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His Holiness Pope Benedict XVI, during a visit to Montecassino, on May 24, 2009. A statue of Saint Benedict can been seen in the background. (Photo L’Osservatore Romano)


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Summer 2009

Bicentennial of Our Founder’s Birth Dear Friends, We are nearly at the midway point of our yearlong celebration of the bicentennial of the birth of our founder, Boniface Wimmer. As a result, we have had many opportunities to reflect on the heritage of Boniface Wimmer. That was the topic of a lecture, given here in March, by Dr. Jerome Oetgen, editor of the newly-published Letters of An American Abbot. In January, Abbot Primate Notker Wolf, O.S.B., opened the ceremonies with a lecture entitled “Passion for Christ.” He asks us to “imagine what would have happened, what would we have here, if Boniface Wimmer would have given up or given in to the many critics in his

Archabbot Douglas and His Holiness, Pope Benedict XVI, in Rome.

Duke Franz von Bayern will send a representative from the Royal Family to the closing celebration of the Wimmer 200 anniversary year in November. His Royal Highness The Duke of Bavaria, is head of the Wittelsbach family, the Royal Family of Bavaria. King Ludwig I (inset), an early patron of Saint Vincent and Boniface Wimmer, was the Duke’s great-great-great-grandfather. Duke Franz visited Saint Vincent during the sesquicentennial celebration in 1996.

time, the warnings not to start? No Saint Vincent with all its contributions to the Church and to education, to its foundations and all their contributions! Nothing, nothing at all! Thank God he withstood all these people with his stubbornness, which in view of the display of God’s works through him I would call ‘sacred stubbornness.’ May the Lord revive that spirit in our times in all of our monastic communities!” Dr. Oetgen noted that “the most important aspect of Boniface Wimmer’s heritage is the Saint Vincent community as it exists today and as it will exist tomorrow—the community of monks and students and faculty and guests and friends and benefactors and parishioners and attendees at Threshold Lectures; in fact, the community of all those who have been welcomed into the Saint Vincent family as Christ himself. Boniface Wimmer’s letters show clearly that this community, this family, was the heritage that he valued most. It was he who took the ancient Benedictine idea of community—Saint Benedict’s idea of community as family—and brought

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it to the United States, where he firmly established it at Saint Vincent in 1846 and then, over the next forty-one years, in dozens of other places.” This summer we prepare to host more guests to our community, including visitors from Archabbot Wimmer’s hometown of Thalmassing, Bavaria, in July. In November we will welcome Cardinal Justin Rigali, Archbishop of Philadelphia, for the closing ceremonies. Additionally, His Royal Highness The Duke of Bavaria, will be sending a representative to the closing ceremonies. Between those dates, we will have thousands of other visitors, from Steeler training camp guests to new students (the class of 2013) and their parents, to prep and college alumni and other familiar faces. We will welcome them all to the Saint Vincent family, just as Boniface Wimmer would have. Sincerely,

Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B. Volume 20, Number 1


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Wimmer’s Passion For Christ Heart to Heart,

from the Latin “Cor ad Cor Loquitur,” or “Heart Speaks to Heart,” is the motto of Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B. It refers to the Archabbot’s prayer that giving and receiving authentic love may always be the chief characteristic of the Saint Vincent monastic community. This was also the motto of John Henry Cardinal Newman.

This newsletter is published by the Benedictines of Saint Vincent Archabbey. Publisher Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B. Development Director Paul R. Whiteside Director of Archabbey Public Relations/Editor Kimberley A. Metzgar Public Relations Associate Liz Cousins Contributors to this issue: Rev. Brian D. Boosel, O.S.B. Liz Cousins Annette D. Hart Rev. Omer U. Kline, O.S.B. Rev. Edward M. Mazich, O.S.B. Jerome Oetgen Paul R. Whiteside Abbot Primate Notker Wolf, O.S.B. Saint Vincent Archabbey 300 Fraser Purchase Road Latrobe, PA 15650-2690 724-805-2601

kim.metzgar@email.stvincent.edu www.saintvincentarchabbey.org www.bonifacewimmer.org (Cover photo © copyright 2009 L’Osservatore Romano. Reprinted with permission.)

Excerpts from the homily by Abbot Primate Notker Wolf, O.S.B., on the occasion of the inauguration of the bicentennial celebration of the birth of Archabbot Boniface Wimmer, O.S.B., January 14, 2009. To read the complete text of his talk visit www.bonifacewimmer.org. “Forward, always forward...We need to expand...” When you read or hear these words you think to be in front of a conqueror running on a horse on top of his army. This impression will be reinforced when you think of the motto of Boniface Wimmer’s coat of arms: ‘In hoc signo vinces’—in this sign you will be victorious,” the words of Jesus Christ to the Great Emperor Constantine. This gives you all kind of associations. And before Boniface Wimmer joined other fellows to restart the abbey of Metten again, he twice had applied to be accepted as a soldier in the Greek war for liberation. It sounds different when he writes: “Each Abbey must become the mother of other abbeys.” Conquering for Christ, for the Benedictines on one hand, we may say....To Boniface Wimmer, mission work and founding Benedictine monasteries have been the same.... Monks have been the stronghold of stability and culture in the times of the European migrations during the 5th to the 7th centuries. They were the stabilizing factors in times of unrest. Monks were not only conserving values, but producing and developing them as teachers, farmers, artists, craftsmen, librarians, musicians, poets.... Inspired by these examples of the importance of monasteries among migrants, Boniface Wimmer had a great vision of his task and his vocation. He worked out strategic plans to set up Benedictine monasteries in the whole of North America, from East to West, the South to the North including Canada, not in order to increase the Benedictine statistics, but to win through Benedictines the whole continent for the Church. Looking again at his motto he could be called a “Benedictine Constantine the

Abbot Primate Notker Wolf, O.S.B. Great.” In hoc signo vinces is a promise and a call.... But Boniface Wimmer was a strategist in a modem sense. He not only had developed plans for spreading monasteries all over the continent, but also for keeping them united in a monastic congregation.... Boniface Wimmer continued to develop new plans relentlessly throughout his life: “The fervour must not be allowed to cool down,” he writes. This may be understood in a psychological way, but it touches the real core and heart of Boniface Wimmer: his passion for Christ and his Gospel. “Woe to me if I do not proclaim the Gospel,” Saint Paul writes in his first letter to the community in Corinth and underlines it several times. In the beginning of the letter to the Romans he writes: “I am under obligation. That is why I am eager to preach the gospel also to you.” In this context it fits very well that the celebration of 200 years of Boniface Wimmer coincides with the jubilee of 2000 years of the birth of St. Paul, proclaimed by the Holy Father. Abbot Boniface and Saint Paul (Continued on Page 4)

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The entrance procession for the evening vespers celebration.

Wimmer’s Passion For Christ (Continued from Page 3) are so close in their fervour, in their passion for Christ, in their strategic mindedness, their visions, their aspirations, their fights with some church authorities, in their hard-headedness, which may also be called sacred stubbornness, in their endurance, perseverance, in their sufferings, sacrifices, sleepless nights. Deep in their hearts they were one in their unending love for Christ and in their desire that everybody in this world may come to know Jesus as Saviour of Humankind. So, Boniface Wimmer has been a great missionary but no real monk, many said and many still would say. It is the old and continued discussion based on the dichotomy of active and contemplative life dating back already to the beginnings of monasticism.... Without starting a profound discussion, please, allow me two observations: • Many bishops nowadays knock at the doors of Benedictine monasteries asking for a contemplative foundation. This expression cannot be found in The Rule of Saint Benedict. The elements of Benedict’s definition in the first chapter are: life in community, under a rule and

an abbot. Some Benedictine communities, especially of women, may follow closer a contemplative way of life, but the character of Benedictine monastics is their cenobitarian way of life. The individual contemplation of God is not the first aim but it is rather the completion of Christ’s love by living together and serving the people of God.... • There follows my second observation. As Christians we all have to follow Jesus Christ, and we as monastics are doing so in a special way. Now, has Jesus been contemplative or active? Paul, the doubtlessly great mystic, has he only been active or also contemplative in the same way? There is no such

dichotomy in Christianity. Reality is one. Only because our human intellect cannot think this kind of oneness and concreteness to separate both into two distinct entities in order to understand them. Throughout the history of western philosophy and thinking we can observe such a dichotomy that dates back to Plato. Yet there is a big difference between Plato and Christ: Plato and also modern esoteric people are looking for some mystical encounter with the Divine, for some enlightenment, and in search for liberation from all bodily tendencies and instincts. A Christian monk finds his liberation, as all Christians should, in his complete union or oneness with the love of Jesus Christ. In the poor and the needy a monk encounters Christ. And it is the oneness with the love of Christ that also carries monks out of their walls and countries in order to serve the people, proclaim the Gospel, witness the merciful love of God, baptize and teach people. If we want to understand the craziness of the vision and work of Boniface Wimmer, we must understand the craziness of the love of God to send his son as a sacrifice for the liberation of humankind from the bonds of sin. Even the most contemplative monastery must have its missionary dimension and interest. In the mission of the church and of the monastics we can find a great variety of missionary charisms. Also this charism finds its incarnation according to the character of the individual. Not (Continued on Page 5)

Father Stephen Concordia, O.S.B., directs the choir.

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Wimmer’s Passion For Christ (Continued from Page 4) everyone will be so courageous, strategic, fearless and stormy as Wimmer had been and before him, Saint Boniface and Saint Paul. There are many types of missionary and monastic vocations. Yesterday on the plane I read in a newspaper a word of your new president Obama. When he was asked how he is going to treat the people who have done harm at Iraq or Guantanamo he answered: “Our task is the future. Let us look forward.” A word which would fit also to Boniface Wimmer. Don’t allow ourselves to be blocked by the past which is gone nor by the present. We have to tackle the challenges, the problems of aging communities, lacking vocations and so on. Maybe we can overcome them more easily by opening new horizons, new perspectives, and as a result our present problems will be put into perspective. Don’t be afraid, don’t be so much concerned about your-

self. Be concerned about the kingdom of God, and everything will be given to you. If we are no longer generous, how should God be still generous to us? A last word which came up to my mind when we were listening to this wonderful choir and singing vespers together with their beautiful voices the praise of God. This is real Benedictine culture in top-form. But imagine what would have happened, what would we have here if Boniface Wimmer would have given up or given in to the many critics in his time, the warnings not to start? No Saint Vincent with all its contributions to the Church and to education, to its foundations and all their contributions! Nothing, nothing at all! Thank God he withstood all these people with his stubbornness which in view of the display of God’s works through him I would call “sacred stubbornness.” May the Lord revive that spirit in our times in all of our monastic communities!

Mother Mary Anne Noll, O.S.B., of Saint Emma Monastery reads an intercession.

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The Heritage of Boniface Wimmer Excerpts from the Threshold Lecture, March 19, 2009, by Dr. Jerome Oetgen. To read the complete text of his talk visit www.bonifacewimmer.org. It is wonderful to be at Saint Vincent once again, in this community that nourished me when I was young.... For those of us who spent much of our youth in these hallowed halls, to return to Saint Vincent is to return home…because Saint Vincent is more than a place, more than an institution, more even than an alma mater. It is a community, a Benedictine community that embraces everyone who has ever been part of it. And its embrace is not something one can ignore. The embrace of a Benedictine community is the equivalent of a bear hug. What is a Benedictine community? Saint Benedict calls it a “school of the Lord’s service.” But for him, the Latin word “schola”—school—signified not a building or an institution, not a college or a seminary…but rather a family—a family whose members include the young and the old, the wise and the inexperienced, the elders and those who come to learn the wisdom of the elders. Such a school as this exists so that its members may serve the Lord by serving one another. It exists for the purpose of passing on a sacred inheritance, an ancient wisdom, from one generation to the next. In his sixth-century Rule, Saint Benedict makes clear again and again that the Benedictine community is a family— a family where members are valued for who they are and not for what they do, a family whose members devote their lives not principally to taking care of themselves and their individual needs but to supporting, caring for, and taking care of the needs of others, particularly other members of the family. That is the kind of community Saint Vincent is, and that is why, for those of us who are, or who ever have been, part of this community—and I include all of us here this evening—to return to Saint Vincent is to return home. I don’t want to overstate this, or to

Author Jerome Oetgen gives the Threshold Lecture on Boniface Wimmer. exaggerate it, or, God forbid, to sentimentalize it. But I do want to emphasize it. In the sixth century, Saint Benedict created a community of monks who came together to seek God through work and prayer and to support one another in their spiritual quest. The core of that community was the monks—and soon, when Benedictine communities of women were formed, the nuns. But very quickly the community came also to include young people who arrived to study at the monastery school; orphans who were abandoned at the monastery gates; youths who were left by their parents to be cared for by the monks; local people who turned to the monks for spiritual comfort, material assistance, and even advice on how to plant their crops; benefactors who came to the monastery’s aid when their aid was needed; travelers who sought the hospitality of the monks. All these good people—whom Saint Benedict called “guests”—soon became part of the Benedictine community too and participated in the prayers and celebrations, the joys and sorrows, the intellectual pursuits, the work, and the spiritual

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quest of the Benedictine family. An important point to remember is that from the time of Saint Benedict— and since then for the past fifteen centuries—the Benedictine family has in a very real sense been both inclusive and diverse. It has embraced multitudes. “Let all guests who come to the monastery be welcomed as Christ,” Saint Benedict says. “Let them be welcomed as Christ, for he himself will say, I was a stranger and you welcomed me.” ...That is why when we speak of the Saint Vincent community, we refer not just to the monks who work and pray and spend their lives here—though they are an essential part and indeed the core of it—but we also refer to all others who have been welcomed into this inclusive family—the students, of course, but also the faculty and administration; the friends and benefactors; those who visit often and those who come just once in a while from faraway places like Haiti. This family includes alumni; oblates; parishioners; those who come to pray and participate in the inspiring litur(Continued on Page 7) Volume 20, Number 1


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The Heritage of Boniface Wimmer (Continued from Page 6) gies; those who come for retreats; those in the college’s adult education program; seminarians from distant dioceses; those who come to seek spiritual renewal or to do research in the library or to attend a Threshold Lecture. All of us are guests who are received as Christ himself, and thus, we become part of the Saint Vincent community and are warmly welcomed into the Benedictine family. We all experience the Benedictine bear hug. ...In my view the most important aspect of Boniface Wimmer’s heritage is…us—all of us who are in this room, and in this college, and on this campus; all of us who are or who ever have been part of this community. All of us, in fact, who make up the Saint Vincent family comprise the most important aspect of the heritage of Boniface “Wimmer… because it is not the impressive buildings that you see at Saint Vincent, not the beautiful basilica, not the college or the seminary, not the library, not the parish, not the football field or the

bookstore or the summer theater—not the institution! These are all things, of course, that would not exist if it weren’t for Boniface Wimmer. But they are not the most important aspects of his heritage. The most important aspect of Boniface Wimmer’s heritage is the Saint Vincent community as it exists today and as it will exist tomorrow—the community of monks and students and faculty and guests and friends and benefactors and parishioners and attendees at Threshold Lectures. In fact, the community of all those who have been welcomed into the Saint Vincent family as Christ himself. Boniface Wimmer’s letters show clearly that this community, this family, was the heritage that he valued most. It was he who took the ancient Benedictine idea of community—Saint Benedict’s idea of community as family—and brought it to the United States, where he firmly established it at Saint Vincent in 1846 and then, over the next forty-one years, in dozens of other places. He established it in Saint Cloud, Minnesota; Atchison, Kansas; Newark, New Jersey; Belmont, North Carolina; Covington, Kentucky; and Baltimore, Maryland. He established it in Savannah, Georgia; Richmond, Virginia; Cullman, Alabama; Saint Leo’s, Florida; Chicago,

Mrs. Cecilia Oetgen, Dr. Jerome Oetgen and Archabbot Douglas Nowicki, O.S.B., prior to the lecture, held in the Carey Center Auditorium.

Heart to Heart Summer 2009 Illinois; Saint Marys, Pennsylvania; Carrolltown, Pennsylvania; and many other places. He went to all these places and established Benedictine communities there. And in most of them, Wimmer’s heritage—which is Saint Benedict’s idea of community as family—still exists, still flourishes, just as it does at Saint Vincent. Like members of Benedictine families in other parts of the United States, we look around this room and see in ourselves the heritage of Boniface Wimmer. It is this heritage that the Saint Vincent community is celebrating throughout the course of this year, which marks the 200th anniversary of Wimmer’s birth.... As the 200th anniversary of Wimmer’s birth approached, Archabbot Douglas suggested that I consider editing a volume of Wimmer’s letters, and the book that was published in January, Letters of an American Abbot, was the outcome of that suggestion. I want to thank him and the many members of the Saint Vincent Community who helped in the production of this book. But let me acknowledge immediately that while my name is on the cover as editor, and is listed among the translators, this book is the product of many hands, of which mine are only two.... Most successful human endeavors—I am tempted to say ALL successful human endeavors— are the result not of individuals laboring and struggling alone in an agonized and agonizing act of creative genius—but of persons working and struggling together, in community, to produce something of value. That is what the Benedictine community does in a very meaningful and all-encompassing way all the time. In a modest way, that is what those who worked on this book did—starting with Boniface Wimmer himself who, after all, wrote the letters. It is noteworthy, I think, that the 200th anniversary of Archabbot Boniface Wimmer’s birth falls within the Jubilee Year 2008-2009, announced by Pope Benedict XVI to mark the 2000th anniversary of the birth of Saint Paul. The fact that these two celebrations are (Continued on Page 8)

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Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B., introduces Dr. Jerome Oetgen before a backdrop celebrating 200 years of the birth of Boniface Wimmer.

The Heritage of Boniface Wimmer (Continued from Page 7) occurring concurrently is a happy coincidence and reminds us of some salient parallels between the life of Wimmer and the life of Saint Paul. Like Saint Paul, Wimmer was a missionary who preached the Gospel over a wide geographic area. He was a community builder who traveled extensively and established Christian communities everywhere he went. He was a man of strong faith whose zeal and single-minded devotion to duty strengthened the Church of Christ. He was a prolific letter writer who through his persuasive correspondence urged and inspired those to whom he wrote to remain faithful in the face of adversity. It is an interesting coincidence—or more than coincidence, perhaps evidence of providential design—that Wimmer began his work in the United States at a church dedicated to Saint Vincent de Paul, and that his second major missionary undertaking occurred in the Diocese of Saint Paul in Minnesota. There are many such coincidences (if coincidences they are) that link Boniface Wimmer with Saint Paul and throw a universal light on the

heritage of the Benedictine monk who founded Saint Vincent. ...The Benedictine tradition that Wimmer brought with him on his mission to America in 1846 was founded on such values as a firm and practical faith, a deep respect for history and tradition, a sense of community as family, and a life-long commitment to hard work and frequent prayer. Wimmer’s single-mindedness and persistence—which some called his perseverance and others, his stubbornness—were manifest throughout his life. He set out as a missionary in 1846, and forty-one years later was still at it. He was deeply conscious of his participation in a tradition, in a history by which he himself had been shaped and which he, through his life’s work, would reshape and confirm and pass on to the next generation. He saw his work in America as a continuation of the work of the Benedictine missionaries in Europe— who brought the twin lights of faith and education to a period called the Dark Ages and who evangelized and essentially Christianized the northern part of

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the continent. Wimmer was quite specific about his relationship to history. “When we consider North America as it is today,” he wrote in 1845, “we can see at a glance that there is no other country in the world that offers greater opportunities... , no other country that is so much like our old Europe was. [In America one finds] immense forests, large uncultivated tracts of land in the interior, most fertile lands... The [people] are scattered, uncultured, ignorant, hundreds of miles away from the nearest priest... In a word, the conditions in America today are like those of Europe 1000 years ago, when the Benedictine Order attained its fullest development and effectiveness by its wonderful adaptability and stability.” Wimmer was born in the first decade of the nineteenth century, a time when Europe experienced the devastation of invasion, war, economic uncertainty, and spiritual decline. Christian faith was at low ebb in its history... It was precisely at the moment when Christian faith was at low ebb that a spiritual awakening took place. In the third decade of the nineteenth century, when Wimmer was a young man, a revived spiritual commitment to Christian faith arose in Europe to counter the secularism and materialism of the Enlightenment... Like Saint Paul, Wimmer became a convert to this reawakened Christianity. Then, after an apprenticeship of prayer, work, and spiritual formation, again like Saint Paul, he became a missionary. Wimmer’s aim was to imitate the model of his Benedictine predecessors and to establish strong, stable communities devoted to the service of God, the pursuit of learning, the preaching of the Gospel, and the education of youth. He believed that America was fertile soil for the planting of this ancient Benedictine tradition and that the tradition itself would contribute a new and vital spiritual energy to the young nation. In 1849, he wrote: “I have determined that our monasteries should not be simply schools for religion and learning, but should also serve as custodians of the fine arts and thus foster greater appreciation for culture, and protect our fellow countrymen (Continued on Page 9) Volume 20, Number 1


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The Heritage of Boniface Wimmer (Continued from Page 8) from the mercenary spirit which can think of little other than how to make money.” With the aid of eighteen young recruits from Bavaria, he established at Saint Vincent in Pennsylvania the Benedictine community he had envisioned. Then, for the remaining forty-one years of his life, he worked tirelessly to strengthen the monastery and school in Pennsylvania and to establish others throughout the United States. By 1880, only 34 years after Wimmer and his eighteen companions arrived at Saint Vincent, nearly 900 Benedictine monks and nuns were working and praying in 60 Benedictine communities in the United States. Numbers never tell the full story, but it is interesting to note that as early as 1880, these Benedictines served 138 parishes where they provided pastoral care for 44,000 souls, operated three major seminaries, six colleges, and 63 elementary schools, and educated an estimated 7,000 students. By 1880, Benedictine monks and nuns served in 21 American dioceses, located in 20 states and territories of the Union. The Benedictine monks and nuns who carried out this work of pastoral care, evangelization, and education in nineteenth-century America regarded Boniface Wimmer as their founder, their leader, and their inspiration. The work continues. Today, American Benedictines who trace their roots back to Wimmer serve in more than 20 American states, as well as in Canada, Mexico, Puerto Rico, the Bahamas, Colombia, Brazil, Taiwan, and Japan. By 1887, when he died, Wimmer was recognized throughout the American Church as an outstanding missionary, ecclesiastical leader, builder, and educator—a worthy successor of Saint Paul, the prototype, and of Saint Boniface, his patron and the Benedictine who had introduced Christianity to the Germans in the early Middle Ages. Wimmer emerged at a moment in history when Christian Faith was regarded as passé; when relativism, materialism, and spiritless rationalism were dominant

in the world. How did he respond? With boldness and intelligence, with strong faith and a deep understanding of history, and with an ability to look at the world with an impressive clarity of vision. It also helped that he was stubborn. He came from a region in Bavaria where the people, like those of New England, are still famous for their stubbornness. Wimmer’s letters show his strong will and stubbornness on virtually every page. They dramatically reveal that his achievement and the heritage he has left us were not easily won. An old Latin proverb says Omnis sanctus pertinax—every saint is stubborn. By that standard, Boniface Wimmer was a very great saint indeed. When he was a young priest in Bavaria stubbornly attempting to convince his superiors to allow him to become a missionary in America—he was turned down three times before he finally was allowed to go—his confreres at Metten mockingly called him the community’s Projektenmacher—the “plan-maker,” the unrealistic visionary, the Don Quixote whose extravagant projects were bound to fail.

Wimmer was a plan-maker, but he was no romantic dreamer. Nor was he history’s slave, seeking to recreate in the present the rose-colored image of an idealized past. His pragmatism, his ability to look at the world around him with a clear and sharp vision, made him recognize that while he had been shaped by history, it was his responsibility to take the sacred inheritance he had received and create from it something new, something rooted in the past but inexorably focused on the future. His mission to America involved drawing strength, insight, and wisdom from the past in order to transform the present by prayer, hard work, and strong faith. Wimmer was a planter, a cultivator of trees. He said: “People plant trees, although they know for certain that their fruits will benefit only the next generation.” His plan called for planting saplings all over America. Many of them grew to become great Benedictine communities, centers of evangelization, oases of Benedictine spirituality, wisdom, learn(Continued on Page 10)

Dr. Jerome Oetgen signs copies of his latest book, Letters of An American Abbot, following the lecture. The book was recently published by Archabbey Publications and can be obtained at www.stvincentstore.com. Dr. Oetgen is also the author of the definitive biography of Boniface Wimmer, An American Abbot, and a history of Saint Vincent Archabbey, Mission to America, He is currently a U.S. diplomat serving in Haiti.

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The Heritage of Boniface Wimmer (Continued from Page 9) ing, and faith. Possessing an outspoken character, Wimmer was frank and sometimes intemperate in his language. “I speak plainly,” he said, “even in Latin.” He once referred to the bishop of Pittsburgh as a “scoundrel,” but he struggled to check his tongue and his temper, and always expressed genuine remorse after such outbursts. He faced opposition and betrayal from some of those in whom he had placed his greatest trust, but he showed uncommon magnanimity towards those who opposed him. “I have been accustomed to every kind of treachery and ingratitude,” he wrote, “and would be tempted to be a misanthrope if I had not learned to make God alone witness of my intentions and actions.” Wimmer was a man of strong faith— faith in himself, of course, but above all faith in God. When the students who were to accompany him to America expressed their fears and doubts about the wisdom of leaving their families and homeland and accompanying him to an

unknown fate, he reminded them of the cross of Christ. He wrote: “We should consider it a great privilege that God deigns to use us as instruments in founding an institution which, if the foundation is well laid, will confer untold benefits on the people of the United States... If these are your sentiments, you will never have cause to regret having followed me [to] America. The main reason is not that you are in quest of beautiful surroundings, a comfortable home, or a life of ease, but rather that you are seeking the opportunity to carry the cross of self denial after the crucified Jesus, to save or regain souls that otherwise would be lost and for which His blood would have been shed in vain.” Many years later, when he had nearly completed his life’s work and had time to reflect on what he and his companions had accomplished, he wrote one of those same students who had been reluctant to come to the United States, but who had come and who for forty years had been a Benedictine monk and missionary in America:

2009 CALENDAR, TIMELINE JULY 11—Saint Benedict’s Day, Solemnity of Saint Benedict, Solemn Profession of Monastic Vows. 27—Anniversary of Boniface Wimmer being designated Abbot and President for Life, 1866. AUGUST 1—Anniversary of Boniface Wimmer’s Ordination to the Priesthood, 1831. 10—Boniface Wimmer embarks for the United States, 1846. SEPTEMBER 15—Boniface Wimmer arrives in New York City, 1846. 17—Boniface Wimmer appointed Abbot of the Saint Vincent community for the first time, 1855. 18-20—Oktoberfest event, Saint Vincent College Homecoming. 30—Boniface Wimmer arrives at Hart’s Sleeping Place, Carrolltown, 1846. OCTOBER 2-11—Benedictine Heritage Tour, Bavaria. October 9 the tour will visit and participate in a tribute to Boniface Wimmer in Thalmassing, his hometown. 18—Boniface Wimmer arrives at Saint Vincent, 1846. NOVEMBER 19—Founders’ Day, Mass with Cardinal Justin Rigali, Wimmerfest. Official closing of the Bicentennial year. Bishops, abbots of foundations of Saint Vincent Archabbey, and all entities of Saint Vincent: Archabbey, College, Seminary, parishes, high school, missions will be attending. DECEMBER 8—Anniversary of Boniface Wimmer’s death, 1887. 29—Anniversary of Boniface Wimmer’s solemn profession of monastic vows, 1833.

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“No one imagined us capable of accomplishing anything significant, and yet we did accomplish something. God’s grace was obviously with us. . . . May unbounded thanks be given to God a thousand times, for He chose and made use of us as instruments for the execution of His designs.... Inasmuch as things have come this far only with the evident protection and grace of God, so may we not expect from ourselves success in the future, but again only from the grace and protection of God, who cannot fail us so long as we work not for ourselves, but for Him, for His holy Church, for the Order, and for souls.” Wimmer’s letters reveal a man of many facets—dedicated priest, conscientious monk, inspired community builder, successful land speculator, enthusiastic farmer, shrewd businessman, wily ecclesiastical politician, fearless risk taker, loyal ally, formidable adversary, outspoken but fair-minded opponent, indefatigable correspondent, wise counselor, generous friend, compassionate confrere, forgiving father, tireless missionary—and a plan-maker who when at last he came to the end of his life was reluctant to stop making plans. There were still communities to be established, converts to be made, immigrants to be evangelized, young people to be taught, missions to be accomplished. Like Saint Paul, however, he turned his thoughts in the end from earthly plans to eternity. “Let us pray for one another that we shall be saved,” he wrote a friend shortly before his death. Like Saint Paul, he fought the good fight; he finished the race; he kept the faith. And when it was time to go, he handed the work over to his successors in the Benedictine communities he had built and inspired. It is a mark of the ultimate success of Boniface Wimmer the plan-maker—and of God’s blessing upon the plan—that his heritage is alive and well today, and continues to flourish in the Benedictine communities he established all over America—including the very first one, here at Saint Vincent. Volume 20, Number 1


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Ash Wednesday in Rome Brother Benoit Alloggia, O.S.B., who will be ordained to the priesthood this summer in Rome, served as a deacon to Pope Benedict XVI on Ash Wednesday in Rome. Each year Pope Benedict begins the Ash Wednesday services at the international Benedictine university in Rome, Sant’ Anselmo. In the photos above Brother Benoit processes with Pope Benedict to the church at Santa Sabina following the service at Sant’ Anselmo, and he receives ashes from the pope at Santa Sabina. (Photos © copyright 2009 L’Osservatore Romano. Reprinted with permission.) Volume 20, Number 1

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In the photo above, His Holiness, Pope Bendict XVI, greets visitors during his visit to Monte Cassino Abbey in Italy this past May.

Pope Benedict XVI Addresses Monks at Monte Cassino Abbey Pastoral Visit of His Holiness Benedict XVI to Cassino and Monte Cassino. May 24, 2009. Dear Brothers and Sisters of the great Benedictine Family, Today I am particularly glad to pause in this sacred place, in this Abbey, four times destroyed and rebuilt for the last time after the bombing of the Second World War 65 years ago. “Succisa virescit:” the words of the new coat of arms clearly convey its history. Monte Cassino, like the age-old oak planted by Saint Benedict, “stripped of its leaves” by the violence of the war, sprang up even more vigorously than before… This evening we … celebrate Vespers together on the Solemnity of the Ascension of Jesus. I express to each one of you the joy of sharing this moment of prayer, as I greet you all with affection, grateful to you for your welcome and to all who have accompanied me on this Apostolic Pilgrimage… I extend my greeting to the Abbots, the Abbesses and the Benedictine communities who are present here.

…To live no longer for ourselves but for Christ: this is what gives full meaning to the life of those who let themselves be conquered by him. This is clearly demonstrated by the human and spiritual life of Saint Benedict who, having abandoned all things, set out to follow Jesus Christ faithfully. Embodying the Gospel in his life, he became the pioneer of a vast movement of spiritual and cultural rebirth in the West… Benedict was a shining example of holiness and pointed Christ out to the monks as the one great ideal; he was a teacher of civilization who, in suggesting a balanced and adequate vision of the divine requirements and ultimate destiny of the human being, always also kept clearly in mind the needs and reasons of the heart, to teach and inspire authentic and constant brotherhood so that in the complex social relations people would not lose sight of a spiritual unity that would always be capable of building and fostering peace. It is not by chance that the word PAX is used to greet pilgrims and visitors at the entrance of this

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Abbey, rebuilt after the dreadful disaster of the Second World War; it rises like a silent warning to reject every form of violence in order to build peace: in families, in communities, among peoples and throughout humanity. Saint Benedict invites every person who climbs this hill to seek peace and to follow him: “inquire pacem et sequere eam (Ps 33: 14-15)” (Rule, Prologue, 17). At his school monasteries down the centuries became fervent centres of dialogue, encounter and a beneficial blending of different peoples, unified by the evangelical culture of peace. Monks have been able to teach the art of peace by word and example, putting into practice the three “bonds” that Benedict mentions as necessary to preserve the unity of the Spirit among human beings: the Cross, that is the very law of Christ; the book, or in other words culture; and the plough that implies work, the domination of matter and of time. Thanks to the activity of monasteries that is structured in accordance with the threefold daily commitment of prayer, study and work, entire peoples on the European continent have experienced authentic redemption and a beneficial moral, spiritual and cultural development, learning the meaning of continuity with the past, practical action for the common good, openness to God and the transcendent dimension. Let us pray that Europe may always be able to make the most of this patrimony of Christian principles and ideals that constitutes an immense cultural and spiritual wealth. This is possible but only if one accepts the constant teaching of Saint Benedict, that is the “quaerere Deum,” the quest for God, as man’s fundamental commitment. Human beings cannot completely fulfill themselves, they cannot be truly happy without God. It is your task in particular, dear monks, to be living examples of this inner and profound relationship with him, implementing without compromise the programme that your Founder summed up in the “nihil amori Christi praeponere,” “prefer nothing to the love of Christ” (Rule 4:21). (Continued on Page 13) Volume 20, Number 1


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Pope’s Address (Continued from Page 12) Holiness consists of this, a valid proposal for every Christian, especially in our time, in which people feel the need to anchor life and history to sound spiritual references. For this reason, dear brothers and sisters, your vocation is more up to date than ever and your mission as monks and nuns is indispensible. From this place, where his mortal remains rest, the holy Patron of Europe continues to invite everyone to pursue his work of evangelization and human promotion. In the first place he encourages you, dear monks, to stay faithful to the spirit of your origins and to be authentic interpreters of his programme of spiritual and social rebirth. May the Lord grant you this gift through the intercession of your Holy Founder, of Saint Scholastica, his sister, and of the Order’s Saints. And may the heavenly Mother of the Lord, whom we invoke today as “Help of Christians,” watch over you and protect this Abbey and all your monasteries as well as the diocesan community that has grown up around Monte Cassino. Amen!

Pope Benedict’s Visit to Monte Cassino On the afternoon of Sunday, May 24, 2009, before returning to the Vatican, Pope Benedict XVI went to the Polish war cemetery at Monte Cassino, Italy, where he paid homage to those who died during the Second World War. Below, Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B. in the procession of abbots. (Top photo ©copyright L’Osservatore Romano, Servizio Fotografico, reprinted with permission.)

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Archabbey News Father Philip M. Kanfush, O.S.B., has been appointed to the Board of Trustees of the Dr. Robert Ketterer Charter School, Latrobe. The Greater Latrobe School District chartered Ridgeview Academy Charter School in 1998, the first in Westmoreland County and later renamed. The school serves approximately 200 students who are adjudicated into Adelphoi Village programs as well as students in several other programs. The school employs 33 full-time faculty members and four administrators. Father Philip, procurator of Saint Vincent Archabbey, is a member of the Education Department faculty at Saint Vincent College. He was also recently invited to join the Response to Intervention (RTI) Higher Education Focus Group. The statewide group’s representatives come from both public and private institutions. The initial session, held in Harrisburg on May 15, explored methods to determine the degree to which RTI content is currently embedded in coursework. The group will also discuss development of a Standards Align System and shared leadership skills in future sessions, as many school districts have committed to implementation of the RTI framework and the initiative’s sustainability. Pennsylvania has received national recognition on behalf of its statewide efforts. Father Philip and Dr. Kristin Harty of the Saint Vincent College Education Department presented research at the Learning Disabilities Association 2009 International Conference in Salt Lake City, Utah, Feb. 25-28. Entitled “Remediating the Reading Problems of Young Adolescents with Emotional Difficulties,” the presentation discussed the results of a pilot study

Father Wulfstan Clough, O.S.B., center, played the Mikado, the emperor of Japan, in a recent Saint Vincent College production of the Gilbert and Sullivan play of the same name. Father Philip and Dr. Harty completed with young adolescents with reading and behavior difficulties. The session included effective research-based literacy strategies for children with special needs in middle school, as well as effective teaching techniques for use in the classroom. Father Philip spoke on the “Sacred Scripture” January 20 at Falbo’s, to students participating in the Campus Ministry “Tapping Theology” program. ***** The Latimer Library staff assembled an exhibit about Saint Vincent Founder Archabbot Boniface Wimmer, in conjunction with the year-long celebration of the 200th anniversary of his birth. The exhibit included books about Wimmer, an ivory snuff box, his personal diary, a gold cross he wore daily, a book of writings for his jubilee in 1869, which is in 14 languages and written by the students of Saint Vincent at the time, and other interesting artifacts that are on loan from the Saint Vincent Archabbey Archives. ***** An “Ask the Benedictine” question and answer session was held recently in Saint Benedict Hall. The panel included Father Wulfstan Clough, O.S.B., Father Mark Gruber, O.S.B., Father Vincent Zidek, O.S.B., Father Brian Boosel, O.S.B., Father Boniface Hicks, O.S.B., and Katie Wojtunik of the Campus Ministry staff. Monks who spoke in a series of monthly classes on Benedictine spirituality included: • Father Boniface Hicks, O.S.B., “Holiness

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in Benedictine Spirituality and Oblate Life.” Father Boniface is assistant professor of computing and information science at Saint Vincent College. • Brother Elijah Cirigliano, O.S.B., “The Eucharist in Benedictine Spirituality and Oblate Life.” Brother Elijah is assistant choir director for the monastery and a seminary student. • Brother Francis Ehnat, O.S.B., “Hospitality in Benedictine Spirituality.” Brother Francis is assistant guest master and a seminary student. • Father Conan Feigh, O.S.B., on caring for the sick. Father Conan is Director of the Monastery Infirmary. ***** Brother Nicholas Koss, O.S.B., the founding president of the Taiwan Association of Classical, Medieval and Renaissance Studies, led a delegation of professors from Taiwan to participate in the 44th International Congress on Medieval Studies held at Western Michigan University, May 7-10, 2009. ***** “Carnegie native monk is ‘regular’ guy with lofty goals.” That was the headline for an article appearing originally in The Carnegie Signal-Item and subsequently in the Tribune-Review (Continued on Page 16) Volume 20, Number 1


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Father Paul Taylor Receives New Appointment Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B., announced the appointment of Rev. Paul R. Taylor, O.S.B., as Special Assistant to the Archabbot/Chancellor for Development, effective July 1, 2009. Father Paul brings a rich experience and educational background to the position. He has served as Vice President for Institutional Advancement for Saint Vincent College during its successful development campaigns for the Herman and Sis Dupré Science Pavilion, the Fred M. Rogers Center, Headmasters Hall and a variety of scholarship endowment funds at Saint Vincent College. Prior to his service as Vice President for Institutional Advancement, Father Paul served as Dean of Admission and Financial Aid and as Acting Dean of Students. A graduate of Saint Vincent College and Seminary, Father Paul received a master of arts degree in mathematics from Duke University and a doctorate in higher education administration from Boston College. In announcing the appointment, Archabbot Douglas noted that “Because of

Father Paul Taylor, O.S.B. his rich experience as a Benedictine and his success as Vice President for Institutional Advancement at Saint Vincent College, Father Paul Taylor is very well qualified to take on these new and broader responsibilities.” Father Paul will continue to assist the college administration in fundraising, but now will expand his efforts to

include the seminary administration and the other major institutions sponsored by the Benedictines of Saint Vincent Archabbey. In addition to the college and seminary, as Special Assistant to the Archabbot/Chancellor for Development, Father Paul’s development activities will now include projects such as the Archabbey Health and Welfare Fund, the Benedictine Military High School in Savannah, Georgia, the Saint Vincent foundations in Taiwan and Brazil and the international Benedictine university of Sant’ Anselmo in Rome. He will also play a major role in the development of a new master plan for the entire Saint Vincent campus. The Archabbot noted that “Father Paul’s personal skills and experience will be crucial in helping to meet this huge fundraising challenge. As a Benedictine, Father Paul has the necessary background to explain the importance of the multiple projects of the Saint Vincent community and to invite the participation of our alumni and friends in our work for the Church and for society.”

Two Appointments to Abbey, Seminary Staff Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B., has announced two recent staff appointments. Ana Lucia Pereira, of São Paulo, Brazil, has been appointed assistant to the archabbot, assistant to the Foreign Mission Office of the Archabbey and to The Saint Benedict Education Foundation. Laura Gerhart of Latrobe has been appointed event manager and grant writer for Saint Vincent Archabbey and Seminary. Ms. Pereira will be helping with the processing of international communications and documents, as well as with travel and visa arrangements for the archabbot and the monks of Saint Vincent Archabbey. Ms. Pereira has fifteen years experience as a religious translator, and eighteen years experience as a simultaneous translator, having worked for several religious communities and dioceses in Brazil, the United States, Italy and France. Over the past seventeen years, she has also performed services for the communities Laura Gerhart, left, and Ana Lucia Pereira of Saint Vincent Archabbey and São Bento Monastery, in Vinhedo, Brazil, drafting and translating canonical documents. then began her training to become a translator at AssoIn 1984, Ms. Pereira received a full licentiate in philosophy from ciação Alumni, in São Paulo, Brazil, where she received Nossa Senhora Medianeira Jesuit College of Philosophy, in São the certificate for primary languages English/Portuguese, Paulo, Brazil, with minors in psychology, education and history. She (Continued on Page 22) Volume 20, Number 1

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Archabbey News (Continued from Page 14) on Brother Gabriel Myriam Kurzawski, a junior monk at Saint Vincent. Written by Becky Shetler, the article noted that: “He might not have realized it at the time, but the seeds of Carnegie native Andrew Kurzawski’s vocation were planted in him more than a decade ago. ‘I was so fortunate when I was growing up at SS. Simon and Jude. It was the largest Catholic school in the diocese,’ Kurzawski said. ‘There were young, vibrant priests, and they

Heart to Heart Summer 2009

played sports with us. They were guys you could relate to. I didn’t see them as just priests.’ ‘They were regular men living an exemplary life, guys trying to do the will of God in their lives. They chose to follow Christ as priests.’ “’Overall, I’m extremely happy,’ Kurzawski said. ‘I haven’t found this type of joy in anything else I’ve done.’” While at Carlynton, Shetler wrote, Kurzawski was the captain of the basketball team and he originally thought his future would be on the basketball court. “When I was done with high school, my main focal point was that I wanted to play college basketball and teach high school,” he said. But, his godfather, the Rev. John Dinello, a Catholic priest at Immaculate Conception-St. Joseph in Bloomfield,

In conjunction with the national observance of “Won’t You Be My Neighbor? Day,” celebrating what would have been the late Fred Rogers’ 81st birthday, the Fred Rogers Center for Early Learning and Children’s Media held an open house at the Fred Rogers Exhibition and the Fred Rogers Archive Library. The Office of Service Learning collected donations of canned goods for the food bank in recognition of Fred’s legacy of service to the community. Everyone wore their favorite sweater and enjoyed birthday cookies. Greeting guests at the center were, from left, Daniel Striped Tiger; Maxwell King, Executive Director, Fred Rogers Center for Early Learning and Children’s Media at Saint Vincent College; Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B., Chancellor, wearing a sweater made by Fred Rogers’ mother, Nancy McFeely Rogers, that was a gift from Fred Rogers, his lifelong friend; Jim Okonak, Executive Director, McFeely-Rogers Foundation; and Jim Towey, President of Saint Vincent College. 16

made him see those called to religious life as regular people with an exemplary calling. He also credits his vocation to the Rev. Carmen D’Amico, pastor of Saint Benedict the Moor in the Hill District. Brother Gabriel recently served as Chief Master of Ceremonies for the Mass of Christian Burial for Pittsburgh Police Officer Paul Sciullo II. The Mass was celebrated on April 8, 2009 at Saint Joseph Catholic Church in Pittsburgh’s Bloomfield neighborhood. Officer Sciullo was tragically killed in the line of duty on April 4th, 2009 along with 2 other Pittsburgh Police Officers (Officers Eric Kelley and Stephen Mayhle). Brother Gabriel met Officer Sciullo and his family while working for the Diocese of Pittsburgh prior to his entry into the monastery. ***** Father Stephen. R. Honeygosky, O.S.B., Ph.D., was recently promoted to Associate Professor of English at Seton Hill University recently. ***** Father Ralph Tajak, O.S.B., cofacilitated with Dr. Susan Muto “Coming Home to Christ,” an Advent evening of reflection at Epiphany Academy of Formative Spirutality, Pittsburgh. ***** On April 20-21, Father Patrick Cronauer, O.S.B., presented a two-day series of four conferences to the Priests of the Diocese of Altoona-Johnstown at the Seven Springs Mountain Resort in Champion. The topic for the conferences was: Saint Paul and his Writ(Continued on Page 28)

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Easter Vigil 2009 Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B., celebrated the Easter Vigil Mass with members of the monastic, college and parish communities. Those received into the fullness of the Catholic faith at the Easter Vigil included: Samantha Jo (Elizabeth) Boroski, Christopher Coles (Pantaleon) Brown, Jocelyn Sapulene (Josephine Bakhita) Matenje, Crystal Anne (Veronica) Sherlock; Sheila Jean (Teresa) Antonacci, Craig Leslie (George) Bryson, Caitlin Alexandra (Basil) Fox, Scott Wayne (Patrick) Grandgeorge, Signe Nicole (Margaret Catherine) Lindberg, Samantha Elaine (Maria) Mykins, Terry Kai (Joseph) Noel, Ashley Lynn (Raphael) Nowicki, Maxwell Neer (Dennis) Posival.

First Irish Festival At Rogers Center The Saint Vincent Archabbey Vocation Office, under the guidance of Father Fred Byrne, O.S.B., held its first Irish Fest on March 15 at the Fred M. Rogers Center on campus. Live entertainment was provided by The Cogan Brothers, the Saint Vincent College Jazz Choir, and Irish step dancers. Irish culture and cuisine were featured at the event, with proceeds going to the Archabbey Vocation Fund and a program building a “culture of vocation� among youths. Volume 20, Number 1

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From left, Archabbot Douglas, Herman Dupré, Sis Dupré, President Jim Towey, Renee Dupré, Gretl Dupré Galgon, and Heidi Dupré Hannah.

Sis and Herman Dupré Science Pavilion

Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B., and Saint Vincent College President Jim Towey flank members of the Dupré family who attended the groundbreaking of the Sis and Herman Dupré Science Pavilion at Saint Vincent College on April 22. Pictured above are, front, from left, Heidi Dupré Hannah, Herman Dupré, Sis Dupré, Renee Dupré. In the second row, from left, are Archabbot Douglas, Gretl Dupré Galgon, Michele Dupré Kocher, Sabina Rizzo, Denise Dupré, Anni Dupré, Rosi Dupré Littlefield, Laura Dupré and Saint Vincent College President Jim Towey.

Schematic of the 102,000 square foot Sis and Herman Dupré Science Pavilion. 18

Saint Vincent College officials broke ground April 22 on construction of the Sis and Herman Dupré Science Pavilion, a 102,000 square foot educational facility that will provide new or renovated classrooms, laboratories and offices for the Herbert W. Boyer School of Natural Sciences, Mathematics, and Computing. The new facility is part of an approximately $40 million initiative that also includes funding for new endowment and instrumentation. The Sis and Herman Dupré Science Pavilion is named in recognition of a $7.6 million gift from the family and friends of Sis and Herman. Mr. Dupré is a graduate of the Class of 1953 and is renowned for his patents in artificial snow-making and for his ownership of Seven Springs Mountain Resort. The Richard King Mellon Foundation made a $7 million grant for this project, which was the largest foundation grant in the College’s history. Other major donors to the science center project include the Katherine Mabis McKenna Foundation, Edward B. Dunlap Family, the CentiMark Foundation and the Benedictine Society. The Dr. John R. Mazero Science Education Center will be a major component of the Science Pavilion as well. Volume 20, Number 1


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From left, Renee Dupré, Gretl Dupré Galgon, Heidi Dupré Hannah, Rosi Dupré Littlefield, Denise Dupré, Laura Dupre Rizzo, Anni Dupré, Sabina Rizzo and Michele Dupré Kocher.

Herman and Sis Dupré.

President Towey, Michael Watson of the Richard King Mellon Foundation and Archabbot Douglas.

Herman and Sis Dupré, daughter Gretl Dupré Galgon (fifth from left), and some of their 29 grandchildren (front and back rows). Volume 20, Number 1

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Library Exhibit On Medieval Manuscripts Saint Vincent College Latimer Family Library recently mounted a public display of 25 medieval manuscripts, early printed books and facsimiles from its extensive collection of books more than 500 years old in conjunction with the History Department’s observance of Medieval Week. The exhibit included a leaf from the first edition of the Chronicles of England printed by William Caxton in 1480, two pages of the first edition of the Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer dated 1478, and a facsimile of the first printed Bible by Johann Gutenberg. “The Middle Ages were a time of intellectual and educational darkness and ignorance across Europe for the majority of the population except for

Father Chrysostom Schlimm looks over the manuscript exhibit. royalty and the wealthy,” noted the Rev. Chrysostom Schlimm, O.S.B., Special Collections Librarian. “It was a time when monasteries, especially Benedictine monasteries, understood the importance of the written word and so housed and preserved not only

Curator Views Monastic Artwork Douglas Dodds, above, head of central services for the Word and Image Department of the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, visited the Saint Vincent campus recently to study both historic and modern monastic art. He visited and talked with present-day monastic artisans, viewed the artwork of Roman Verostko in the monastery, seen above, as well as the WIM display in the Fred Rogers Center designed and installed by Verostko. 20

precious theological writings, but also those of ancient and contemporary secular history, art, politics, and literature. At that time, any book or legal document was a manuscript. It had to be tediously hand written and then copies were also made by hand, usually applied onto animal skins called parchment or vellum. By the mid1400s a new technology—printing— appeared as well as the widespread use of paper as we now know it. “This revolutionary transition first began in Germany and the Low Countries (Holland), and then spread to France, Italy, Belgium and eventually England. Printing was at the time viewed as cutting edge technology and the printers themselves were considered to be the celebrities even more so than authors,” Father Chrysostom continued. “Given the centuries of wars, floods and fires, surviving manuscripts and books from this time period are very rare artifacts. Saint Vincent College is fortunate to possess numerous examples of both handwritten manuscripts and early printed books. Many of these manuscripts are illuminated—decorated with colored inks, pictures, and even gold leaf. Early printed books, called incunabula, are interesting in that their type faces and decoration in many instances tried to imitate the written hand, since Roman type as we know it did not appear until the early 1500s.” Volume 20, Number 1


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Father Rene Kollar, O.S.B., Receives Thoburn Award The Rev. Rene M. Kollar, O.S.B., Professor of History and Dean of the Saint Vincent College School of Humanities and Fine Arts, was presented with the Thoburn Excellence in Teaching Award by Saint Vincent College President Jim Towey at the annual Founders’ Day Honors Convocation on November 20. Father Rene, a member of the Saint Vincent College faculty since 1981, was recognized as an accomplished scholar and academic administrator. This was the 12th presentation of the Thoburn Award, which was established and endowed by the late Thomas and Dr. Tina Thoburn of Ligonier, noted educators and philanthropists, to honor outstanding teaching at Saint Vincent College. A graduate of the former Saint Vincent Preparatory School, Father Rene earned a bachelor of arts degree from Saint Vincent College in 1970, a master of divinity degree from Saint Vincent Seminary in 1973 and a master of arts and doctorate from the University of Maryland. He is the author of six books on various aspects of English ecclesiastical history including, most recently, A Foreign and Wicked Institution? The Campaign Against Convents in Victorian England, which will appear in the Princeton Theological Monograph Series published by Pickwick Publications. This book is a collection of articles, previously published in America and abroad, which examines the deep suspicion of convent life in Victorian England. In addition to looking at anti-Catholicism and the fear of both Anglican and Catholic sisterhoods which were established during the nineteenth century, this study also explores the prejudice which existed against women in Victorian England who joined sisterhoods and were involved in orphanages, social work among the urban poor and education. Women, according to some critics, should remain passive in matters of religion. Nuns, however, did play an important role in many areas of life in nineteenth century England and faced hostility from many who felt threatened and challenged by members of female

Father Rene M. Kollar, O.S.B., center, Professor of History and Dean of the Saint Vincent College School of Humanities and Fine Arts, was awarded the Thoburn Excellence in Teaching Award by College President Jim Towey, left, and Dr. Susan Mitchell Sommers, right, Professor and Chair of History and Chair of the Faculty Council, at the annual Founders’ Day Honors Convocation in Saint Vincent Basilica. religious orders. Father Rene is also the author of over 80 scholarly articles published in journals and publications including Harvard Theological Review, Church History, Journal of Ecclesiastical History, Anglican Theological Review, and Feminist Theology. A recent article, “A Question of Rescue Work or Abduction: Eliza McDermot and Anti-Convent Prejudice in Victorian England,” appears in the current volume of

Recusant History. Father Rene’s book reviews have appeared in numerous journals including The American Benedictine Review, The American Historical Review, Journal of Ecumenical Studies, and The Heythrop Journal. He also edited The Movement Toward Unity in the Nineteenth Century, A Wimmer Memorial Lecture and wrote the script for Abbot Aelred Carlyle for the series The Welsh Connection which appeared on BBC Wales.

Saint Vincent Past to Present The Saint Vincent Gristmill hosted an exhibit of old photographs from around the area February 26 to March 12. The exhibit featured photographs from the recently released book Saint Vincent Past to Present: A Visual Journey. The book includes 100 restored images from the Saint Vincent Archabbey glass plate negative collection, which was recently catalogued and digitized. The book is available for $21 from www.stvincentstore.com.

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Archabbey’s Wimmer Celebration Featured in Our Sunday Visitor “I will not rest until I have succeeded.” That quote from Boniface Wimmer helped writer Maryann Gogniat Eidemiller recount the story of his persis persistence and “sacred stubbonness” in coming to America to serve his fellow countrymen. He wrote, “the result of my soul-searching is always the same: my poor, forlorn countrymen stand before me and call for help.” The article on Wimmer and his spirit and heritage appeared this spring in Our Sunday Visitor Visitor. Eidemiller’s interview included quotes from Saint Vincent Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B., Abbot Primate Notker Wolf, O.S.B., and Dr. Jerome Oetgen, who edited the book Letters of An American Abbot, recently published by Archabbey Publications. In talking about Wimmer’s vision, Archabbot Douglas noted that Wimmer’s “vision was to establish a little school here to help people adjust to the New World. He really understood that one way that they could become part of the American mainstream society was if they were educated.” “What surprises me most about them,” said Dr. Oetgen in talking about the letters, “is how consistently they show him to be a man of faith—faith in himself, but especially faith in God. As a young man, he set out to accom accomplish a mission, and he was still working to accomplish that mission when he died at the age of almost 79. How many of us can say that we have been that faithful? I think it’s a lasting tribute that the institutions that he established not only lasted all these years, but that they have spawned new ins institutions.” At the time of his death, monks under his supervision had established 11 priories and abbeys, more than 150 parishes, and 75 schools in America. They were ministering to more than 50,000 souls. Eidemiller concludes the article describing the statue of Wimmer that greets visitors to the Archabbey Basilica. “It is a tribute to his vision,” Arch Archabbot Douglas said, “and that forward-looking stance reflects what was very much a part of who he was. Wimmer always said, ‘forward, always forward.’”

Two Appointments to Abbey, Seminary Staff (Continued from Page 15) Portuguese/English, with secondary training in Spanish, Italian and French. Ms. Pereira received a master of arts degree in systematic theology from Saint Vincent Seminary in 1992. Upon returning to Brazil, she taught English to pre-school children and advanced level students for seven years, while starting her practice as a translator, which she maintained until beginning her service at Saint Vincent Archabbey. Ms. Gerhart has been appointed event manager and grant writer for Saint Vincent Archabbey and Seminary. A 2008 graduate of Saint Vincent College, her responsibilities include planning events for donors, alumni, and friends of 22

Saint Vincent Archabbey and Seminary, such as Seminary commencement, the annual scholarship banquet, Red Mass, and various fund raisers. In addition, Ms. Gerhart is responsible for writing grants for the Archabbey and Seminary. During her junior and senior years at the college, she worked as a public relations assistant in the Archabbey and Seminary Public Relations Office. After graduating summa cum laude with a bachelor of arts degree in communications, and a minor in marketing, she was hired as a part-time public relations assistant, where she assisted with the production of the book, Saint Vincent Past to Present: A Visual Journey. As a student, she served as a public relations intern for the Pittsburgh Steel-

ers during the team’s annual training camp at Saint Vincent. During her undergraduate years, she also served as a community relations assistant at Adelphoi, marketing assistant for the Laurel Highlands Visitors Bureau, and as a news intern at both WPXI-TV and WTAE-TV. Ms. Gerhart has been actively involved in campus affairs for many years, first as an admissions ambassador, as the advertising and promotions director of the Company Cabaret, and as an SVC-TV news and sports reporter. She also received the 2008 SGA Senior Award for her involvement in Student Government as the public relations chairperson.

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Saint Vincent Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B., left, Most Rev. Lawrence E. Brandt, Bishop of Greensburg, and newly-ordained Father Joseph M. Adams, O.S.B., following the May 16 ordination Mass. At left, Father Joseph is vested by Father Jude Brady, O.S.B., pastor of Saint Benedict Parish, Carrolltown, where he served his deacon year.

Brother Joseph Adams Ordained To Priesthood May 16 Most Rev. Lawrence E. Brandt, Bishop of Greensburg, ordained Brother Joseph M. Adams to the priesthood on May 16 in the Archabbey Basilica. Father Joseph attended Saint Catherine Laboure Parochial School in Wheaton, Maryland, and is a 1982 graduate of Wheaton High School. He earned a bachelor of arts degree in history from Saint Vincent College in 2001. He began studies at Saint Vincent Seminary in 2005 and received the master of divinity degree in 2009. He made simple profession of vows July 10, 1997, at Saint Vincent Archabbey Basilica, and solemn profession of vows on July 11, 2000. He was ordained to the

diaconate on August 9, 2008 by Bishop Brandt, and served his deacon year at Saint Benedict Parish, Carrolltown. He has served as miller at the Saint Vincent Gristmill, socius of novices (through 2000), and was captain of the Saint Vincent Fire Department until his appointment as fire chief in 2001. He served as chief until 2005, when he became assistant chief. In 2000 he was named a dorm moderator for Saint Vincent College and assistant director of vocations (2001-2002). In 2001-2002 he served as building manager of the Saint Vincent Gristmill. In 2002 he began emergency medical technician and licensed practi-

cal nurse training at Bowman Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, San Antonio, Texas. In 2003 he began studies in facilities management and electronics at Triangle Tech, Pittsburgh. From 2004 to 2008, he served as electrician’s assistant in Facilities Management at Saint Vincent College. Born in Silver Spring, Maryland, he is a son of Paul V. and Rita A. Adams of Lusby, Maryland. He has two brothers, Paul L. Adams of Chapel Hill, North Carolina and David T. Adams of Gaithersburg, Maryland; and two sisters, Julie M. Gonzales of Dale City, Virginia, and Jennifer M. Adams of Lusby, Maryland.

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Brother Bonaventure Curtis Ordained To Diaconate Brother Bonaventure Curtis, O.S.B., was ordained to the diaconate on Saturday, May 30, 2009, by Most Rev. Lawrence E. Brandt, Bishop of Greensburg, in the Archabbey Basilica. Brother Bonaventure, a native of southern California, was raised in Minneapolis, and completed his undergraduate studies at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, in 1970, majoring in English and Secondary Education. He taught senior English at Coon Rapids Senior High School for two years before returning to southern California in 1972. After successful business ventures in insurance and donut shops, he entered Western State University/Thomas Jefferson College of Law, San Diego, in the Fall of 1975 and completed his studies for the Juris Doctor degree in December of 1977. He was admitted to the State of California Bar Association the following year and practiced law continuously thereafter, including more than five years of daily civil litigation practice in the areas of general business and corporate securities matters. During his law practice he was also Chief Executive Officer of one of the nation’s largest travel agency concerns and became an expert in the field of franchise law. He entered the novitiate at St. Vincent on July 1, 2004, made simple profession of monastic vows on July 10, 2005, and solemn profession on July 11, 2008. His parents, John and Vera Curtis, are both deceased, but were long-time residents of Coronado, California. His wife, Roswitha, originally from Innsbruck, Austria, died from cancer in 2000. She was survived by their three daughters, who were raised and continue to live in San Diego. Brother Bonaventure has served as an assistant in the Archabbot’s Office (2005-2007), and was named assistant director of Archabbey vocations. He has been a member of the faculty of Saint Vincent College from 2005-present.

Following the ordination, pictured with Brother Bonaventure, second from left, are from left, Father Earl Henry, O.S.B., Prior; Most Rev. Lawrence E. Brandt, J.C.D., Ph.D., Bishop of Greensburg; Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B.; retired Archabbot Paul R. Maher, O.S.B.

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Volume 20, Number 1


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Summer 2009

Taiwan Ordination Brother David Ho, O.S.B., of Saint Vincent Archabbey, was ordained to the diaconate on November 1, 2008 by Archbishop John Hung Shan-chuan, S.V.D., Archbishop of Taipei, at Fu Jen Catholic University, Taipei. His brother, Father Solomon Ho, O.P., served as master of ceremonies for the Mass. Brother David, who will be ordained to the priesthood on July 18, 2009, in Taiwan, is the son of Jin Li Ho and Ayin Ma of Taipei. He made solemn profession of monastic vows on July 11, 2000 before Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B., at the Saint Vincent Archabbey Basilica. He has served as assistant master of ceremonies and sacristan and is assigned to Wimmer Priory, Taipei, Taiwan. In the top photo, Brother David, third from right, is pictured with Archbishop Shan-chuan, Father Phan, S.V.D., and Father Solomon Ho, O.P. and priests from the Archdiocese of Taipei who were present for the ceremony. Father Phan, lower right photo, at right, was a classmate of Brother David’s at the Seminary. Volume 20, Number 1

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Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Summer 2009

Vocations Office Video Wins Awards “I Only Show You The Cross,” a 20-minute video created for the Saint Vincent Archabbey Vocations Office by Fineline Multimedia of Greensburg, won five awards in four different awards competitions in 2008. A portion of the video is available for viewing at this weblink: http://www. saintvincentarchabbey.org/video/bonifacewimmerletter.lasso. Planning began in the spring of 2007 and production began that July. The final edit was completed in the summer of 2008. Directed by Father Fred Byrne, O.S.B., Archabbey Vocations Director, and Fred Findley of Fineline Multimedia, the script for the video was written by Father Andrew Campbell, O.S.B. of the Archabbey Public Relations Office. It was narrated by David Safin, Director of Multimedia and Marketing at Saint Vincent College, with Dr. Ron Davis of the Communications Department at Saint Vincent College serving as the voice of founder Boniface Wimmer. Findley directed the photography, post-production and editing, while Alexander Byers assisted him with the lighting. Jared Bundy and Safin served as production assistants. Additional photography was done by Byers, Safin, Bundy and Jonathan McMahon.

Bundy, Byers and McMahon are/were college students, so working on this video gave them valuable experience and a resume item. The soundtrack included music sung by monks of the Archabbey. Archival material was provided by Father Brian Boosel, O.S.B., Archivist, and Kim Metzgar and Liz Cousins of the Archabbey Public Relations Office. Monks interviewed in the video included junior monks Brother Elijah Cirigliano, O.S.B. and Brother Maximilian Maxwell, O.S.B.; Father Fred Byrne, O.S.B.; Father Justin Matro, O.S.B., Seminary Rector; Father Wulfstan Clough, O.S.B., Associate Professor of English; Archabbot

Benedictine Pedagogy Conference More than 50 persons representing colleges, universities and schools sponsored by Benedictine monks and sisters attended the Third Annual Benedictine Pedagogy Conference on “Orienting New Members to Our Benedictine Learning Communities” at Saint Vincent College May 28 to 30 at the Fred M. Rogers Center. Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B., left, and Jim Towey, President, right, welcomed Sr. Thomas Welder, O.S.B., President of the University of Mary of Bismarck, North Dakota, who gave the keynote address. The conference was sponsored by Saint Vincent and the Center for Mission and Identity at Benedictine University, Lisle, Illinois. 26

Douglas Nowicki, O.S.B.; Father Sebastian Samay, O.S.B., Novice Master, and Father Edward Mazich, President of the Saint Benedict Education Foundation. The video tracked a year in the life of the monastic community. In addition to interviews with monks, Findley and his crew filmed a priesthood ordination, the funeral of a confrere, prayer and meals in the monastery, Mass, and the day to day activities of the monks, such as novices studying with Father Sebastian. The Aurora Awards competition is an international, independent film and video competition for cable programming, documentaries, industrial, instructional and corporate videos. The Saint Vincent Archabbey video won the Platinum Best in Show in the category of Religious Service, 2008. The Videographer Awards international competition is designed to recognize excellence in video productions, television commercials and programs and new media. Entries are judged by the Association of Marketing and Communication Professionals (AMCP), an organization comprised of several thousand marketing, communication and video professionals. “I Only Show You the Cross” received an Award of Excellence in the category of Directing, 2008. The Telly Awards honor the best local, regional, and cable television commercials and programs, as well as video and film productions, and work created for the Web. The vocations video received a 2008 Bronze Award in the category of recruitment. The 29th Annual Telly Awards received over 14,000 entries from all 50 states and 5 continents. Entering its seventh year, the international Accolade competition is an international, non-traditional, virtual venue. Awards go to those videographers who produce fresh, standout entertainment, animation and compelling documentaries. “I Only Show You the Cross” received two Accolades, the 2008 Award of Excellence in the category of Editing, and a 2008 Honorable Mention in the category of Viewer Impact. Volume 20, Number 1


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Brother Miguel Savieto, O.S.B., and Abbot Joaquim Zamith, O.S.B., of São Bento Monastery in Vinhedo during recreation at the Priory. Brother Miguel was already a monk at the Priory when Saint Vincent Archabbey was asked to make it one of its dependent priories.

Heart to Heart Summer 2009

Mission to Brazil Above, Brother José Matias, O.S.B., fifth from the right, back row, of São Bento Monastery in Vinhedo, and Benedictine Brothers and Sisters from communities throughout Brazil during their visit to São Bento Abbey in São Paulo. They were welcomed by Abbot Mathias Tolentino Braga, O.S.B. (middle). At left, Father Justin Nolan, O.S.B., during the Saint Vincent College Campus Ministry Spring Break Service Trip to Brazil. Father Justin accompanied the group on their first day in Brazil when he had the opportunity to visit some of the children and families the Saint Vincent students would be helping. Katie Wojtunik of Campus Ministry, center, helped coordinate the project that has helped so many people in Brazil and in the United States.

Civil War Chaplain/Monk Honored in Georgia

Father Brian D. Boosel, O.S.B., archabbey archivist, traveled to Jonesboro, Georgia, to accept a sculpture by Sir Knight Tony Antoine of Rev. Emmeran Bliemel, O.S.B., presented on January 24, 2009, at a ceremony held at the Father Emmeran Bliemel, O.S.B. Assembly 1962, Knights of Columbus Hall. A Mass celebrated by Archbishop emeritus John F. Donoghue of the Archdiocese of Atlanta, at Saint Philip Benizi Catholic Church, Jonesboro, Georgia, preceded the presentation. Father Bliemel, a monk of Saint Vincent Archabbey, was the first Catholic chaplain killed in the line of duty in the Civil War. Volume 20, Number 1

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Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Summer 2009

A Life of Service The Benedictine Community of Saint Vincent has more than 150 monks who devote their lives to serving the needs of people through a wide variety of pastoral, educational, and missionary works, both at Saint Vincent and throughout the world. While the older monks remain active well past retirement age, they face the same financial hardships that other retirees do — rising health care costs and increasing living expenses. The Monastery Health and Welfare Fund provides older priests and brothers the care they need after their many years of service to the people of God. Enclosed is my tax-deductible gift of: $50 $100 $500 $1000 Other __________ My company will match my gift.

Name Address

City Zip

State Phone

E-Mail Please make checks payable to Saint Vincent Archabbey Benedictine Health and Welfare Fund Saint Vincent Archabbey 300 Fraser Purchase Road, Latrobe, PA 15650-2690.

PLEASE ADD ME TO THE HEART TO HEART MAILING LIST Name ___________________________ Address _________________________ ________________________________ City ____________________________ State _________ Zip Code __________

Saint Benedict’s Day Service Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B., celebrated the feast of Saint Benedict on March 21, with members of the monastic community, students of the College and Seminary, and of the Basilica Parish community. In the lower photo, Father Stephen Concordia, O.S.B., directs the Saint Vincent Community Choir.

Archabbey News (Continued from Page 16)

ings: Attempting to make them Accessible, Useful, and Applicable for Today. ***** Father James F. Podlesny, O.S.B., was invited to give the lead presentation at a Jewish-Christian Dialogue series on The Human Condition at Beth El Temple, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. Father Jim’s talk was entitled: “In the Image of God: A Chris-

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tian View of the Nature of the Human Being in Genesis Chapter 1.” It was delivered on May 4, 2009. Father Jim is pastor of the Church of the Holy Spirit in Palmyra, and Catholic EcumenistTheologian for the Pennsylvania Conference on Interchurch Cooperation, the ecumenical agency of the Pennsylvania Catholic Conference and the Pennsylvania Council of Churches.

Volume 20, Number 1


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Summer 2009

Bookstore Ministry Suits Father Anthony Grossi Well Saint Vincent College Public Relations Since the Middle Ages, Benedictine monks have had a reverence for books. But unlike his predecessors who laboriously copied manuscripts in calligraphy a page at a time for distribution, Father Anthony Grossi, O.S.B., presides over the daily sale and distribution of thousands of textbooks as the manager of the bookstore at Saint Vincent College. A monk of Saint Vincent Archabbey, Father Anthony was assigned to the bookstore nine years ago and hopes to stay for an eternity. “While God is always first, my next love is the bookstore,” Father Anthony said. Father Anthony became manager in 2000 following the nearly 50-year service of another monk, Brother Mark Evans, O.S.B. “It is a service-oriented position in which I get to meet many people­—the campus community of students, faculty and staff as well as the outside community of alumni, visitors, and especially those thousands of Steelers fans who visit during the annual Summer Training Camp,” he said. “I belong to the Benedictine Order and live in community. Each of us uses his talents in the way that best serves Saint Vincent and the students. I believe that everything I do is a ministry because my presence in the store makes me accessible to students and others who may want to talk about something in their lives other than books. And the work is interesting to me since the inventory is always changing—new books, clothing styles, school supplies and gifts.” During training camp, Father Anthony draws a lot of attention from members of the television media who are attracted to a monk, wearing the traditional long black habit, selling Steelers merchandise and college souvenirs despite the nearly 100 degree heat in July and August. “It gives people an opportunity to learn more about a Benedictine monk in service to others and to realize that we are regular people who chose to respond to a vocation to be a monk.” “We try to offer the best customer service possible,” he added. “New textbook prices are very expensive and so we now

offer used textbooks which have been very popular.” The Saint Vincent Bookstore has been selling on the internet since 2002. While some colleges and universities retain national book dealers to manage campus bookstores, he noted Saint Vincent continues to own and operate its own store. “Revenue from our operation goes back into the college’s budget so the students ultimately benefit from the private arrange-

ment as it provides auxiliary income.” Father Anthony is also an assistant campus minister. “I celebrate Mass for the students every day in the Mary Mother of Wisdom student chapel.” A native of Butler, he attended Butler Catholic Grade School and Butler High School before enrolling at Butler County Community College. He transferred to Saint Vincent College and earned a bachelor of arts degree in history in 1993. Son of James and Linda Grossi, he enjoyed working at Saint Michael’s Church during the summers unpacking books at the school and working in the office. “I also liked to play Monopoly because you had to manage your money,” he added. Growing up, he always felt a call to a life of service and was inspired by the Sisters of the Apostles of the Sacred Heart of Jesus who taught him. He entered the Benedictine community in 1994 and made final vows in 1998. He graduated from Saint Vincent Seminary in 1998 and was ordained a priest in 1999.

Irish Ambassador Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B., is pictured at top left with Dan Rooney, recently named U.S. Ambassador to Ireland. Mr. Rooney and the rest of the six-time Super Bowl champion Pittsburgh Steelers family will be returning to Saint Vincent for training camp, which will run from July 31 to August 21 this year.

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Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Summer 2009

Tribute, Memorial Gifts To give a tribute or memorial gift, please make a donation to Saint Vincent Archabbey in honor of or in memory of a friend, colleague or family member. Donations should be mailed to Mr. Paul R. Whiteside, Archabbey Development Office, 300 Fraser Purchase Road, Latrobe, Pa., 15650-2690, 724-532-6740. Donors from October 1, 2008 to May 31, 2009, include:

IN HONOR OF: REV. THOMAS P. ACKLIN, O.S.B. Mrs. Lucy Ludwikowski Ms. Molli E. Vassar REV. WILLIAM A. BEAVER, O.S.B. Mrs. Joanne M. Pearson MS. ANDREA CARELLI Ms. Amy Lynn Phillips BR. JAMES CARTWRIGHT, O.S.B. Mrs. Joanne M. Pearson BR. ELIJAH C. CIRIGLIANO, O.S.B. Mr. and Mrs. Fortunato A. Cusato REV. PATRICK T. CRONAUER, O.S.B. Mrs. Violette McCall MRS. MARY LOU CURRY Ms. Audrey Burns REV. WILFRED M. DUMM, O.S.B. Ms. Lois M. Dowell ARLENE GOLOFSKI Mrs. Anna Golofski BR. EDWARD V. GRINDER, O.S.B. Mr. and Mrs. Walter B. Hobart, Jr. VERY REV. EARL J. HENRY, O.S.B. Mr. and Mrs. Walter B. Hobart, Jr. REV. BONIFACE P. HICKS, O.S.B. Mr. and Mrs. Greg Forbes REV. LEON H. HONT, O.S.B. Mrs. Joanne M. Pearson IN GRATITUDE Mr. and Mrs. Louis F. Bowden EILEEN JOHNS Dorothy and John Hannon JOHNSON FAMILY Mr. James M. Whiley, Sr. REV. MYRON M. KIRSCH, O.S.B. Mrs. Violette McCall REV. PASCHAL N. KNEIP, O.S.B. Mr. Mark F. Garcea Mr. and Mrs. Paul Janka Mr. and Mrs. Michael Little Mrs. Barbara Sauter REV. AARON J. KRISS Mr. Gary T. Beuke MR. NEIL A. LINDO Ms. Joy Lindo REV. STANLEY T. MARKIEWICZ, O.S.B. Mr. and Mrs. Gerald J. Yanity

RT. REV. DOUGLAS R. NOWICKI, O.S.B. Mr. and Mrs. Charles G. Manoli, Sr. Ms. Amy Lynn Phillips BR. NATHANAEL R. POLINSKI, O.S.B. Mr. and Mrs. George Haller MR. RONALD RAIMONDO Ms. Suzanne H. Clapper Ms. Virginia C. White REV. CHRYSOSTOM V. SCHLIMM, O.S.B. Alphonse and Sarah Bon NANCY SIKO Ms. Christie K. Collins REV. PAUL R. TAYLOR, O.S.B. Ms. Amy Lynn Phillips THE TOWEY FAMILY Mr. and Mrs. Fortunato A.Cusato MS. LISA CHESTER WINSOR Syma and Patrick Mulich REV. DANIEL C. WOLFEL, O.S.B. Mrs. Violette McCall REV. FLAVIAN G. YELINKO, O.S.B. Dr. and Mrs. Ferdinand L. Soisson REV. JEAN-LUC C. ZADROGA, O.S.B. Mrs. Lucy Ludwikowski

IN MEMORY OF: +AUGUST J. BATTAGLIA Josephine and Rose Battaglia Bonnie Bukoskey Helen and Leo Burger Millie Burik Jim Calabrace Robert Cramer Family Ben Flora Mr. and Mrs. Mike Gennaro Mr. and Mrs. Robert Glenn Judy Glenn and Family Don Gray Family Barb Henderson Kay McGorray Albert Sylvester Family +REV. FIRMIN F. BEYER, O.S.B. Mr. and Mrs. William J. Bender +REV. ALBERT C. BICKERSTAFF, O.S.B. Mr. and Mrs. William W. Shearouse, Jr. +FRANCIS BILICIC Mrs. Mary Ann Facetti +JACOB BILLMAN Tom and Kathy Herald +JOHN F. BOZEK, SR. Ms. Rebecca S. Marin +DOROTHY R. BRINIKLE Mrs. Marion F. Showers

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+REV. JOSEPH P. BRONDER, O.S.B. Mr. James E. Bach Barbara Balcerek Larry and Margie Barish Richard and Ellen Briggs and Sarah Boyle Anne Bronder and Family Mr. and Mrs. Howard Bronder Chris and Cristina DeDiana Droyd Family Mrs. Irma M. Federlein Mr. Sam Folby Ms. Marcia Guzik Mr. and Mrs. Edward P. Hager Mr. and Mrs. Larry Haverty Helen and Jim Hawrylak Joe and Helen Hawrylak Anne Immekus and Scott Fingal Alex and Cathy Keefe Mr. and Mrs. David Kelly Ray and Dorothy LaFrankie Clara A. Macko Mr. and Mrs. Charles G. Manoli, Sr. Mr. Melvin J. Matty Mr. and Mrs. William J. McGarrity Mr. and Mrs. Arthur F. Moeller Mucci Family Ms. Mary Anne Odendahl Bill Palko Miss Roberta Penich Miss Dorothy M. Petrosky Ms. Suzanne N. Photos Ms. Andrea J. Ridilla Mary J. Schuetz Mr. Glenwood C. Scott Ms. Kim Shemansky Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Skelly Richard and Willie Ulery Mrs. Dorothy Vilsack Michele Wissinger +PHYLLIS D. BUCCI Mrs. Marion F. Showers +STACY BYRNS BURLAS Carl and Charlotte Burlas +EUGENE COSCHIGANO Tom and Kathy Herald +GERTRUDE CZAJKA Syma and Patrick Mulich +REV. MARION J. EMLING, O.S.B. John and Patricia Donlon +TERRENCE FITZMAURICE Ms. Margo Cook Ms. Rose M. Long +MRS. MARY FOLBY Mr. Sam Folby Volume 20, Number 1


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Tribute, Memorial Gifts +PAUL GABIG Ms. Mary Ann Eubanks +JOSEPH J. GALLO Mr. and Mrs. Albert E. Fiorina +REV. CLAIR F. GANNON, O.S.B. Ms. Margaret M. Gannon +MARY HALLETT Alta Vita Condominium Association +HARRY HASLAM, SR. Mr. J. Harry Haslam, Jr. +MARGARET K. HEIDE Mr. John W. Heide, Jr. +JULIA IMMORDINO Mrs. Ave I. Bacher +DR. PAUL J. KESSLER Ms. Margo Cook Mrs. Joan F. Kessler +BROTHER GERARD F. KLARIC, O.S.B. Donald and Judy Melroy +MRS. MARGARET KOSKI Kistler Family Mr. Paul Klym +REV. THOMAS J. KRAM Mrs. Patricia M. Coghlan +WILLIAM L. KUBIC Mrs. J. Roberta Kubic Miss Mary K. Kubic +WALTER H. LABYS Ms. Martha A. R. Bewick +REV. GERMAIN LIEB, O.S.B. Mr. and Mrs. William J. McGarrity +STEVEN LOSTEN Mrs. Jennie D. Losten +MRS. MARY MERSKY Floyd Browne Group Mr. and Mrs. Paul J. Harton Latrobe Country Club, Inc. Mr. Jerry Palmer Daniel and Sherren Elias Pensiero +MRS. OLGA MIKA Ms. Roberta S. Henry +DAVID PHILLER Tom and Kathy Herald +MRS. GLORIA PICCOLO Mr. Vincent R. Piccolo +MATTHEW RAIMONDO Keystone Waterproofing, Inc. +JOHN SARNESO Mrs. Edith Sarneso +VINCENT AND FLORENCE SCHLIMM Ms. Celine M. Schlimm Rev. Chrysostom V. Schlimm, O.S.B. +MRS. ANN M. SCHNEIDER Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. DeSimone

+PAUL C. SCHWARTZEL Mrs. Romayne Schwartzel +REV. LOUIS S. SEDLACKO, O.S.B. Barbara Bacha and Family Mr. and Mrs. Peter Berletic Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Buccini John and Helen Butala Mr. Robert R. Charlton Arlene Clark Alma Demyan and Gerard Mr. Edward J. Dunn, III Mary and Bob Erkel Helen Fajt Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Fiori Mr. and Mrs. William D. Foski Don and Regina Haas Mr. and Mrs. John Hertneky Mr. and Mrs. Harry P. Hess Tom and Helen Kissell Mr. and Mrs. John Klasnic Miss Mary E. Kornides Mrs. Lucy Koval Mr. and Mrs. Steve Lipovic Ralph and Marge Maiorana Charles and Anita Manoli Robert and Rita Martin Melvin J. Matty Dorothy Meehan Jim and Dottie Nicholas Ms. Helen S. Pavlock Mrs. Josephine Pavlock Vivian Pavlock Mrs. Genevieve Pesavento Jim and Esther Pevarnik Rev. Chrysostom V. Schlimm, O.S.B. Tom and Mary Jean Sedlacko Janet and William Shrum Mrs. Josephine Smart Dr. and Mrs. Perry C. Smith Bob South Mrs. Betty Sucha Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert J. Sulkey Michele Wissinger +REV. PAULINUS J. SELLE, O.S.B. Gina Allen and Family Ed and Jennifer Anderson Ken and Deb Anderson Jim and Win Anderson Tim and Dawn Anderson Tom and Mary Anderson Joyce and Denny Bauer Grace and Dan Bollhorst Nadine and Joe Brosky Chris and Michelle Casey Betty Christian

Heart to Heart Summer 2009 Vicki and George Ehrhardt Ray and Jean Espin Jason and Becky Gabler Jeremy Gabler Sandy and Jack Gabler Rev. Carl J. Gentile Amy and Bob Jones Janie and Tom Lander Charles and Anita Manoli Mary Rita and Greg McClure Mr. and Mrs. Leonard R. Monticue Butch and Veronica Nekuza Larry and Kate Nekuza Patty Pearson and Family Bob and Kathy Pontzer Carol and Joseph Pontzer Joe and Carol Pontzer Margaret Pontzer Pat and Jennifer Pontzer Rev. Stephen J. Pontzer Dolores and Donald Reisch Mr. Leo Selle Ms. Marilyn L. Selle Rita Jane Selle Shirley Stauffer Dolly and Ed Tanouye Diane Valentine and Family Arlene Wehler +WILLIAM W. SHEAROUSE, SR. Mr. and Mrs. William W. Shearouse, Jr. +PAUL, MARY AND DIANA SOFRANKO Ms. Roberta S. Henry +THOMAS Q. SPITZER Mr. Quinn Spitzer +SYLVIA STAICER Mr. Frank Staicer +RICHARD ULAM, SR. Mr. and Mrs. William K. Carter Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. Wright +MR. FRANK J. VANEK Mr. and Mrs. James W. King Mr. and Mrs. George F. Matus Ms. Mary J. Scherer Mr. and Mrs. Paul Vojtek +MARY JANE VAN OPDORP Syma and Patrick Mulich +REV. REMIGIUS B. VEROSTKO, O.S.B. Mr. and Mrs. Donald S. Pawlak +REV. BENJAMIN R. WALKER, O.S.B. Mr. Thaddeus Konefal +EDWARD WOLFEL Mrs. Mary Ann Facetti +JAMES T. YOUNG Syma and Patrick Mulich +ARTHUR ZITTERBART, JR. Mrs. Jane Zitterbart

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Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Summer 2009

Obituaries

Rev. Paulinus J. Selle, O.S.B. Father Paulinus J. Selle, O.S.B., a monk of Saint Vincent Archabbey, died Sunday, February 8, 2009. He was 95. Born in St. Marys, Pennsylvania on February 4, 1914, he was a son of the late Joseph and Margaret (Caskey) Selle. He was one of seventeen children. He is survived by one brother, Leo Selle of St. Marys. His other fifteen siblings, all deceased, are Francis, Bertha (Mrs. Arthur) Anderson, Julia (Mrs. Herman) Pontzer, Marcella (Mrs. George) Michael, George, Henry, Margaret (Mrs. Frank) Nekuza, Joseph, Raymond, Edward, Catherine, Benedict, William, Clara and Frederick Selle. He attended Windfall (Benzinger Township) Grade School and St. Marys Catholic High School in St. Marys. In 1928, Father Paulinus came to Saint Vincent to attend the Preparatory School, then the College and Seminary. He is a 1931 graduate of Saint Vincent Preparatory School. He received a bachelor of arts degree in philosophy from Saint Vincent College in 1936. He earned a bachelor of sacred theology in 1938, and licentiate in sacred theology in 1940 from the Pontifical Atheneum of Saint Anselm in Rome.

He entered the Benedictine Monastic Community of Saint Vincent Archabbey in 1933. He made simple profession of vows at Saint Vincent Archabbey on July 2, 1934 and solemn profession of vows at Montecassino Archabbey, Italy, on July 11, 1937. He was ordained a priest at Montecassino Archabbey on July 16, 1939, by the Most Rev. Gregorio DiAmare, O.S.B., Archabbot of Montecassino and Bishop of Cassino. Because of the war that was breaking out, Father Paulinus returned to Saint Vincent in 1940 to begin his long and distinguished years of service. He taught theology in the College from 1940 to 1963, serving as chairman of the department from 1949 to 1963. In the Seminary, from 1940 to 1997, at various times he taught moral theology, patristics, dogmatic theology and fundamentals of liturgy, teaching in the seminary for 57 years and 116 consecutive semesters. Father Paulinus was academic dean of Saint Vincent Seminary (1955–1965), spiritual director at Saint Vincent Scholasticate (1950–1959), and assistant spiritual director at Saint Vincent Seminary (1965-1971). He taught summer school at Mount St. Mary Monastery in Pittsburgh (1953–1956), and at Saint Benedict Monastery, Bristow, Virginia (1961–1965). He also served on the Board of Directors of Saint Vincent College (1964–65 and 1966–1971), and the Archabbey Council of Seniors (1964-1965, 1966-1980). The year 2009 commemorates the 50th anniversary of the year when Pope John XXIII surprised the world by announcing his intention to call an ecumenical council. The Second Vatican Council would begin its sessions three years later in 1962. Father Paulinus was a pivotal figure in the transition in seminary education from the pre-Vatican to a post-Vatican II approach. In 1987 Father Paulinus received

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the Nova et Vetera Award from Saint Vincent Seminary for “Outstanding and Distinguished Service to the Seminary and the Church in priestly formation and theological education.” In 1989 he received the Saint Vincent Alumni Association Award in “recognition of his meritorious contribution to Saint Vincent College.” At this event Father Paulinus was presented a bound volume of letters from 110 former seminary and college students who wished to thank him for the blessings he had brought to their lives. In the classroom he maintained a professor-student relationship. Outside the classroom he made a point of knowing his students individually as a friend, and as a counselor in their times of need. In 1992 he received an Honorary Doctor of Sacred Theology Degree from Saint Vincent Seminary and in 1997 he was named professor emeritus of Saint Vincent Seminary. His pastoral experience included weekend missions at Holy Family Parish in West Newton and many other parishes of the Dioceses of Pittsburgh and Greensburg. He was Chaplain at Saint Vincent College (1948–1950), and at the Carmel of the Assumption Monastery in Latrobe (1980–1989). He served as a role model to all of his confreres—young and old alike. Brother Timothy Waid, a lifelong friend, shared one of the Mass record books where Father Paulinus carefully recorded each Mass intention and the day it was fulfilled. He had recorded 29,457 completed Mass intentions. A Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated on February 12, 2009, at Saint Vincent Archabbey Basilica, followed by interment in the Saint Vincent Benedictine Community Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be made to the Father Paulinus J. Selle Endowment Fund at Saint Vincent Seminary, 300 Fraser Purchase Road, Latrobe, PA 15650-2690.

Volume 20, Number 1


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Summer 2009

Obituaries

Rev. Joseph Bronder, O.S.B. Father Joseph Bronder, O.S.B., a monk of Saint Vincent Archabbey, died Wednesday, November 5, 2008. He was a son of the late Edmund and Elizabeth (Schuetz) Bronder of Pittsburgh. Born in Pittsburgh on March 18, 1942, he is survived by a sister, Ruth Bronder of Pittsburgh, and a brother, Edmund Bronder and his wife Ann, of Washington, D.C. He attended Saint Joseph Mount Oliver Grade School in Pittsburgh Pennsylvania, and was a 1960 graduate of Saint Vincent Preparatory School. He received a bachelor of arts degree in philosophy from Saint Vincent College in 1965 and a master of divinity degree from Saint Vincent Seminary in 1969. Father Joseph was twenty years of age when he entered the novitiate at Saint Vincent Archabbey in 1962. He professed simple vows on July 2, 1963, and solemn vows on July 11, 1966. He was ordained to the priesthood by Bishop William G. Connare on May 24, 1969, in the Archabbey Basilica. One cannot think of Father Joseph’s

life and his contribution to the community without thinking about his work and his passion for music. Music in all its dimensions. He began music lessons at the age of five. Some years later in 1972 he was awarded a Master’s Degree in piano at Yale University, and continued to study with the best pianists while also giving recitals. Perhaps the highlight of his performances was to do Beethoven’s C Minor Piano Concerto, with orchestra under the direction of Richard Karp, founder and director of the Pittsburgh Opera. While on the faculty and serving as chairman of the music department at Saint Vincent College, he taught countless young people how to play the piano, and particularly enjoyed their successes when they were able to play in recital every spring in the Science Center Amphitheater. In addition to performance and teaching, Father Joseph enjoyed directing choirs and choruses in the abbey, college, and with singers and players from local communities. Father Joseph founded and administered the Saint Vincent Concert Series, treating audiences to firstclass recitals and concerts at a high professional level. He was chair of the Department of Music, director of the Saint Vincent College Concert Series, director of the Department of Music concerts, the Saint Vincent Camerata, the Saint Vincent College Singers, the Saint Vincent College Troubadours and associate professor of piano. He performed over 80 piano recitals, conducted numerous choral performances, presented over 350 concerts in the Saint Vincent College Concert Series, and presented 40 student piano recitals. Father Joseph served the Archabbey in its educational apostolates since 1972. He was named Acting Chair of the Fine Arts Department

(2001-2002). He has also been on the faculties of Seton Hill College, Carnegie Mellon University (1980–1987), and Duquesne University (1992–1996). His previous assignments include: chorus director at Saint Vincent Preparatory School and Saint Xavier Academy (1968–1969), and director of the Saint Vincent Camerata (1972–1980 and 1996-2004). Father Joseph was a member of the Pittsburgh Symphony Society, the College Music Society, and the American Music Scholarship Association. He was a past adjudicator for the Carnegie Awards of Carnegie Mellon University (1983–1987). He also served on weekends in the parishes of Immaculate Conception Church in Irwin, Pennsylvania; Saint Anne’s Church in Wilpen; and Holy Trinity Church in Ligonier, Pennsylvania. Another value that Father Joseph lived out in his own life and in his teaching was to use to the utmost all the talent that God had given to him. In a newspaper interview, he remarked: “You are born with talent, but there has to be determination, discipline, and sacrifice to stay with it.” Father Joseph in his own life had a high degree of determination, discipline, and sacrifice. Even in the last year of severe illness, one had the impression that he was determined to continue his work though it was clear that his illness had so sapped his strength that he was simply not able to perform up to his high standards. A Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated on November 10, 2008, at Saint Vincent Archabbey Basilica, followed by interment in the Saint Vincent Benedictine Community Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be made to The Benedictine Health and Welfare Fund, Saint Vincent Archabbey, 300 Fraser Purchase Road, Latrobe, PA 15650-2690.

Memorial Contributions

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Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Summer 2009

Development Corner An Invitation Over the course of the last four years, I have had the unique opportunity to meet so many good friends and generous donors to Saint Vincent Archabbey. The Saint Vincent family is truly grateful for your ongoing generosity even in these difficult economic times. It was encouraging to read recently that many of the economic experts are predicting a positive turnaround in the economy later in 2009 and throughout 2010. While I don’t know that we will see a return of the Dow Jones to 13,000, it certainly would be comforting to witness a rebound in the housing market and the employment data. It appears that the world is awaiting the United States to lead the way to economic health, and then everyone else will follow! As the nation and world continue to experience wild swings in the economy and the geo-political situation, it is comforting to know that our Church is a rock upon which we can rely for solace and comfort that our future ultimately rests with God. Saint Vincent Archabbey is a microcosm of the Church at large. Hardly a day goes by that I do not hear from a friend or

Paul R. Whiteside Director of Development

benefactor how much they enjoy a visit to Saint Vincent to find peace of heart and mind. For example, Father Donald Raila, O.S.B., our director of Oblates along with Brother Hugh Lester, O.S.B., host regular retreats for Oblates and other groups of laity and clergy alike who seek a few days of solace and prayer that are so much the “signature” of Saint Vincent. Please accept this letter as your invitation to visit at any time. As Director of Development, one of my most

important (and beloved) duties is to host guests for coffees and lunches! While my waistline pays dearly for this, my heart is grateful for the opportunity to meet personally with those who have an interest in Saint Vincent Archabbey in one or more of the many services that are provided to the people of God’s Church. Your visit could be as formal as a retreat as mentioned above, or as informal as a stroll through the beautiful grounds of our campus combined with afternoon or evening prayer with the monks. In any case, I would be happy to arrange a visit for you. If you would like a break from the “roller coaster of life,” please do not hesitate to arrange a visit. I cannot guarantee that the Dow Jones Average will rise, but I can assure you that your investment in time at Saint Vincent Archabbey will pay you significant dividends for years to come. Please write or email me at paul. whiteside@email.stvincent.edu. Paul R. Whiteside Director of Development Saint Vincent Archabbey 300 Fraser Purchase Road Latrobe, PA 15650 724-532-6740 Thank you.

Name Address City Zip

State

Phone

Enclosed is my gift. I am interested in discussing estate planning. I am interested in discussing a contribution of: I am interested in supporting the education of a monk. Stock Real Estate Annuities I would like to pledge $ _______ per month. Please Return Card To:

Mr. Paul R. Whiteside, Director of Development Saint Vincent Archabbey 300 Fraser Purchase Road, Latrobe, PA 15650-2690, Phone: 724-532-6740 E-mail: paul.whiteside@email.stvincent.edu

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Volume 20, Number 1


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Summer 2009

Cardinal Rigali To Close Wimmer 200 Anniversary Year (Continued from Page 36) 14, 1985, in the Cathedral of Albano. From 1985 to 1990, in addition to being President of the Pontifical Ecclesiastical Academy, he held a number of positions at the Vatican, serving the Secretariat of State, the Council for the Public Affairs of the Church, the Congregation for Bishops and the Pontifical Council for the Laity. On December 21, 1989, he was named Secretary of the Congregation for Bishops and on January 2, 1990, he became the Secretary of the College of Cardinals. He was a member of the Permanent Interdicasterial Commission and served as a consultant to the Pontifical Commission for Latin America and the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith. During the same time, he was also engaged in pastoral services to a number of parishes and seminaries in Rome. On January 25, 1994, Pope John Paul II appointed him the eighth Bishop and seventh Archbishop of St. Louis. He was formally installed on March 15, 1994 by His Eminence Cardinal Bernardin Gantin, Prefect of the Congregation for Bishops. He received the Pallium from the Holy Father on June 29, 1994. That same year, on November 7, he became a member of the Knights of Columbus. On July 15, 2003, Pope John Paul II appointed Archbishop Rigali as the twelfth Bishop and eighth Archbishop of Philadelphia. He was named a Cardinal on September 28, 2003. On October 7, 2003, he was installed Archbishop of Philadelphia by Archbishop Gabriel Montalvo, the Apostolic Nuncio, in the Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul. Cardinal Rigali is the spiritual leader of almost 1.5 million Catholics in the City of Philadelphia and the surrounding counties of Bucks, Chester, Delaware, and Montgomery. He is also a successor of Saint John Nepomucene Neumann, the fourth Bishop of Philadelphia (1852-1860) and the first canonized male American saint. Two weeks after his installation as Archbishop of Philadelphia, he was formally created a Cardinal by Pope John

Paul II in the Public Consistory in Saint Peter’s Square on October 21, 2003. He was assigned the Titular Church of Saint Prisca in Rome. His Holiness Pope Benedict XVI appointed Cardinal Rigali a member of the Vatican Congregation for Bishops on September 26, 2007. He is also a member of the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments and a member of the Congregation’s Vox Clara Committee. In addition, he is a member of the Administration of the Patrimony of the Holy See. Currently, Cardinal Rigali is the Chairman of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops Committee for Pro-Life Activities and is the Chairman of the Ad Hoc Committee on Aid to the Catholic Church in Central and Eastern Europe. He is a member of the Committee on the Liturgy, the Committee on the Relationship Between the Eastern and Latin Catholic Churches, the Ad Hoc Committee on the Review of Scripture Translations and is a member of the Board of Directors of the Black and Indian Mission Office. He was elected by the United

States bishops in 2006 to serve as the national delegate to the Plenary Assembly of the 49th International Eucharistic Congress, and in 2005 as a delegate to the Eleventh Ordinary General Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, which celebrated the theme “The Eucharist: Source and Summit of the Life and Mission of the Church.” The Cardinal is on the Board of Trustees of The Catholic University of America. At the same time he is Chair of the University Seminary Committee and member of the Administrative Committee. He is also on the Board of the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington, D.C. and the Chair of the Iconography Committee. He is a member of the Order of the Knights of Malta and the Order of the Knights of the Holy Sepulchre. Cardinal Rigali is also a member of the Papal Foundation. On June 5, 2004, he became a Knight of Peter Claver. The Cardinal is also a member of the Board of Directors of the National Catholic Bioethics Center and is Episcopal Advisor to Serra International.

Father Edward Mazich, O.S.B. Completes Doctoral Studies at Oxford, Named Master of Novices Father Edward Mazich, O.S.B. recently completed his doctoral studies at the University of Oxford, and was named Master of Novices at Saint Vincent Archabbey. Having written his licentiate thesis at the Gregorian University on F. D. Maurice and John Henry Newman, Father Edward continued his study of these two nineteenth-century figures in England, defending his dissertation, Ideas and Authority: F. D. Maurice’s Critique of John Henry Newman’s ‘Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine,’ on April 28th. This fall, Father Edward will resume teaching courses in theology and sacred scripture at Saint Vincent Seminary, where he has been a member of the faculty since 2007. He looks forward to developing his work on Maurice and Newman in the future.

Father Edward will continue serving as President of the Saint Benedict Education Foundation.

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Cardinal Rigali To Close Wimmer 200 Anniversary Year Cardinal Justin Rigali, Archbishop of Philadelphia, will be the principal celebrant and homilist at the closing ceremonies of the Wimmer 200th anniversary celebration, scheduled for Thursday, November 19. Bishops, abbots of the foundations of Saint Vincent Archabbey, and all entities of Saint Vincent: Archabbey, College, Seminary, parishes, high school, and missions, will be represented. Cardinal Rigali, a Los Angeles native, attended Catholic schools in Los Angeles and studied in the archdiocesan seminaries at Los Angeles College, Our Lady Queen of Angels Seminary in San Fernando and Saint John’s College and Saint John’s Seminary in Camarillo, California. He was ordained a priest by Cardinal James Francis McIntyre in the Cathedral of Saint Vibiana in Los Angeles on April

25, 1961. In October 1961, he entered the graduate division of the North American College in Rome and began graduate studies in canon law at the Pontifical Gregorian University . He obtained a doctorate in Canon Law from that university in 1964. From 1964 to 1966, he followed the course of studies at the Pontifical Ecclesiastical Academy, while serving in the English-language section of the Secretariat of State of the Vatican . From September 1966 to February 1970, he served at the Apostolic Nunciature in Madagascar, which also was the Apostolic Delegation for the islands of Mauritius and La Reunión. During this time in July 1967, he was named a Papal Chamberlain (Monsignor) to His Holiness Pope Paul VI. In February 1970, Monsignor Rigali became the director of the English-language section of the Vatican Secretariat of State, and the English-language translator for Pope Paul VI, whom he accompanied to various countries. Monsignor Rigali served as a professor at the Pontifical Ecclesiastical Academy in Rome from 1972 to 1973. During his service at the Vatican Secretariat of State, he also accompanied Pope John Paul II on a number of international pastoral visits, including the Holy Father’s first two major journeys to the United States in 1979 and 1987. On April 19, 1980 he was named a Prelate of Honor of His Holiness. He became a magistral chaplain in the Knights of Malta on October 25, 1984. On October 13, 1986, he became a Knight of the Holy Sepulchre. On June 8, 1985, he was named President of the Pontifical Ecclesiastical Academy and Titular Archbishop of Bolsena. Pope John Paul II ordained him to the episcopacy on September

Saint Vincent Archabbey 300 Fraser Purchase Road Latrobe, PA 15650—2690 724-539-9761 http://www.saintvincentarchabbey.org

(Continued on Page 35)

NON—PROFIT ORGANIZATION U.S. POSTAGE PAID PERMIT NO. 110

Santonio Holmes, who made the winning catch to give the Pittsburgh Steelers a record-setting sixth Super Bowl Championship, Coach Tomlin, and the rest of the team will return to Saint Vincent for the 43rd year for training camp from July 31 to August 21.

Profile for Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Summer 2009  

This 36-page color issue includes excerpts from the first part of the Wimmer 200 celebrations held in 2009. Abbot Primate Notker Wolf, O.S.B...

Heart to Heart Summer 2009  

This 36-page color issue includes excerpts from the first part of the Wimmer 200 celebrations held in 2009. Abbot Primate Notker Wolf, O.S.B...

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