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Newsletter of the Benedictines of Saint Vincent Archabbe Archabbey Latrobe, Pennsylvania 15650, 724-532-6600

Volume 9, Issue 3, Winter 1998

Restoration Work Begins On Historic Gristmill Its products have sustained many generations of monks at Saint Vincent, and at one time members of the local community, too. Now, one of Pennsylvania’s Heritage Parks and two regional foundations have provided grants totalling $250,000 to help sustain it. The Saint Vincent Gristmill, listed in the National Register of Historic Places since 1978, will receive a face-lift and repairs thanks to grants of $100,000 each from the Allegheny Foundation of Pittsburgh and the Katherine Mabis McKenna Foundation of Latrobe. A third

Saint Benedict’s Day to Be Observed March 21 Benedictines at Saint Vincent will observe Saint Benedict’s Day on Saturday, March 21. The Most Rev. Anthony G. Bosco, Bishop of Greensburg, will say Mass at 8:30 a.m. at the Archabbey Basilica in honor of the occasion. First vespers will be held at 4 p.m. Friday, March 20. Saint Benedict’s Day is the date of death of the passing of Benedict of Nursia, the founder of western monasticism. The public is invited to the services.

grant of $50,000 was recently awarded by the Lincoln Highway Heritage Corridor Project, from the Pennsylvania Heritage Parks Program under the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.

the monks raised, the gristmill is still operated by Saint Vincent Benedictines, and still provides flour for the famous Saint Vincent Bread, once popular throughout the region. The production of bread for residents out-

ary. A completion date is uncertain because the roof project still has to be bid and awarded. Phase II of the renovations will include making the gristmill visitor-ready by constructing a welcome center, installing restrooms, and heating the building. Tours are currently given only in part of the mill because of the need for renovations. The architect for the project is Tasso Katselas, whose firm has provided architectural designs for structures at Saint Vincent

“We are grateful to these organizations for the opportunity to help us preserve the historic Saint Vincent Gristmill,” said Father Paul R. Taylor, O.S.B., who heads the Benedictine committee which oversees its operation. Although its 1997 production levels aren’t as high as they were in the more agrarian days of the gristmill has been in continuous operation since its construction in 1854, just a few years after Boniface Wimmer established the Monastery, College and Seminary at Saint Vincent. Once used to grind the wheat, corn, barley, rye, oats and buckwheat that

side of the monastery was discontinued in 1963, after fire destroyed several buildings on campus, including the one in which the bakery was located. The grants will fund Phase I of the renovations. That phase will include new cedar clapboard siding, new windows, a new metal roof and an electrical upgrade. Many windows are broken, the siding is torn and peeling off, and electrical rewiring is sorely necessary, according to Brother Joseph M. Adams, O.S.B., the current miller. He said the repairs are necessary to help preserve the building. Phase I renovations should begin by mid-Janu-

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Inside This Issue..... Archabbot’s Message ....... 2 News of Monks................. 2 Easter Reflection ....... ....... 3 Gift Shop Opens ........ ....... 3 Trip to China ............. ....... 4 Retreat in Taiwan ..... ....... 5 How Milling Is Done......... 6 List of Millers ........... ....... 7 St, Marys ................. ...... 8 The Latest Book ......... ....... 9 Bill Moyers to Speak . ....... 9 Memorial Donors ..... ....... 9 Obituaries ................. ...... 10 An American Abbot Out... 11 Wimmer scholars ..... ...... 11 Founder’s Day .......... .......11 Calendar of Events .... ...... 12 Summer Retreats ..... ...... 12 Construction Update........ 12


Heart to Heart

Winter 1998

Saint Vincent Archabbey

Archabbot’s Message When Father Boniface Wimmer, the founder of Saint Vincent, arrived in the United States to establish the first Benedictine monastery here, he said: “Everything depends upon this one question, namely, to whom will the next generation belong?” The start of a new year has brought us one step closer to the millennium. Like the new year, the third millennium holds promise of a new beginning, a fresh start, of hope for the future, and raises the question for us: “To whom will the next generation belong?” In establishing Saint Vincent College and Saint Vincent Seminary, Archabbot Boniface was doing his part to be sure that the next generation would belong to Jesus Christ. A headline in the local newspaper, during the Holy Father’s recent visit to Cuba, read: “Youths Cheer Pope in Cuba.” To the youth of Cuba, the Holy Father remarked: “Your youthfulness has rejuvenated me.” The Pope was there to be sure that among the many voices competing for their hearts and minds, the voice of Jesus Christ was heard loudly and clearly. On January 22, youths from throughout the United States gathered in Washington D.C. for the annual “March for Life.” The occa-

sion marked the 25th anniversary of Roe vs. Wade, the Supreme Court decision legalizing abortion. It was a deeply moving experience to see tens of thousands of our nation’s youth gathered to “March for Life.” It is a hopeful sign that the values of the next generation will be those values which seek to promote life and respect for life, even among those who are most helpless — our nation’s unborn children. It is a

hopeful sign that the next generation will indeed belong to Jesus Christ. Among those in our community who are also helping to prepare for the spiritual needs of the next generation are Father Demetrius R. Dumm, O.S.B., and Father Mark Gruber, O.S.B. In this issue Father Demetrius recounts some of his experiences in Taiwan and China, where he conducted three retreats and planted the seeds for future growth. Father Mark recently released his third book on spirituality, Waiting for Dawn: Portents of His Coming. We are contributing to the next generation in other ways also. Saint Vincent Archabbey recently presented five high school seniors with Wimmer Scholarships. The scholarships, with a total value of over $200,000, will help these students prepare to enter the world in the third millennium, when they graduate in 2002. In other news, the Priory at St. Marys has undergone some changes, and the historic Saint Vincent Gristmill will get a fresh look, as three recent grants will initiate much-needed renovations. Thank you for your support in helping Saint Vincent to claim the next generation for Christ. Sincerely in Christ, Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B. Archabbot of Saint Vincent

News of Monks Heimat North America, a bilingual book on GermanAmericans in the last 50 years, was just published and is being sent to bookstores. The editor of the book, Mr. Bert Lachner, visited Saint Vincent last year and invited Father William Wurm, O.S.B., to write an article for the book. Father William’s article on and pictures of Saint Vincent were incorporated into the book. ***** Father Mark Gruber, O.S.B., presented a paper entitled “The Garden and Desert,” as part of the conference, “Benedictine Perspectives on the Environ-

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ment,” which was held at Benedictine College in Atchison, Kansas on October 4. Father Mark’s paper, along with that of the Rev. Terrence Kardong, O.S.B., editor of the American Benedictine Review, reflected on the interface of environmental awareness and Biblical spirituality, especially as they are elaborated in the Rule of Saint Benedict and in the Monastic tradition. Both papers are being considered for possible publication. Father Mark also was the guest speaker on the Rev. Ron Lengwin’s radio show, Amplify (KDKA AM - 1020)

on Sunday, November 16. The show aired in 36 states and most of Canada. The discussion centered around Father Mark’s latest spirituality book, Waiting for Dawn: Portents of His Coming, for which Father Ron wrote the foreword. The book is a collection of Advent/Christmas meditations, and is now available from Saint Vincent Spirituality Publications. ***** Father William Wurm, O.S.B., German instructor at Saint Vincent College, participated in the 31st Annual Meeting of the American

Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) in Nashville, Tennessee from Thursday, November 20 to Sunday, November 23. The American Association of Teachers of German also held its annual meeting in conjunction with the ACTFL meeting. Over 5,500 elementary, secondary, college and university language teachers from the United States participated in the meeting. Father William, president of the Western Pennsylvania Chapter of AATG, also participated in the meeting of AATG presidents and the AATG business meeting.

Volume 9, Issue 3


Heart to Heart

Winter 1998

Saint Vincent Archabbey

Easter is More Than Alleluia From the Latin, “Cor ad Cor Loquitur,” or “Heart Speaks to Heart,” is the motto of Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B. It refers to the archabbot’s prayer that giving and receiving authentic love may always be the chief characteristic of the Saint Vincent monastic community. “Cor ad Cor Loquitur” was also the motto of Cardinal John Newman. This newsletter is published quarterly by the Benedictines of Saint Vincent Archabbey. Publisher Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B. Office of Development Director Edward P. Hager Writer/Editor Kimberley A. Metzgar Contributors to this issue: Director of Public Relations Donald A. Orlando Writer/Editor Theresa Schwab Alumni Director Rev. Gilbert J. Burke, O.S.B. Rev. Omer U. Kline, O.S.B. Rev. Demetrius R. Dumm, O.S.B. Rev. Wulfstan F. Clough, O.S.B. Mary Simons Meyer D. Reuther Rev. Paul R. Taylor, O.S.B. Saint Vincent Archabbey 300 Fraser Purchase Road, Latrobe, Pennsylvania 15650-2686 724-539-9761 Ex. 2601 info@stvincent.edu

Volume 9, Issue 3

By Father Demetrius R. Dumm, O.S.B. Easter is not just one among many Christian feasts. It is the only truly indispensable Christian feast. There was no feast of Christmas for the first two centuries of the church’s life, but Christianity is unthinkable without Easter. It is a joyful feast because it celebrates a victory that seemed impossible. It is also perfectly situated in the calendar (at least for us of the northern hemisphere) because it is joined by nature which celebrates its own liberation from the frozen bondage of winter. In spite of these favorable elements, however, Easter can easily remain a very shallow experience — hardly more than a spring festival with special foods and special bonnets! Too often, these secular elements seem to eclipse and override the deeper religious meaning of the resurrection of Jesus. To deepen our appreciation of Easter we must remember that it really begins on Holy Thursday. On that feast, we see how Jesus summed up everything that he was and taught in the sacrament of his body given and his blood poured out. In this way, he reminded his disciples, in his very last words to them, that unselfish loving is the secret of successful human living. In John’s gospel, the same message is conveyed in Jesus’ washing of his disciples’ feet: “If I then, your Lord and Teacher, have washed your feet, you also ought to wash one another’s feet” (John 13:14). This solemn revelation of the deepest meaning of human life is not just the first act in that wonderful drama that ends with resurrection. It is the indispens-

Father Demetrius R. Dumm, O.S.B. able first step without which there can be no drama ending in resurrection. If we have not come to believe in the need for unselfish loving in our lives, we simply have no concept of who Jesus was or what he did. This is, therefore, the most critical step in our lifelong process of conversion and we need to pray constantly that God will enable us to make this message the center of our lives. For there can be no real Easter without accepting the meaning of Holy Thursday. The second act in the drama of Easter is Good Friday. On this day, we learn that unselfishness means letting go of many things to which we have become attached. But most of all it means that we do this because we have chosen to put the interests of others before our own concerns. Good Friday is far more about loving than it is about suffering. For the suffering of Good Friday is a suffering that comes from loving. We call this kind of suffering “sacrifice” and it is the only kind of suffering that leads to salvation. To avoid this kind of suffering is to miss the meaning of life, for it is to choose not to love. There is a long pause on Holy Saturday. It is as if the whole world and all the angels were holding their

breath to see whether Jesus’ secret of loving sacrifice can possibly lead to anything good. Can such apparent folly prove to be perfect wisdom? The resounding answer comes on Easter Sunday morning. In a very special way, this is God’s day and God knows how to make the most of it. It is, of course, God’s day for us, but only on condition that we have made our own the teaching of Holy Thursday and Good Friday. God certainly wants us to participate in the wonderful victory of Easter Sunday but we can do so only to the extent that we have accepted the secret of Holy Thursday and lived it generously on Good Friday. The lesson to be drawn from this is that we must listen very carefully to what Jesus tells us on Holy Thursday. For we never finish learning about the wisdom of finding freedom by opening ourselves to goodness and then turning that freedom into love and goodness for others. This will cost us something on the Good Fridays of our lives, but it will be the sweet suffering that is full of love and patience and trust. After that, there is nothing but final freedom and victory and eternal glory. Happy Easter!

Basilica Gift Shop Opens A gift shop has opened at Saint Vincent Parish Center, adjacent to the Archabbey Basilica. The Basilica Gift Shop is open from 9 a.m. to noon and 1 to 4 p.m. Mondays to Fridays, 9 a.m. to noon and 1 to 6:30 p.m. Saturdays and from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sundays. The shop sells a range of items, from monastery cookbooks to rosary beads and prayer cards.

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Heart to Heart

Winter 1998

Saint Vincent Archabbey

Archabbot Visits China, Philippines Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B., visited China and the Philippines in December. He attended the Third Meeting of Benedictine Major Superiors of East Asia and the Philippines in Tagaytay City. Following his meeting in the Philippines, the Archabbot met with the Fu Jen Alumni Association in Beijing. The original Fu Jen University was established by the Benedictines of Saint Vincent Archabbey and the American Cassinese Congregation in 1925. In the top photo, Archabbot Douglas (seated, left), and Abbot Timothy Kelly of St. John’s Abbey (seated) meet Madame Wang Guangmei (seated, center), chair of the Fu Jen Alumni Association in Beijing. Madame Wang Guangmei, a graduate of the school, was married to Liu Shaoqi, the former President of China. Also at the dinner was Brother Nicholas Koss, O.S.B. of Saint Vincent Archabbey’s Wimmer Priory in Taipei, Taiwan. In the middle photo, Archabbot Douglas and Brother Nicholas are pictured with a group of native Taiwanese dancers. The group performed following the Mass which Archabbot Douglas celebrated for the

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new addition to St. Benedict’s Catholic Church, Lin Kou, Taiwan. In the bottom left photo, from left, Abbot Andrew

Formileza of Our Lady of Montserrat, Manila. Father Rafaelito and a novice welcome Archabbot Douglas. At the bottom right

photo, Archabbot Douglas is pictured with a newlybaptised infant and his parents at St. Benedict’s Church, Taiwan.

Volume 9, Issue 3


Heart to Heart

Winter 1998

Saint Vincent Archabbey

Father Demetrius Returns From Taiwan (Editor’s Note: Father Demetrius R. Dumm, O.S.B., recently returned from Taiwan, where he gave three retreats at Saint Benedict’s Retreat House. The retreat house is run by the Taiwan Benedictine sisters, and the retreats were given for seminarians, lay students and religious.) By Father Demetrius R. Dumm, O.S.B. There are many adjustments to be made by one who travels to the Orient. When I arrived in Taiwan, I was surprised to discover that temperatures were still in the 80s in late October. The food was another surprise. Much of it was not easily identifiable and, when it was, its preparation was unfamiliar, to say the least. However, it usually turned out to be both flavorful and nutritious. Our Brother Nicholas Koss had arranged retreats and lectures for me in Taiwan and the photos shown here were taken during three weekend retreats at the Benedictine Sisters’ retreat center near Taipei. One of the retreats was for the Sisters themselves while the others were for seminarians and lay students from the Catholic University in Taipei. I had to use an interpreter for most conferences and that was a new experience for me. However, it was not as difficult or as distracting

Volume 9, Issue 3

Father Demetrius R. Dumm, O.S.B., center, is pictured with retreatants at Saint Benedict’s Retreat House, Taiwan. Father Demetrius gave the retreat for religious, seminarians and lay students. as I had anticipated. I gave lectures also at the diocesan seminary in Taipei and at the national seminary in Beijing on the mainland. The students were invariably attentive and appreciative. In Beijing, the welcome was as warm as the classroom was cold! I wore a sweater and jacket during the lecture and still felt uncomfortable. In both Taiwan and mainland China, I was especially aware of the huge population and of the desperate need for effective Christian witness. I hope that I may have sown some seeds for future growth.

Above, Father Demetrius talks with some of the sisters who were participating in his retreat. Below at left, retreatants are listening to his presentation. Below, at right, are participants in his retreat for young people.

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Heart to Heart

Winter 1998

Saint Vincent Archabbey

The late Brother Joseph Weigl, who was miller at Saint Vincent Gristmill from 19511970, is shown operating the millstone. Behind him on the left is Michael Nicol. The person on the right is unidentified. (Saint Vincent Archives photo)

How It’s Done.... By Father Paul R. Taylor, O.S.B. In the days of Boniface Wimmer, the crops of Saint Vincent were abundant. The Brothers worked the soil to provide all kinds of grains, fruits and vegetables for the Monks and the students. The grains were corn, barley, rye, oats, buckwheat and wheat. The need for flour was great and Wimmer commissioned a local millwright, George Washington Bollinger, to design a gristmill for Saint Vincent, for which he received $400. Milling of flour is done by grinding wheat between a set of buhrstones, each stone weighing a ton. The bottom stone is mounted in a platform, motionless. An axle protrudes through the middle of this bottom stone which propels a drive bar. The top stone rests above the bottom stone and spins when in operation; the drive bar propels this stone. The stones grind at their best quality when they are 1/100th of an inch apart. To achieve such precision the cutting edge of the stones must be level and the stones must be balanced. Covers encase the stones so that when the flour is ground, it is caught and guided into a chute. The wheat flows into the eye (center) of the top stone, which leads to the grinding surface between the two stones. It is guided through furrows to the outside of the stones. The circular motion of the top stone pulls the wheat out of the furrows onto the raised portion of the grinding face, where it is actually cut and not crushed. The sifting bolt, purchased in 1854, takes whole wheat flour ground by the stones and sifts it into its component parts of unbleached flour, middlings and bran. The sifting mechanism of the bolt is a six-sided tube of silk of different weave density framed with wood. The whole wheat flour would flow through the inside of this tube. As it spun, the unbleached flour, which is the finest part of the whole wheat flour, is sifted through the 1OXX and 12XX silk. The middlings are sifted through the OXX and 2XX silk. The bran is not even sifted; it is expelled through the end of the tube. The trough of the bolt, where the flour falls, cradles an auger which directs the flour and middlings to their particular chutes that lead to the first floor. Mills were built so that most operating and collecting could be done on the first or ground floor.

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Making Saint Vincent Bread. Many loc regionally-famous bread.

Wheat stored in the gristmill before it

Volume 9, Issue 3


Heart to Heart

Winter 1998

Saint Vincent Archabbey

The Millers at Saint Vincent

Congressman John Murtha, on campus to announce more funding for the Monastery Run Project, toured the gristmill recently with Father Paul R. Taylor, O.S.B. More on the Monastery Run Project will appear in the next issue. The date 1885 marks one of the historic milling machines at the gristmill. (D.Reuther photo)

cal residents still fondly recall the once (Saint Vincent Archives photo)

Gristmill Renovations (Continued From Page 1)

is processed into flour.

Volume 9, Issue 3

(D. Reuther photo)

since 1963. The Gristmill Committee, chaired by Father Paul, has for a number of years been planning these renovations and seeking to fund them. Other committee members include Father Warren D. Murrman, O.S.B.; Father Kurt J. Belsole, O.S.B.; Father Thomas More Sikora, O.S.B.; Brother Philip M. Kanfush, O.S.B.; Brother Matthew T. Laffey, O.S.B.; Brother Joseph M. Adams, O.S.B. and Brother PaulAlexander Shutt, O.S.B.

Brother Peter Seemueller, 1854 - ?; Brother Leo Christ, 1854-?; Brother Majolus Kreutinger, 1854-1862; Brother Corbinian Schiller, 1854- ?; Brother Veremund Erhaid, 1854-?; Brother Mark Bauer, 1879-1888; Brother Chilianus Weigand, 1888-1907; Brother Mark Bauer, 1907-1946; Brother Bernard Lewitske, 1946-1951; Brother Joseph Weigl, 1951-1970; Brother Edward Grinder, 1970; Brother Eric Vogt, 1970-1971; Brother Derris Jeffcoat, 1971-1976; Brother Mark Peters, 1976-1979; Father Justin Nolan, Brother Tobias Yott, Brother Francis Crawford, Brother Christopher Hoff, Brother Justin Matro, 1979-1984; Father Kurt J. Belsole, 1984-1985; Brother Francis Ehnat, 1985-1988; Brother Paul R. Taylor, 1988-1990. Brother Michael McIlwain, 1990-91 Brother William Francis Vernon, 1991-92 Brother Philip Casper, 1991-92. Gristmill Committee, 1993-1997 (Father Paul R. Taylor, Chairman). Brother Joseph M. Adams, 1997-

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Heart to Heart

Winter 1998

Saint Vincent Archabbey

St. Marys Benedictines Experience Togetherness By Mary Simons Meyer "Praying together, working together, sharing together, adjusting together," are the words of Father Jude W. Brady, O.S.B., in referring to the Benedictine monks of St. Marys, Pennsylvania, as they enter a new phase of their development in the Priory on Church Street. The decision was made by Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B., of Saint Vincent in January of 1994 that the Benedictine monks in St. Marys would all live in the Priory. The change altered the lifestyle of the priests involved in ways beyond what they expected. At the time, the priests were living in the rectories of their respective parishes. Now they are together in community according to the Rule of St. Benedict, the founding father of their monastic way of life. "Now it's the way it should be," commented Father Jude, the Archabbot's regional coordinator for pastoral affairs in St. Marys. "It's a challenge to live with six other people. When you are living with one other monk, you have one person to adjust to. When you are living with 120 others, as is the case at the Archabbey, differences aren't so pronounced. But with six, the number is small enough that each is challenged to understand our likes and dislikes, our outlook on life and our personalities, our talents and our weaknesses." That adjustment has reaped much fruit and has allowed each of the priests to better understand the meaning of community which is the essence of Benedictinism. When the six came together they began to see the importance and the positive potential of sharing tasks. Although each is assigned to one of the three parishes, St. Marys, Sacred Heart, and Queen of the

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The Benedictines of the St. Marys Priory are front, from left, Father Jude W. Brady, O.S.B., Father Leon Hont, O.S.B., Father Chad R. Ficorilli, O.S.B.; back, Father Alfred Patterson, O.S.B., Father Jeremy J. Bolha, O.S.B., and Father Ananias G. Buccicone, O.S.B. World, as pastor or parochial vicar, each also has certain assignments that seem to fit the personality of that particular monk. For example, Father Chad, who is concerned with hospitable outreach, is the liaison to the St. Marys Regional Medical Center and serves as president of the local group of priests, ministers and lay people who join in ecumenical endeavors. Father Leon, who formerly was a history teacher at Central Catholic High School in Pittsburgh, is now very focused on education, serving as representative to the Catholic Schools Alliance of Elk County, Elk County Christian High School, and the Inter-Parish Schools Committee, as well as his ministry to Queen of the World School. Father Jeremy is the Priory representative to Saint Vincent College and Seminary and is an advocate to the senior citizens. Father Alfred's focus is on youth and vocations, serving as tri-parish youth coordinator and representative to Saint Vincent and the Diocese of Erie regarding vocations. He also is the

liaison to the veterans groups in St. Marys. Father Ananias, the artist in residence, creatively uses his talents to enhance joint liturgical events for the parishes. Also, just recently, he was responsible for the renovations to the front downstairs section of the priory, creating a hospitable entranceway, a comfortable meeting room where the priests can visit with parishioners and guests, and a Benedictine chapel which he designed and meticulously furnished to reflect the sense of serenity, comfort and peace that a chapel is meant to do. While the monks were learning to share tasks, they also, in a new way, began to realize more fully that this was drawing them closer to God, which, of course, is their ultimate goal. And as they discern more clearly the meaning of community, the better they are able to foster that same spirit among their parishioners and the community of St. Marys. That new-found sense of community seemed to reach a milestone on October 14 when, at Evening

Prayer, Archabbot Douglas dedicated the Priory chapel. The service was simple but symbolic of the potential the chapel may bring to the monks. If, through communal prayer, they can draw quiet strength and commitment, then the better they can take that strength to those to whom they minister. Archabbot Douglas sensed, that their deeper understanding of community would serve them well, in a letter he wrote to the monks thanking them for all they do as a Benedictine community, “... your cooperation and progress... will be a great help in years to come.” Being together in the chapel was, he declared, “a wonderful experience in a new setting.” The six monks who reside in the priory now seem to know better than they did before, that living together, and praying together in the new setting of the chapel, is going to, in the words of Father Jude, “enable us to do the best that we can.” Mary Simons Meyer is the Development Coordinator for the Catholic Schools Alliance of Elk County.

Volume 9, Issue 3


Heart to Heart

Winter 1998

Saint Vincent Archabbey

New Book Published by Father Mark Gruber, O.S.B.

The Rev. Mark Gruber, O.S.B., has published a third book on spirituality, Waiting for Dawn: Portents of His Coming, in November of 1997. Father Mark is an associate professor in the Department of Sociology/Anthropology at Saint Vincent College. Father Mark received a bachelor of arts degree in philosophy from Saint Vincent College in 1971, and a master of divinity degree from Saint Vincent Seminary in 1983. He received a master of arts degree in anthropology from the State University of New York (SUNY) at Stony Brook in 1986. His 1990 doctorate in anthropology, also from SUNY, encompassed four fields: Physical Anthropology, Archaeology, Ethnology and Linguistics. In addition to numerous reviews, articles and other

publications in the field of anthropology, Father Mark has published two other books on spirituality. The first was Wounded by Love: Intimations of an Outpouring Heart, published in 1993 ($17.95). The second was Exalted in Glory: Encountering the Risen Christ ($12.95). It was published in 1994. Both books received favorable reviews in

the Pittsburgh Catholic and other publications. His professional affiliations include the American Anthropological Association (AAA), the Society of Coptic Church Studies, Societe d’Archeologie Copte, and the Anthropology of Religious Section of the AAA. He has done numerous research projects in Egypt, Mexico, Belize, New York, California and locally. He just returned from a two-week trip to Ethiopia, where he spent two weeks visiting the Coptic monasteries as a follow-up to the anthropological study done in Egypt. The book is available from Saint Vincent Spirituality Publications, 300 Fraser Purchase Road, Latrobe, PA, 15650-2690. Cost is $19.95 plus $3 shipping. Add $1.50 shipping for additional books of any title.

Memorial Contributions Noted

Tribute gift and Memorial gift donors to Saint Vincent Archabbey from October 1, 1997 to December 31, 1997 include: In memory of Regis L. Keddie: Rose, Sam and Joe Albini; Allegheny Ludlum Employees, co-workers of John Keddie; Allegheny Ludlum Waste Water Treatment Plant Employees; Mr. and Mrs. Lewis R. Ayers; Mireille Azouri; Balzers and Leybold US Holding, Inc.; Beaver County Board of Assistance Employees; Mr. and Mrs. Michael Bennardo; Mr. and Mrs. Ross Butch; Ms. Gloria Capretto; Mr. and Mrs. Angelo Carpentieri; Ms. Karen Chevine; Ms. Margaret Claus; Ms. Deann Cline; Mr. and Mrs. Vic Colaianni; Ms. Arlene and Bee Colecchi; Mrs. Tina Cristello and Frank; Mr. and Mrs. Alvin B. Cummings; Mr. and Mrs. Lenny Delia; Mr. and Mrs. Albert D. DeMichele; Mr. and Mrs. Guido DePaul; Mr. John G. Dettore; Mr. and Mrs. William Ebitz;

Volume 9, Issue 3

Tony, Julie, and Rosemary Ferrante and Anthony and Barbara Ferrante; Mr. and Mrs. Don Ferrante; Mrs. Josephine Ferrante; Mary Ferrante and Tom, Jr.; First Bank of Leechburg; the Fulgenzi Family; Ms. Joann Fulgenzi; Ms. Mary M. Giotto; Ms. Pam Hatzimbes; Mr. and Mrs. William R. Hawes; Mr. and Mrs. Paul Hollinger; Ms. Karen L. Hughes and Mr. John Nedlik; Ms. Angeline L. Jessup; Mr. and Mrs. Richard Kardos; Ms. Irene Komorowski; Ms. Marie Kowalczyk; Ms. Alice Kulakowski; Mr. and Mrs. William J. Kumpf III; Mr. and Mrs. John Laezza; Mr. John C. Lash; Mr. and Mrs. Dom Latella; Ms. Angie A. Loperfito; Adelaide, Rosemary and Gabi Lundy; Ms. Edith Maglocci; Mr. and Mrs. Tony Malvone; Mr. and Mrs. William McGinley; Mellon Bank Dealer Financial Services; Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Milie; Mr. Donald R. Moffatt; Ms. Dorothy L. Musala; Ms. Barbara L. Ometz; Mr. and

Mrs. Edward W. Parry; Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Passarelli and Petrarca aunts and uncles; Mr. and Mrs. Robert Perella; Mr. and Mrs. John Petrarca; Ms. Elaine Petrosky; Ms. Linda Pietz and Mr. Ira Spill; Mrs. Virginia Radzwill; Mr. and Mrs. James R. Rekrut; Ms. Nellie A. Rekrut and family; Mr. and Mrs. Sam Sauro; Mr. and Mrs. Louis Scanga; Mr. and Mrs. David L. Smail; Mr. and Mrs. James E. Summerville; Gertrude and Tom Tatananni; Ms. Rosemarie Trombetta; Mr. and Mrs. Nick Troslo; Frank, Lena and Rennie Trozzi; Mr. and Mrs. Dom Valco; Mr. and Mrs. Joe Vincent; Ms. Susan M. Wagner; Ross G. Walker Funeral Home, Ltd.; Mr. and Mrs. Paul P. Yaloures. In memory of Joan Waid: Mr. and Mrs. George M. Laskos; Ms. Florence M. Peterson. In honor of Father John F. Murtha, O.S.B.: Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Shimko.

Bill Moyers

Moyers to Give Lecture on March 19 Author, television commentator and former presidential press secretary Bill Moyers will be the 43rd speaker in a special Threshold on the Twenty/First Century lecture series presentation co-sponsored by the Diocese of Greensburg and Saint Vi ncent College at 8 p.m. Thursday, March 19 in Kennedy Hall on the Saint Vincent campus. The title of his talk is from his latest book, Genesis: A Living Conversation. He will be introduced by the Most Rev. Anthony G. Bosco, Bishop of Greensburg, and the Rev. Martin R. Bartel, O.S.B., President of Saint Vincent College. Admission is free; however, all seats are reserved and admission will be by ticket only. To reserve a seat call the Threshold Box Office (724-537-4556) from 1-4 p.m. weekdays starting Monday, Feb. 23. In conjuction with the Bill Moyers lecture, a group of diocesan and community leaders will hold a series of three panel discussions on the Book of Genesis: at 7 p.m., Thursday, March 12, “Religion’s Role in the Family”; 7 p.m., Thursday, March 26, “Religion’s Role in Promoting Tolerance”; and 7 p.m., Thursday, April 2, “Religion and the Media.” Reservations are required for these presentations.

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Heart to Heart

Winter 1998

Saint Vincent Archabbey

Obituaries

Rev. Herman F. Ubinger, O.S.B. The Rev. Herman F. Ubinger, O.S.B., 66, a monk of Saint Vincent Archabbey, Latrobe, Pennsylvania, died Tuesday, November 11, 1997, after an extended illness. Father Herman was born in Jeannette, Pennsylvania,

Rev. Remigius B. Verostko, O.S.B. The Reverend Remigius Bernard Verostko, O.S.B., died on Thursday, January 1, 1998, after a long struggle with cancer. Father Remigius was born in Tarrs, Pennsylvania, on February 16, 1926, the son of the late Mr. and Mrs. John F. Verostko, and was one of eight children. He resided in Mt. Washington (Pittsburgh) and is survived by five brothers and one sister: John E. Verostko of Danielsville, Georgia; William D. Verostko of Tarrs. Roman Joseph Verostko of Minneapolis, Minnesota; Charles E.

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on August 26, 1931, the son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Joseph A. Ubinger, and was one of five children. He attended Sacred Heart Grade School in Jeannette, graduating in 1945, then attended Jeannette High School for one term before entering Saint Vincent Preparatory School in 1946. He graduated in 1949, and entered Saint Vincent Monastery in 1951. He professed simple vows on July 2, 1952, and entered Saint Vincent Seminary the same year. He received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Saint Vincent College in 1954, made solemn profession of vows on July 11, 1955, and graduated from the Seminary and was ordained to the priesthood in 1958. After ordination Father Herman attended Ohio State University in the

summers of 1959 and 1960, and the University of Michigan in the summers from 1961 to 1963. He received a Master of Arts in classical languages with a Latin major from the University of Michigan in 1963. Father Herman served as a weekend assistant for several parishes in the Diocese of Greensburg. At Saint Vincent he served as Director of Lay Retreats for over thirty years. He also taught Latin at the Preparatory School, was Prep Prefect for 15 years, and served as sponsor of the Junior Classical League. In 1968 he became a member of the Saint Vincent Development Club, and in 1974 was named Director of Alumni. He held that post until his retirement in 1996, when he was named Alumni

Director Emeritus in recognition of his years of distinguished service. Father Herman was an amateur ornithologist and a member of the National Audubon Society. He was also on the National Honorary Committee for the Bird Research Foundation, Ltd.; and, a member of the Classical Association of Pittsburgh and Vicinity and of the American Classical League. Father Herman is survived by two sisters, Mrs. Patricia Hails of Greensburg, and Mrs. Joann Bedont of Jeannette. Memorial contributions can be made to the Father Herman F. Ubinger, O.S.B., Inspirational Scholarship at Saint Vincent College, c/o the Institutional Advancement Office, 300 Fraser Purchase Road, Latrobe, PA, 15650-2690.

Verostko of Houston, Texas; Andrew D. Verostko of Ruther Glen, Virginia; and Theresa Lesko of Tarrs. He graduated from East Huntingdon High School in May of 1944, ranking first in his class, and then worked as a tool and die maker for Robertshaw Thermostat in Youngwood. After making his monastic profession on July 2, 1952, he graduated from Saint Vincent College in June of 1954. Prior to his graduate studies abroad, Father Remigius attended Saint Vincent Seminary and was ordained to the priesthood on July 19, 1957. Following several years of theological study at Saint Vincent, he was sent to

study at the College of St. Anselm in Rome. Following his ordination, he pursued further study in scripture at the Ecole BibliquĂŠ in Jerusalem. Illness prevented him from completing his advanced studies. A promising life in the priestly ministry and in biblical scholarship was cut short by his illness. Partial rehabilitations permitted some academic work that included editing and writing articles for the New Catholic Encyclopedia (1964-65) and a brief period teaching Latin. Following a period of hospitalization at Mayview in the late 1960s he enjoyed rehabilitation and peace working first as an

outpatient and then as a full-time housekeeper at Mayview. He resided for over 20 years on Mt. Washington. During the past six years he struggled with cancer and was able, up until the last weeks of his life, to be active in his private study. On December 18, 1997, he was admitted to Montefiore Hospital in Pittsburgh and later was transferred to the Heartland Health Care Center in Shadyside where he died on New Year’s Day, 1998. A Mass of Christian burial and a memorial service were held at Saint Vincent Archabbey. Interment was in the Saint Vincent Benedictine Community Cemetery.

Volume 9, Issue 3


Heart to Heart

Winter 1998

Saint Vincent Archabbey

Wimmer Scholarships Presented by Archabbey Five high school seniors were recognized as winners of prestigious Saint Vincent Wimmer Scholarships during the Saint Vincent Founders’ Day Vespers and Honors Convocation at 4 p.m. Tuesday, December 2, in the Saint Vincent Archabbey Basilica. This is the fourteenth year for the Wimmer Scholarships, which are awarded on the basis of a competitive examination. A full tuition, room and board, four-year scholarship, valued at $72,010, was awarded to David D. Miller of Greens-burg, who is a senior at Greensburg Salem High School. The other fouryear scholarships are valued at $36,000 each. They were awarded to Gretchen M. Dickson of Latrobe, a senior at Greater Latrobe High School; Jennifer M. Koran of Brook Park, Ohio, a senior at Holy Name High School in Parma Heights, Ohio; Orrin T. Stanforth of Norwalk, Ohio, a senior at Edison High School, Milan, Ohio and Shauna M. Kinkela of Manor, a senior at Penn Trafford High School. The Saint Vincent

Announcing the Fourteenth Annual Saint Vincent Archabbey Wimmer Scholarships were, left, Saint Vincent College President the Rev. Martin R. Bartel, O.S.B., and right, the Very Rev. Earl J. Henry, O.S.B., Prior of Saint Vincent Archabbey. The students are, from left, Orrin T. Stanforth, Norwalk, Ohio; David D. Miller, Greensburg; Shauna M. Kinkela, Manor; Gretchen M. Dickson, Latrobe. Not pictured is Jennifer M. Koran, Brook Park, Ohio. Archabbey Wimmer Scholarships, which were awarded on the basis of performance on a written examination given at the College on October 25, are named in honor of Boniface Wimmer, who founded Saint Vincent in 1846. Students

who participated in this year’s competition were nominated by their high school principals. The students had to be college bound and rank in the top fifth percentile of their high school graduating class. The Wimmer Scholarship pro-

gram recognizes high school students with outstanding academic abilities and to encourage them to pursue a quality undergraduate education at Saint Vincent College. Competitors are eligible for other scholarships and grants.

An American Abbot Available

Founders’ Day Held Dec. 2 Attending the recent Founders’ Day activities at Saint Vincent on December 2 were, from left, speaker Sr. Colman O’Connell, O.S.B., President Emeritus of the College of Saint Benedict, Minnesota; The Most Rev. Anthony G. Bosco, Bishop of Greensburg; and the Rev. Martin R. Bartel, O.S.B., President of Saint Vincent College. Sr. Colman spoke on community-building, giving examples of successes and failures as related to her own experiences.

Volume 9, Issue 3

An American Abbot, the revised edition of the story of Boniface Wimmer, O.S.B.,the father of the Benedictine presence in North America, is now available. The massive, 466page volume was authored by Jerome Oetgen, an alumnus of Saint Vincent College, who is now a U.S. foreign service officer at the United States Information Agency in Washington, D.C. Cost is $39.95. Additionally, copies of the special sesquicentennial book, Saint Vincent: A Benedictine Place, are still available. Cost is $30.95 plus $3 shipping. Both are available from the Saint Vincent Book Center, which is open weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Order from Saint Vincent Archabbey, Box RR, 300 Fraser Purchase Road, Latrobe, PA 156502686.

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Heart to Heart

Winter 1998

Volume 9, Issue3

Upcoming Events

Construction is progressing on the new $5.1 million Instructional Technology Resource Center on the Saint Vincent College campus. The center will serve as the hub of communication technologies on campus. Work is being done by PDC Builders, Inc., of Latrobe.

Summer Retreats Announced The 1998 Summer Retreat Schedule at Saint Vincent Archabbey has been announced by Brother Hugh D. Lester, O.S.B., Retreat Director. There will be a total of six retreats offered, starting May 22-24, with “Benedictine Spirituality.” Retreat Master will be the Father Donald S. Raila, O.S.B., Director of Oblates. This retreat is for oblates and other interested persons. Benedictine Oblates are lay people who study Benedictine spirituality and live under the guidance of the wisdom of the “Rule of Saint Bene-

dict.” Father Thomas M. Hart, O.S.B., will conduct a retreat for married couples from June 12-14. A retreat designed for women is scheduled for June 19-21, and will be conducted by Father Mark Gruber, O.S.B. Father Mark will also conduct a retreat for charismatics July 1719. There will be a four-day retreat for men July 2326, conducted by Father Nathan J. Munsch, O.S.B. And Father John-Mary Tompkins, O.S.B., will conduct a three-day retreat for men July 31 to

MARCH 21 Saint Benedict’s Day, Mass at 8:30 a.m., Archabbey Basilica, with Bishop Anthony G. Bosco of Greensburg, as principal celebrant and homilist. APRIL 4-5 Saint Vincent Camerata Lenten Concert, 8 p.m., Archabbey Basilica. For ticket information call 724537-4579. APRIL 9 Holy Thursday, Conventual Mass of the Lord’s Supper, 7:30 p.m., Archabbey Basilica. APRIL 10 Good Friday Commemoration of the Passion and Death of Our Lord, 1:30 p.m., Archabbey Basilica. APRIL 11 Easter Vigil and Conventual Mass, 8 p.m., Archabbey Basilica. APRIL 12 Easter Sunday, Masses at 6 a.m., 7:30 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11:30 a.m., Archabbey Basilica. MAY 11-15 First Monastic Retreat. Retreat Master to be announced. JUNE 8-12 Second Monastic Retreat. Retreat Master: Archabbot Lambert W. Reilly, O.S.B., of St. Meinrad Archabbey, Indiana.

MAY 23 Saint Vincent Benedictine Priesthood Ordination, Saint Vincent Archabbey Basilica, 10 a.m. August 2. Persons registering for a retreat can send their reservations to Brother Hugh D. Lester, Saint Vincent Retreat Program, 300 Fraser Purchase Road, Latrobe, Pennsylvania, 15650-2686. Registrants

SAINT VINCENT ARCHABBEY 300 Fraser Purchase Road Latrobe, PA 15650-2686

should include a $10 nonrefundable deposit. Anyone with questions on the Retreat Program can contact Brother Hugh by phone at 724-5326600, Extension 2139, or by e-mail at hlester@stvincent.edu.

Non-profit Organization U.S. Postage Paid Latrobe, PA Permit No. 110

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The First Benedictine Monastery in the United States, Founded in 1846

Profile for Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Winter 1998  

Restoration work on the historic Saint Vincent Gristmill was detailed in the cover story. Inside, an Easter reflection by Father Demetrius R...

Heart to Heart Winter 1998  

Restoration work on the historic Saint Vincent Gristmill was detailed in the cover story. Inside, an Easter reflection by Father Demetrius R...

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