”

The inaugural cohort of the Global Policy Program.

Johns Hopkins University | 27


Prepared to Work in a Global Context

Andrée Simon ’00 meets FINCA Women’s Networking Group in Pakistan

28 | SAIS Magazine Winter 2016


SAIS VOICES

The Johns Hopkins SAIS-FINCA Connection

Johns Hopkins University | 29


Johns Hopkins SAIS has long been associated with organizations and individuals committed to making the world a better place. A particularly strong relationship is the one between Johns Hopkins SAIS Global Career Services and microfinance organization FINCA International. “FINCA and SAIS have always had a close relationship,” said Johns Hopkins SAIS alumna, Andrée Simon, vice president and chief operations officer at FINCA. “We have lots of full-time SAISers at FINCA, and we have had many interns from SAIS work here over the years.” A quick search of LinkedIn turns up more than 40 Johns Hopkins SAIS alumni who have had some meaningful connection to FINCA, either through full-time employment or an internship. Given the scope of FINCA’s work, this isn’t surprising. Johns Hopkins SAIS is a natural source for the type of global talent FINCA seeks. Simon said, as a general rule, she finds Johns Hopkins SAIS students to be highly motivated and successful self-starters who aren’t afraid to plunge into something new.

WOMEN ENTREPRENEURS

NONPROFITS

Johns Hopkins SAIS’ collaboration with FINCA extends to the classroom. Simon has taught at Johns Hopkins SAIS and has always been very generous with her time, participating in information sessions and panel discussions and engaging directly with students. She enjoys these interactions because she finds that students have great ideas. A few years ago at SAIS, she met Julia Wallin ’14, who had created her own nonprofit and was looking for ways to expand her experience. According to Simon, “It was such a wonderful thing to see 30 | SAIS Magazine Winter 2016


MICRO LOANS

her capitalizing on all of the connections available through SAIS.” Simon’s own career has been influenced by her connection to Johns Hopkins SAIS. “Clearly SAIS prepared me to work in a global context and reinforced my appreciation of cultural diversity,” said Simon. “From an educational perspective, I’ve always appreciated the depth of thinking at SAIS. It was so satisfying to be in an environment where everyone was committed to answering big, meaty questions that could impact world development. I’d like to think that passion and thoughtfulness contribute to my work today.” Simon’s career trajectory is impressive. She returned to FINCA in 2013 after serving for three years as president and COO of Women for Women International. Prior to that she was deputy to the president and CEO of FINCA for more than seven years. During that time, she played a pivotal role in redesigning FINCA’s business model from a donor-based nonprofit to a for-profit operating structure that brought unprecedented growth to the organization. She has also held various business and advisory roles in other organizations. “Andrée is a superstar in her sector,” said Setu van Lare Hodges, associate director of career services at Johns Hopkins SAIS. Hodges has worked closely with Simon for years. “Andrée is a tremendous leader and a great mentor to so many,” she added.

LIFE IMPROVEMENTS

Simon’s mentoring spirit shines through when asked what advice she has for students aspiring to a similar career. “Students should be open-minded. It’s great to go after exactly what you want and get it but you don’t always land that way. Being open to a range of different experiences can inform the later choices in your career in a pretty powerful way.” Johns Hopkins University | 31

SAIS VOICES

“Being open to a range of different experiences can inform the later choices in your career in a pretty powerful way.”


FACULTY INK negotiators need to keep in mind to get a deal that encourages developing country engagement.

Towards a Workable and Effective Climate Regime, edited by Scott Barrett, Carlo Carraro, and Jaime de Melo (FERDI, 2015) SAIS Europe Adjunct Professor of Energy, Resources and Environment Jaime De Melo and co-editors argue that a new international climate treaty is needed bring about real collective action.

To date, incentives to increase participation by developing countries in such a treaty have been lacking and negotiations have focused on setting bottom-up targets and timetables. The book suggests ways to structure and implement the December 2015 Paris COP-21 agreement, including the dimensions of what

32 | SAIS Magazine Winter 2016

Will Africa Feed China? by Deborah Brautigam (Oxford University Press, 2015) Is China building a new empire in rural Africa? In her latest book, Deborah Brautigam, Bernard L. Schwartz Professor of International Political Economy and director of the International Development Program, again probes the myths and realities behind the media headlines. Her careful field research explores the conventional wisdom—that the Chinese government is acquiring large expanses of African land to grow food to send back to China— and explains why Africa is unlikely to become China’s rice bowl. Fragmented Borders, Interdependence and External Relations. 

The Israel-PalestineEuropean Union Triangle, edited by Raffaella A. Del Sarto (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015) Edited by SAIS Europe Associate Professor of Middle East Studies Raffaella Del Sarto, this volume investigates the complex relations among Israel, the Palestinian territories, and the European Union. By assessing the rules and practices that establish a web of interlocking functional and legal borders, this work adopts a novel perspective and sheds light on the complex patterns of interdependence and power asymmetries that exist across these fragmented borderlands. China’s Changing Legal System, co-authored by Chuan Feng and Thomas Simon (Palgrave Macmillan, 2016) This book is a symbol of the Sino-American academic collaboration at the heart of the Hop-


China and North Korea: Strategic and Policy Perspectives from a Changing China, edited by Carla P. Freeman ’90, PhD ’99 (Palgrave MacMillan, 2015) At a time when China’s historically close “as lips and teeth” relations with North Korea appear to be changing, this volume provides unique access in English to the diverse perspectives informing China’s North Korea policy and insights into how Chinese specialists assess a country that, while both its neighbor and ally, is also a threat to international security and China’s national interests. The editor has gathered original essays by some of today’s leading Chinese experts on China’s foreign policy toward North Korea, the history of Beijing’s relations with Pyongyang, and North Korea’s politics and economy. Contributors include scholars from

FA C U LT Y I N K

kins-Nanjing Center. It was jointly authored by HNC professors Chuan Feng and Thomas Simon, together with HNC student Leyton Nelson, who earned an HNC Certificate in 2015 and is now finishing his MA at Johns Hopkins SAIS. It provides a comprehensive introduction to China’s legal system, covering both civil and criminal law. China’s elite universities and think tanks in Beijing, as well as from provinces bordering North Korea. Handbook on China and Developing Countries: Handbooks of Research on Contemporary China Series, edited by Carla P. Freeman ’90, PhD ’99 (Edward Elgar Publishing, 2015) This handbook explores the rapidly evolving and increasingly multifaceted relations between China and developing countries. Cutting-edge analyses by leading experts from around the world critically assess such timely issues as the “China model,” Beijing’s role in international development assistance, Chinese peacekeeping and South-South relations, and developing countries and the internationalization of the renminbi. Chapters also examine China’s engagement with individual countries and regions throughout the

developing world. For scholars, practitioners, and postgraduates, the volume’s breadth and depth of coverage will inform and guide present and future analysis. Rule-Makers or RuleTakers? Exploring the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership, co-edited by Daniel S. Hamilton ’79, PhD ’85 and Jacques Pelkmans (Rowman and Littlefield International, 2015) Daniel Hamilton, Austrian Marshall Plan Foundation Research Professor and executive director of the Johns Hopkins SAIS Center for Transatlantic Relations, and a team of European and American scholars cut through the confusion and controversies swirling around the U.S.-EU TTIP trade negotiations by examining the ramifications for a wide range of sensitive areas, from food safety and public procurement to the auto industry and

Johns Hopkins University | 33


Europe James Anderson Senior Adjunct Professor Gianfranco Pasquino B’66, ’67 the work provides detailed analysis of the main social movements in Italy and period-by-period historical treatment, showing that while Italian politics today is different from what it was during the immediate post-World War II period, it retains many of the influences of the past.

the digital realm—along with chemicals, energy, services, investor-state settlement mechanisms, technical barriers to trade, and regulatory cooperation. The Oxford Handbook of Italian Politics, co-edited by Erik Jones B’89, ’90, PhD ’96 and Gianfranco Pasquino B’66, ’67 (Oxford University Press, 2015) Part of the Oxford Handbooks in Politics and International Relations Series, this volume provides a comprehensive look at the political life of one of Europe’s most exciting and turbulent democracies. Edited by Johns Hopkins SAIS European and Eurasian Studies Program Director and Professor of European Studies and International Political Economy Erik Jones B’89, ’90, PhD ’96 and SAIS

34 | SAIS Magazine Winter 2016

A Changing Republic. Politics and Democracy in Italy, co-edited by Gianfranco Pasquino B’66, ’67 and Marco Valbruzzi (Edizioni Epoké, 2015) SAIS Europe James Anderson Senior Adjunct Professor Gianfranco Pasquino B’66, ’67, together with Marco Valbruzzi, explores the many changes that have occurred in Italian politics, explaining their origins and assessing their consequences for the political system

and for the quality of Italian democracy. The volume emphasizes the complexity of the political landscape from a comparative perspective, rejecting the stereotype that Italian politics are characterized by immobility and stalemates. The authors instead conclude that bad politics and a resilient democracy characterize the evolution of the Italian political system, making it very interesting for observers and scholars but depressing and unsatisfactory for most Italian citizens. On the Cusp: From Population Boom to Bust, by Charles S. Pearson ’66, N’91 (Oxford University Press, 2015) For much of its history, human population growth increased at a glacial pace. The demographic rate only soared about 200 years ago, climaxing between 1950 and 2000. In that 50-year


economic effects may require policies to boost fertility (which has plunged), increase immigration, and work longer, harder, and smarter—as well as undertake pension and health care reform— all of which have hidden costs.

Preventing Deadly Conflict by I. William Zartman (Polity Press, 2015) I. William Zartman, Jacob Blaustein Distinguished Professor Emeritus of International Organization and Conflict Resolution at Johns Hopkins SAIS, offers a new look at conflict prevention, analyzing how it works when it does, drawing lessons from that experience, and developing old and new norms, mechanisms, methods, and measures to improve prevention.

Demanding Devaluation: Exchange Rate Politics in the Developing World by David A. Steinberg (Cornell University Press, 2015) David Steinberg, assistant professor of international political economy at Johns Hopkins SAIS, demonstrates that political considerations influence decisions about exchange-rate policy. The book includes case studies of Argentina, China, Iran, Mexico, and South Korea. Arab Spring: Negotiating in the Shadow of the Intifadat, edited by I. William Zartman

Johns Hopkins University | 35

FA C U LT Y I N K

span, the population grew more than it had in the previous 5,000 years. Though these raw numbers are impressive, they conceal the fact that the growth rate of population topped out in the 1960s and may be negative later this century. The population boom is approaching a population bust, despite the current world population of 7 billion people. In On the Cusp, economist Charles Pearson ’66, N’91, Johns Hopkins SAIS Professor Emeritus, explores the meaning of this population trend from the arc of demographic growth to decline. Analyzing population trends through dual lenses—demography and economics— Pearson examines the potential opportunities and challenges of population decline and aging. Aging is almost universal and will accelerate. Mitigating untoward

(University of Georgia Press, 2015) I. William Zartman, Jacob Blaustein Distinguished Professor Emeritus and former director of African studies at Johns Hopkins SAIS, and his 15 collaborators, many from the region, present and analyze the events of the Arab Spring as negotiations, even when they enter into violence, to show how the uprisers operated to achieve their evolving goals and how the governments reacted to defend the Old Order.


LENA ABDIN ’16

STUDIES PREGNANT SYRIAN REFUGEES IN BEIRUT

Over the summer, I had the opportunity to go to Beirut, Lebanon, to conduct research for my thesis through the Fouad Ajami Fellowship. I experienced many highs and many lows during my journey but ultimately met with success in my research. I decided to research antenatal care for Syrian refugee women in Beirut and the impact the crisis in Syria has had on that care. I visited three clinics around Beirut and interviewed 42 pregnant women. One story stuck with me the most. A pregnant Syrian woman waddled into the clinic, exasperated and in despair. The secretary at the clinic motioned to me to go over and interview her. I introduced myself while she looked at me with glazed eyes. Instead of diving into my interview questions, I asked what was wrong and she let out a long sigh. She told me she was 43 years old and in her eighth month of pregnancy—and that she had just found out two days ago. My mouth hinged open. I asked how could she have not known she was pregnant (at least by her swollen belly)? She lament36 | SAIS Magazine Winter 2016

ed that she had no time to realize she was gaining weight and that she had stopped menstruating, what with living with 16 people in a tiny studio apartment and taking care of all the children. She was also worried about the health of her baby, given her age and the fact that she had surgery two months ago under anesthesia after falling off a ladder. This is just one of the desperate tales I heard and witnessed during my research. My findings varied, but I was able to conclude that most of the women I interviewed had not visited a doctor more than four times. The reasons most cited were expenses and lack of time and transportation. Families couldn’t afford the cost of the visits and most couldn’t make it out to the clinics to get treated. Others were prescribed vitamins but refused to take them due to lack of trust in the health system and the fact that, in Lebanon, medicine is labeled in French or English, while in Syria most medicine is labeled in Arabic only.


Furthermore, many women preferred to give birth in Syria, despite the dangerous circumstances, because it would be cheaper and they trusted their doctors there. Most of the women lived in rented apartments with more than 10 people together in a single room yet, like the woman I mentioned above, they were not considering birth control. I learned so much during my time in Beirut and got to shadow a great Lebanese doctor while he treated the pregnant women. Most of their stories were very sad, but he always found the good in their situations and brought to light the fact that they had a gift coming their way that could help brighten their dark days. Despite their bleak situations, the women were all determined to make their children’s lives better. Lena Abdin ’16 is a second year student in Middle East studies and the recipient of the Julia Bachleitner Fellowship. Johns Hopkins University | 37

STUDENTS ON THE GO

“She told me she was 43 years old and in her eighth month of pregnancy—and that she had just found out two days ago. My mouth hinged open. I asked how could she have not known she was pregnant (at least by her swollen belly)? She lamented that she had no time to realize she was gaining weight and that she had stopped menstruating, what with living with 16 people in a tiny studio apartment and taking care of all the children.”


PETER M.

LEWIS

ASSOCIATE DEAN FOR ACADEMIC AND FACULTY AFFAIRS social development, or conflict resolution, also with a Middle East focus). Lewis will also manage the recruitment of up to 10 distinguished scholars who will be housed in the new Henry A. Kissinger Center for Global Affairs.

A LONG HISTORY WITH SAIS

JOHNS HOPKINS SAIS APPOINTS NEW ASSOCIATE DEAN FOR ACADEMIC AND FACULTY AFFAIRS IN JULY 2015, Peter Lewis took the helm as associate dean for academic and faculty affairs at Johns Hopkins SAIS. A member of the school’s Academic Board for nearly a decade, Lewis brings the perspective of a seasoned academic and plays a leading role in strategic initiatives designed to support the school’s academic mission in exciting new ways. In 2016, Lewis will lead searches for the Aronson Distinguished Professor (a senior Middle East Studies scholar) and the Aronson Professor (an expert in international relations and comparative politics, international economics and 38 | SAIS Magazine Winter 2016

From 2006 to 2015, Lewis served as an associate professor and director of the African Studies Program. His research and teaching focus on economic reform and political transition in developing countries, with particular emphasis on governance and development in subSaharan Africa. He has written extensively on questions of economic adjustment, democratization, and civil society in Africa; democratic reform and political economy in Nigeria; public attitudes toward reform and democracy in West Africa; and the comparative politics of economic change in Africa and Southeast Asia. Lewis is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, the Research Council of the International Forum for Democratic Studies, the editorial boards of the Journal of Democracy and the Journal of Modern African Studies, and an elected member of the Board of Directors of the African Studies Association. He has consulted for the Ford Foundation, the MacArthur Foundation, the Carter Center, the Council on Foreign Relations, Freedom House, USAID, and the World Bank. He received a Bachelor of Arts from the University of California, Berkeley, and a master’s degree and PhD from Princeton University.


IN KEEPING WITH PRESIDENT RONALD J. DANIELS’

COLLABORATION FOSTERS CROSS-POLLINATION OF IDEAS AND NEW SYNERGIES, Johns Hopkins SAIS in fall 2015 welcomed a new generation of faculty members whose specialties cut across academic disciplines. These scholars’ expertise is wide ranging: from the political economy of energy to the structure and performance of governments and organizations that receive foreign aid. The new faculty members add to Johns Hopkins SAIS’ knowledge on China and East Asia, Latin America, India, and the Middle East, and will teach courses across all programs including China studies, energy resources and environment, international development, and the South Asia studies program. In addition, a few professorships have been created to promote interdivisional collaboration and interdisciplinary scholarship: the Bloomberg Distinguished Professorships and the Aronson Center for International Studies Professorships. Among the recently recruited faculty are four tenure-track professors who are core members of the new International Political Economy concentration: Ling Chen, Andrew Cheon, David A. Steinberg, and Pavithra Suryanarayan. A fifth tenure-track professor, Daniel Honig, joined the International Development Program faculty and a sixth, Jonathan D. Hoddenbagh, joined the International Economics Program faculty. Johns Hopkins SAIS also welcomed its first Bloomberg Distinguished Professor, Jessica Fanzo. And Raffaella A. Del Sarto joined the SAIS Europe full-time faculty.

NEXT GENERATION

WHERE INTERDISCIPLINARY

FACULTY

VISION OF ONE UNIVERSITY

Johns Hopkins University | 39


Andrew Cheon is an assistant professor of international political economy who has written on energy subsidies, energy investments, and interest groups’ role in environmental policy. He received a Bachelor of Arts in political science and Asian and Middle Eastern studies from Duke University and a Master of Arts and Master of Philosophy, as well as a PhD in political science, from Columbia University. He specializes in international political economy as it relates to energy, and his work has been published in Political Studies, Energy Policy, Comparative Political Studies, and the Journal of Conflict Resolution.

MY RESEARCH CHALLENGES DISCIPLINARY

ANDREW

CHEON ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY

BOUNDARIES OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS, ENGAGING TOPICS SUCH AS ENERGY SECURITY AND NATIONAL OIL COMPANIES.

40 | SAIS Magazine Winter 2016


WHAT ARE THE LINKAGES, DRIVERS, TRADE-OFFS, AND ETHICS OF ENSURING SUSTAINABLE FOOD SYSTEMS OF POOR POPULATIONS LIVING IN POST-CONFLICT COUNTRIES?

Prior to joining Johns Hopkins, Jessica Fanzo served as an assistant professor of nutrition in the Institute of Human Nutrition and the Department of Pediatrics at Columbia University. She also acted as the senior adviser on nutrition policy at Columbia’s Center on Globalization and Sustainable Development. She has worked at the United Nations World Food Programme, Bioversity International in Italy, and the Millennium Development Goal Centre in Kenya. Fanzo’s area of expertise is the linkages among agriculture, nutrition, health, and the environment in the context of sustainable and equitable diets and livelihoods. She was the first laureate of the Carasso Foundation, receiving the Sustainable Diets Prize in 2012 for her work on sustainable food and diets for long-term human health.

JESSICA

FANZO BLOOMBERG DISTINGUISHED ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF ETHICS AND GLOBAL FOOD AND AGRICULTURE

Johns Hopkins University | 41


I STUDY THE COMPARATIVE POLITICS OF INEQUALITY AND DEMONSTRATE HOW DIFFERENT FORMS OF INEQUALITY— ECONOMIC, ETHNIC, SOCIAL— STRUCTURE POLITICAL BEHAVIOR AND SHAPE REDISTRIBUTIVE

PAVITHRA

INSTITUTIONS.

SURYANARAYAN ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY

42 | SAIS Magazine Winter 2016

Pavithra Suryanarayan is an assistant professor in international political economy. She studies fiscal capacity, inequality, ethnic politics, and voting behavior, both sub-nationally in India and crossnationally. She completed her undergraduate education at the National University of Singapore and holds a master’s degree in public policy from the University of California, Berkeley. She is currently a doctoral candidate at Columbia University. Her dissertation examines the relationship between democratization and taxation. Using colonial India as the illustrative case, she demonstrates how elites can manipulate the fiscal bureaucracy to limit the redistributive potential of the state after political expansion. She has published in World Politics, American Journal of Political Science, Party Politics, and Asian Survey.


Daniel Honig is an assistant professor of international development. His research focuses on the relationships among organizational structure, management practice, and performance in developing country governments and organizations that provide foreign aid. Honig holds a PhD in public policy from Harvard Kennedy School, where his dissertation focused on the optimal level of autonomy in the delivery of foreign aid, and a BA in political science and philosophy from the University of Michigan. Outside the academy, he has worked in Liberia, East Timor, South Sudan, Thailand, India, and Israel, among other countries. He has worked for developing country national governments (Liberia, South Sudan) as well as aid organizations and NGOs in sectors including aid management and negotiation, youth agriculture, and social entrepreneurship.

DANIEL

HONIG ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

ORGANIZATIONS ARE COMPOSED OF INDIVIDUALS WHO IMPACT WHAT HAPPENS IN INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT. HOW SHOULD PEOPLE BE MANAGED? MOTIVATED? MEASURED? Johns Hopkins University | 43


David A. Steinberg is an assistant professor in international political economy with expertise in monetary and financial policy in emerging markets. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in political science and economics from McGill University and a Master of Arts and PhD in political science from Northwestern University. Prior to Johns Hopkins SAIS, he served as an assistant professor of political science at the University of Oregon. His work has appeared in World Politics, International Studies Quarterly, Comparative Political Studies, Economics and Politics, and the Canadian Journal of Political Science. His book, Demanding Devaluation: Exchange Rate Politics in the Developing World, was published by Cornell University Press in 2015.

DAVID A.

STEINBERG ASSISTANT PROFESSOR IN INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY

I LOVE TRYING TO FIGURE OUT WHAT SHAPES THE SOCIAL AND POLITICAL WORLD — AND TEACHING MY STUDENTS ABOUT WHAT I LEARN FROM MY RESEARCH. 44 | SAIS Magazine Winter 2016


MY RESEARCH FOCUSES ON POLITICAL ECONOMY AND COMPARATIVE DEVELOPMENT OF CHINA AND EAST ASIA, ESPECIALLY GOVERNMENTBUSINESS RELATIONS AND INDUSTRIAL POLICIES. Ling Chen is an assistant professor of international political economy whose work focuses on political economy and government-business relations in China and East Asia. She has written on China’s electric sector reform and the evolution of Japan’s economic institutions, and she is completing a book manuscript on how globalization influences China’s industrial policies. Chen completed her PhD in political science at Johns Hopkins University. Prior to joining Johns Hopkins SAIS, she was a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard Kennedy School’s Ash Center and a Shorenstein Fellow at Stanford University. Her work appears in New Political Economy, Politics & Society, Review of International Political Economy, and The China Journal. Her research has received support from the Social Science Research Council (Andrew Mellon Foundation) and other institutions.

LING

CHEN ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY

Johns Hopkins University | 45


MY CURRENT RESEARCH IS CONCERNED WITH BORDERS, POWER, AND INTERDEPENDENCE IN THE MIDDLE EAST, ALSO IN RELATION TO THE EUROPEAN UNION.

RAFFAELLA

DEL SARTO ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF MIDDLE EAST STUDIES

46 | SAIS Magazine Winter 2016

Raffaella Del Sarto is an associate professor of Middle East studies at SAIS Europe in Bologna. She holds a PhD in international relations from Hebrew University of Jerusalem and previously served as a Pears Fellow in Israel and Mediterranean studies at the Middle East Center of St. Antony’s College at the University of Oxford, and as a Marie Curie Fellow and Jean Monnet Fellow at the European University Institute. Del Sarto’s specializations include politics and international relations of the Middle East region, as well as relations among the Middle East, the European Union, and the United States. Her research also focuses on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and EUIsrael bilateral and multilateral relations. Her most recent book is Fragmented Borders, Interdependence and External Relations: The Israel-Palestine-European Union Triangle, published by Palgrave Macmillan.


Jon Hoddenbagh is Assistant Professor of International Economics at Johns Hopkins SAIS. His research and teaching focus on international macroeconomics and finance. His current research interests include the conduct and formulation of monetary policy, the role of fiscal federalism in monetary unions, and the ability of financial shocks to generate economy-wide recessions. A graduate of Queen’s University in Canada (BA, MA) and Boston College (MA, PhD), Hoddenbagh was a Fellow at the Clough Center for Constitutional Democracy and a recipient of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences Dissertation Fellowship at Boston College in 2014. Prior to attending graduate school he worked as an economist at Canada’s central bank.

JON

HODDENBAGH ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS

MY RESEARCH STUDIES THE OPTIMAL ROLE OF MONETARY AND FISCAL POLICY IN ALLEVIATING RECESSIONS AND PROMOTING ECONOMIC STABILITY.

Johns Hopkins University | 47


THE NEW HENRY A. KISSINGER CENTER FOR GLOBAL AFFAIRS WILL EDUCATE FUTURE LEADERS IN GLOBAL STRATEGY

ADDRESSING GLOBAL ISSUES In June 2007, the Hopkins-Nanjing Center for Chinese and American Studies hosted its 20th anniversary celebration. The event culminated in the presentation of an award to former U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger.

48 | SAIS Magazine Winter 2016


“THE CHALLENGES OF TODAY’S WORLD DEMAND FRESH THINKING AND NEW IDEAS BASED ON HISTORICAL PERCEPTION, KNOWLEDGE, AND SOUND ANALYSIS. JOHNS HOPKINS SAIS IS UNIQUELY POSITIONED TO TACKLE SUCH CHALLENGES WITH A COMBINATION OF CONTEXTUAL STUDIES IN ECONOMICS, RELIGION, AND REGIONAL AND CULTURAL HISTORY WITH PRACTICAL DIPLOMACY.”

—HENRY A. KISSINGER Johns Hopkins University | 49

S T R AT E G I C I N I T I AT I V E S

&OURBUILDING FUTURE


JOHNS HOPKINS SAIS is honored to announce the creation of the Henry A. Kissinger Center for Global Affairs. Through long-term strategic analysis and the application of historical lessons to contemporary international problems, the Kissinger Center will support the school’s mission to educate the next generation of world leaders—by applying the lessons of history, the wisdom of philosophy, and the deep knowledge of cultures—so that they may solve complex global problems. “There is a need for an approach in international relations education that transcends the narrow confines of short-run policymaking,” Johns Hopkins President Ronald J. Daniels said. “The Kissinger Center is created to address that need. The rigorous theoretical research at the center will instill a deep sense of intellectual inquiry in the minds of all those who engage with the subjects at hand, including the most vexing international issues of our time.”

“THERE IS A NEED FOR AN APPROACH IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS EDUCATION THAT TRANSCENDS THE NARROW CONFINES OF SHORT-RUN POLICYMAKING. THE KISSINGER CENTER IS CREATED TO ADDRESS THAT NEED.” —RONALD J. DANIELS, JOHNS HOPKINS PRESIDENT Former New York City Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg led the effort to create the Kissinger Center, providing the initial funding and helping define the center’s mission to honor Kissinger’s legacy through the education of future leaders. Kissinger’s diplomatic achievements span nearly six decades, advancing the U.S. national interest during times of momentous upheaval and shifts in global politics. From the negotiation of a peaceful settlement of the Vietnam War to détente with the Soviet Union and rapprochement with China, the former secretary of state inspired a strategic approach to global affairs for multiple generations of foreign policy experts.

Former U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger joins Jill McGovern, member, SAIS board of advisors, SAIS Europe Advisory Council, and Hopkins-Nanjing Council, at the New York home of Todd A. Fisher ’91, vice chair, SAIS board of advisors. 50 | SAIS Magazine Winter 2016

The Kissinger Center will be permanently established with an endowment, funding the work of at least 10 distinguished scholars in international affairs. In doing so, the Kissinger Center will greatly strengthen the school’s tradition of producing and promoting new ideas that influence academia, public debate, and policymaking.


Eric E. Schmidt, the executive chairman of Alphabet Inc. (formerly Google Inc.), endowed the first Kissinger chair during a visit to the SAIS Europe campus in Bologna, Italy, in April last year. The $5 million gift will support the research of a scholar based out of SAIS Europe. Schmidt has a long history with Johns Hopkins and Bologna. His father, Wilson Schmidt, served as professor of international economics at the SAIS Europe campus from 1963–65. Schmidt has said the experience of living in Bologna with his father “changed my life, and I owe much of my success and career to Johns Hopkins.” The gifts of Schmidt, Bloomberg, and over a dozen other donors to advance the Johns Hopkins mission through the Kissinger Center are “a timely investment in furthering the study of international relations during a period in which the global order faces both new opportunities and complex challenges,” said Vali Nasr, dean of Johns Hopkins SAIS. The thought leadership and research of the Kissinger Center will greatly advance the mission of Johns Hopkins SAIS to educate and train the next generation of global leaders to solve the multifaceted challenges of the 21st century. From establishing a campus in Nanjing, China, in 1986 as one of the first joint academic ventures between U.S. and Chinese

The Agnelli Family Alcoa Corporation and Foundation Anonymous Foundation Bloomberg Philanthropies Anne E. de la Renta The Diller– von Furstenberg Family Foundation JP Morgan Chase & Company The Kraft Group The Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis Foundation Rupert Murdoch David Rockefeller Eric and Wendy Schmidt Speyer Family Foundation The Starr Foundation The Xerox Foundation

institutions, to building a base for the study of international affairs out of Bologna, Johns Hopkins SAIS has always been at the forefront of providing a transformational approach to foreign policy. Over the years, thousands of the school’s students have assumed leadership positions in diplomacy, negotiation, and statecraft— and not without challenge and difficulty. Building upon this foundation, the Kissinger Center will allow the school to grow and expand in ways that enable its students to better understand, analyze, and learn from the great events of statecraft so that they can take on the changing global order. “The center’s thought leadership, scholarship, and pedagogy,” Nasr said, “will shape the way our future leaders will develop and implement foreign policy.” Johns Hopkins University | 51

S T R AT E G I C I N I T I AT I V E S

The center’s scholars will conduct innovative research that will inform policymakers and thought leadership through forums and conferences. Scholars will engage faculty across the university in a broader conversation on capturing the essence of strategy in global affairs.

With deepest gratitude, Johns Hopkins SAIS recognizes the following individuals and organizations who made founding gifts to the Kissinger Center over the past year:


Contact the Development and Alumni Relations Staff SAIS WASHINGTON KENNA BARRETT Director of Development cbarre18jhu.edu

KIM MORTON Associate Dean for Development and Alumni Relations kmorton3@jhu.edu

VALENTINA CUCUZZA Senior Adminstrative Coordinator vcucuzz1@jhu.edu

ELISE MOYLAN Associate Director of Corporate and Foundation Relations emoylan@jhu.edu

LOUIS DIEZ Assistant Director of Development louis.diez@jhu.edu

SAIS EUROPE

MARY EVANS Special Events Coordinator mary.evans@jhu.edu MARGARET HARDT FRONDORF ’00 Director of Alumni Relations mfrondorf@jhu.edu JORDI IZZARD Senior Associate Director of Alumni Relations jizzard1@jhu.edu ANNA LEMBERGER Development Coordinator anna.lemberger@jhu.edu LIZ LEVINE Senior Associate Director of Development liz.levine@jhu.edu SEAN MALONEY Associate Director of Development smaloney@jhu.edu

ALESSANDRA ADAMI Administrative Assistant of Development aadami@jhu.edu GABRIELLA CHIAPPINI Director of Development gchiappini@jhu.edu CLARISSA RONCHI Development Coordinator cronchi@jhu.edu FRANCESCA TORCHI Assistant, Alumni Relations ftorchi@jhu.edu

SAIS CHINA EMILY SPENCER ’14 Director of Development emily.spencer@jhu.edu HUGH SULLIVAN Associate Director of Development hugh.sullivan@jhu.edu

Thank you to all who contributed to John Hopkins SAIS during our 2015 fiscal year (July 1, 2014–June 30, 2015). Look for the donor honor roll at sais-jhu.edu/donors. 52 | SAIS Magazine Winter 2016

Christian Herter Society The legacy of Christian Herter—former U.S. secretary of state and co-founder of SAIS— has inspired thousands of students to strive to address the most pressing challenges in international relations. We recognize and celebrate his lasting imprint by honoring individuals who contribute $2,500 or more in support of the mission and goals of Johns Hopkins SAIS. CHS members are highlighted in the SAIS Honor Roll and receive special seating at select SAIS events, as well as exclusive access to policy insiders and leading thinkers. In the spring of 2016 we are pleased to announce the first New York City CHS Event. Make your gift now and ensure that SAIS remains the premier educational institution for international relations. For more information, contact Louis Diez at 202.663.5630 or louis.diez@jhu.edu.

Join today!


WE ARE MORE THAN 17,000 STRONG, WITH ALUMNI RESIDING AROUND THE GLOBE. GRADUATES FROM OUR THREE LOCATIONS IN WASHINGTON, D.C.; BOLOGNA, ITALY; AND NANJING, CHINA, STAY CONNECTED THROUGH SAIS-SPECIFIC CLUBS AND GROUPS, AS WELL AS THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY ALUMNI ASSOCIATION.

Johns Hopkins University | 53

ALUMNI LIFE

ALUMNI LIFE


SAIS VOLUNTEER LEADERSHIP

Increased presence of SAIS alumni on JHU Board of Trustees highlights importance of global education and outlook

James

Like Anderson, Savage, and Flaherty, many alumni leaders begin their volunteer careers as city or regional representatives

Anderson

and continue their involvement

Joins JHU Board of Trustees

locally while bringing their leadership skills to the university more broadly.

The increasing role

WHEN JAMES ANDERSON

three other Johns Hopkins

B’81 ACCEPTED AN INVITATION

SAIS alumni on the Hopkins

alumni on the board of trustees

TO JOIN THE JOHNS HOPKINS

board: Sarah O’Hagan ’86,

is a measure of the reputation

UNIVERSITY BOARD OF

current SAIS board chair;

of SAIS graduates as well as a

TRUSTEES, his admiration for

Lou Forster KSAS ’82, ’83,

nod to the rising importance

the group and what it stood for

SAIS’ Rising to the Challenge

of a global orientation to

was tempered by, as he recalls,

Campaign chair; and Pam

the university’s leadership.

“some degree of anxiety as to

Flaherty ’68, former SAIS board

Johns Hopkins’ greater

what I [could] possibly add to

chair and trustee emeritus.

global footprint—thanks to

the skills and commitment not already on display.”

With the appointment of Anderson to the university board,

Modesty aside, Anderson, a

nine Johns Hopkins SAIS alumni

manager with the Scottish

and volunteers will have risen

investment firm Baillie Gifford,

to the role of trustee, beginning

brings deep experience to his

with Frank Savage ’64 in 1977.

role. Since 2008, he has served

More recently, Flaherty served

on the SAIS Europe Advisory

as the first female chair of the

Council, where he supported

JHU Board in 2007. Savage and

SAIS Europe with his time and

Flaherty continue as members

financial resources. He joins

of the SAIS Board of Advisors.

54 | SAIS Magazine Winter 2016

of the school’s

international students, alumni, and patients as well as additional campuses and partnerships abroad—means close ties between SAIS and the university are ever more important. SAIS’ focus and expertise can attract global interest in Johns Hopkins, as shown by the recent creation of the Kissinger Center for Global Affairs.


be far better known outside

JHU travels in both directions,

North America.” In the other,

and SAIS benefits greatly, too.

“for this to happen requires

Historically, Hopkins trustees

the international activities…

have been generous advocates

of Hopkins to become more

for SAIS. In the past year alone,

central to the university’s self-

Oliver Russel B’13, ’14,

Jeff Aronson KSAS ’80 and his

perception and…consistently

James Anderson Fellow-

wife Shari made a $10 million

advanced in the future.”

ship recipient.

James Anderson and

gift to create two endowed professorships, bridging together SAIS and the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences. Although not a SAIS alumnus himself, Aronson recognized the school’s importance to the university and to the world of international affairs. Anderson views his role as a two-way conduit from Hopkins to the broader society. “In one direction,” he notes, “the university…deserves to

“SAIS has always been a jewel in the Hopkins family, but both the university and SAIS have benefited from a closer and more symbiotic relationship in recent years—the Aronson gift to support shared professors with the Krieger School, a shared Bloomberg professor with public health, the Kissinger Center for Global Affairs, and administration support for tenure policy and young tenure track professors, to name just a few. International relations is one of the most popular undergraduate majors at Hopkins and having the top IR/foreign relations school in the country as part of the Johns Hopkins family is a perfect match. I was thrilled to become the first SAIS alum to become chair of the university Board of Trustees.” —PAM FLAHERTY ’68, JHU BOARD OF TRUSTEES CHAIR EMERITUS, MEMBER OF THE SAIS BOARD OF ADVISORS

Pam Flaherty

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ALUMNI LIFE

The synergy between SAIS and


REFLECTIONS & SPOTLIGHTS

Honoring Life & Legacy The Elif Nazmiye Yavuz Fellowship — JULIE D. HACKETT, ALEXANDRA JAECKH, CAMILO TELLEZ B’03, ’04

“WE HAVE FOUND

ONE WAY TO HONOR HER LEGACY AND REMEMBER THAT ALTHOUGH SHE IS NO LONGER PHYSICALLY WITH US, HER LIGHT AND HER SPIRIT WILL LIVE ON FOREVER.”

Thanks to the generosity and hard work of Johns Hopkins SAIS alumni to raise $100,000, the Elif Nazmiye Yavuz Fellowship Fund has recently been endowed to benefit an incoming student who shares the same passion for development that Elif Yavuz, B’03, ’04 embodied in her studies at SAIS and in her professional life.

countless conversations about how to honor the beautiful life that Elif lived. Knowing her love for the Bologna Center and reminiscing about the amazing year we shared together, the class came together in a remarkable effort to raise money for an endowed fellowship that would benefit an incoming student dedicated to the same causes that Elif held dear.

Two years have passed since that September day in 2013 that changed our lives forever. The attack on the Westgate Mall in Nairobi, Kenya, still haunts us as we continue to come to grips with the senseless act of hatred that took our friend and classmate Elif Yavuz, B’03, ’04, her partner Ross Langley, and their unborn baby girl.

Hearing the news and moved by her story and her commitment to making the world a better place, former SAIS Board of Advisors member Robert Hildreth ’75, founder and executive director of Inversant, which empowers families to invest in higher education, stepped forward with a matching gift challenge to create an endowed scholarship in Elif’s honor.

As the Bologna Class of 2003 grappled with the reality and tragedy of Elif’s death, memorial services were held along with

56 | SAIS Magazine Winter 2016


He proposed that if we managed to raise the first $25,000, he would match that amount. Still short of reaching the ultimate goal of an endowed fellowship, the grassroots outreach campaign continued and donations, small and large, poured in from our class, friends of Elif, and people who were simply touched by her story. By December 2014, $25,000 had been raised to meet the first match. Hildreth then offered another $25,000 match, to raise another $50,000 for a combined total of $100,000—the amount needed to endow a fellowship. Classmates banded together, telling friends and family about our mission to raise money for the fellowship and trying to figure out ways to cross the finish line. Finally, in March 2015, we received confirmation that our fundraising efforts had met Hildreth’s second target and that Elif’s scholarship would become a reality.

Elif’s mother, Lia Yavuz, was moved by the outpouring of love and support from Elif’s friends. She expressed her gratitude that this fellowship would support an incoming student who shared Elif’s love for improving the health and well-being of women and families in disadvantaged communities in Africa and across the globe. The pain of Elif’s absence will always be with us, but through this fellowship we have found one way to honor her legacy and remember that although she is no longer physically with us, her light and her spirit will live on forever. We are grateful to the 93 individual donors who rose to the challenge, to Bob Hildreth, whose generosity made this possible, and to friends and fellow Johns Hopkins SAISers who continue to keep the memory of our dear friend alive.

Johns Hopkins University | 57

ALUMNI LIFE

To donate online, go to http://bit.ly/ SAISMakeaGift and note “Elif Nazmiye Yavuz Fellowship Fund” in the “Other Designation” tab. To make a taxdeductible gift in Europe, e-mail Alessandra Adami, aadami@jhu.edu.


REFLECTIONS & SPOTLIGHTS

“HEY,

HERE COME THE

GOOD GUYS!” INTERNATIONAL FIRST RESPONDER SPEAKS OUT FOR HUMAN RIGHTS

— PHILIP ROBERTSON ’97

As a European ambassador in Kuala Lumpur invites me into a well-appointed office, and coffee arrives for our meeting, she turns to me to say, “It’s good to see you again—but I must say that I’m surprised you didn’t have any trouble at the airport…” It’s a refrain I hear often from diplomats across Southeast Asia and one that marks my career as being somewhat apart from many other SAISers. Robertson leads a protest in Tokyo at the de facto North Korean Embassy to demand rights in North Korea and the return of abducted Japanese nationals, September 2011.

58 | SAIS Magazine Winter 2016

For many governments in the region, I’m the human rights messenger, offering strong recommendations in private and biting commentary in the media that points out that they are falling short by breaking up peaceful rallies, charging activists for speaking up, or harassing local groups and communities. As deputy director for Asia for Human Rights Watch (HRW), people know who I am even if we haven’t met—a point that I make later that day at a business conference, where I tell a group of corporate social responsibility reps that “if we meet across the table, you know something has gone very wrong in your supply chain.” But for those with their back against the wall, like my friend Zunar, an editorial cartoonist facing 43 years in prison for sending out nine tweets, or Nisha, a transgender activist attacked by two unknown men with a metal bar outside her apartment, I’m an international community first responder, at the scene or on the phone talking with journalists and diplomats to loudly demand action to right a wrong. Those who bravely face injustice

Robertson speaks at the founding conference of the International Coalition to Stop Crimes Against Humanity in North Korea, held in Tokyo on Sept. 8, 2011. by standing up for themselves and their communities are the ones who most firmly grasp what I do on a day-to-day basis as I demand that their governments abide by their international human rights commitments. What I can’t and won’t ever forget is human rights is all about people wanting to be treated fairly and with respect and about pushing back against a world increasingly full of scenes of brutality and horror. And so, at the end of the day as I walk with a HRW colleague to meet local journalists at a bar, one of the reporters calls out, “Hey, here come the good guys!” Damn right.


water FOCUS ON

ALUMNI LIFE

SAIS EDUCATION PROVIDES STRONG FOUNDATION ON INTERNATIONAL WATER ISSUES

— MEREDITH GIORDANO ’93, N’94

In August 2013 my family and I moved back to Washington, D.C., from Colombo, Sri Lanka. Two weeks later I attended my SAIS 20th class reunion and, a year later, celebrated a similar milestone with the HopkinsNanjing Center. A lot has happened in those 20 years. I joined the Foreign Service with the U.S. Agency for International Development, received a PhD in geography (concentrating on international water relations), and for the past 13 years I have worked with the International Water Management Institute, first in Colombo and now in Washington, D.C. The government of India honored Madhya Pradesh for groundwater augmentation following the introduction of a rainwater harvesting initiative.

IWMI is a nonprofit scientific research organization and member of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research. IWMI focuses on the sustainable use of water and land resources in developing countries. My responsibilities have involved research and research management of projects and programs focused on transboundary water conflict and cooperation, agricultural water management, and the impact of agricultural research. With IWMI, I have had the opportunity to work in many different contexts in Africa and Asia and to engage with a host of academic, government, nonprofit, and community groups. What has struck me throughout my career is the strength of human ingenuity and adaptation. Agricultural communities in both the developed and developing world face a number of natural resource management challenges, but there are inspiring stories of innovation to overcome such challenges. In South Asia and

Giordano breaks ground for a new rainwater harvesting pond in Madhya Pradesh, India. sub-Saharan Africa, for example, despite significant constraints, smallholder farmers are investing their own resources to access and manage water resources, fueling a growing and vibrant trend in small private irrigation. Twenty-two years ago I did not anticipate a career focused on water. Through my career, however, I’ve had an opportunity to build on the knowledge I gained at SAIS in international relations and development and apply it to a topic rich with social, economic, and environmental dimensions.

Johns Hopkins University | 59


REFLECTIONS & SPOTLIGHTS

MARTIN EICHTINGER:

Global Ambassador

MARTIN EICHTINGER B’85 became Austria’s ambassador to the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in January 2015. He joined the Bolognesi a Londra committee and hosted the group’s signature alumni event on Nov. 7, 2015, at the Austrian ambassador’s residence. The gathering featured an expert panel that discussed how Europe can face the challenge of the refugee crisis. 

60 | SAIS Magazine Winter 2016

Eichtinger joined the Austrian Foreign Service in 1986. Postings included service in Mexico, in the cabinet of the Austrian foreign minister, and in Washington, D.C. (1992–1999). Upon returning to Vienna, he accepted a position as the Federation of Industry’s director for international affairs. He then took on an extraordinary assignment as head of the Office of the Special Representative for Payments to Former Forced and Slave Labourers of the Nazi Regime. He later became chief of staff in the cabinet of the federal minister of economics and labor; four years later, he was named secretary general of that ministry. Eichtinger’s first ambassadorial posting, to Romania and Moldova, came in 2007. Prior

to his current position in the U.K., he was director general for cultural policy at the Ministry for Europe, Integration and Foreign Affairs. The ambassador remembered the year he spent as a student in Bologna as one of the best of his life, calling it a “unique experience and the best possible preparation for an international career.” He recently attended his 30th class reunion, held during the 2015 SAIS Europe alumni weekend. Eichtinger said he enjoys staying in touch with fellow Bolognesi as they are “friends for life” and is grateful that the year he spent in Bologna has allowed him to be a part of the global Johns Hopkins SAIS family.


ALUMNI IN PRINT

ALUMNI LIFE

Tu Plan de Visibilidad 40+ by Neus Arqués B’90, B’91 (Penguin Random House, 2015) This book offers cost-effective visibility tools to independent professionals, helping them better present and profit from their knowledge and experience. It is aimed at the experienced professional whose training, background, and outlook are primarily analogue but who needs to stay current in today’s dynamic digital environment. You can be 40+ and be visible. And you should. Cuba: It Matters, co-authored by Jay S. Brickman ’67 and Maria Conchita Mendez (CreateSpace, 2015) This is a historic moment for relations between the United States and Cuba. For the first time in more

than a half-century the two countries have formal diplomatic relations. But what happens now? The authors have more 50 years of joint experience dealing with Cuba/U.S relations. Cuba: It Matters shares that experience with a message that is clear: It is really important that both governments take advantage of this historic time to “get it right.” The Socialism of Fools? Leftist Origins of Modern Anti-Semitism, co-authored by William I. Brustein B’70, ’71 and Louisa Roberts (Cambridge University Press, 2015) Anti-Semitism, as it has existed historically in Europe, is generally thought of as a phenomenon of the political right. To the extent that 19th and

early 20th-century leftist movements manifested anti-Semitism, their involvement has often been suggested as fleeting and insignificant. This study seeks to examine more fully the role of the historic European left in developing and espousing anti-Semitic views. The authors draw upon a range of primary and secondary sources, including the analysis of left- and right-wing newspaper reportage, to trace the relationship between the political left and anti-Semitism in France, Germany, and Great Britain. This work looks at the phenomenon from the French Revolution to World War II, ultimately concluding that the relationship between the left and anti-Semitism has been much more profound than previously believed.

Ghost Image by Ellen Crosby B’75, ’78 (Scribner, April 2015) Ellen Crosby, a former freelance reporter with The Washington Post and Moscow correspondent for ABC Radio News, has written her ninth mystery, Ghost Image. This one unfolds in Washington, D.C., and London and involves an international photojournalist’s search for a 200-year-old botanic treasure worth millions. The search was sparked by the confession of a secret by a good friend, a well-known environmentalist and Franciscan friar who is found dead shortly afterward. Crimea, Global Rivalry, and the Vengeance of History by Hall Gardner ’82, PhD ’87 (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015) This book analyzes the long-term causes and consequences of

Johns Hopkins University | 61


ALUMNI IN PRINT

Moscow’s annexation of Crimea and political-military interference in eastern Ukraine. It is a response to Hall Gardner’s first book, Surviving the Millennium, which outlined in 1994 a pessimistic scenario under which Moscow might eventually opt for the annexation of Crimea. This newer volume suggests that the post-Cold War world was never at the “end of history.” Rather, the author suggests, homo geopoliticus is experiencing the “vengeance of history,” a dangerous period that must be surmounted by a difficult accommodation with Russia, China, and other states.

with the causes and consequences of the 1870–71 Franco-Prussian War and the German annexation of Alsace-Lorraine, this book systematically explores the key geostrategic, political-economic, and socio-cultural-ideological disputes among France, Germany, Austria-Hungary, Italy, Russia, Japan, the United States, and Great Britain, as well as the nature of their foreign policy goals, alliance formations, arms rivalries, and the dynamics of the diplomatic process, in order to better explain the deeper roots of the “Great War.”

The Failure to Prevent World War I: The Unexpected Armageddon by Hall Gardner ’82, PhD ’87 (Ashgate, 2015) By starting its analysis

Cold War Diplomat: Inside U.S. Diplomacy 1981–2011 by George A. Glass ’76 (CWD, 2015) This memoir, by a retired U.S. senior diplomat, recounts foreign service

62 | SAIS Magazine Winter 2016

experiences during and after the Cold War. The author traces the role he played in German unification, the Bosnia peace accords, the combating of terrorist finance, the stopping of the Iranian nuclear challenge, and the WikiLeaks fallout. Other tension-filled moments include the infiltration of the Berlin peace movement, dealing with Moscow dissidents, KGB arrests, a high-speed KGB auto chase, and the suicide of a friend. Gender, Home & Identity: Nuer Repatriation to Southern Sudan by Katarzyna Grabska B’98, ’99 (James Currey, 2014) This work follows the lives of South Sudanese Nuer from refugee camps in Kenya back home to war-torn South Sudan. Katarzyna

Grabska explores the aftermath of repatriation due to violence and war (1983–2005). How and where did returning refugees make their homes in South Sudan? How were gender relations and identity (re)defined as a result of war, displacement, and return to the post-war communities? And how were those displaced, often for years, able to re-create and rebuild a home, a community, and a nation? Colosio and Ruiz Massieu Twenty Years Later by Humberto Hernandez-Haddad ’81 (Self-published, 2014) This book examines the Mexican guerrilla insurrection in Chiapas followed by the assassinations of political leaders Luis Donaldo Colosio Murrieta and José Francisco Ruiz Massieu.


ALUMNI LIFE

Humberto Hernandez-Haddad highlights the initial attempt to extradite Manuel Muñoz Rocha—accused of masterminding one of the killings—from Texas and how that effort disappeared into the bowels of both countries’ bureaucracies. Who buried it and why? That part of Mexico’s history remains to be illuminated, and this book provides a starting point. O Beloved: Letters from the Front 1942–1944 by Stephen Hirst ’66 (Muuso Press, 2015) This work compiles and annotates the correspondence of Dr. David Hirst, a front-line combat surgeon twice wounded at some of the fiercest battles of the North African and Italian campaign, including Hill 609 and Anzio. His neardaily letters to his wife include more than 100

photographs and maps. They reveal mundane and humorous details of life on the front beyond the horrors. From the Sweet Life and the Great Beauty: A Literary Tour through Rome by Christina Höfferer B’98 (Picus, 2015) Christina Höfferer explores the Italian capital in the footsteps of great artists like John Keats, Federico Fellini, Pier Paolo Pasolini, and Ingeborg Bachmann. A look at modern art in Rome joins essays on “Bikes and Kisses,” “Urban Fruits,” “Eataly,” and current life in the Italian Senate. The International Protection of Adults, co-edited by Alex Ruck Keene B’99, ’00 (OUP, 2015) This is the first book to address in detail the

legal problems—and some of the solutions— connected to the increasing mobility of global citizens. The work looks at the consequent issues that arise when criteria like age or disability impact adults who are unable to protect their own welfare interests or property and affairs outside their “home” state. Constitutions and Conflict Management in Africa: Preventing Civil War Through Institutional Design, edited by Alan J. Kuperman ’96 (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2015) This book explores how domestic political institutions may buffer or exacerbate shocks that can lead to political instability, up to and including civil war and genocide. It includes chapters by several

other current and former Johns Hopkins SAIS professors: I. William Zartman, Gilbert Khadiagala, Stefan Wolff, and Justin Frosini. Private Equity Investing in Emerging Markets: Opportunities for Value Creation by Roger Leeds ’70, PhD ’77 (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015) Roger Leeds, director of the Center for International Business and Public Policy and senior research professor of International Finance at Johns Hopkins SAIS, illustrates how private equity is uniquely suited to strengthening the performance of a broad range of businesses in emerging markets. He outlines how private equity can play a significantly larger role in bolstering individual company performance and the private sector’s overall contribution to

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ALUMNI IN PRINT

economic growth and development. Drawing heavily on actual investor experiences, Leeds demonstrates that the same inefficiencies and weaknesses that characterize business climates in emerging-market countries also open the door to outsized opportunities for investors. Lillian on Life by Alison Jean Lester ’90 (Putnam, 2015) This is the story of a single woman reflecting on her choices and imagining her future. Born in the Midwest in the 1930s, Lillian lives, loves, and works in Europe in the ’50s and early ’60s. Once she settles in New York, she pursues the great love of her life. By the early ’90s, she’s taking stock. Throughout her life, walking the unpaved road

between traditional and modern choices for women, Lillian grapples with parental disappointment, societal expectations, and wins and losses in love as she develops her own brand of wisdom. The Transformation of Italian Armed Forces in Comparative Perspective. Adapt, Improvise, Overcome? by Francesco N. Moro B’04, ’06 and Fabrizio Coticchia (Ashgate, 2015) This is a book about the profound transformation that Italian armed forces have undergone in the past two decades of intensive deployments in the Balkans, the Middle East, and Afghanistan. Comparing and contrasting the Italian experience with the French and British ones, the book helps expand knowledge of the

64 | SAIS Magazine Winter 2016

functioning of European armed forces within NATO and sheds light on the mechanisms that underpin learning and innovation in complex organizations such as the military. New Centers of Global Evangelicalism in Latin America and Africa by Stephen Offutt ’00 (Cambridge University Press, 2015) This book engages in the debate about how and why an evangelical, Pentecostal form of Christianity is booming in the Global South. The central actors in Stephen Offutt’s account are local entrepreneurs who draw on transnational resources. Their Schumpeterian activities result in ever larger megachurches and media outlets, increased ability to export religion, greater social stratification within their own

movement, and more and different kinds of social and political engagement. Mouse Muse: The Mouse in Art by Lorna Owen B’84, ’85 (The Monacelli Press, 2014) This is the first-ever compendium of the minuscule animal’s astonishing legacy in visual art across centuries and cultures. Lorna Owen presents a vast range of works, including an ancient Roman bronze, a painting by Hieronymus Bosch, a woodblock print by Katsushika Hokusai, a photograph by André Kertész, a sculpture by Katharina Fritsch, and a video installation by Bruce Nauman, to name but a few. Each full-page color reproduction is accompanied by the intriguing history of how or why the mouse inspired the artist.


ALUMNI LIFE

Dulci’s Legacy by Margaret Pinard ’08 (Taste Life Twice Publishing, 2014) In this novel, the protagonist is starting high school and begins to have visions of disturbing events in her hometown on Cape Breton Island. Are these visions related to her best friend’s family, which is part of the Mi’kmaq tribe? How will Dulci deal with the intercultural challenges she discovers? In Journalism and Human Rights: How Demographics Drive Media Coverage by John C. Pollock ’67 (Routledge, 2015) This author compares cross-national coverage of human trafficking, HIV/AIDS treatment, water handling/contamination, and child labor. He also looks at U.S. cross-city reporting

on same-sex marriage, detainee rights at Guantanamo, immigration reform, and post-traumatic stress, illuminating the critical role of variations in both female empowerment and “vulnerability” demographic measures. My Life: What Not To Do; #1–10 by Eric Steiner ’96 (EarthBrew Books, 2014) This work is a brief, believable memoir (also true), with 10 cohesive chapters that cover politics, religion, sex, and drugs. Therein lies the author’s attempt to live “true.” What Not To Do is real life, perhaps too real. The stories include travels through Eastern Europe, work in the American ghetto, and navigating love and loss. It’s about a normal guy on the normal path, though the path turns out to have more zigs

and zags than normal. Or maybe it’s the guy.

remarkable family, and a historic career.

Privilege and Prejudice: The Life of a Black Pioneer by Clifton R. Wharton, Jr. ’48 (MSU Press, 2015) This is a stereotype-defying autobiography. The author’s breakthroughs include being the first black student at the School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins, the first to earn a doctorate in economics from the University of Chicago, the first black president of a major research university, Michigan State University, and the first black chairman and CEO of a Fortune 500 company, TIAA-CREF. His career culminated as deputy secretary of state during the Clinton administration. His narrative describes a most unusual childhood, a

Forging Trust Communities: How Technology Changes Politics by Irene S. Wu ’94, PhD ’04 (Johns Hopkins, 2015) This work illustrates the rich world history of citizens and leaders exercising political power through communications technology. Twenty historical case studies reveal how technology allows people to trust one another while mobilizing around a shared cause. In China, activists used the telegraph and newspapers to mobilize politically. Qatar (1990s) and the U.K. (1930s) relied on public broadcasters to enhance their influence abroad. The information and ideas exchanged are sources of political power like military and economic strength.

Johns Hopkins University | 65


1970s

1979 Following President Richard

Nixon’s historic visit to China in 1972, the United States and the PRC establish formal relations and exchange ambassadors. Johns Hopkins University and Nanjing University begin discussions to create a joint program to train leaders in U.S.-China relations.

1980s 1981

The Hopkins-Nanjing Center, the longest active Sino-American academic partnership in modern China, brings Chinese and non-Chinese students together to study international relations in their target language. In the midst of dynamic changes, the HNC has remained dedicated to creating graduates comfortable in two languages, two cultures, and an increasingly interdependent world. The HNC stands as a successful longstanding symbol of Sino-American cooperation and a cornestone of the China Studies program at Johns Hopkins SAIS.

Johns Hopkins University President Steven Muller and Nanjing University President Kuang Yaming sign a historic agreement to establish the Hopkins-Nanjing Center for Chinese and American Studies.

1984 Construction of the HNC begins.

30th Anniversary Celebration Hopkins-Nanjing Center June 17–19, 2016 Nanjing, China

1986 The HNC opens its doors

For more information, go to www.sais-jhu.edu/hopkinsnanjinganniversary or contact nanjing@jhu.edu.

1987 The HNC holds its first

66 | SAIS Magazine Winter 2016

in September 1986; 24 American students and 40 Chinese students enroll in the HNC Certificate program.

graduation ceremony. USAID makes its first grant to the HNC and has continued to provide valuable support to the HNC library and programs for almost 30 years.


1989 The HNC cancels

1990s 1994 Wan Li, former chair-

man of China’s National People’s Congress, visits the HNC and receives an honorary degree.

1998 Former U.S. President

George H.W. Bush visits the HNC, meets with students, and receives an honorary doctorate from Nanjing University.

2007 Former U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger speaks at the HNC’s 20th anniversary celebration in Nanjing.

2009 U.S. Ambassador to China John Huntsman, Jr. speaks at the HNC.

2010s 2011 The HNC Dragon Boat Team makes a historic finish by placing third in citywide final competition.

1999 The NATO bombing of

the Chinese embassy in Belgrade leads to protests in Nanjing. U.S. and Chinese HNC students hold a joint meeting to openly discuss the crisis and relieve tensions.

2000s 2003 The SARS epidemic in

China causes the HNC to relocate for the fall semester to the East-West Center at the University of Hawaii.

2012 HNC students competing in the Jessup

International Law Moot Court Competition place third in China’s national finals and finish in the top half of 137 teams in the international finals in Washington, D.C.— an extraordinary result for a small institution with no law school. The HNC fields award-winning teams in international moot court competitions in subsequent years.

2013 U.S. Ambassador to China Gary Locke speaks at the HNC’s 2013 commencement.

2014 The HNC launches its “Energy, Resources, 2006 The HNC opens a second

building, connected to the original building and housing a new library, classrooms, and faculty apartments. It also launches the two-year Master of Arts in international studies, the first master’s degree fully accredited in both China and the United States.

and Environment” academic concentration to address the world’s growing environmental challenges and opportunities.

2016 The HNC will celebrate its 30th anniversary June 17–19, 2016, a milestone in JHU’s longstanding commitment to innovation and partnership between China and the United States.

Johns Hopkins University | 67

SAIS VOICES

its June 1989 graduation ceremony and students depart early due to nationwide protests centered on Tiananmen Square. Normal operations resume in September 1989, and the HNC hosts a year-end conference in China on democracy.


AROUND THE GLOBE Our amazing Johns Hopkins SAIS community comprises alumni, friends, and students who create links with each other, with the school, and with the broader Johns Hopkins universe. On nearly all continents, alumni guide activities and drive events while working in partnership with SAIS Alumni Relations.

E U R O P E

1

Moscow: Alumni Summer Gathering

2

Berlin: Annual German Alumni Meeting

3

Paris: Alumni Dinner

The Moscow 1 alumni chapter organized a weekend get-together of current students and alumni at the country house of Mikhail Ryzhkov ’97. MOSCOW

BERLIN The annual alumni meeting at the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Auswärtige Politik included a roundtable discussion with Norbert Baas B’76, president of the JHU SAIS German Alumni Association, and Michael G. Plummer B’82, SAIS Europe director.

2

PARIS Alumni gathered for dinner at Cercle de l’Union Interalliée.

3

LONDON Johns Hopkins SAIS alumni came together at the sixth annual Il Bolognesi a Londra event at the Austrian Residence in London for a panel discussion followed by a reception and dinner.

4

LJUBLJANA Slovenian alumni gathered at the Restaurant Pen Klub for an informal dinner.

5

68 | SAIS Magazine Winter 2016


London: Il Bolognesi a Londra

6

Bangkok: Social Gathering

8

Jakarta: Reception with U.S. Ambassador Robert Blake ’84 and Dean Vali Nasr

5

Ljubljana: Dinner and Discussion

7

Hanoi: Happy Hour

A S I A BANGKOK Joey Tulyanond ’02 welcomed Johns Hopkins SAIS alumni for a social gathering at Hemingway’s.

6

HANOI Linh Le ’09 and Jacky Ly ’11 greeted fellow alumni at the Press Club Hanoi. Participants connected over happy hour and learned about interesting things to do in Hanoi.

7

9

Seoul: Dinner and Dialogue

JAKARTA U.S. Ambassador to Indonesia Robert Blake ’84 welcomed Dean Vali Nasr and alumni for a reception at his residence.

8

SEOUL Kee Hoon Chung ’11 welcomed fellow graduates for dinner at Mad for Garlic.

9

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ALUMNI LIFE

4


AROUND THE GLOBE

SINGAPORE Professor Carla Freeman ’90, PhD ’99 met alumni for tea time and happy hour during her visit to Singapore.

10

10

Singapore: Tea Time and Happy Hour with Professor Carla Freeman

11

Taipei: Dinner Gathering with Adjunct Professor David Brown

12

Tokyo: 30th Anniversary Celebration of Class of 1985

13

Boston: “Social Hour” Discussion

TAIPEI Professor Chi Su ’75 welcomed fellow alumni and guests who gathered for dinner with David Brown, adjunct professor of China studies.

11

TOKYO The SAIS Class of 1985 celebrated its 30th graduation anniversary at the Tokyo Gas Aoyama-Club.

12

N O R T H

A M E R I C A

BOSTON The SAIS Alumni New England Club hosted a social hour discussion on “How Access to Finance Can Support Communities in Need.” The event featured Tim Nourse ’97 at Impact Hub Boston.

13

HOUSTON Johns Hopkins SAIS alumni enjoyed a breakfast discussion with Professor Michael Mandelbaum, director of the American Foreign Policy Program. Mandelbaum spoke about his new book, The Road to Global Prosperity, at the River Oaks Country Club.

14

BALTIMORE SAISers who serve as representatives on the Johns Hopkins Alumni Council came together for the JHU Alumni Council dinner.

15

MIAMI SAIS and JHU alumni gathered at White & Case offices for cocktails and conversation with the mayor of Coral Gables James Cason ’68 who gave a talk on Cuba.

16

70 | SAIS Magazine Winter 2016

14

Houston: Discussion with Professor Michael Mandelbaum


Baltimore: JHU Alumni Council Dinner

16

Miami: Discussion with Coral Gables Mayor James Cason ’68

MEXICO CITY The Johns Hopkins SAIS Mexico Chapter hosted a conversation at the Torre Polanco on Mexico’s energy sector. Anna Raptis B’97 ’98 and Eduardo Lopez ’95 greeted fellow SAIS alumni and students.

17

17

Mexico City: Conversation About Energy

NEW YORK The SAIS Women’s Alumni Network hosted its inaugural New York Speaker Series featuring a conversation with a disting– uished panel of alumnae. Elizabeth Madigan Jost B’97 ’98, Rebecca Patterson B’94 ’95, and Patricia Sabga B’94 ’95 discussed how they have successfully navigated the corporate ladder within their industries and the challenges they’ve faced along the way.

18

18

New York: SWAN NY Speaker Series

NEW YORK Johns Hopkins SAIS and Bloomberg School of Public Health alumni in New York met at Morgan Stanley for a panel discussion moderated by Anika Penn ’10 on “Global Healthcare: Innovations on the Frontline.” The keynote speaker was Youseph Yazdi, executive director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Bioengineering Innovation & Design. Panelists included Joseph Wilson ’12, Emmanuel d’Harcourt MED ’96, and Suprotik Basu A&S ’99, SPH ’02.

19

19

New York: Global Healthcare: Innovations on the Frontline

Johns Hopkins University | 71

ALUMNI LIFE

15


AROUND THE GLOBE

NEW YORK SAIS and Hopkins-Nanjing Center hosted a Chinese New Year celebration over dim sum at the Hunan House, where SAIS alumni had the chance to meet HNC American Co-Director Cornelius Kubler.

20

TORONTO The Johns Hopkins SAIS Toronto Alumni Club hosted a summer reception on the rooftop of the U.S. Consulate.

20 New York: Chinese

New Year Dim Sum

21

Toronto: Summer Reception

21

22

Washington, D.C.: Amici di Bologna Celebration

23

Washington, D.C.: Strategic Studies Alumni Dinner

WASHINGTON, D.C. SAIS Europe alumni celebrated the Bologna Center 60th anniversary with Amici di Bologna at the Italian Embassy.

22

WASHINGTON, D.C. Alumni and current students gathered for cocktails and dinner at the annual Strategic Studies Alumni Dinner at the Willard Intercontinental. Alumni were welcomed back with remarks by Professor Eliot Cohen and enjoyed a keynote address by Juan Carlos Pinzón, Colombia’s ambassador to the United States.

23

WASHINGTON, D.C. Alumni and students met at SAIS for breakfast with Nick Binkley ’71, former SAIS Board of Advisor member and Bank of America vice chairman, and András Simonyi, former Hungarian ambassador to the United States and current managing director of the Johns Hopkins SAIS Center for Transatlantic Relations. They discussed Free to Rock, a documentary film about the impact of music on the end of the Cold War.

24

72 | SAIS Magazine Winter 2016

20 Washington, D.C.: Breakfast with Nick Binkley ’71


Washington, D.C.: SAIS Career Fair

WASHINGTON, D.C. Alumni returned to the school to represent their employers and meet with students at the 2015 SAIS Career Fair.

25

WASHINGTON, D.C. SAIS Europe alumni gathered in SAIS Kenney Auditorium to welcome SAIS Europe Director Michael Plummer B’82 and to meet newly admitted students at the annual SAIS Europe Reception.

26

26

Washington, D.C.: SAIS Europe Reception

27

Washington, D.C.: SWAN DC Hosts SAIS Women Leaders

27

28

Washington, D.C.: MIPP Reception

WASHINGTON, D.C.

Distinguished alumnae Anne Derse B’80, ’81, former U.S. ambassador to Azerbaijan and Lithuania, and Ellen Laipson ’78, president and CEO of the Stimson Center, led an interactive discussion on foreign affairs topics in SAIS Kenney Auditorium. Leah Romero ’13 and Rachel Dunsmoor B’07, ’09 welcomed guests. WASHINGTON, D.C. Master of International Public Policy alumni, students, and faculty mingled at the annual MIPP Reception. Dean Vali Nasr welcomed everyone with remarks in the SAIS Herter Room.

28

29

Washington, D.C.: Breakfast with Jon Showe ’72

WASHINGTON, D.C. Jon Showe ’72 spoke on “Obstacles and Opportunities for U.S.-Cuba Relations” with alumni and students who gathered for a breakfast conversation at the SAIS Rome Building.

29

30 Washington, D.C.: Southeast Asia Anniversary Dinner

WASHINGTON, D.C. Southeast Asia Studies Alumni celebrated their 20th reunion over dinner at the Tabard Inn.

30

Johns Hopkins University | 73

ALUMNI LIFE

25


LEGACY

Inaugural Class of ’45 Graduate

Endows Fellowship As a member of the first class of SAIS graduates, Elfriede Sobernheim ’45 knew that some men still questioned whether women should have a hand in shaping international diplomacy. Post-graduation, she spent 27 years proving her worth to her adoptive nation and to her mostly male colleagues at the U.S. Department of State and in the Army. A talented translator, she would help chase Nazis, identify communist threats,

and work on early satellite mapping systems. While marriage or post-war force reductions might have pulled some women away from their government jobs, Sobernheim and many of the female friends she made at graduate school maintained commitments to their careers. “We were able to show them differently,” she said of those early doubters during an oral history interview recorded for the school in 2010.

Even in retirement, when her days were filled with women’s service group meetings and knitting for the homeless, Sobernheim stayed on top of current affairs. She was deeply moved by the Ebola crisis, with its many implications for international relations and global health. Upon her death in 2015, Sobernheim left a generous gift to establish the Elfriede L. Sobernheim Endowed Fellowship, which will support

Leading the way for

women in WWII …

Sobernheim and the first SAIS graduates in 1945 Photo from the Johns Hopkins SAIS photograph collection.

74 | SAIS Magazine Winter 2016

“THE DUAL-DEGREE PROGRAM WAS A CRITICAL STEPPINGSTONE FOR ME. IT PROVIDED AN ENVIRONMENT WHERE I COULD ABSORB THE PERSPECTIVE AND PRACTICE OF PUBLIC HEALTH AND THEN BEGIN DEVELOPING THE ANALYTIC AND STRATEGIC SKILLS NECESSARY FOR POLICYMAKING. I AM STILL CLOSE WITH MENTORS AT BOTH THE BLOOMBERG SCHOOL AND SAIS, AND I CONTINUALLY RELY ON THE EVER-BROADENING COMMUNITY OF CLASSMATES FROM BOTH SCHOOLS.” —TED ALCORN ’10


The dual-degree program is a cross-disciplinary merging of two top-ranked schools. In addition to on-campus instruction, students complete a practicum and have the opportunity to pursue internships with think tanks or nongovernmental organizations on the ground amid health crises in places like Ethiopia, Indonesia, or Zimbabwe. Dualdegree graduates have gone on to work for the World Bank, the Clinton Foundation, and several government agencies.

“THE MA/MSPH PROGRAM HAS ALLOWED ME TO UNDERSTAND GLOBAL HEALTH ON MANY LEVELS, FROM THE INDIVIDUAL TO THE ECONOMIC AND POLITICAL. WHILE COMPLETING MY DEGREE, I LIVED IN FOUR DIFFERENT CITIES ON THREE DIFFERENT CONTINENTS … AND BUILT A LARGE NETWORK OF FRIENDS WHO WILL GO ON TO HOLD A WIDE VARIETY OF CAREERS AROUND THE WORLD… I CAN WORK ACROSS DISCIPLINES AND APPROACH GLOBAL HEALTH PROBLEMS FROM THE MANY DIFFERENT ANGLES THAT THEIR COMPLEXITY REQUIRES.”

—CHASE PERFECT ’15

—LEAH EWALD ’16

…and leading the way in

public health today.

The goal is to give students the health management tools that will help them navigate the increasingly political world of global health services.

More than 60 years later, she still fondly recalled living above the old Florida Avenue classrooms where she took notes with a fountain pen.

Sobernheim was thrust into politics at 11, when her family fled Berlin for the United States. After living in Binghamton, N.Y., she opted to come to SAIS because of its programs and its setting in Washington, D.C.

“Today’s students don’t know how lucky they are,” she said.

maximized her support with a gift through her will. If you have included SAIS in your estate plan or are considering doing so, please let us know. We want to thank you and welcome you into the Johns Hopkins Legacy Society and SAIS Legacy Circle, honoring those who make a gift from their estate or a life income gift. For more information,

Elfriede Sobernheim gave

contact Liz Levine at 202-663-5646

generously to Johns Hopkins

or liz.levine@jhu.edu or visit

SAIS throughout her lifetime and

rising.jhu.edu/giftplanning.

Johns Hopkins University | 75

ALUMNI LIFE

students pursuing a dual degree through SAIS and the Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore.

“GLOBALIZATION CONTINUES TO HAVE A DYNAMIC IMPACT ON THE FACTORS SHAPING PUBLIC HEALTH IN EVERY CORNER OF THE GLOBE.… THE DUAL DEGREE HAS GIVEN ME A UNIQUE PERSPECTIVE ON THE POLITICAL ECONOMY OF INTERNATIONAL HEALTH SYSTEMS. HOPKINS, THROUGH ITS INTERNATIONAL REPUTATION AND NETWORK OF ALUMNI, HAS PROVIDED A SIGNIFICANT BOOST TO MY EFFORTS TO CONVERT THIS PERSPECTIVE INTO MEANINGFUL IMPROVEMENTS IN GLOBAL HEALTH.”


Keeping

THE

Connection

1

News you need to know.

2

KEEP CURRENT with SAIS Alumni NEWS, a monthly e-newsletter featuring recently published alumni books, news, and a menu of event opportunities happening around the world. You won’t want to miss it! Subscribe by sending your current email address to saisalum@jhu.edu.

Engage with Johns Hopkins SAIS and social media.

SHARE YOUR JOHNS HOPKINS SAIS-RELATED NEWS any time you are attending an informal dinner with fellow alumni or organizing a formal alumni event! Use #saisalum and @SAIShopkins to connect our community via Twitter and Instagram. Did you know that there are almost 10,000 alumni on LINKEDIN and that 7,000 are part of the Johns Hopkins SAIS LinkedIn group? It is a great global network where you can search for and find fellow alumni by geographic location or industry, review mid-career job announcements from fellow alumni and our Career Services team, and hear about alumni-driven social events.

76 | SAIS Magazine Winter 2016


Pay it forward. Remember the excitement of relocating to a new city—venturing out and forging new connections? To meet fellow alumni, you do not have to do it all on your own: More than 60 Johns Hopkins SAIS graduates serve as POINTS OF CONTACT (POCs) worldwide. They assist newcomers with introductions to other alumni and host dinners and happy hours to get the community together. View the Who’s Who of SAIS POCs at sais-jhu.edu/ communities, or pay it forward and become a POC in your city.

4

Broaden your scope.

SAISers are part of the larger ALUMNI COMMUNITY of the Johns Hopkins University (186,000 alumni, nearly 17,000 of them SAIS grads). Join JHU chapters at alumni.jhu.edu/chapters and connect with SAIS alumni communities at sais-jhu.edu/alumni.

Have extra time? Want to add some ENRICHMENT to your schedule? • R  eceive a 50 percent fellowship for fall or spring Johns Hopkins SAIS courses (space permitting) and a 25 percent fellowship for summer courses. For details, call 202.663.5671 or email saisnondegree@jhu.edu. • S  AIS Global Career Services offers Professional Skills courses to help alumni brush up. For more information, contact Martina Leinz at mleinz@jhu.edu. • V  isit the Johns Hopkins SAIS and JHU libraries to tackle your every knowledge need. Alumni are granted access to the libraries for up to four hours per day. In-library privileges may be limited, based on availability of space and resources, as current JHU students receive priority over alumni and other library guests. Borrowing privileges for a library cost $50 for six months (or $100 for six months for access to all JHU libraries). For more information, see the library’s Alumni Information Guide at libguides.sais-jhu.edu/alumni or email SAISlibrary@jhu.edu. Knowledge Net—a selection of online resources at connect.jhu.edu/knowledgenet— is available to all alumni, free of charge.

Johns Hopkins University | 77


y h t r o w e t o n & CLASS OF

1960

In June 2015, NICOLE SALINGER B’60, SAIS Europe Advisory Council member and president of the Friends of the Musée Marmottan Monet, welcomed a group of alumni living in France to the Musée Marmottan Monet. Alumni toured the permanent collections dedicated to First Empire pieces and Impressionist art and visited the exhibition “The Invention of Privacy.” The Marmottan Monet, a property of the French Academy of Fine Arts, holds the largest Claude Monet collection in the world. CLASS OF

1964

In April 2015, LES JANKA ’64 was elected chairman of the Board of Directors of the George C. Marshall International Center in Leesburg, Va. The center maintains as a museum the home

of George Marshall and keeps alive the legacy of the Marshall Plan through youth educational exchanges with Europe. Janka had retired in July 2014 as president of the Quincy Group in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, and moved to Leesburg, where he and his wife, Michele, are restoring a historic farmhouse. CLASS OF

1965

CHESTER A. CROCKER ’65, PHD ’69 is the James

R. Schlesinger Professor of Strategic Studies at Georgetown University’s Walsh School of Foreign Service and sits on the board of its Institute for the Study of Diplomacy. He served as assistant secretary of state for African Affairs from 1981 to 1989 and in 2011 ended two decades of service on the board of the United States Institute of Peace, including 12 years as chair of the

78 | SAIS Magazine Winter 2016

independent, nonpartisan institution created and funded by Congress to strengthen knowledge and practice in managing international conflict. He is a distinguished fellow at Canada’s Centre for International Governance Innovation and a founding member of the Global Leadership Foundation. He is an adviser on strategy and negotiation for a number of U.S.

and European firms and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, the International Institute for Strategic Studies and The American Academy of Diplomacy. He is co-author or co-editor with Fen Osler Hampson and Pamela Aall of nine books addressing mediation and conflict resolution, including Managing Conflict in a World Adrift, published in 2015.

JOHN CHILDERS B’63, ’64, former CEO of the Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area, has moved to St. Pete Beach, Fla., where he said he has happily taken up as “CGO, chief grandfather officer” for his new granddaughter, Lila Rose. He said Washington and its issues seem far away.


practice of law in 2000, continues to serve on several boards, including that of the Washington Humane Society. At age 36, when her children were aged 7, 9, and 11, she attended Georgetown University Law Center. She practiced law for 23 years, specializing in international matters and original jurisdiction cases—disputes between states that go directly to the U.S. Supreme Court as a matter of first jurisdiction. She and her husband, Chester A. “Chet” Crocker ’65, PhD ’69 have lived in Washington, D.C., since their days at Johns Hopkins SAIS and will celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary in December. They have eight grandchildren. ROSLYN G. HEES ’65

is senior adviser for Transparency International’s secretariat and is currently leading a program on Preventing Corruption in Humanitarian Assistance. She has worked with Transparency International since 1997, as director for the Africa and Middle East Department and advising on evaluation and fundraising on a pro-bono basis. She previously worked with the World Bank as a project officer and manager for human development operations in the Asia/ Pacific and Middle East/ North Africa regions

ALUMNI LIFE

SAÔNE BARON CROCKER ’65, who retired from the

In April 2015, the Class of 1965 celebrated its 50th anniversary at the Legacy Circle Luncheon at Johns Hopkins SAIS in Washington, D.C.

and with the United Nations Development Programme in Haiti. BARBARA T. HOFFMAN ’65 is an arts, cultural

heritage, and cultural institution lawyer in New York City, providing transactional advice and litigation services to the domestic and international arts and cultural community. She is a pioneer in the field of public art and developed, for the New York City Bar Association, the model contract for the field. She has represented a majority of renowned artists working in the public realm with large-scale private and public projects. These projects are worldwide, from memorials to award-winning American Institute of Architects’ artist-architect collaborations in locales ranging from Manhattan’s Battery Park to Shanghai. She was named one of New York magazine’s “Best Lawyers” in 2010–16 and 2012 and is included in Marquis Who’s Who and Joseph

Goulden’s The Superlawyers. She is a former chair of the International Bar Association Committee on Art, Cultural Institutions, and Heritage Law and is chair of the New York City Bar Association Committee on Art Law. She was the first woman to serve as associate professor of law at Seattle University School of Law (formerly UPS), where she taught for 10 years before returning to full-time legal practice in New York. She is fluent in French, Spanish, and Italian. JULIE HAWKINS FISHER MELTON ’65, PHD ’77 is

retired from her position as program officer at the Kettering Foundation, a think tank that studies deliberative democracy. Her career also included consulting to both nongovernmental organization partnerships and microenterprise evaluation for Save the Children, TechnoServe, CARE, Trickle Up, and numerous other international NGOs. She taught comparative politics at Connecticut College

and a World Population course at the Yale Forestry School. She is the author of three books: The Road From Rio: Sustainable Development and the Nongovernmental Movement in the Third World (1993); Nongovernments: NGOs and the Political Development of the Third World (1998); and Importing Democracy: The Role of NGOs in South Africa, Tajikistan and Argentina (2013). She is currently promoting her most recent book, along with the idea that democratization NGOs are an ignored global trend. They import democratic ideas and combine them with the recovery of local democratic traditions, often visible only at the community level. CHARLES J. “CHARLIE” MICOLEAU ’65 is practic-

ing law at Curtis, Thaxter, Stevens, Broder and Micoleau. After graduation from Johns Hopkins SAIS, he worked for an antipoverty program in Maine and eventually worked his way into the Maine Democratic Party

Johns Hopkins University | 79


NEWS AND NOTEWORTHY

ranks. He was a scheduler for Sen. Edmund S. Muskie’s 1970 campaign and later served as his administrative assistant. From 1984 through 1992 he served on the Democratic National Committee. Micoleau received his JD from the George Washington University in 1977. MARVIN C. OTT ’65, PHD ’70 is a professorial

lecturer and visiting scholar in Southeast Asia Studies at Johns Hopkins SAIS, and in East Asian Studies at Johns Hopkins University, and a senior scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. He was professor of national security policy at the National War College and faculty fellow at the Institute for National Strategic Studies at the National Defense University. He has been an associate professor at Mount Holyoke College, senior manager at the Congressional

Office of Technology Assessment, adjunct professor at American University, senior East Asia analyst at the Central Intelligence Agency, consultant on Japan to the National Academy of Sciences, chairperson for Southeast Asia at the Foreign Service Institute at the U.S. Department of State, senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and deputy staff director of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence. He is widely published, primarily on Asian security issues, and writes a regular international affairs newspaper column. EMILINE ROYCO OTT ’65, PHD ’75 also received a

journalism degree from Northwestern University and studied art in Paris and Mexico City. After serving a number of years as an official with both the executive and legislative branches of government in Washing-

ton, D.C., she returned to her first love—photography. Her work has been widely published, and she has been a principal photographer for the Maine Tourism Association. She has had many one-artist shows, including a special exhibit in the Rotunda in the Cannon House Office Building in Washington. Since 1990 she has owned and managed her own company, Island Images, which produces high-quality photographic notecards and prints marketed primarily in Maine and Washington, D.C. She is an active supporter of the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University. Investment banker MAYNARD J. TOLL ’65, PHD ’70 is retired from First

Boston Corp. and Credit Suisse First Boston. He headed the bank’s operations in Japan and was in its New York City mergers and acquisitions department. He

retired in 1997 after 22 years in banking. Prior to that, he was an assistant professor of politics and assistant dean of faculty at the University of Massachusetts Boston. He then worked for Sen. Edmund S. Muskie of Maine, first as his legislative assistant for foreign policy and then as administrative assistant. He currently serves as chair of The Edmund S. Muskie Foundation. Since retirement, MAX A. VAN ALPHEN B’65 has continued serving on various boards and foundations. He also likes to travel and regularly attends the annual Alumni Weekend reunions in Bologna. Alphen pursued general and business economics at Erasmus University Rotterdam before studying at the SAIS Europe campus in Bologna. After military service, he spent his professional life in trade and industry, most recently as chief financial officer

The Bologna Class of 1965 celebrated their 50th anniversary at SAIS Europe’s Alumni Weekend in Bologna in April 2015.

80 | SAIS Magazine Winter 2016


NICK BINKLEY ’71 is the

ANNE CIPRIANI WEBB B’64, ’65 has lived in

Arlington, Va., since graduating from Johns Hopkins SAIS and, now retired, she volunteers in the community and enjoys traveling the world. Cipriani had a wide-ranging career as a government historian, university research associate in policy studies, and archivist at Tudor Place, a historic house-museum in Washington, D.C. She has co-authored two books: The Glebe Houses of Colonial Virginia and Who Is Markie? The Life of Martha Custis Williams Carter, as well as articles on local history. She said last year’s highlight was the 50th reunion of her class at the Bologna Center. CLASS OF

1967

RAIMONDO CAGIANO DE AZEVEDO B’67 lives

in Rome and recently retired from University La Sapienza where he was full professor of demography for more than 50 years. He is director of the UNESCO Chair in Population, Migrations, and Development and has been a consultant on population issues for 33 years at the Council of Europe in Strasbourg. He married Letizia Norci and has four children and 10 grandchildren, an indication that he will have a lot to keep busy with in retirement.

1971

In July 2015, GIANFRANCO PASQUINO ’67

co-authored A Changing Republic: Politics and Democracy in Italy. A month later, he lectured in Argentina, Paraguay, and Mexico. Sept. 3, 2015, marked the 50th anniversary of the day he became a master’s degree student at the Bologna Center and he is proud of it. From March 25 to June 1, 2016, he will hold a Fulbright Scholarship at the University of Chicago, Department of Political Science.

CLASS OF

1968

JIM CASON ’68 was elected mayor of Coral Gables, Fla., for a third time in April 2015. This public service commitment follows a 38-year U.S. Department of State career that he ended as chief of mission in Havana and ambassador to Cuba. CLASS OF

1970

MONIQUE BERNATH B’70

has been traveling to New York and spending time with her beloved relatives there. She lives in Bologna, Italy.

executive producer/ producer of the feature-length documentary film that tells how “rock and roll helped end the Cold War and the collapse of the Soviet Union.” The film, including interviews with Mikhail Gorbachev, former President Jimmy Carter, the Beach Boys, Billy Joel, and many Soviet rockers, premiered in Washington, D.C., in November 2015 at Georgetown University’s Gaston Hall. Binkley resides in Rancho Santa Fe, Calif. CLASS OF

1972

In July 2015, Baltimore resident DAVE SCHOTT ’72, coordinated a mission trip from his church, Ascension Lutheran Towson, to Nicaragua where he and friends of Fe y Esperanza Iglesia Luterana Managua (Managua Faith and Hope Lutheran Church) celebrated 25 years of growth and service. Earlier that month he met Bill Canis ’73 and Brian Mohler ’72 at a Washington Nationals baseball game in D.C. to watch the Nats beat the San Francisco Giants 2-1. Canis and Mohler reside in Great Falls, Va., and Cave Creek, Ariz., respectively. CLASS OF

1974

In June 2015, JOSEPH MACKIEWICZ ’74 and his wife, Kim, welcomed

the arrival of their third grandchild, Cassandra. Mackiewicz is happily retired in Westport, Conn., after a 28-year international banking career at Citibank with assignments in Tokyo, Taipei, Seoul, London, Los Angeles, and New York City. The couple always looks forward to connecting with old friends. CLASS OF

1979

DOUGLAS L. FAULKNER ’79, president of Leath-

erstocking LLC, a global clean-tech strategic advisory firm, recently launched a new joint venture with The Stella Group. The new Jacobs Ladder Energy Group is designed to help houses of worship cut their utility bills. Faulkner lives with his wife, Polly, in Arlington, Va. CLASS OF

1980

JOHN CONSTANTELOS B’79, ’80 marks his

twentieth year as a professor of political science at Grand Valley State University in Michigan. This summer he was back in Italy, teaching a course on Italian politics at John Cabot University. His most recent article, “Vetoes and Venues: Economic Crisis and the Roads to Recovery in Michigan and Ontario,” appears in the Canadian Journal of Political Science. He lives in Grand Rapids, Mich., with his wife, Polly. Johns Hopkins University | 81

ALUMNI LIFE

CLASS OF

of an internationally active Dutch company.


NEWS AND NOTEWORTHY

Studies. He is a chair professor and editor-in chief of the Journal of Macao Studies. He has written and edited 26 books and monographs and authored more than 50 journal articles and book chapters. CLASS OF

MARTIN EICHTINGER B’85 (right) began his duties as Austria’s ambassador to the United Kingdom in January 2015. Later in the year he hosted the SAIS Bologna Center community at his London residence. Photo by Christopher Gunson 2015 (christophergunson.com)

CLASS OF

1982

CLASS OF

1984

PETER T. LAM ’82 is

NICOLE ETCHART ’84

practicing as an immigration and citizenship consultant in Toronto. In his spare time, he is a freelance writer in English and Chinese. He has published articles on Barack Obama, Joseph Stalin, Pierre Trudeau, and Canada’s Liberal and New Democratic political parties.

and her family returned to the United States after 16 “incredible” years in Chile, where she founded NESsT, an organization that invests in social enterprises that provide dignified jobs and income to vulnerable communities in emerging-market countries. Etchart is based in the San Francisco Bay Area, where NESsT has its global headquarters, closer to her two adult children who attended college in the United States and are pursuing careers in law and theater.

CLASS OF

1983

In March 2015, WILLIAM MARK HABEEB ’83, PHD ’87 was named

U.S. editor of The Arab Weekly, an English-language newspaper based in London. Habeeb remains adjunct professor of global politics and security at Georgetown University and managing partner of Habeeb Investments LLC. He is a member of the Steering Committee of the Arlington County Democratic Committee in Virginia.

After teaching 16 years at Colgate University and serving as dean of faculty of social sciences and humanities at the University of Macau from 2005–13, YUFAN HAO ’84, PHD ’90 is dean of faculty of social sciences and acting director of the Center for Macao

82 | SAIS Magazine Winter 2016

1985

In July 2013, LINDA HOR BUCKLEY JHU ’84, ’85

took off her Hopkins sweatshirt and left federal government to join the administrative staff across town at Georgetown University, managing financial systems and applications. She is also working on another master’s degree, this time in liberal studies. She said she is loving life, learning about biblical history, and re-reading Tolstoy.

STACY DUTTON ’85, retired managing partner of Brandywine Global Asset Management, recently became chair of the Board of Directors of Intercultural Journeys, a small nonprofit in Philadelphia that produces performing arts programming in the service of social change and peaceful conflict resolution. She continues to serve on the boards of the Philadelphia Orchestra Association and Lantern Theater Company. CLASS OF

1986

DAVID BIETTE ’86,

formerly director of the Canada Institute at the Wilson Center, was named director of the center’s new Polar

MARY JOHNSON ’86 is working on a book on Ocean City, Md. and continues teaching with Villanova University online. She celebrated her 60th birthday in July 2015. She and her husband, Donald, enjoyed lunch at the Donald Trump Tower Ocean View Wai’oli Lounge in Waikiki. A month later, Donald Johnson fell ill with a prostrate infection and compression fracture. Sadly, he died in October. As the family’s friend and pastor at Chapel of Saint Andrew in Boca Raton, Fla., said: “It is not the years, it is the miles.” Donald Johnson was proud of the 44 countries he visited for IBM World Trade “many more than once.”


In January 2015, WILLIAM ROSS PUMFREY ’87 retired from the

DAVE T. FUHRMANN ’82 received the 2015 Johns Hopkins University Alumni Association’s Heritage Award. The recognition was bestowed on Nov. 12, 2015, at the Willard Hotel in Washington, D.C. as part of the annual Strategic Studies Alumni Dinner and Lecture, which drew nearly 200 alumni. JHU Alumni President Jay Lenrow, A&S ’73, presented The Heritage Award, which honors Johns Hopkins alumni and friends who contribute outstanding service over an extended period to the progress of the university or the activities of the Alumni Association. Fuhrmann is a former owner and partner of Glenwood LLC, Glenwood GmbH, and several other pharmaceutical/medical supply businesses based in the United States and Europe. Stateside, he is on the Johns Hopkins SAIS Board of Advisors. His philanthropy supports the SAIS Strategic Studies program, which led to the creation of an endowment to fund the program’s many activities. He is the co-founding chairman of the Strategic Studies Alumni Council, a supporter and participant of the legendary Strategic Studies Staff Rides, and the visionary behind the annual Strategic Studies Fall Dinner at the Willard Hotel in Washington, D.C. His nearly four-decade commitment to Johns Hopkins SAIS and to the University is profound and will lead to long-term sustainability of academic programming at SAIS.

Initiative in June. The initiative investigates Arctic and Antarctic issues, including the economic, environmental, geopolitical, and human security challenges of the Polar Regions.

CLASS OF

1987

ROSEMARY (DRAPER) GALLANT N’87 is a

member of the senior foreign commercial service. She served as the principal commercial officer at the U.S.

Embassy in Beijing from 2008–13 and is currently the senior commercial officer in Jakarta, Indonesia. She is married to Jonathan Gallant, a U.S. State Department Foreign Service specialist.

Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas, where he had been on loan to the “border affairs” team at the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. With his retirement, he gained a pension and greater flexibility with his time. He dedicates significant time to the Texas Solar Energy Society as vice chairman, takes classes in Italian cooking and language, and competes in one long-distance swimming event annually. HARRY SULLIVAN N’87

departed as principal officer in the U.S. Consulate Nagoya to assume the position of political counselor in the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad during the summer of 2014. He returned recently to the Washington metropolitan area to start work on a Master of Strategic Studies degree at the Marine Corps War College, specializing in leadership and ethics.

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Former SAIS associate dean of development and strategic planning and executive director of the Foreign Policy Institute, AMIR PASIC ’87, became the dean of the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy in Indianapolis in January 2015. He and his family reside in Indianapolis.


NEWS AND NOTEWORTHY

CHILD ’88, and their

WINNI FEJNE ’87 joined Sweden’s diplomatic service in 1973 and has represented Sweden throughout the world, e.g. in the United States, France, Malaysia, the U.K., and Ireland. Before retiring, she served as Sweden’s consul-general in Canton (Guangzhou), China, 2007-09. Fejne was the president of Swedish Friends of Hebrew University of Jerusalem Association 2001–04 and today heads its South Sweden chapter. In June 2015, HUJ conferred an honorary fellowship upon her at a ceremony in Jerusalem.

CLASS OF

1988

MASAHIKO SASAJIMA ’88, former senior corre-

spondent for The Yomiuri Shimbun newspaper in Japan, took a new position in April 2015 as a professor of international affairs at Atomi University in Tokyo. He resides with his wife, Yukiko, in Yokohama, Japan. DAVID YOUTZ ’88

became the Yale-China Association executive director in June 2015. Youtz, his wife, MARY

daughters returned in 2011 from Hong Kong, where Youtz was CEO of Mother’s Choice, an NGO providing family and social services in China, Hong Kong, India, and Cambodia. Youtz has also held senior positions at World Monuments Fund and the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations. He and Child left their long-time New Jersey home in August 2015 and moved to Woodbridge, Conn. CLASS OF

1989

CHARLES RAGEN N’89, is an entrepreneur in Seattle providing stone fabrication and logistics for the creation of public and private spaces such as Stern Grove in San Francisco, St James in Seattle, and carvings for sculptor R. Deutsch at Chevy Chase Metro and Penrose Square in Arlington, Va. He and his spouse, Wenjun, enjoy showing visitors from China and beyond the grand vistas and culture of the Pacific Northwest. Their Beijing-born daughter, Sarah, graduates with the JHU class of 2016.

In December 2014, Secretary of State John Kerry swore in TED OSIUS ’89 as the sixth U.S. Ambassador to the Socialist Republic of Vietnam. Osius and his spouse, Clayton Bond, live in Hanoi with their children Tabo and Lucy.

84 | SAIS Magazine Winter 2016

CLASS OF

1990

LISA CLAYPOOL N’90,

professor, historian of art and design, and expanded fielder at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, is writing a book about intersections of science and art in modern China. Her research has appeared in The Journal of Asian Studies; positions: asia critique Yishu: Journal of Contemporary Art in China; Cross-Currents: East Asian Culture and History Review; The International Journal of Politics, Culture, and Society; and other journals, conference volumes, and exhibition catalogues. YAN PENG N’90, former regional director of East Asia for C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group and China director of Clean Air Asia, works on the Expert Group of the China Green Freight Initiative. The initiative is led by the Ministry of Transport of China. She is also chief expert with the Wuhan Research Center of C40 Cities Low Carbon Actions and senior advisor of the Smart Freight Center. One of China’s leaders in advancing pro bono culture, she is chairman of China Pro Bono Link in Beijing. KAREN SEIGER B’89, ’90 became director

of business development and marketing at Colibri Solutions in May 2014. The management consultancy develops custom software

solutions for businesses, nonprofits, and corporate workgroups. Seiger lives in New York City with her husband, James Wesolowski JHU ’91, and publishes MarketsOfNewYork.com, a popular site about the city’s best artisan, farmer, food, and flea markets. She writes for Edible Manhattan and Edible Brooklyn magazine online and contributes to NY1 News. CLASS OF

1991

In June 2015, DOUGLAS KEH ’91 started a job in Afghanistan as country director with the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). Afghanistan is UNDP’s largest operation globally, with an annual budget of approximately $800 million, and it is central to the government’s efforts to counter the Taliban. Keh’s last field posting was as UNDP country director in Sri Lanka (2007–12) when the civil war there came to an end. He hopes to bring similar luck to Afghanistan. After many years working in the electric power industry, HEATHER MEHTA N’91 plans to transition into the nonprofit world and return to her passion and roots in the Asia/international arena. Mehta lives in Dublin, Calif., in the San Francisco East Bay. She is married to Rahul Mehta and they have two daughters. In 2015,


she resigned from a firm where she worked for more than 16 years as a consultant to the electric power industry. CLASS OF

1992

ANTHONY KUHN N’92

has worked as Beijing correspondent for NPR since 2005, also spending time reporting on Europe and Southeast Asia. Previously, he worked for the Far Eastern Economic Review, the Los Angeles Times, and other media. He said he feels lucky to be researching and informing listeners/readers about topics that intrigued him as a student at the Hopkins-Nanjing Center. He has interviewed his former teachers and returned to the center to speak to students about his work. In June-August 2015, JAY THITINAN PONGSUDHIRAK ’92

took a leave of absence from Bangkok’s Chulalongkorn University to take up the Sir Howard Kippenberger Chair at the Center for Strategic Studies at Victory University of Wellington in New Zealand. He was

joined there by his wife, Pavida Pananond, who is a professor, and their daughter, Petra. DREW THOMPSON N’92, A&S ’05 is director for

China, Taiwan, and Mongolia at the Office of the Secretary of Defense. Recognized for authoring the U.S.-Mongolia Joint Vision Statement signed by the secretary of defense in April 2014, he leads the Department of Defense’s efforts to develop confidence-building measures with China’s People’s Liberation Army. He is married to KATHERINE CASEY DELHOTAL N’92, A&S ’01, who is director for

Asia Pacific in the Government Relations Department at ExxonMobil in Washington, D.C. They have one son, Austin. CLASS OF

1993

FRANCIS BASSOLINO N’93 works out of

Shanghai consulting for (mostly) private equity funds building businesses in Asia. The rapid pace of change is causing destruction and creation on a large scale and, last summer, the

In September 2015, MARINA NIFOROS ’93, former managing director of AmCham France, launched an executive education course, Women in Leadership: Negotiating your Path to Success, with the MCI Management Center Innsbruck. This seminar offers an opportunity for women moving into senior executive roles to learn from negotiation best practices and develop greater cross-cultural communication skills. Niforos resides in Paris with her husband and three daughters. She heads the transatlantic strategic advisory firm Logos Global Advisors. FRANCE PEPPER N’93 is the founder and director of China Insider, a China cultural consultancy focused on art, business, and culture. Pepper advises and appraises art for private collectors and institutions and curates high-level cultural trips to China and Asia. Her company also consults for U.S. luxury and lifestyle businesses interested in offering high-touch services to

Chinese travelers to the United States. Concurrently, she lectures at the Metropolitan Museum of Art on Chinese and Asian art. CLASS OF

1994

KEVIN CROWE N’94 lives and works in Hong Kong in the marine electronics and boating and yachting industry, combining his love and passion for yachting and his 20+ years of Asia business experience. He also enjoys using his Chinese now and again. CLASS OF

1995

In July 2015, LARS LARSON B’92, ’95 entered early retirement with the goal of devoting attention to things that he feels have gone neglected for years because of work obligations. He is also exploring new career options. He lives in Vienna, Austria. CLASS OF

1996

HUAIJIN BAO N’96 is managing director of Citi Commercial Bank at Citibank China. She runs Citi China middle market business, which provides banking support and services to fast-growing medium and large Chinese private-sector corporations. She manages a team with more than 30 people across the China franchise. Bao is married, has one son, and currently is based in Shanghai.

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In Greece this summer, CARLA BOECKMAN ’93, ALAN YOUNG ’95, PAUL PSAILA ’93, and DARIUS SZWARCEWICZ ’93 (front) gathered for a “mini” reunion in Crete.

demand for consulting services spiked. Bassolino plans to continue to sell picks and axes to those who are building businesses to capture their share of the China dream (because, as he notes, there will be winners) and ambulance and repair services to those injured in the battles.


NEWS AND NOTEWORTHY

CLASS OF

1997

MALIA K. DU MONT N’97

moved to New York City to undertake new challenges and now works as director of strategy at Amur Capital Management. Previously, she was director of strategy in the Office of the Secretary of Defense. She remains in the Army Reserve, where she is an intelligence officer and serves on the China Desk in the U.S. Pacific Command’s Directorate for Strategic Planning and Policy. TIM HUSON ’97 is a for-

eign service officer with the U.S. Department of State. In August 2015, he moved to San Jose, Costa Rica, where he has begun a sabbatical he expects will last a year or more. Huson is joined by his wife, Anne Braghetta, and their sons: Peter, 16; Scott, 15; and Teo, 10. They are hoping their Johns Hopkins SAIS friends will come visit. JENNIFER FRIEDMAN SKLAREW ’97

received her PhD in public policy from George Mason University in August 2015. Her Japan-based research, funded by a Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Award, examines how institutional relationships have combined with external shocks to influence Japanese energy policymaking from the oil crises era to the post-Fukushima disaster period.

JAMES LEIBOLD N’97 is recognized as one of the world’s leading experts on ethnic issues in China and has published widely on the modern history of China’s early 120 million ethnic minorities; contemporary ethnic relations; ethnic policy and theory; ethnic minority education; the Han majority; and ethnic identity articulation online. He is currently a senior lecturer in politics and Asian studies at La Trobe University in Melbourne, Australia. BROCK WILSON N’97 is a private banker in the Asian Client Group at Citi where he advises ultra-high net worth clients on their investments. After many years in greater China as a U.S. diplomat and banker at Credit Suisse, Wilson and his family relocated to the United States in mid-2014. Brock and his wife have two children, aged 12 and 14. CLASS OF

1998

DAVID DAVIES ’98 is a

professor of anthropology and director of the East Asian Studies Program at Hamline University in Saint Paul, Minn. Earlier this year he was promoted to the rank of full professor. In September 2014, DAVID DAYHOFF B’97, ’98 became the vice

president of Partners in Food Solutions, a Minnesota-based nonprofit helping strengthen agriculture and food chains

86 | SAIS Magazine Winter 2016

in sub-Saharan Africa by providing technical assistance and knowledge transfer to small food processors. PFS is a partnership of global food companies and its skilled volunteers work directly with hundreds of small African millers, dairies, and other agribusinesses. He lives in Minnetonka, Minn., with his wife, Aimée, and their two children. XINGHONG HUA N’93, ’98 is managing director

and head of China at Cerberus Capital Management LP, a leading global investment company headquartered in New York City. He recently joined the Hopkins-Nanjing Advisory Council. In June 2015, ELIZABETH MADIGAN JOST B’97, ’98 became chief

operating officer for Morgan Stanley’s Latin America businesses. She had previously been head of emerging

markets strategy and business development in the firm’s Fixed Income Division and, prior to that, Morgan Stanley’s chief risk officer for Latin America and global head of country risk. She lives with her husband and three children in Edgemont, N.Y. MINGJIANG LI N’98 is an associate professor at S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore. He is also the coordinator of the China Program at RSIS. His main research interests include China-ASEAN relations, Sino-U.S. relations, Asia-Pacific security, and domestic sources of Chinese foreign policy. He is the author or editor of 12 books and has published in various peer-reviewed journals, including the Journal of Strategic Studies and Harvard Asia Quarterly. Li frequently

NADÈGE V. WHITE B’99, ’99 and her husband, Erik White, enjoyed their destination wedding in Costa Rica in April 2014. Pictured from left to right: GILLIAN JOHNSON B’99, ’99, Erik White, Nadège V. White, and SASHA GOTTLIEB ’99.


In June 2015, PERCIVAL MANGLANO ’98 was elected councilor of the city of Madrid. After living in Paris for almost two years, he and his wife and daughter now reside in Madrid. CLASS OF

1999

In February 2015, ANNA-MARIE VILAMOVSKA B’01, ’03 became the Secretary for Innovation Policy and Healthcare Policy under the President of the Republic of Bulgaria, H.E. Rosen Plevneliev. Vilamovska represents Bulgaria at the Member States Board on Digital Entrepreneurship. While finalizing plans for Sofia Tech Park, the first science and technology park of its kind in Southeast Europe, Vilamovska started a JHU SAIS Club in Bulgaria in July 2015, jointly with other Bulgarian SAIS alumni.

In July 2015, ANTHONY ZUCO B’98, ’99, former controller

at Owl Creek Asset Management L.P., took a new position as controller at Stone Ridge Asset Management LLC in order to build out the firm’s internal accounting team. He resides with his husband, Ricky, and their two children in Maplewood, N.J. Jiayang Jin, the 10-yearold son of ZHENDAI YANG N’99, had a tremendously successful solo piano recital at the Steinway Music Hall of Nanjing, China, on July 17. Jin started learning piano at age 5 and was admitted to the precollege at Manhattan School of Music in 2013. He won the Gold Award in the 7th International Youth Culture and Art Festival Piano Competition in 2015. His proud mother, Zhendai, lives in New York. CLASS OF

2000

CHRISTIE CALDWELL N’00 is the director of

consulting for APAC at Aperian Global, a con-

sulting firm focused on global talent development and strategy. She is the co-author of the recently published Leading Across New Borders: How to Succeed as the Center Shifts, which looks at economic and political power shifts and asks what they mean for global business leaders and organizations. Caldwell currently lives and works in Shanghai, China. KAREN FANG N’00 is working in Beijing and Shanghai as director and partner of G2S Creative Workshop.

In July 2015, SASHA KISHINCHAND ’00

moved to BrightonHove, U.K., to take on the position as principal consultant, Fragile and Conflict-Affected States with Itad Ltd, an M&E specialist consultancy. Before that, she spent January–March 2015 in Liberia developing the monitoring and evaluation plan for the USAID-funded response to the Ebola outbreak (Clinical and Non-clin-

ical Management of Ebola Treatment Units). Since Johns Hopkins SAIS, she has lived and worked in Washington, D.C.; Iraq; San Diego, Calif.; Yemen; and Afghanistan. In April 2014, RICARDO G. ROJAS ’00, former chief of staff at the Chilean Foreign Minister, took a new position as minister counsellor and deputy chief of mission at the Chilean Embassy in Colombia. He resides in Bogota. BRANTLEY TURNER N’00

serves as the founding American principal at Shanghai Qibao Dwight High School in Shanghai, China. CLASS OF

2001

CHRISTINA WU COVAULT N’01 is an assistant

United States attorney in Phoenix, Ariz., where she prosecutes violent crimes that occur on Indian reservations. In June, she completed her term as president of the Phoenix Chapter of the Federal Bar Association

and remains active on its board. She and her husband, Jason, are happily juggling full-time careers and parenting their son Grayson, who will turn 2 in December. AH-YOUNG KIM N’01 is a political affairs officer in the Department of Political Affairs in the Security Council Affairs Division at the United Nations in New York. She is working on sanctions related to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea and supports the work of the Panel of Experts. She has worked for the United Nations since 2005, covering political and humanitarian affairs focused on the Asia-Pacific region. She is a mother of three: Gabriella, 9; Luke, 6; and Max, 4.  CLASS OF

2002

S. SITA SONTY ’02,

former Senior India desk officer, has been named senior advisor for Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Central Asia for the Bureau of Political-Military Affairs at the U.S. Department of State. She oversees regional security cooperation and arms transfers to the seven countries in her portfolio, leading interagency discussions with the departments of defense and energy and other agencies. She lives in Arlington, Va., with her son, Jairam, 7, daughter, Ananda, 5, and husband Lt. Col. Scot Wilcox (U.S. Air Force).

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ALUMNI LIFE

participates in track-two events on East Asian regional security.


NEWS AND NOTEWORTHY

MAHLET GETACHEW N’02 lives in the San

Francisco Bay Area and is senior legal counsel at GoPro. He looks forward to the 30th anniversary of the Hopkins-Nanjing Center this June. GARY L. HOWE N’02 is a freelance photojournalist and writer. He lives in Traverse City, Mich. He is also an adjunct instructor at Northwestern Michigan College, teaching world regional geography—a class, he says, where in each chapter he is compelled to mention China. In addition, he has pursued an interest in urban planning and currently holds an elected position on the City Commission in Traverse City. He maintains a photography website and blogs about urban planning.

In January 2015, WILL SHIELD B’01, ’02 moved to the British Embassy in Bangkok after four very happy, albeit smoggy, years in Beijing. Shield and his wife, Tiffany, are the proud parents of Tommy and Annabelle, who were both born in China. XIAOPING ZHAO N’02, a leading member of the Hopkins Club of Beijing, is the deputy director-general at Kunming National Hi-tech Park. He is in charge of investment promotion, economic development, scientific and technical innovation, and international cooperation for

the park. He finished his post-doctoral research with the Chinese Academy of Governance in July 2015 and has been on the reviewing committee for The Recruitment Program of Global Experts (Chinese Qian Ren Jia Hua). CLASS OF

2003

LAURA MARGARITA FERNANDEZ LORD B’02, ’03 is working at BBVA

Microfinance Foundation, a network of eight microfinance institutions in seven countries of Latin America that reaches 1.5 million clients and has nearly 8,000 employees. She is in charge of the foundation’s Culture and Leadership Program, among other human resources projects, and corporate governance training for micro-finance institution boards in Spain. She lives in Madrid with her 3-year-old daughter, Marina. Late last year, MARK RILEY ’03 became the U.S. military security cooperation chief at the U.S. Embassy in Jakarta, Indonesia. His responsibilities entail all training, education, and armaments cooperation between the U.S. and Indonesian militaries. LUKE ROBINSON N’03 is a lecturer (assistant professor) in film studies in the Department of Media and Film Studies at the University of Sussex. He lives in London.

88 | SAIS Magazine Winter 2016

CLASS OF

2004

KEN MONAHAN ’04, previously a senior policy analyst at Bloomberg LP, started a new position In March 2015 as director of international trade policy at the National Association of Manufacturers in Washington, D.C. MALKA OLDER B’03, ’04 is pursuing her PhD

at the Institut d’études politiques de Paris (Sciences Po). Her novel Infomocracy, a political thriller set in the late 21st century, will be published in June 2016. EDWIN VAN BIBBER-ORR N’04 is assistant pro-

fessor of Chinese at Syracuse University. After graduating from

the Hopkins-Nanjing Center, he pursued a PhD in Chinese literature at Yale University, taking a year off in between to live with two friends in a diminutive, uninsulated cabin on a Vermont lake. He finished his PhD in 2013. He is working on a book, Writing Women: A Genealogy of the Chinese Female Poet.  CLASS OF

2005

MORGAN JONES N’05

finished his executive MBA at Cornell University and started a new role as senior emergency management specialist with New York University Langone Medical

In July 2015, JOSHUA HURWITZ ’04 and his family visited Machu Picchu. They live in Panama, where Hurwitz is responsible for evaluating and securing new investments in Latin American ports on behalf of the Maersk Group.


Center, focusing on the entire medical center’s business continuity, risk management, and emergency response. Jones lives in Jackson Heights, Queens, New York with his wife, Zoe, and still manages to use his Mandarin. CLASS OF

2006

STEPHEN CHIEN ’06 and

his wife, Robyn, celebrated the birth of their daughter, Talia, in June 2015. Chien continues to work for Charles Schwab and resides in Los Angeles. JIMMY LAU N’06 is a co-founder and creative director at Stuart & Lau, a new e-commerce men’s luggage and accessories lifestyle brand based in New York and Hong Kong. He divides his time between the two cities. XI CHEN N’06 is assis-

tant professor of public health and economics at Yale University. He is a faculty fellow at the Yale Institution for Social and Policy Studies, research fellow at the Yale Macmillan Center for International and Area Studies, and

faculty adviser of the Yale-China Association. He serves as associate editor of China Health Review and is on the planning committee of the China Health Policy and Management Society. Chen lives in New Haven, Conn. with his wife and daughter. CLASS OF

2007

SARINA BEGES-THYSEN ’07 and her husband,

Erik Thysen, welcomed their daughter, Layla Rose Thysen, in March 2014. Beges-Thysen lives in Menlo Park, Calif., where she serves as the associate director of Stanford’s Center on Democracy, Development and the Rule of Law, leading its international programming and operations. In June 2015, Colonel JOHN KENKEL ’07 completed a U.S. Army War College fellowship at the International Counter-terrorism Center in Herzliya, Israel. He now works as director of training for the U.S. security coordinator at the U.S. Consulate General-Jerusalem. In this capacity he oversees

an international team providing training to the Palestinian Authority Security Forces. CLASS OF

the World Bank. They have plenty of room for Johns Hopkins SAISers passing through. PLAMEN NIKOLOV ’08

2008

DESMOND FANG N’06, ’08 is director of finance

and business operations with Samba TV, a television data analytics software provider in San Francisco, where he manages day-to-day business operations and investor relations. Previously, Fang was vice president with AKP Capital, a private equity firm in Hong Kong. There he co-managed an RMB public-private fund with the Chinese city of Nanjing. Fang is on the University of Arizona Alumni Leadership Council and advises on the university’s China growth initiatives. In April 2014, JOHN B’07, ’08 and SARAH MOYER B’07, ’08 welcomed a son, Miles, just four months before the family relocated to Jakarta, Indonesia. John Moyer is regional manager for South East Asia at Water.Org and Sarah Moyer is a carbon finance specialist with

received his PhD in November 2013 from Harvard University. In his dissertation, he focused on development economics issues, specifically sub-Saharan Africa. He lives in New York City. BRYAN PRUDEN N’08

is a director of asset protection at Ralph Lauren in Hong Kong. After graduation from the HNC, he joined a China-based consultancy helping multinational companies navigate fraud and security risks throughout greater China. Since moving to an in-house position with Ralph Lauren, he conducts a wide range of investigations, audits, and security assessments throughout the Asia Pacific region. In February 2015, PHILIP REINER ’08, former senior director for South Asian affairs at the National Security Council, left the National Security Council, the Department of Defense, and

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In October 2015, the Class of 2005 celebrated its 10-year reunion at Johns Hopkins SAIS in Washington, D.C.


NEWS AND NOTEWORTHY

Washington, D.C., as his wife received a fantastic promotion based in San Francisco. Reiner is taking time as a stay-home father with his newborn daughter before moving back into private industry. He is currently working as a consultant. He resides with his wife, Annie, and daughter, Amelia, in California’s Oakland Hills. CLASS OF

2009

BRIAN STOUT ’09 and wife Jennifer were delighted to welcome Viviana Perla Stout to the world in June 2015. The Stouts are taking a break from their different roles at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to celebrate this new addition and to enjoy a Seattle summer.

CLASS OF

2010

NEIL BOUHAN B’10, ’10 continues to be an

active Johns Hopkins SAIS alumni leader in Chicago. He welcomed his daughter, Nora Helena Rose Bouhan, to the world in September 2015. After obtaining his PhD in war studies from King’s College London, OLEG SVET ’10 began working in July 2015 as a security sector assistance subject matter expert and a war-gaming designer at Group W, a defense consultancy. He resides in Fairfax, Va. In June 2015, MARI TANAKA ’10, project manager at The Nippon Foundation, moved to Yangon and took a new position at the foundation’s Myanmar Liaison Office. Tanaka is excited to be involved with education and human resource development projects, including school construction projects in remote areas of Myanmar. CLASS OF

2011

CARLOS CASANOVA N’11 is an economist at

In July 2015, NEIL GIBSON ’08 was assigned as economic officer at the U.S. Embassy Tokyo. He was accompanied by his wife, Momo, and three sons. Gibson joined the U.S. Department of State in 2009.

Banco Bilbao Vizcaya Argentaria in Hong Kong. He is responsible for following key macroeconomic and geopolitical developments in Asia and China. Casanova’s expertise focuses on aspects of Chinese trade and foreign investments, particularly with other emerging markets in

90 | SAIS Magazine Winter 2016

RENEE SEWALL ’09 is greatly enjoying a recent career change into financial planning and investment management. She passed her certification exam to become a Certified Financial Planner™ last summer and works at Professional Financial Solutions LLC, a financial planning firm in Fairfax, Va. She lives with her husband, Jeremy, and three children in Falls Church, Va.

Asia and Latin America. He has published numerous academic articles and has appeared in several international media outlets including: Bloomberg, Bruegel, Business Spectator, Expansión, La Tribune, and Nikkei Asian Review. JANSEN GIVENS N’11

is working at the Confucius Institute at the University of Oklahoma in Norman, Okla. BERNARD GEOXAVIER N’11, a middle school

Chinese teacher at Avenues: The World School in New York City, is a member of the New York Army National Guard. In September 2015, he graduated from the accelerated Officer Candidate School program at Fort Indiantown Gap, Penn., and was commissioned as a 2nd lieutenant in the U.S. Army. He teaches Chinese to students in grades five

through eight and leads spring break language and cultural immersion trips to Beijing. JONATHAN HWANG N’11 is a U.S. Foreign

Service officer serving as a consular officer in Shenyang, China. In his previous posting, Hwang served as a political officer at the U.S. Consulate General in Ho Chi Minh City. CHRISTOPHER LIU N’09, ’11 is director of

Mobile Gaming at VNG Corporation, the largest Internet company in Vietnam and Southeast Asia. The firm is based in Ho Chi Minh City. Liu has published mobile games across Southeast Asia, reaching more than 10 million users, and lectured on online gaming in Korea, China, Singapore, and Thailand. In May 2015, after reuniting with friends and classmates in Bologna during Alumni Weekend,


Journalist Don Oberdorfer, U.S.-Korea Institute Chairman Emeritus, Dies at 84

After graduating from Princeton University, Oberdorfer served in South Korea as a U.S. Army lieutenant during the Korean War. The experience would drive a lifelong interest and, later, an unparalleled expertise in the region. “He not only understood but had internalized Korea’s geostrategic predicament and the Korean people’s sentiments,” USKI Director Jae Ku PhD ’03 said. “His deep knowledge of Korea came from his own eyewitness accounts of modern Korean development.” After leaving the military, Oberdorfer launched a career in journalism, working at The Charlotte Observer, The Saturday Evening Post, and what is now the Knight Newspapers group before joining The Washington Post. During his 25 years with The Washington Post, he served as a White House, Northeast Asia, and diplomatic correspondent and wrote several books. “Don Oberdorfer was a giant among American journalists covering Asia in the second half of the 20th century. Don covered virtually every major development in the region from the Vietnam War to the People Power revolution in the Philippines and the growth of democracy in Korea,” USKI Chairman Stephen Bosworth said in a statement. “His book The Two Koreas is the essential work for anyone trying to understand the contemporary history of the Korean Peninsula.” After retiring from The Washington Post in 1993, Oberdorfer was appointed Distinguished Journalist in Residence by George R. Packard, former dean of Johns Hopkins SAIS. He taught a popular and well-received course, News Media in International Affairs, and was instrumental in the launch of the USKI. In 2006, he was named its chairman. “He was the founding chairman of the U.S.-Korea Institute, which has become a leading academic center at SAIS focused on research and teaching about Korea. Don Oberdorfer will be much missed,” said Bosworth.

MONICA SENDOR B’10, ’11 started a two-year

assignment as an economic officer at the U.S. Embassy in Kyiv, Ukraine. BRENDON STEWART N’11

is a retail management professional with Amazon.com in Seattle. He leads Amazon’s digital video games category and is responsible for profit-and-loss management and content acquisition. In his two years at Amazon, Stewart has led some of the largest product launches in the company’s history and has managed strategic partnerships with Microsoft Xbox, Disney, Riot Games, and Mojang.  CLASS OF

2012

BETHANY ALLENEBRAHIMIAN N’12 was

recently promoted to assistant editor at Foreign Policy magazine in Washington, D.C. After receiving a highly competitive fellowship from the International Reporting Project to report on religion in China, her research was featured in two longform covers on Foreign Policy’s website, with another feature-length article upcoming. JAKE CLARK N’12 will receive his JD from Michigan State University College of Law in May 2016. He is currently interning in the appellate chambers of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia at The Hague,

Johns Hopkins University | 91

ALUMNI LIFE

DON OBERDORFER, a celebrated expert in Asian affairs and chairman emeritus of the U.S.-Korea Institute at Johns Hopkins SAIS, died July 23 in Washington, D.C. He was 84.


NEWS AND NOTEWORTHY

Netherlands, for the duration of the fall 2015 semester. After graduation, he hopes to pursue a career in law with a focus on U.S.-China legal relations, immigration law, public interest, and human rights. RAMON ZERTUCHE ’12, previously minority staff director in the House Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on the Western Hemisphere, joined Ford Motor Co. in March 2015 as manager of international government affairs for the Americas. Zertuche lives with his wife, Alejandra, in North Bethesda, Md. CLASS OF

2013

In July 2015, NATHANIEL AHRENS ’13 moved from the Center for Strategic and International

I N

Studies to the University of Maryland where he is now director of China Affairs. He continues to run the American Mandarin Society, a nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting the development of the future stewards of U.S.-China relations. He resides in Alexandria, Va., with his wife, Friederike, and two children. MAXIMILIAN DUNN N’12, ’13 lives in Chicago and

works with the Federal Reserve Bank of New York doing foreign exchange analysis. He focuses on China and the U.K. In March 2015, MAHRUKH HASAN B’12, ’13 took a new

position as research and outreach specialist with Internews, a media development orga-

M E M O R I A M

P ETER CON R AD BLO CH B ’6 8, ’69 M EHTAB DER E B ’08, ’09 JACKSON FLYN N , FOR M ER FACULT Y CH R I STI N E GIANGR ECO B ’ 70, ’ 7 1 ROB ERT GI LLI S HOAG ’60 ED GAR LUNA M EN D OZA B ’0 2, ’03 D ON OBER D OR FER , FOR M ER ADJUNCT P ROFESSOR MA RY O’ N EI L B ’ 97, ’ 98 MA LCOLM N . Q UI NT ’ 5 6 GLORIA ECKERT (ANDERSON) REMY ’48 ELFR I EDE SOBER N H EI M ’ 4 5

92 | SAIS Magazine Winter 2016

In May 2015, RILIND LATIFI B’12, ’13 and ALBAN PRUTHI B’06, ’07 finished the Black Bear Triathlon in Pennsylvania. Latifi and Pruthi, both from Kosovo, created TriTeam Kosova to promote Kosovar athletes who, until recently, were not allowed to compete in international competitions. Last year, Kosovo was admitted as a full member in the International Olympics Committee and its athletes will be able to participate for the first time in Rio 2016.

nization that ensures effective and sustainable programming for radio journalism training, a free media environment, and increased coverage of critical issues. She is currently based in Juba, South Sudan. In July 2014, CAMERON THOMAS-SHAH B’12, ’13

moved to Vietnam to begin his foreign-service career at the U.S. Consulate in Ho Chi Minh City. His next assignment—beginning July 2017—will be cultural affairs officer in Tegucigalpa, Honduras. CLASS OF

2014

DAVID FISHMAN N’14

lives in Shanghai, China, where he is a project manager at Nicobar Group, a consulting firm helping U.S. firms in the nuclear energy sector do business in China.

HANNAH HINDEL N’14 is a second-year master’s student in the Asian studies program at Georgetown University’s Walsh School of Foreign Service. Last summer she interned for the Department of State’s Bureau of East Asian and Pacific Affairs, Office of Australia, New Zealand, and Pacific Affairs. She is now a research intern at the Center for Strategic and International Studies China Power Project and her research appears in the Jamestown Foundation’s China Brief.

On June 6, 2015, ALAYNA RODRIGUEZ ’14 and Pierce Tria were

married at the Four Seasons Resort in Santa Fe, N.M. The couple honeymooned in Cancún, Mexico. They currently live in Arlington, Va.


MASTER OF ARTS IN GLOBAL RISK Analyze. Assess. Act. TACKLING RISK IN THE 21ST CENTURY The Master of Arts in Global Risk builds on the multi-disciplinary strengths of Johns Hopkins SAIS by introducing students to a broad array of concepts and tools required for sophisticated careers in political and economic risk analysis. To learn more about this 13-month, cohort-based, new degree offering program, based at SAIS Europe, visit sais-jhu.edu/mgr.


1740 Massachusetts Avenue, NW Washington, DC 20036

SAVE THE DATE SAIS Europe Alumni Weekend

AP R I L 22–24, 2016 SAIS EUROPE B O L O G N A , I TA LY

SAIS Europe in Bologna looks forward to welcoming alumni from all class years back to the city and the Center. For more information visit europe.jhu.edu/aw2016/ or contact sais.eu.alumni@jhu.edu.

China’s Changing Frontier JUN E 14 –2 8, 2 016

Y U N N A N P R OV I N C E , CHINA

Join Professors David M. Lampton, Director of SAIS China, and Hua Tao, an expert on the development of China’s northwestern minorities and the history of Islam in China, for an exclusive trip to China’s southwestern frontier and the ancient Tea Horse Road. For more information go to alumni.jhu.edu/travel/2016/china

Nanjing Center 30th Anniversary

JUN E 17–19, 2016 HOP KI N S- NA N JI NG CENTER NA N JI NG , CH I NA

The Hopkins-Nanjing Center, the longest active Sino-American academic partnership in modern China, brings Chinese and non-Chinese students together to study international relations in their target language. For details on the anniversary celebration, go to www.sais-jhu.edu/hopkinsnanjinganniversary or contact nanjing@jhu.edu. TO KEEP CURRENT WITH SAIS EVENTS VISIT WWW.SAIS-JHU.EDU/NEWS-AND-EVENTS

Johns Hopkins SAIS Magazine 2016  
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