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’ 2013 Annual Dinner Monday, November 25, 2013 The Waldorf Astoria Grand Ballroom New York City

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The SVS Motto “Believe, Belong, Become, Benefact”

As members of a community are interrelated, so are the precepts of the SVS motto. Each individual precept derives its strength and meaning from the others, and fuels our approach to our work with the young people and families in our care. First one believes and learns to have faith and trust in oneself, and in others. With belief, one is able to belong to the larger community, and to participate meaningfully in the groups, organizations, and institutions that serve the community and make it stronger. Through belonging, one has the opportunity to become the person one wants to be, and to aspire to greatness in all areas of life. And in so becoming, one learns to benefact, to give back to the community in order to make the world a better place for the next one who dares to believe. The entire St.Vincent’s Community, from our youngest to our oldest members, benefits from living the ideals behind our motto. And in applying its precepts, we each become the beneficiary of what we have practiced because “it is in giving that we receive; it is in loving that we are loved.”

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St.Vincent’s Services

2013 Annual Dinner

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Jane Tutoki Global Head of Claims Operations AIG

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Jane Tutoki is the Global Head of Claims Operations at AIG, one of the largest multinational insurance corporations in the world. Upon joining the company in 2012, she brought a wealth of both international and national claims experience. Her previous positions include Global Head of Claims at Xchanging and Chief Claims Officer at Zurich Financial Services. Prior to joining Zurich North America Commercial in August 2007, Jane worked in Switzerland as the global chief claims officer for Zurich Financial Services. Jane joined Zurich from the Farmers Insurance Exchanges where she served two years as Vice President of Auto Claims and in 2003 became Vice President of Specialty Claims. Prior to joining Farmers, Jane was the Vice President of Commercial Claims operations for The Hartford Insurance Company. Jane began her affiliation with the insurance industry as a trial lawyer performing defense work for numerous insurance companies, then becoming in-house counsel for the Continental/CNA insurance company before joining The Hartford in 1993. In September 2009, Jane was honored with the Insurance Networking News’ Women in Insurance Leadership award. She is a member of the Federation of Defense and Corporate Counsel (FDCC), a Chartered Property Casualty Underwriter (CPCU) and is a past member of the Board of Directors of Electricidad de Caracas (EDC), a Venezuelan electric company. Jane holds a law degree from the University of Pittsburgh and a Bachelor’s Degree in management from Seton Hill College in Pennsylvania. She is admitted to practice law before the Supreme Courts of Pennsylvania, New York and the U.S. Supreme Court. She is fluent in Japanese and is a basketball aficionado, having played on several women’s teams in the U.S. and Japan.

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“Wait, thou child of hope, for Time shall teach thee all things.” Martine Farquhar Tupper

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Mr. William P. Sabado President & Chief Executive Officer St.Vincent’s Services My Dear Friends, It is my great pleasure to welcome you to St.Vincent’s Service 2013 Annual Dinner. On July 1st, 2013 we began our 145th year of continuous service to needy children and their families with initiatives which support, supplement or substitute for the healing, nurturing, and developing relationships ideally found in family life. We presently serve approximately 700 of the city’s most vulnerable children annually, including: • Over 550 children in Family Foster Homes, and successfully placing 100 children in permanent adoptive homes. • 55 children in our Positive Caring Services program (including children with HIV/AIDS and other medically fragile conditions). • 50 children in our Youth Residential Services comprised of four residences where dedicated, round-the-clock staff help our young people achieve stability and become healthy, active members of the community. • 53 Developmentally Disabled adults, aged twenty through seventy plus in five community residences that provide supportive “family style” housing, high-quality medical care and physical therapy, weekly life skills workshops, and recreational opportunities. • Over 15,000 visits per year comprised of SVS children and families as well as clients from the surrounding community through our outpatient Mental Health Clinic. • Over 19,000 visits per year through our comprehensive Chemical Dependence Services Program to help families reunite with their children who have been placed in foster care due to chemical or alcohol addiction problems. St.Vincent’s Services is distinguished by the range of programs we provide to our group home and foster care youth. We treat each young person holistically, offering activities that work to heal their past traumas and support them in addressing their challenges so they can achieve self-sufficiency in adulthood. In addition to these services, St.Vincent’s offers an array of Education and Empowerment programs to provide support “over and above” what is mandated by the government, in order to ensure that your youth overcome their challenges and prepare for bright futures. Our signature educational initiative – The American Dream Program (ADP) – reflects our commitment to education for young people as the route toward independence in adulthood. For fifteen years, ADP has ensured that when our youth leave us, they do so with marketable skills that will enable them to secure meaningful employment and compete in today’s competitive global economy. ADP fulfills this ambitious goal by providing tuition assistance and room and board, as well as support for tutoring, counseling, health care and other incidental expenses through graduation – even past age twenty-one, when all government aid ceases. Together, our Education and Empowerment programs provide the young people of SVS with the types of support that will help them achieve academically, personally and professionally; gain self-sufficiency; and become productive members and leaders in their communities. These programs are possible only because of the caring generosity of our donors. We remain extraordinarily grateful for your support that enables us to care for the whole child, and to build stronger families and communities in New York City. Warmest wishes for a wonderful holiday season, William P. Sabado

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Youth of the Year Awards The Youth of the Year Award has an esteemed history. First called “The Corporal Raul Orta Award,” it was named for a young man who lived at St. Vincent’s from 1959 until 1963. Raul rejoined the United States Marine Corps in 1965 and was killed in action in Vietnam on February 1, 1967, one month before he was to terminate his tour of duty. He was not quite 22 years old. In commemoration of Raul’s sacrifice for his county, the Board of St. Vincent’s unanimously voted to designate an annual award for a senior resident of St.Vincent’s Services deemed most worthy of such an honor. All the recipients listed below have distinguished themselves in one capacity or another. We are proud of their association with St. Vincent’s. 2012 Damien Little

1996 Loran Tulloch

1980 Stephen McCain

2011 Marcelle Dublin

1995 Ishmael Robleh

1979 Anthony Miller

2010 Tasha Pringle

1994 Si Van Lam

2009 Carl McVay

1993 Shawn Vialva

1978 Victor Flores Jose Flores

2008 Devon Reynolds

1992 Karleen Duval

2007 Melany Centano

1991 Anna Velez

2006 Christine Chung

1990 Charles Hazzard

2005 Joel Ceballos

1989 Phan Ming Tung

2004 Bahati Dramou

1988 James Michael Gregg

2003 Antoinette Holley

1987 Lawrence Harris

2002 Kenith Packer

1986 Debi Roy

2001 Brandy Caughman

1985 Edward Irizarry

2000 Elliot Fynn

1984 Edwin Hernandez, Jr.

1999 Shelly Ramsammy

1983 Ralph Johnson, Jr.

1969 Dennis Thomas Lawrence Thomas

1998 Glen Bridgers

1982 Jason Wheeler

1968 Raphael Torres

1997 Kareem Roker

1981 Eugene Warren

1967 Raphael Torres

1977 Melvin Penn 1976 John McConnell 1975 Hiram Rodrigues

1971 Michael C. Thorogood Steven E. Wojnarowicz 1970 Julio Morales

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2013 Youth of the Year Award Presented to

Mamadou Dione For his outstanding achievements and for exemplifying the values and principles of St.Vincent’s Services.

After Mamadou’s aunt was denied re-entry into the United States due to citizenship problems, he was left alone in the U.S., a foreign country in which he had no additional family. However, St.Vincent’s made a place for Mamadou, and he became a resident in one of the group homes. “St. Vincent’s has helped make the dream of college actually a reality,” says the Senegal-native. Today, Mamadou has gotten his Associates Degree in civil engineering at the New York City College of Technology, and is now in his sophomore year at New York University Polytechnic Institute pursuing a Bachelor’s Degree in civil engineering. Mamadou, who was born in Dakar, Senegal, first came to the U.S. with his stepfather, a Senegalese Air Force Commander, who was pursuing additional training at the U.S. Air Force base in Virginia. He is one of seven children in a large, close knit extended family that emphasized education above all else. When circumstances beyond his control would separate him from his family, Mamadou relied heavily on his Muslim faith, strength of character, and cultural pride to endure and overcome life’s storms. He also attributes his success to his mother, who has remained an inspiration for him. “My mother has given me the courage not to give up,” he says. As Mamadou works towards finishing his Bachelor’s Degree and reuniting with his family, he stays focused on continuing on the path to success. He desires to be an example for what one can achieve if one is given a support network, and is challenged to persevere through life’s ups and downs. For youth who want to be where he is now, Mamadou advises them, “Opportunities may be different for everyone, but goals may be the same. It’s important to work towards your goals no matter what, and you will create the right opportunity for yourself.”

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“The potential possibilities of any child are the most intriguing and stimulating in all creation” !

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2013 Annual Dinner Committee

Domenick C. DiCicco, Jr. Senior Vice President Global Head & Staff Counsel AIG

Bert Fortney Northeast Insurance Sector Leader Deloitte LLP

John J. McDonough, Esq. Vice Chairman, Commercial Litigation Department Cozen O’Connor

Adam Potter Executive Director Claims and Litigation Management Alliance


“The grand essentials of happiness are: someting to do, something to love, and something to hope for.” Allan K. Chalmers

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St. Vincent’s Services, Inc. OFFICERS OF THE BOARD Alan D. Schwartz, Chairman of the Board Executive Chairman Guggenheim Partners, LLC John J. McDonough, Esq., 1st Chairman Vice Chairman, Commercial Litigation Department Cozen O’Connor Mark A. Van Lith, Treasurer Senior Managing Director Guggenheim Partners, LLC

MEMBERS OF THE BOARD John J. Amore

John W. McConnell, Esq.

Andrew W. Attivissimo

William D. Motherway, Esq. Executive Vice President Tishman Construction Corporation

Thomas E. Constance, Esq. Chairman/Partner Kramer Levin Naftalis & Frankel LLP

Bishop Paul R. Sanchez Auxiliary Bishop of Brooklyn, Pastor of Our Lady Queen of Martyrs Church

Lawrence F. DiGiovanna, Esq.

TRUSTEE MEMBERS Marc S. Cohn President Eldan Properties Ltd. Philip J. Corbisiero John R. Considine Executive Vice President & CFO Becton, Dickinson & Company Thomas R. Tizzio

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St.Vincent’s Services 2013 Dinner Menu

APPETIZER SMOKED SALMON GALETTE Fennel and Sweet Onion Salad Micro Greens, Horseradish Creme Fraiche and Chive Oil *** ENTREE HERB CRUSTED BRAISED BEEF SHORT RIBS Celery Root and Potato Puree Root Vegetable Ragout Gremolata *** DESSERT APPLE CRANBERRY CRUMB TART Cinnamon Ice Cream Creme Anglaise *** Waldorf Astoria Petit Fours Freshly Brewed Coffee,Tea, and Decaffeinated Coffee *** WINES TO BE OFFERED Chardonnay, Hess Select, California & Cabernet Sauvigon, 14 Hands, Columbia Valley, Washington

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Program

WELCOME John J. McDonough, Esq. 1st Vice Chairman of the Board, St.Vincent’s Services Vice Chairman, Commercial Litigation Department, Cozen O’Connor REMARKS AND INVOCATION Most Rev. Nicholas DiMarzio, Ph.D., D.D. Bishop of Brooklyn and Queens GREETINGS William P. Sabado, LMSW, JD President & Chief Executive Officer, St.Vincent’s Services 2013 YOUTH OF THE YEAR Mamadou Dione INTRODUCTION OF GUEST OF HONOR John J. McDonough, Esq. AWARD PRESENTATION TO GUEST OF HONOR 2013 Fred and Nancy DeMatteis Award to Jane Tutoki REMARKS Jane Tutoki Global Head of Claims Operations AIG TRIBUTE TO REV. MSGR. ROBERT M. HARRIS Alan D. Schwartz Chairman of the Board, St.Vincent’s Services Executive Chairman, Guggenheim Partners, LLC REMARKS Rev. Msgr. Robert M. Harris Former President & CEO of St.Vincent’s Services, 1968-2012 1869-2013 S V I N C E N T ’S T

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A Quarter of a Century of Former St.Vincent’s Services Honorees: 1987-2012 Year Honored Name of Honoree 2012

Brandon Burgess

2011

Company/Job Title ION Media Networks, Inc., Chairman & Chief Executive Officer Nielsen

2010

Andrew W. Hobson

Univision Communications, Inc., Sr. Executive Vice President & CFO

2009

Peter S. Zaffino

Marsh, Inc., President & CEO

2008

Doreen A. Toben

Verizon Communications Inc., Former Executive Vice President & CFO

2007

Martin J. Sullivan

Willis Group Holdings, Deputy Chairman and Chairman and CEO of its Willis Global Solutions, Former Chairman of AIG

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David Shedlarz

Pfizer, Inc. - former Vice Chairman

2005

Michael J. Dolan

IMG, President & COO, Former CFO of Viacom, Inc.

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Salvatore Zaffino

Guy Carpenter & Company, Chairman & CEO

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John A. Schneider

G2 Investment Group, Former Managing Director of Allen & Company

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Seth H. Waugh

Deutsche Bank Americas, CEO

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Salvatore Sodano

The American Stock Exchange LLC - Former Chairman & CEO

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Leo M. Hart

The Hilton Hawaiian Village Beach Resort & Spa, Director of Sales Former Managing Director of Brae Capital Corp.

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Richard J. Bressler

Thomas H. Lee Partners, Managing Director, Former CFO, Time Warner

1998

Frank C. Lanza

L-3 Communication, Inc., Founder, Chairman & CEO - Deceased

1997

John F. Antioco

Blockbuster, Former Chairman

1996

Fredric V. Salerno

New Mountain Capital, L.L.C., Senior Advisor and Director of GGCP, Inc. a company of Gabelli, Former Vice Chairman & CFO of Verizon

1995

Richard A. Grasso

New York Stock Exchange, Former Chairman

1994

Thomas R. Tizzio

AIG , Retired Senior Vice Chairman - General Insurance & Chairman of the Board, St. Vincent’s Services

1993

Vincent Tese

Cablevision Systems, Director, Former Director of Bear Stearns

1992

Frank A. Zarb

Nasdaq, Former Chairman

1991

John A. Catsimatidis

Red Apple Group, President, Chairman & CEO

1990

Nancy DeMatteis

Wife of Deceased Former Chairman of the Board for St. Vincent’s Services, Fred DeMatteis, Co-Founder of Home Depot

1989

Robert G. Blount

American Home Products Corporation, Former Executive Vice President

1988

Alan D. Schwartz

Guggenheim Partners, LLC, Executive Chairman

1987

Kenneth G. Langone

Invemed Associates, LLC - Founder, Chairman of the Board, CEO & President

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“Hope sees the invisible, feels the intangible and achieves the impossible.” Anonymous

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Grace, Dignity and Discernment in Times of Trouble The Reverend Monsignor Robert M. Harris was a fresh-faced young priest when he came to St. Vincent’s Hall in 1968. But the 37 year old, who could pass for one of the boys in his charge when without his collar, became the first Executive Director with professional qualifications to take the helm. With a Master’s Degree in social work and ample experience working for the Catholic Youth Organization of the Diocese of Brooklyn and Queens, Father Harris knew what motivated and inspired young people. He would go on to combine a new methodology for the delivery of social services with a new focus of the whole child, laying the foundation for a new vision for the agency’s future. Father Harris’ academic credentials were extensive at the time of hiring, and his quest for deeper understanding of social services best practice has only furthered his academic achievements. See inset. A philosophy major in college, he received graduate degrees in religious education, social work and the philosophy of sociology. These broad academic interests provided training, from practical and hands-on experience to abstract, theoretical learning, making Father Harris uniquely suited to take the helm of an agency at a crossroad. The landscape for the public care of children was rapidly shifting. Change—social and legislative—was the rule rather than the exception, accompanied by rising costs and vastly increased social work caseloads. Also, the demographics of the children being served were changing. In its first 75 years, St.Vincent’s children were boys, either orphans or came from impoverished families, and were mostly white, Catholic, and accustomed to life in large congregate care settings. By the early 1970’s, St.Vincent’s children were boys and girls representative of more diverse backgrounds, and fewer were white or Catholic. More significant, however, was the exacerbated emotional damage of the newer entrants. The new children often came from traumatic home situations with abusive or drug addicted parents, and were unaccustomed to foster care.

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The very nature of what social services should entail was undergoing its own transformation. The prevailing way of looking at child “welfare” was maintenance: the child’s basic needs were attended to — they were fed and sheltered with compassion. A heavy emphasis was placed on school attendance, but not on what actually took place in the child’s mind while he was in school. There was no consideration of factors — emotional or psychological— that might be affecting his school performance.The old notion held that to improve lives, one only needed to improve settings. Reflecting the broader shifts in social work consciousness, Father Harris introduced a dynamic model for the delivery of social services: with a new focus on the whole child, he underscored the need for tailor-made services that addressed issues beyond the provision of food, shelter and daily maintenance. As the social work field took a “psycho-social” approach to the child, Father Harris changed it for St. Vincent’s. Not only was attention paid to the psychological and social needs of the child, he also paid close attention to the child’s educational needs. Under Father Harris’ leadership, the agency sought to have a “career-centered educational plan” for each boy and girl.The plan often started in junior high school, where youngsters were three to five years behind their age level. St. Vincent’s took the responsibility to do what the school was not: tutoring children at night and on weekends, and actually developing remedial programs. The social worker also became the child’s “educational coach.” In fact, the children’s weekly allowance took into consideration “educational effort” as well the maintenance of good living standards. Early in his tenure, Father Harris also came to the conclusion that no system would work if the children were on one side of the issue and the staff on the other. To show the implications of this idea, he revised the organization chart, placing the children on top with the direct staff, who were personally and directly delivering services, and the Board and Executive Director on the bottom, as the foundation for the organization. It was a symbolic move, meant to show that staff and directors were there to serve the needs of the children.This shift in perspective led the way to a shift in St.Vincent’s fundamental mission: to make

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the agency that offered room and board and a safe environment, more of a ‘home away from home’ that empowered and nurtured children through personalized childcare, based on today’s needs and tomorrow’s dreams. Father Harris believed that an agency could be “simply and truly evaluated by the happiness felt by its children. A fully accredited agency admired by government and the social service professions — which should be its quest — nevertheless without the applause of its children is without merit.” He understood that all children need to feel loved and to have a sense of pride, and he worked to make St.Vincent’s a place of nurture and love, a place where endearing and enduring relationships would grow. The philosophical course that Father Harris— who became Monsignor Harris in 1984—set for St.Vincent’s steered the agency through enormous waves of change over the past 45 years. In following this child-centered path, Father Harris distinguished St.Vincent’s Services beyond its ability to model best practices in its service delivery. This guiding principle aided St. Vincent’s in its ability to respond with innovation, expedience, and expertise to profound social changes that took place during his years, decisive responsive to new-found societal ills. The results have been extraordinary. Under Msgr. Harris’ leadership, St. Vincent’s established a number of new programs. Some were short-term solutions designed to address immediate humanitarian crises, and others have continued to set St. Vincent’s apart from other social services agencies that have followed. One such program, the Indochinese Refugee Assistance Program (RAP), was created to serve the surge of refugee children from Vietnam and Cambodia following the Vietnam War. And while serving children was always the raison d’etre, Father Harris ensured that St. Vincent’s could serve this unique population holistically. In preparation for the arrival and placement of the children, Father Harris required RAP supervisors and staff and foster parents to view many hours of films and documentaries, reading and learning about the history, customs and habits of this population. St. Vincent’s went a step further to actively recruit Vietnamese families in order to provide ethnically compatible homes. And staying close to its tough stance on education, St. Vincent’s provided ongoing and intensive tutoring in English as well as in

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other subjects needed by the older students for both high school and college. Of the 373 “boat” and refugee children who came to St.Vincent’s, 361 were thriving adults when they left the agency’s care. St. Vincent’s engaged them in special programs to assist their acclimation to life in America, always creating opportunities for celebration of the children’s cultural heritage. When the crack-cocaine epidemic of the 1980’s left large numbers of abandoned infants languishing in city hospitals, their drug-addicted mothers unable to care for them, Father Harris once again readied St.Vincent’s to answer to the call of duty. The Emergency Infant Nursery was created to take in these “boarder babies” until relatives were readied or alternative foster homes could be found. A pediatrician examined each baby every 24 hours, and a staff of certified home health aids, RNs, social workers, teachers who specialized in early childhood education, psychologists, and nutritionists met the needs of the infants and toddlers. Of the 51 infants cared for, no baby was in the nursery more than 46 days. All went home to relatives, and only 3 went into foster care. Like RAP, the Emergency Infant Nursery was a short term solution in response to a crisis. Other programs created under Father Harris’s leadership continue to provide innovative, wholistically, relevant care for New York’s children. The Positive Caring Program (later called Positive Caring Services), one such program that continues today, launched in response to the burgeoning HIV/AIDS epidemic that was becoming the number one killer of African-American and Hispanic women, and one of the most pressing social issues at the time. Thousands of babies were being born exposed to the virus and older children, not routinely screened for the disease were discovered to be HIV-positive. Once the depth of the problem became clear, Father Harris brought St. Vincent’s the frontline of caring for HIV/AIDS most helpless victims, blazing a new trail in caring for these dying children. In 1988, St. Vincent’s became one of the first childcare agencies in the state to establish a program to deal with the complex issues facing biological parents and their HIV-infected children at a time when there were no adequate medications. The

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Positive Caring Program became the second largest AIDS program in the United States and served as a model for other agencies throughout the country. In the first year of Positive Caring Services, 94 children with HIV infection plus 10 of their siblings who did not have the infection were placed with foster parents. After three years, 64 of those first children remained in the program, four were adopted, nine returned to their families, and 15 were buried by St. Vincent’s. But the work done within the context of Positive Caring Services extended beyond the basic care, placements, and other outreach directly to the children. Father Harris saw it necessary to work closely with the mothers, who knew they were going to die, to establish a plan for their children. Positive Caring Services, with Father Harris at the lead, lobbied to change the quality of dying and death for children with AIDS at a time when everyone was afraid of the disease. One of the most important quests was to give children the right to die with dignity and at home with the people they loved nearby. The battle also extended to the provision of pain medication for these children. At the time, Medicaid would not pay for medication. Father Harris and his colleagues worked tirelessly to have the law changed so the kids would not have to die in pain. Today, Positive Caring Services provides care and support for medically fragile infants and children facing a range of complex conditions, including HIV/AIDS, cerebral palsy, spina bifida, brittle bone syndrome and autism. PCS is staffed with nurses who have public health backgrounds and are skilled not only in caring for patients at home, but in teaching caregivers the techniques needed to care for their children. Foster parents of children with medically fragile conditions receive intensive training so they can deliver the children’s basic health needs such as monitoring medications, physical therapy, infection control, and skin care. These efforts underscore the program’s intent to provide as much

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medical care as possible at home and in the clinic so the child does not have to be hospitalized. Like Positive Caring Services, the American Dream Program (ADP) continues to provide a unique basket of services and opportunities to St.Vincent’s youth. Long since the Agency’s signature program, ADP assures that each and every St. Vincent’s child who aspires to a college education will have the opportunity to realize that dream. Father Harris’ commitment to education, and his firm belief that from the time a child enters our care, he or she will be given enriched academic support in preparation for ultimate college entry, remains the inspiration for ADP. In spite of its necessary intentions, ADP was a costly promise. All government support for foster care ceases when a student turns 21 years old. However, because of the unfortunate circumstances that brought them into foster care in the first place, most of our young people are well behind grade level when they come to us, consequently starting college later. Thus when Father Harris launched ADP, he ensured that St.Vincent’s would pick up the full bill for providing unreimbursed tuition, books, supplies, transportation, clothing, personal grooming, spending money, health and dental insurance, and a place to live. Father Harris achieved ADP’s aims through earnest fundraising; the program continues to be funded solely through charitable contributions only. ADP is separated into four groups: high school students, college students under 21, college students over 21. and former St. Vincent’s students who now are considering starting or re-enrolling in college. College students over 21 are supported as described above. For our high school students, St.Vincent’s provides tutoring, guidance counseling, remedial academics and

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computer training to bolster their shaky skills. Built into the program are incentives such as special trips and extra allowance to encourage them to exercise their best efforts. For the younger students who have already been accepted to college but are still under 21, St.Vincent’s pays for any tuition not covered by loans, travel and books as well as all of the support services we offer high school youngsters. Finally, the fourth group, St.Vincent’s was helping with expenses they are unable to meet on their own. The impact that ADP has had on the lives of its students is profound. St.Vincent’s students who have learned the value of education and bettered themselves in high school, at college, and in vocational programs, greatly improve their ability to make a successful living.This alone helps break the cycle of poverty that otherwise has a disturbing tendency to be passed from one generation to the next. Now even more, St.Vincent’s students who have been successful in gaining an education impress on those around them— their siblings, their children, their partners, their friends—the idea that education is important. And they develop a vested interest in working to build a better community and society. As an instrument for educational opportunity, the American Dream Scholarship program is having a positive impact on our young people’s lives by making the dream of a college education, independence, and a hopeful future come true. Today, St.Vincent’s serves children and their families through all-encompassing services. These range from family foster care and family foster case group homes to specialized care for the developmentally disabled. For over 45 years, Msgr. Harris has guided St.Vincent’s through the most challenging years of its long history. He has responded in creative and positive ways to circumstances that have often been frought with uncertainty and tension. He has been aided in this by a supportive and talented group of co-workers. Msgr. Harris’ leadership has prepared SVS for the changes to come in the 21st century, and has created the formidable foundation for it to remain a vital resource to the hundreds of children and families that it continues to support to this day.

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The Reverend Monsignor Robert M. Harris Msgr. Harris has an M.S.W. from Fordham University and an M. Phil., Sociology from St. John’s University. He earned an M.A. in Religious Education at St. Vincent College and his B.A. in Philosophy at St. Vincent College. Msgr. Harris is a Licensed Therapist, a Registered Clinical Social Worker and a Certified Social Worker and a member of the Academy of Certified Social Workers. In addition, Msgr. Harris holds Graduate Management Certificates from the Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University and Yale University’s Business School. He also graduated from the Institute of Not-For-Profit Management, Graduate School of Business at Columbia University. Since 1971, Msgr. Harris has been a Board Member of the New York State Council of Family & Child Caring Agencies, and served on their Executive and Governance Committees. In 1979, Mayor Edward I. Koch appointed Msgr. Harris as an Advisory Committee Member to the Department of Juvenile Justice, New York City, where he served until 2000. During that time, he was credited by Mayor Koch for moving juvenile justice’s perceptions of juveniles in the system from needing imprisonment to viewing the wayward child as a child who has temporarily lost his way. Under his leadership, in 1988 SVS received the Joseph Weber Award from the United Way of New York City for The Best Managed Social Service Agency. Msgr. Harris led St.Vincent’s Services from 1968-2012. He is currently a Board Member of the Alliance for Children & Families, headquartered in Milwaukee, WI, and is active on their Development Committee.

Mary Louise Morgan November 2013

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We have inherited the past.We can create the future...

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The Children of St. Vincent’s Services acknowledge The DeMatteis Family Foundation and the late Fred DeMatteis for the creation and continuing support of The American Dream Program

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DIAMOND UNDERWRITER Midtown Equities - Michael Cayre BRONZE UNDERWRITERS Accenture AIG Cozen O’Connor Datacert, Inc. Deloitte

SILVER UNDERWRITERS The Schwartz Family Foundation ION Media Networks Kramer Levin Naftalis & Frankel LLP Massey Knakal Realty Services Lewis Brisbois Bisgaard & Smith LLP Magna Legal Services MYLAW Realty Corp.

DISTINGUISHED DONORS Christopher Tutoki John J. Amore Larry F. DiGiovanna, Esq. Mark Van Lith Rev. Msgr. Robert M. and Marilyn Harris William D. Motherway, Esq.

GOLD PAGE ADS Putney Twombly Hall & Hirson, LLP Joshua Stein PLLC Whittier & Associates

FULL PAGE ADS Grace G. LoGrande

ACKNOWLEDGMENT John A. Tsiouris, M.D. M.G. Enterprises

HALF PAGE ADS Afederal Exterminating Ltd Boro-Wide Recycling Corp. Briscoe Protective Systems O’Toole Fernandez Weiner Van Lieu, LLC United Health Care/Oxford William Hird & Co. Inc. Oxford Health Care

SILVER PAGE ADS Grassi & Co. BRONZE PAGE ADS Vassolotti & Associates Architect LLP LMS Technical Services York Risk Services Group, Inc.


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Congratulations to St. Vincent’s Services th as you begin the 145 year of continuous service to New York City’s neediest children and families. Midtown Equities


“An institution is the lengthened shadow of one man� Ralph Waldo Emerson

With heartfelt thanks to Msgr. Harris for all your hard work and dedication throughout the years

Nancy and Alan Schwartz


©2013 Accenture. All rights reserved.

6.0” trim

High performance deserves high praise.

8.0” trim

Accenture congratulates tonight’s honoree, Jane Tutoki, Global Head of Claims Operations at AIG. And we salute St. Vincent’s Services for their commitment to improving the lives of children and families in New York City.


AIG is proud to support

St. Vincent’s Services

AIG is the marketing name for the worldwide property-casualty, life and retirement, and general insurance operations of American International Group, Inc. For additional information, please visit our website at www.aig.com.


Cozen O’Connor congratulates Jane Tutoki, Global Head of Claims Operations at AIG, on being the Honoree at St. Vincent’s Services 2013 Annual Dinner

John J. McDonough

1st Vice Chairman of the Board – St. Vincent Services Vice Chairman, Commercial Litigation Department – Cozen O’Connor 212.908.1226 | jmcdonough@cozen.com 45 Broadway | 16th Floor | New York, NY 10006 575 Lawyers | 23 Offices Worldwide cozen.com © 2013 Cozen O’Connor


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Datacert is a proud sponsor of St.Vincent’s Services 2013 Annual Dinner © 2013. Datacert, Inc. All Rights Reserved.


Deloitte is proud to support St. Vincent’s Services Deloitte is proud to support St. Vincent’s Services Annual Dinner honoring Jane Tutoki and Rev. Msgr. Robert M. Harris www.deloitte.com

About Deloitte Deloitte refers to one or more of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited, a UK private company limited by guarantee, and its network of member firms, each of which is a legally separate and independent entity. Please see www.deloitte.com/about for a detailed description of the legal structure of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited and its member firms. Please see www.deloitte.com/us/about for a detailed description of the legal structure of Deloitte LLP and its subsidiaries. Certain services may not be available to attest clients under the rules and regulations of public accounting. Copyright © 2013 Deloitte Development LLC. All rights reserved. Member of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited


Tom & Janet Constance and Kramer Levin Naftalis & Frankel LLP are pleased to support St. Vincent’s Services and salute this year’s honoree Jane Tutoki

1177 Avenue of the Americas New York, NY 10036 Phone: 212.715.9100 www.kramerlevin.com

NEW YORK

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SILICON VALLEY

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Lewis Brisbois is proud to support St. Vincent’s Services and congratulates this evenings honorees, Jane Tutoki and Rev. Msgr. Robert M. Harris. LewisBrisbois.com


N Y C ’s # 1 B U I L D I N G S A L E S F I R M

Proudly supports

St.Vincent’s Services & Congratulates It’s Honorees Rev. Msgr. Robert M. Harris & Jane Tutoki

877.657.0777

www.masseyknakal.com


MYLAW Realty Corp. is pleased to celebrate Monsignor Robert Harris. Thank you for your life long servitude to St.Vincents.


GRASSI & CO. ACCOUNTANTS AND SUCCESS CONSULTANTS

Working together to enhance your organization’s overall success and bring you to the

next level

488 Madison Avenue New York, NY 10022 212.661.6166

50 Jericho Quadrangle Jericho, NY 11753 516.256.3500

www.grassicpas.com


LMS Technical Services Would Like to Congratulate ST. Vincent's Services On the Success of the American Dream Program

LMS Technical Services 631.694.2034 www.lmstech.com


Congratulations York congratulates

JANE TUTOKI recipient of the 2013 Fred and Nancy DeMatteis Humanitarian Award.


Rev. Msgr. Robert M. Harris You are truly deserving of this great tribute! Clearly thousands of youth are far better off for having been served by St. Vincent’s. You provided them extraordinary and meaningful opportunities for a brighter future! Congratulations and Best Wishes! Grace G. Lo Grande

     


CONGRATULATIONS     ST. VINCENT’S SERVICES  For All Your Hard Work & Dedication  From Your Friends and Fire Alarm Professionals 116 West 23rd St. Suite 500 NY, NY 10011

99 Mark Tree Rd. Centereach, NY 11720-2276

1-888-274-7263

www.briscoeprotective.com


TO LEND A HELPING HAND Here’s to those who give without a thought of receiving. We’re dedicated to building stronger communities – and we couldn’t do it without you. We give heartfelt thanks to St. Vincent’s Services.

oxfordhealth.com ©2013 United HealthCare Services, Inc. UHCNY669706-000


SVS 2013 Online Journal