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Spring-Summer 2008

Pope Benedict XVI’s Visit To the United States

Sis and Herman DuprĂŠ Receive Presidential Honors

Coach Mike Tomlin Speaks

Max King: New Rogers Center Director


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Spring/Summer 2008

Benedict XVI: Pope of Hope Dear Friends, This spring, our Holy Father Pope Benedict XVI, visited the United States for the first time during his papacy. During the six-day visit, he celebrated Mass at Nationals Park in Washington, D.C., and Saint Patrick’s Cathedral and Yankee Stadium in New York, and presided over vespers at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington. He spoke to U.S. Bishops and Catholic educators at Catholic University of America, met with victims of sexual abuse, addressed the United Nations, and prayed at Ground Zero, the site where thousands of Americans died following the 2001 terrorist

attacks. Whether he was speaking to the bishops, priests and members of religious communities, to Catholic educators, to political leaders, or to our young people and seminarians, Pope Benedict presented a message of hope in Christ. “Follow faithfully in the footsteps of those who have gone before you,” he

said at Nationals Park. “Past generations have left you an impressive legacy.... On these solid foundations the future of the church in America must even now begin to rise.” Pope Benedict made several references to the freedom which our society values, but noted that we should “use wisely the blessings of freedom” to “build a future of hope for coming generations.” Pope Benedict told us that our “ancestors came to this country with the expectation of finding new freedom and opportunity, while the vastness of the unexplored wilderness inspired in them the hope of being able to start completely anew, building a new nation on new foundations.” “Hope for the future,” he said, “is very much a part of the American character. And the Christian virtue of hope—the hope poured into our hearts by the Holy Spirit, the hope which supernaturally purifies and corrects our aspirations by focusing them on the Lord and his saving plan—that hope has also marked, and continues to mark, the life of the Catholic community in this country.” The Holy Father’s visit, as well as the onset of spring, with all of its commensurate activities, also brings us hope here at Saint Vincent. With college and seminary graduations, the ordinations of Brother Matthias Martinez and Brother Michael Gabler to the priesthood, and Brother Joseph Adams and Brother Benoit Alloggia to the diaconate, along with the simple and solemn profession of vows of our junior monks, hope for our future here is strong. We have also formed a committee and begun plans for the 2009 celebration of the 200th anniversary of the birth of our founder, Archabbot Boniface Wimmer, who said: “Let us meet one another there under the cross where we will always discover new courage and gather fresh hope.” In Christ’s Love,

Pope Benedict XVI talks to educators and leaders of Catholic universities during a visit to Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C. 

Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B. Volume 19, Number 1


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Spring/Summer 2008

Heart to Heart,

from the Latin “Cor ad Cor Loquitur,” or “Heart Speaks to Heart,” is the motto of Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B. It refers to the Archabbot’s prayer that giving and receiving authentic love may always be the chief characteristic of the Saint Vincent monastic community. This was also the motto of John Henry Cardinal Newman.

This newsletter is published by the Benedictines of Saint Vincent Archabbey. Publisher Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B. Development Director Paul R. Whiteside Director of Archabbey Public Relations/Editor Kimberley A. Metzgar Public Relations Associate Liz Cousins Contributors to this issue: Britton Batschke Kelly Bridges Liz Cousins Laura Gerhart Annette D. Hart Rev. Omer U. Kline, O.S.B. Paul R. Whiteside

Bishop Zubik Honored His Excellency The Most Reverend David A. Zubik, Bishop of Pittsburgh, was the commencement speaker and recipient of an honorary Doctor of Divinity Degree at the Saint Vincent Seminary commencement held on May 9. In the photo at top, are, from left, Father Brian Boosel, O.S.B., Master of Ceremonies; Dr. John C. Marous, Jr., Chairman of the Board of Regents; Bishop Zubik; Father Justin Matro, O.S.B., Rector; and Dr. Kathleen Borres, Academic Dean. In the photo below, Brother Michael J. Gabler, O.S.B., of St. Marys, received the Master of Divinity degree. Pictured with Brother Michael, second from left, are Archabbot Douglas, Father Justin and Dr. Borres. Archabbot Douglas cited Bishop Zubik for his Spirit-filled leadership and service to the Diocese of Pittsburgh and the Universal Church. “Your door is open to the priests and people of the Pittsburgh Diocese whom you have been called to shepherd,” the Archabbot said. “You approach problems not from the perspective of ‘what is the easiest thing to do,’ but rather ‘what is the best thing to do’ for the Church and for her people. Your decisions are made on the pursuit of truth and of justice,” he added, before presenting Zubik with the honorary Doctor of Divinity degree. Bishop Zubik called on the graduates to help the world come closer to Jesus, as Jesus expected the apostles to do in the birth of the early church. “Jesus challenges us as he challenged those Apostles around the Last Supper table,” he said. “Jesus calls us to know Him and to let Him speak through us to others.”

Saint Vincent Archabbey 300 Fraser Purchase Rd., Latrobe, PA 15650-2690 724-805-2601

kim.metzgar@email.stvincent.edu www.saintvincentarchabbey.org

Volume 19, Number 1




Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Spring/Summer 2008

News From Around The Archabbey Brother Elliott Maloney, O.S.B., has had his book on the Kingdom of God in Mark’s Gospel translated into Portuguese and published in São Paulo by Paulinas publishers as Mensagem urgente de Jesus para hoje. Also, Brother Elliott’s 1981 doctoral dissertation, Semitic Interference in Marcan Syntax, has been reprinted by the Society of Biblical Literature’s prestigious Dissertation Series. ***** Several monks have given presentatons on the Catechism of the Catholic Church during a new program sponsored by Saint Vincent College Campus Ministry. The evenings at Falbo’s Restaurant in Latrobe have included 20-minute presentations, followed by a question and answer session, then pizza. Presentations have included ‘Resurrection’ by Father Edward Mazich, O.S.B., President of the Saint Benedict Education Foundation; ‘Crucifixion’ by Father Thomas Acklin, O.S.B., former Rector of Saint Vincent Seminary and a Seminary faculty member. ***** Father Shawn Matthew Anderson, O.S.B., gave a parish mission Nov. 4-7 at Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton Parish,

Carnegie. The mission was based upon Ephesians 2:8—“By grace you have been saved through faith; and this is not your own doing, it is the gift of God.” He gave a series of Lenten talks to Saint John the Evangelist Parish, Latrobe. The talks were centered around Pope Benedict XVI’s latest Encyclical Spe Salvi. He gave one in a series of monthly classes in Benedictine spirituality March 16 to Oblates of Saint Benedict. The topic was “Saint Benedict and His Rule.” ***** Father Mark Gruber, O.S.B., gave the Community Retreat to the Trappist monks of The Abbey of the Genesee in Piffard, New York, from Feb. 23 to March 2. On Saturday, March 1, Father Mark Wenzinger, O.S.B., gave 15 members of the monastic community at The Abbey of the Genesee in Piffard, New York, a two-hour talk on the Christian Phenomenology of Michel Henry. ***** Brother David Carlson, O.S.B., chairperson of the Computing & Information Science department, has created a freeware parser program



for his CS171 class, Discrete Structures II. The program provides an easyto-use, table-driven LL(1) parser for educational use. The user supplies the program to be parsed as an input file, as well as files containing tables that specify the grammar rules, the finite state machine used to chop the program up into tokens, etc. The output, if parsing is successful, is an indented form of the parse tree for the given input program. The parser is useful to those studying the theory of programming languages and to those studying finite state machines and pushdown automata. More information about the parser is available at the software’s web site, http://cis.stvincent.edu/carlsond/parser/. ***** Father Sebastian Samay, O.S.B., Master of Novices at Saint Vincent Archabbey, gave a presentation to Oblates of Saint Benedict on Benedictine spirituality. ***** Brother Nathan Cochran, O.S.B. was recently awarded the Blessed Karl of Austria medallion for outstanding work and service at the annual meeting of the International Presidium (board of directors) of the Blessed Karl of Austria League of Prayers for Peace Among Nations, held in Stams, Austria. Only two other people have ever received the award. Brother Nathan has been a member of the League of Prayers since 1986, and has been the U.S.A./Canada Delegate of the Presidium since 1996. (Continued on Page 8) Volume 19, Number 1


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Spring/Summer 2008

Saint Benedict’s Day 2008

Most Rev. Denis J. Madden, Auxiliary Bishop of the Archdiocese of Baltimore, and Urban Vicar, was the principal celebrant and homilist at the Saint Benedict’s Day Mass, celebrated April 1 in the Archabbey Basilica. Bishop Madden was ordained an Auxiliary Bishop for the Archdiocese in 2005. He was also appointed to the concurrent position of Urban Vicar for the 50 parishes in Baltimore City. He received his undergraduate degree from Saint Benedict’s College in Atchison, Kansas, before his ordination in 1967. He received a master’s degree in psychology from Columbia University in New York and a Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Notre Dame. He is a licensed clinical psychologist in the State of Maryland and the District of Columbia. In 1973, he took a position in the psychology program at the University of Maryland, while also working parttime as a marriage and family counselor for Associated Catholic Charities. From 1996-2005, the future bishop served as Associate Secretary General of the Catholic Near East Welfare Association, established by Pope Pius XI in 1926 to work on behalf of the Holy See in those lands in which from ancient times the majority of Christians belonged to various Eastern churches. The main activities of the CNEWA include assisting the Holy See, building religious institutions, facilitating priestly ministries, preparing church leadership, responding to urgent human needs, caring for needy children, building social service institutions, promoting social development and fostering interfaith communication. From 1994-1996 Bishop Madden also served as the Director of the Pontifical Mission for Palestine office in Jerusalem. Bishop Madden has edited a book and written numerous journal articles and chapters in books in the field of psychology. He was one of the co-founders of the Accord Foundation, a humanitarian organization that has worked since 1988 in the West Bank and Gaza. Volume 19, Number 1




Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Spring/Summer 2008

Saint Vincent Establishes Bronder Prize For Piano Saint Vincent College, under the leadership of Brother Nathan Cochran, O.S.B., has established a prize in its concert series in honor of Father Joseph P. Bronder, O.S.B., titled The Saint Vincent College Bronder Prize for Piano. Father Joseph has spent a lifetime dedicated to promoting piano music as a concert pianist, piano teacher and presenter of classical musicians at Saint Vincent College and in the region. To recognize his contributions, this prize in piano is being named in his honor. The Saint Vincent College Concert Series brings world-class, international classical musicians to the Saint Vincent stage. Many of these performers are winners of prestigious international competitions such as the Tchaikovsky International Competition in Moscow, the Young Concert Artists International Competition in New York, and the Concert Artists Guild International Competition, also in New York. Many of these musicians go on to become the future stars of classical music. To recognize their achievement and Father Joseph’s contributions to piano performance, one pianist each year performing in the Saint Vincent series will be selected to receive the Bronder Prize for Piano, consisting of a trophy and a cash performance

award. The prize was awarded for the first time on Saturday, April 12, to Benjamin Moser, a pianist from Germany who gave a concert in the Robert S. Carey Center for Performing Arts on the Saint Vincent campus. Father Joseph is an Associate Professor of Music and has been a member of the faculty of Saint Vincent College since 1972. He is the founder and past director of the Saint Vincent College Concert Series. A native of the South Hills of Pittsburgh, Father Joseph began studying piano at the age of five and

developed a lifelong love of music. A graduate of Saint Vincent Preparatory School in 1960, he earned a Bachelor of Arts Degree from Saint Vincent College in 1965, a Master of Divinity Degree from Saint Vincent Seminary in 1969 and a Master of Music Degree in Piano Performance from the Yale University School of Music in 1972. He has been a monk of the Benedictine Community of Saint Vincent Archabbey since 1962 and was ordained to the priesthood in 1969. Former Chair of the Saint Vincent Music Department, he has also served as director of the Saint Vincent Camerata, as adjunct faculty member at Duquesne University, Carnegie Mellon University and Seton Hill University and as a teacher of piano for hundreds of students. Moser won first prize in the 2007 Young Concert Artists International Auditions. In June 2007, he won fifth prize at the 13th International Tchaikovsky Competition, as well as the Toyota Audience Prize and the MICEX Award for the Best Interpretation of a Tchaikovsky Work. His other awards include first prize in the 2004 Artur Schnabel Piano Competition. In 2005, he was awarded a scholarship in the German Music Council Competition, and the Steinway Award in Berlin.

Father Myron Receives Award

Saint Vincent College President Jim Towey (left) and Faculty Council President Dr. Susan Sommers (right) presented Father Myron M. Kirsch, O.S.B., with the 2008 Boniface Wimmer Award. 

Saint Vincent College honored Father Myron M. Kirsch, O.S.B., assistant professor of accounting in the Alex G. McKenna School of Business, Economics, and Government, with the Boniface Wimmer Faculty Award. The award is named for the founder of Saint Vincent and recognizes senior faculty for continuing, distinguished achievement and loyal service to the College. Father Myron, a Nicktown, Cambria County native, graduated from Bishop Carroll High School and later earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in philosophy from Saint Vincent College. He was awarded a Master of Divinity from (Continued on Page7) Volume 19, Number 1


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Spring/Summer 2008

Mister Rogers’ Birthday Celebrated The Fred Rogers Center at Saint Vincent College celebrated Fred Rogers’ 80th birthday and 40th anniversary of “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood” by wearing sweaters on March 19. There to help celebrate his birthday by signing a birthday banner were: (front, from left) Dr. Roberta Schomburg, Rogers Center Fellow, Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B., Chancellor of Saint Vincent College and Rogers Center Advisory Council, Bill Isler, Executive Director of Rogers Center, Rita Catalano, Associate Director of Rogers Center, (back, from left) Cindy Scarpo, Administrative Assistant to Rogers Center, Brother David Kelly, O.S.B., Rogers Center Archivist, Emily Uhrin, Archivist Assistant, Melissa Evans, student assistant, Wanda Reynolds, Coordinator of Early Learning Professional Development Project, and Dr. Veronica Ent, Faculty Fellow for the Center and Assistant Professor of Education.

Gristmill Featured On New DVD By Britton Batschke The art and craftsmanship of Greensburg, Latrobe, and neighboring towns was the focus of a recent DVD on tourism in the Laurel Highlands region. The DVD, Explore PA, Artists’ Trail: Route 30 is a 30-minute program which was featured on Pittsburgh’s public broadcasting station, WQED. In every episode, the host Elizabeth Jennings sends a family

out on a road trip across Pennsylvania to see sights and experience the local flavor. On the episode Artists’ Trail: Route 30, Explore PA sent the Reddig family—a Jazz musician, his wife, and their two young daughters—on a tour of the Lincoln Highway to discover the art local to Westmoreland County. After the family browsed the Westmoreland Museum of

Father Myron Receives Award (Continued from Page 6) Saint Vincent Seminary, and an MBA from Loyola University of Chicago. He became a member of the Benedictine Monastic Community in 1966 and was ordained a priest in 1973. He began teaching at the College in 1977 and later served as Dean of Students from 1984 until 1994. Since 1983, Father Myron, an exceptional baseball and softball player in his own right, has been Director of Athletics at Saint Vincent overseeing the addition of women’s sports in the early 1980s and most recently leading Saint Vincent in the transition from the NAIA Volume 19, Number 1

to the NCAA. He has also overseen the addition of numerous new varsity sports including the reinstitution of football in the fall of 2007. During Father Myron’s tenure as Director of Athletics, participation in varsity athletics has skyrocketed, and currently a full quarter of the student body participates in varsity athletics. Living in Wimmer Hall, Father Myron has been a Benedictine role model in the residence halls for decades. On weekends, Father Myron regularly travels on mission to Cambria County to St. John/Immaculate Conception Parishes in Summerhill/New Germany.

American Art and played an improvised concert with several musicians of the Westmoreland Jazz Society, they headed to Latrobe to see the work of the craftsmen monks of Saint Vincent. At Saint Vincent, the family learned about the millwork and weaving of Father Thomas More Sikora. At the Gristmill, the camera panned over shots of the grain being refined and worked while Father Thomas described the traditional milling process. The episode also showed a glimpse of Father Thomas working at his loom weaving a colorful tapestry. The DVD showcases the stained glass artwork of Brother Mark Floreanini. Brother Mark lets the family’s daughters put several pieces of stained glass together to form a cross with an ornate fleur-de-lis pattern. While the daughters worked, the family asked questions about Brother Mark’s art and the effort that went into it. 7


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Archabbey News (Continued from Page 4) ***** Father Philip M. Kanfush, O.S.B., gave two presentations at the Pennsylvania Association of Environmental Educators Conference, held Feb. 29 at Antiochian Village, Ligonier. “Environmental Education in Inclusive Settings” was the topic of a presentation given with Dr. Kristin Harty. Both Father Philip and Dr. Harty are members of the Education Department Faculty at Saint Vincent College. The session was geared to providing environmental educators with techniques to aid all students in the environmental education classroom. Presenters provided suggestions on how to adapt and accommodate instruction for students with special needs. Various populations of disabilities were discussed. Father Philip’s second presentation was entitled “A Wetlands Adventure: Incorporating Printed Educational Materials Into the Field Experience.” Environmental educators often look to field experiences to facilitate the learning process. The wetlands at Saint Vincent offers both school groups and individuals a unique learning opportunity. The session provided naturalists, researchers and parents with a model for incorporating printed educational materials into the three-dimensional world of experiential learning. Father Philip is the author of Emma’s Wetlands Adventure, an educational children’s book on the Saint Vincent wetlands. ***** Upon return form Christmas break, the Italian students of Father Paul-Alexander Shutt, O.S.B., visited the residents of Green Meadows with a presentation on the role of the “Befana” in traditional Italian Christmas/Epiphany celebrations.

Heart to Heart Spring/Summer 2008

The visit was coordinated with Jarod Trunzo, co-director of Service Learning and Outreach Programs at Saint Vincent College. After a group presentation, students visited with the residents sharing with them their interests in Italian culture and especially family connections that still exist in Italy. Traditional “Befana” gifts of candied fruit and nuts were distributed. “The History of the Use of Latin in the Latin Rite Church” was the topic of a presentation that Father Paul-Alexander gave to the high school students of the Latin Club at Seton-LaSalle High School in the Diocese of Pittsburgh. The talk gave students an overview of how the liturgical language of the Latin Church has changed over the millennia: from Greek, to Latin, to the vernacular, to Pope Benedict XVI’s recent calls for Latin rite Catholics to know and appreciate basic liturgical and non-liturgical prayers in Latin. The invitation was extended by a former Latin student and a recent history graduate of Saint Vincent College, Matthew Duran. Mr. Duran is in his first year of teaching at Seton-LaSalle. ***** In January 1963, Saint Vincent experienced a catastrophic fire which affected the entire Saint Vincent Community. Not only were buildings destroyed or severely damaged, but people’s lives were also in upheaval. In January, Father Brian Boosel, O.S.B., and Father Rene Kollar, O.S.B., offered a slideshow and narrative account of the devastating fire that affected monks, seminarians, students and parishioners alike. ***** Father Boniface Hicks, O.S.B., Assistant Professor of Computing and Information Science, presented a report recently at



Ball State on work funded by Motorola through the Software Engineering Research Center (http://www.serc. net). The work was entitled Jifclipse: Development Tools for Sec u r i t y - Ty p e d Languages. This work has resulted in a paper with the same title published at the Programming Language Analysis for Security ACM Workshop, 2007 and a software release found at http://siis.cse.psu. edu/jifclipse. Jifclipse is an Integrated Development Environment plug-in for Eclipse to aid software developers using the security-typed language, Jif. Father Boniface also presented a paper entitled Channels: Runtime System Infrastructure for Security-Typed Languages at the Annual Computer Security Applications Conference (ACSAC) (http://acsac.org). The paper addressed an important problem in using programming languages that ensure strong security, such as Jif. The paper was published in conference proceedings and will be available through the IEEE web site. ***** The Savannah Morning News of December 8, 2007, featured a photo of Benedictine Headmaster Col. Frank Ziemkiewicz, O.S.B., from the previous day’s Pearl Harbor celebration at Benedictine Military School. The event also featured retired Lt. Gen. Donald Rosenblum and a Cadet Col. Shane Summerlin salute during the 66th Annual George K. Gannam Remembrance. Gannam, a Benedictine graduate, was killed during the Pearl Harbor attack. Father Frank is a retired military chaplain. (Continued on Page 28) Volume 19, Number 1


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Spring/Summer 2008

Saint Patrick’s Day, Savannah 2008

The Hibernian Society of Savannah, Georgia, invited Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B., to speak at its 196th annual banquet, held March 14 . The invitation was extended by Mr. William Shearouse, alumnus of the Benedictine Military School in Savannah and chairman of the Hibernian Society 2008 Saint Patrick’s Day program. Also attending the banquet and dinner were Most Rev. J. Kevin Boland, D.D., Bishop of Savannah (photo bottom, right); Hon. Casey Cagle, Lieutenant Governor of Georgia; Billy Kelleher, T.D., Minister for Labour Affairs, Ireland; and Rev. John A. Kenneally, pastor of Saint William’s Catholic Church, Saint Simons Island, Georgia and Vicar General of the Diocese. Pictured next to Father Frank Ziemkiewicz, O.S.B., headmaster of the school, left, is J. Harry Haslam, Sr., who was also honored. He is a graduate of Benedictine Military School, which is operated by the monks of Saint Vincent Archabbey. Also attending was Rev. Philip M. Kanfush, O.S.B., who serves on the school’s Board of Directors. (Photos Daly & Salter Photography, Savannah) Volume 19, Number 1




Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Spring/Summer 2008

From left, Maxwell King, new executive director of the Fred Rogers Center for Early Learning and Children’s Media at Saint Vincent College; Joanne Rogers, wife of the late Fred Rogers; William Isler, outgoing executive director and President of Family Communications, and Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B.

Max King New Executive Director Of The Fred Rogers Center M a x w e l l King has been appointed executive director of the Fred Rogers Center for Early Learning and Children’s Media at Saint Vincent College, effective Sept. 1. After a distinguished career in journalism, Mr. King served until earlier this year as president of The Heinz Endowments. He was in that role for nearly a decade and presided over the awarding of more than $500 million in grants during that time. His strong leadership on environmental and education issues and in advocating for more economic opportunities for the disadvantaged, especially for women and minorities, were hallmarks of his tenure. Other areas in which he made significant contributions were in the promotion of literacy, civic design, and early-childhood

learning. “We are delighted that Max King has accepted our invitation to serve as exec-

utive director of the Fred Rogers Center,” Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B., Chancellor, commented. “As the Center moves into its new $14 million quarters, it will be poised to assume a national leadership role in issues affecting early learning and children’s media. Mr. King’s knowledge of education and his connections to resources in the region and in the world will enable the Rogers Center to soar in its commitment to continuing the work of Fred Rogers.” Mr. King described himself as “thrilled” to have the opportunity to work to advance the legacy of Fred Rogers. “Fred was a great champion of children,” said Mr. King, “and he was the strong conscience of television, and he was a brilliant innovator and creator. No one, anywhere, had a more positive impact on children’s media, and on television in general, than Fred.” “I learned a lot about the great importance of early childhood education from two people I worked with at Heinz: Teresa Heinz, the chairman, and Marge Petruska, the senior program director,” he added. “Teresa, who is herself one of the world’s great champions of children and early childhood education, also often spoke with great passion about the importance of Fred’s work. Taking what (Continued on Page 11)

View of the Fred Rogers Center for Early Learning and Children’s Media at Saint Vincent College, May, 2008.

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Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Spring/Summer 2008

Saint Vincent College Pays Tribute To Alumnus William C. Ucker Members of the Saint Vincent College community, alumni and friends gathered at historic Saint Benedict Hall to bless and dedicate the structure which has been re-named Headmasters Hall and The William C. Ucker Center following a more than $1 million renovation and restoration during the past year. The structure is a sturdy “home-made” building designed and built in sections between 1855 and 1877 by the Benedictine monks who cut the trees, sawed the timber and fashioned clay dug from the early campus into bricks. Although Saint Vincent Preparatory School closed in the 1970s, its historic role in providing Benedictine secondary education in Latrobe and throughout the world is preserved in the hall, which honors both the headmasters and directors of the Prep School and the Scholasticate. This landmark building provides new classrooms, offices and conference rooms in addition to a permanent display of photos, books, trophies and other memorabilia relating to the Prep School. The building houses the campus post office, the offices of academic affairs, faculty commons, faculty offices and classrooms for the School of Humanities and Fine Arts and the Department of Psychology. Five monks who served as Headmas-

The program included remarks by Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B. Father Paul R. Taylor, O.S.B., Vice President for Institutional Advancement, served as Master of Ceremonies. Archabbot Douglas talks with Wilma Ucker, widow of William C. Ucker, and Claudia Watson, niece of Mr. Ucker, after the dedication ceremony. ter of the Prep School are honored on the second floor in a series of framed portraits including Rev. Edmund Cuneo, O.S.B., who served from 1934 to 1945, Rev. (later Archabbot) Egbert H. Donovan, O.S.B., (1945 to 1954), Rev. Warren J. Raab, O.S.B., (1954 to 1956), Rev. Louis Sedlacko, O.S.B., (1956 to 1967) and Rev. Luke Callahan, O.S.B., (1967 to 1972).

Max King New Executive Director Of The Fred Rogers Center (Continued from Page 10) I’ve learned from Teresa and Marge, and applying it to advancing the Rogers Center and Fred’s work, is such a worthy challenge and a great honor, I believe.” Mr. King was actively involved in the Pittsburgh community, serving on the boards of The Allegheny Conference on Community Development, the Riverlife Task Force, the Mayor’s Commission on Public Education, the Pittsburgh Public Service Fund, the University of Pittsburgh Institute of Politics Board of Fellows, and the board of the Senator John Heinz Pittsburgh Regional History Center.

As chairman of the board of the national Council on Foundations, based in Washington, D.C., Mr. King focused on ethics, accountability and good governance in the philanthropy and non-profit sectors. He spent most of his career in journalism, and from 1990 to 1998 he served as editor of the Philadelphia Inquirer. He received his Bachelor of Arts Degree cum laude from Harvard University in 1967, and attended the Stanford Executive Program at Stanford University’s Graduate School of Business. He has received honorary doctorates from the University of Pittsburgh and Point Park University.

The Ucker Center is named for the late William Charles Ucker, P’43, C 50, D’83, who died on February 18, 2006 at the age of 81. Mr. Ucker made a major gift to Saint Vincent because he said “It changed my life.” Mr. Ucker was recognized by Saint Vincent College in 1983 with the conferral of an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters Degree. Mr. Ucker, born in Cleveland, studied business management at Saint Vincent College. In 1947 he joined the Clark Equipment Company as a field sales representative. He became part owner of a Clark franchise in the Pittsburgh area in 1948, organized a branch operation in Youngstown, Ohio, in 1950, formed his own corporation in Baltimore in 1955, and moved to Washington, D.C. in 1958 to concentrate on government and international sales. He was instrumental in organizing a new national bank in 1973 and served on the board of directors and executive committee of the Hemisphere National Bank of Washington, D.C. Mr. Ucker was also board chairman of the Potomac Equipment Corporation. He was recognized by Saint Vincent College in 1983 with the conferral of an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters Degree.

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Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Spring/Summer 2008

Sis And Herman Dupré Science Complex Planned Saint Vincent College announced the largest building project in its history—a major expansion of its science buildings that will be named The Sis and Herman Dupré Science Complex in recognition of a $7.6 million gift from the family and friends of Sis and Herman. This gift, one of the largest in its history, will enable Saint Vincent College to house the Herbert W. Boyer School of Natural Sciences, Mathematics, and Computing, in one of the premier undergraduate educational facilities in the United States. It also initiates a $40 million fundraising project that will finance the expansion of the Science Complex as well as provide endowment for science faculty professorships, student scholarships and research and ongoing facility operation and maintenance. The Richard King Mellon Foundation awarded a $7 million grant to the project as well. Herman Dupré graduated from Saint Vincent College in 1953 and was honored by Saint Vincent College in 1998 with the conferral of an honorary Doctor of Science Degree. An inventor and entrepreneur, Mr. Dupré holds 34 U.S. patents and developed one of the largest snowmaking systems in the world at Seven Springs Mountain Resort, Champion, Pennsylvania. He is the chief engineer for Snow Economics, Inc. and his system is used worldwide. Mr. Dupré served as chief executive officer of Seven Springs for 40

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Sis and Herman Dupré, benefactors for whom the new Saint Vincent College Science Complex will be named, received the Presidential Medal of Honor at the 2008 commencement of Saint Vincent College. years prior to his retirement in 1992. The former Mary “Sis” McSwigan, was originally from Pittsburgh and enjoyed an outstanding career as a teacher of English and Physical Education in the Pittsburgh City School System. The couple has nine daughter—Denise, Laura, Rosi, Anni, Janeen, Heidi, Gretl, Michele and Reneé. Sis and Herman Dupré have always recognized the importance of education, especially the role played by high school

teachers and have supported Saint Vincent College in this common goal. They established the College’s Great Teacher Recognition Program which recognizes the influential secondary school teachers of Saint Vincent freshmen. “Sis and Herman Dupré embody the spirit of Boniface Wimmer, our founder, in every dimension of their lives and his motto—Forward, Always Forward, Everywhere Forward—summarizes the energy and enthusiasm they have toward education and its importance in shaping the minds and hearts of students,” Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B., commented. “The entire Saint Vincent community is deeply grateful for this generous gift which will honor two incredible individuals whose vision and wisdom will continue to be an inspiration to future generations of students who will come to Saint Vincent to explore the rapidly expanding world of science.” The planned building project will renovate nearly 60,000 square feet of space and add another 45,000 square feet of new construction to the original Science Center built in 1969. More than 60 percent of the space will be dedicated to labs and lab support. Volume 19, Number 1


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Spring/Summer 2008

College Honors Dr. Loe, Duprés, Mike Tomlin Nearly 300 students were awarded bachelor’s or master’s degrees at the 162nd annual commencement of Saint Vincent College on Saturday, May 10. Mike Tomlin, Head Coach of the Pittsburgh Steelers, was the commencement speaker. Tomlin told the students they will be “measured in many ways,” and sometimes the numbers on the scoreboard will be irrelevant. It’s always important, Tomlin said, “how you play the game of life.” Dr. Barbara Loe, pictured below, established the James and Margaret Tseng Loe China Studies Center at Saint Vincent. She received an Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters, and Mr. Herman Dupré and Mrs. Mary “Sis” Dupré received Presidential Medals of Honor from President Jim Towey.

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Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Spring/Summer 2008

Campus Ministry Mission To Brazil

Father Vincent Zidek, O.S.B., and members of the Saint Vincent College campus ministry staff led a trip over spring break, 2008, with college students to São Bento Monastery, Brazil. Students met with Prior Father Paulo Panza, O.S.B. Father Prior Paulo and Father Noel Rothrauff, O.S.B., director of the Abbey’s Foreign Mission Office, are pictured celebrating Mass during the trip. College students spent time volunteering at an AIDS clinic as well as a ranch for persons with AIDS who were recovering from substance abuse problems. They visited some of the poorest areas of Brazil, spent time at an orphanage, visited school children, and participated in the celebration of Mass, at São Bento as well as at some of the local parishes where the Missionary Sisters of Christ work. Father Noel helped Father Vincent celebrate Mass at some of the places the students visited. 14

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Pope Benedict XVI’s Apostolic Journey To the United States

“People today need to be reminded of the ultimate purpose of their lives. They need to recognize that implanted within them is a deep thirst for God. They need to be given opportunities to drink from the wells of his infinite love. It is easy to be entranced by the almost unlimited possibilities that science and technology place before us; it is easy to make the mistake of thinking we can obtain by our own efforts the fulfillment of our deepest needs. This is an illusion. Without God, who alone bestows upon us what we by ourselves cannot attain (cf. Spe Salvi, 31), our lives are ultimately empty. People need to be constantly reminded to cultivate a relationship with him who came that we might have life in abundance (cf. Jn 10:10). The goal of all our pastoral and catechetical work, the object of our preaching, and the focus of our sacramental ministry should be to help people establish and nurture that living relationship with ‘Christ Jesus, our hope’ (1 Tim 1:1).” ADDRESS OF HIS HOLINESS BENEDICT XVI National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception Washington, D.C. Wednesday, 16 April 2008

“Time spent in prayer is never wasted, however urgent the duties that press upon us from every side.” ADDRESS OF HIS HOLINESS BENEDICT XVI National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington, D.C. Wednesday, 16 April 2008


Pope Benedict XVI’s Apostolic Journey To the United States “In the name of freedom, there has to be a correlation between rights and duties, by which every person is called to assume responsibility for his or her choices, made as a consequence of entering into relations with others.” “Recognition of the unity of the human family, and attention to the innate dignity of every man and woman, today find renewed emphasis in the principle of the responsibility to protect.... Every State has the primary duty to protect its own population from grave and sustained violations of human rights, as well as from the consequences of humanitarian crises, whether natural or man-made.... What is needed is a deeper search for ways of pre-empting and managing conflicts by exploring every possible diplomatic avenue, and giving attention and encouragement to even the faintest sign of dialogue or desire for reconciliation.” MEETING WITH THE MEMBERS OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE UNITED NATIONS ORGANIZATION ADDRESS OF HIS HOLINESS BENEDICT XVI New York Friday, 18 April 2008


“...Bear witness to hope. Nourish your witness with prayer. Account for the hope that characterizes your lives (cf. 1 Pet 3:15) by living the truth...” ADDRESS OF HIS HOLINESS BENEDICT XVI Conference Hall of the Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C. Thursday, 17 April 2008

“The contemporary ‘crisis of truth’ is rooted in a ‘crisis of faith.’ Only through faith can we freely give our assent to God’s testimony and acknowledge him as the transcendent guarantor of the truth he reveals. Again, we see why fostering personal intimacy with Jesus Christ and communal witness to his loving truth is indispensable in Catholic institutions of learning. Yet we all know, and observe with concern, the difficulty or reluctance many people have today in entrusting themselves to God.” “Freedom is not an opting out. It is an opting in—a participation in Being itself. Hence authentic freedom can never be attained by turning away from God. Such a choice would ultimately disregard the very truth we need in order to understand ourselves.” “Truth means more than knowledge: knowing the truth leads us to discover the good. Truth speaks to the individual in his or her entirety, inviting us to respond with our whole being.” ADDRESS OF HIS HOLINESS BENEDICT XVI Conference Hall of the Catholic University of America Washington, D.C. Thursday, 17 April 2008

Pope Benedict XVI’s Apostolic Journey To the United States

“Here I wish to make a special appeal to Religious Brothers, Sisters and Priests: do not abandon the school apostolate; indeed, renew your commitment to schools especially those in poorer areas. In places where there are many hollow promises which lure young people away from the path of truth and genuine freedom, the consecrated person’s witness to the evangelical counsels is an irreplaceable gift. I encourage the Religious present to bring renewed enthusiasm to the promotion of vocations. Know that your witness to the ideal of consecration and mission among the young is a source of great inspiration in faith for them and their families.” ADDRESS OF HIS HOLINESS BENEDICT XVI Conference Hall of the Catholic University of America Washington, D.C. Thursday, 17 April 2008


Pope Benedict XVI also spoke at the United Nations in New York City. Archabbot Douglas attended, along with Father Cornelius Chang, O.S.B., a Saint Vincent Benedictine who serves the Korean community at Holy Family Church in the Archdiocese of New York. Pictured below are some of the Cardinals who attended the talk, including Cardinal Theodore E. McCarrick, Archbishop Emeritus of Washington, D.C., and Cardinal John P. Foley, grand master of the Knights of the Holy Sepulcher.


Pope Benedict XVI’s Apostolic Journey To the United States

Sometimes it is challenging to find a reason for what appears only as a difficulty to be overcome or even pain to be endured. Yet our faith helps us to break open the horizon beyond our own selves in order to see life as God does. God’s unconditional love, which bathes every human individual, points to a meaning and purpose for all human life. Through his Cross, Jesus in fact draws us into his saving love (cf. Jn 12:32) and in so doing shows us the way ahead—the way of hope which transfigures us all, so that we too, become bearers of that hope and charity for others. MEETING WITH YOUNG PEOPLE HAVING DISABILITIES WORDS OF HIS HOLINESS BENEDICT XVI Saint Joseph Seminary, Yonkers, New York Saturday, 19 April 2008 “Friends, again I ask you, what about today? What are you seeking? What is God whispering to you? The hope which never disappoints is Jesus Christ. The saints show us the selfless love of his way. As disciples of Christ, their extraordinary journeys unfolded within the community of hope, which is the Church. It is from within the Church that you too will find the courage and support to walk the way of the Lord. Nourished by personal prayer, prompted in silence, shaped by the Church’s liturgy you will discover the particular vocation God has for you. Embrace it with joy. You are Christ’s disciples today. Shine his light upon this great city and beyond. Show the world the reason for the hope that resonates within you. Tell others about the truth that sets you free.” MEETING WITH YOUNG PEOPLE AND SEMINARIANS ADDRESS OF HIS HOLINESS BENEDICT XVI Saint Joseph Seminary, Yonkers, New York Saturday, 19 April 2008


“Freedom is not only a gift, but also a summons to personal responsibility. Americans know this from experience—almost every town in this country has its monuments honoring those who sacrificed their lives in defense of freedom, both at home and abroad. The preservation of freedom calls for the cultivation of virtue, self-discipline, sacrifice for the common good and a sense of responsibility towards the less fortunate. It also demands the courage to engage in civic life and to bring one’s deepest beliefs and values to reasoned public debate. In a word, freedom is ever new. It is a challenge held out to each generation, and it must constantly be won over for the cause of good (cf. Spe Salvi, 24). “The Church, for her part, wishes to contribute to building a world ever more worthy of the human person, created in the image and likeness of God (cf. Gen 1:26-27). She is convinced that faith sheds new light on all things, and that the Gospel reveals the noble vocation and sublime destiny of every man and woman (cf. Gaudium et Spes, 10). Faith also gives us the strength to respond to our high calling, and the hope that inspires us to work for an ever more just and fraternal society. Democracy can only flourish, as your founding fathers realized, when political leaders and those whom they represent are guided by truth and bring the wisdom born of firm moral principle to decisions affecting the life and future of the nation.” ADDRESS OF HIS HOLINESS BENEDICT XVI South Lawn of the White House, Washington, D.C. Wednesday, 16 April 2008

Pope Benedict XVI’s Apostolic Journey To the United States


Saint Vincent Archabbey

By Laura Gerhart

Heart to Heart Spring/Summer 2008

Sports Friendship Day Draws Crowd

Members of the Saint Vincent community combined their efforts to host a day of fun and friendship for over 100 people from the community with special needs. “Sports Friendship Day is a true witness to our Benedictine hospitality,” coordinator and campus minister Katie Wojtunik said. A volunteer student planning committee also assisted Wojtunik with the coordination of the event’s activities and student help. Sponsored by Campus Ministry, the annual event depends on student involvement to make it a success. Over 100 college students volunteered their time March 9 to play sports, do crafts, and participate in the day’s activities with the special guests. Participants this year received a t-shirt, and created an autograph book to collect their new friends’ contact information. For many of the guests the day was an opportunity to make new friends with other individuals with special needs, as well as with the student volunteers. Upon arrival, each guest is paired with a student volunteer, who assists them throughout the afternoon with games, crafts, face painting, a sing-along, and talent show before escorting them to mass and dinner. Over 500 students gave up their meal plan that day so that the guests and their fami-

Sports Friendship Day activities included (above) a talent show and sing-along, as well as (below) various sports activities such as basketball. lies could share a meal together free of charge after the mass. In addition to student support, members of the Benedictine community such as Brother Norman Hipps, and Father Vernon Holtz attend Sports Friendship Day every year to spend time with the guests and enjoy the energy of the day. As the Saint Vincent College Chaplain, Father Vincent Zidek, O.S.B. noted that “The program began when I was a student at Saint Vincent. I remember being a buddy. To host an event such as this is a true honor for us. Our guests are honored to be here, but I believe Saint Vincent is even more honored to host them.” The event has become an annual tradition at Saint Vincent College that many participants have enjoyed year after year. In a memorable moment of the opening ceremony, Father Vincent

asked the crowd of guests how many of them had attended Sports Friendship Day consecutively over the last five, ten, and even fifteen years. Almost half of the guests remained standing to the very end, demonstrating just how significant the event had become in the lives of so many people. Some guests have remarkably participated in Sports Friendship Day every year since its origination in 1984. Even the bad weather couldn’t stop over 150 guests and their families from attending this year’s 24th annual event. “There is so much excitement that day and the Carey Center is always filled with energy and joy,” Wojuntik explained. “The whole of the Saint Vincent Community comes together, which is what makes this day so special. It is Benedictine Hospitality at its finest!”

Campus Minister Father Vincent Zidek, O.S.B., welcomes everyone to Sports Friendship Day. Volume 19, Number 1

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Professions, Ordinations In July

Top row, from left, Brother Joseph Adams, and Brother Benoit Alloggia will be ordained to the diaconate on Aug 9. Brother Bonaventure Curtis and Brother Peter Augustine Pierjok will profess solemn vows on July 11. Brother Michael Antonacci, Brother Jeremiah Lange, Brother Gabriel Myriam Kurzawski and Brother Maximilian Maxwell will profess simple vows on July 10.

Tribute To State Trooper The funeral Mass for Trooper Kenton E. Iwaniec, 24, a 2007 Saint Vincent College graduate, was held at the Saint Vincent Archabbey Basilica on Friday, April 4. Trooper Iwaniec died as the result of an automobile accident on Friday, March 28. More than 100 Pennsylvania State Police Troopers in uniform attended the Mass, serving as pallbearers and formal honor guard for their fallen comrade. Members of the Benedictine community concelebrated at the Mass.

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Abbey Artists Attain Awards

Brother Michael Gabler, O.S.B., and Brother Mark Floreanini, O.S.B., were ribbon winners at the 54th Open Show of the Latrobe Art League. Ribbons were presented at the show’s opening on April 1. Brother Michael, pictured with his work (top, left) Lindsay’s Irises, done in colored pencil, took third place in the open division. Brother Mark won an Award of Merit for his work in acrylic/oil entitled Apple Blossom, and pictured above him. A number of art students of Brother Mark, who teaches in the Fine Arts Department at Saint Vincent College, also received awards.

Green Meadows Residents Model For Art Students Thirteen Saint Vincent College students in the painting class of Brother Mark Floreanini, O.S.B., painted portraits on canvas of elderly residents at Green Meadows Assisted Living in Wimmerton, which is near the college. After the portraits were completed and graded, the students offered the paintings to their models as Christmas gifts to give to their family or friends after being on display at the facility for other residents, visitors and staff members to enjoy. The project was coordinated through Saint Vincent College’s new Service Learning Program under the direction of Kelly King, director, and Jarod Trunzo, coordinator.

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Michael Gabler Ordained To Priesthood Brother Michael J. Gabler, O.S.B.,was ordained to the priesthood on Saturday, May 17, 2008, at Saint Vincent Archabbey Basilica by the Most Rev. Lawrence E. Brandt, J.C.D., Ph.D. He is the son of Michael F. and Margaret A. Gabler of St. Marys. He attended St. Marys parochial school and is a 1985 graduate of Elk County Catholic High School. He earned a Bachelor of Science degree in M.I.S. from Penn State University in 1989. He entered the Saint Vincent monastic community in 2002 and made first profession of vows on July 10, 2003. He earned a Master of Divinity degree from Saint Vincent Seminary in 2008. He served his deacon internship at Saint Benedict Parish, Carrolltown. He has two sisters, Lori A. Lingenfelter of Ridgway, Melanie A. Meyer of St. Marys, and a brother, Sean, of St. Marys.

The Most Rev. Lawrence E. Brandt, Bishop of Greensburg, ordained Father Matthias Martinez, O.S.B., to the priesthood on Jan. 19.

Matthias Martinez Ordained Matthias Martinez, O.S.B. was ordained a priest on January 19, 2008, by Bishop Lawrence E. Brandt of the Diocese of Greensburg. Father Matthias is the son of Lynda

C. Martinez of Latrobe, and the late Edelmiro Martinez, Jr. He is a 1993 graduate of Northfield Mount Hermon High School. He earned a bachelor of arts degree in philosophy in 1999 from Saint John Seminary College, and a master of divinity degree with highest honors from Saint Vincent Seminary in 2007. He also studied at Babson College and Saint John Seminary. His sister, Janalyn Pentlow, is from Douglaston, New York. In 2004, he was named assistant archivist and assistant master of ceremonies/sacristan. In 2007, he was named assistant to the rector of Saint Vincent Seminary, He was assistant curator of the archabbey music collection (2005-2006), Benedictine Resident of Wimmer Hall at Saint Vincent College (2006-2007) and a Campus Ministry Assistant (2006-2007). Father Matthias made simple profession of vows July 9, 2004, and solemn profession of vows July 11, 2007. He was ordained to the diaconate on July 14, 2007, and served his deacon internship at Saint Mary Parish, St. Marys.

The Most Rev. Lawrence E. Brandt, Bishop of Greensburg, ordained Father Michael J. Gabler to the priesthood on May 17. 26

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Easter Vigil At Saint Vincent Archabbey

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Project Haiti Featured In Liguorian By Kelly Bridges Haiti is a country of many contradictions. Some citizens have cell phones but no running water. Heavily reliant on agriculture as a source of income, the landscape is deteriorated by deforestation. Although most of the Haitian people live in dire poverty, they retain their spirituality, and through the support of programs such as Project Haiti, founded by Father Fred Byrne, O.S.B., in 1997, can receive ministerial and charitable aid. That work received national attention when it made the March, 2008, cover of Liguorian Magazine. Father Fred was the head of the Catholic Campus Ministry at Penn State University for nearly a decade. As part of a campaign to create awareness among Penn State college students about poverty on a global level, he started Project Haiti in 1997. Father Fred wanted to create a system of cooperation between Penn State’s Campus Ministry and another campus in Haiti, but while traveling in Haiti he discovered that there was no such thing. With help from the Carmelite Community of the Word sisters in the Diocese of Altoona-Johnstown, he was able to establish a relationship between Penn

State’s Catholic Campus Ministry and other ministry groups in Haiti. “Every student who went to Haiti came back transformed in his or her attitude toward the poor,” Father Fred told writer Mary Ellen Pellegrini. Since 1997, over $100,000 has been raised for Project Haiti and other corresponding organizations. The project annually sends about 20 students to Haiti during Penn State’s spring break, the article noted. “A lot of young folks might not be interested in a charismatic prayer meeting, but put a service opportunity out there and you get them,” said Father Matthew Laffey, O.S.B., who has been in charge of Penn State University’s Catholic Campus Ministry and Project Haiti since 2001. Father Matthew views the spring

break excursions to Haiti as an opportunity to create a lifelong devotion to helping the poor. “If we give students this opportunity, many of them will do it again down the road,” he said. Last year, students raised nearly $20,000 for an orphanage and several other charitable organizations rooted in Haiti. Many of the charitable organizations involved with Project Haiti aim to teach the citizens self-sufficiency and skills that can give them a chance to earn fair wages. Father Fred added that Project Haiti has been successful not only with its original mission of raising awareness of poverty in Haiti, but also with awareness of what Haiti and its people can mean to the students involved. “We touched the lives of the young people we visited there,” said Father Fred, noting that “the Haitian people taught us about prayer and trusting in the Lord.”

Archabbey News (Continued from Page 8)

Father Matthew Laffey, O.S.B.

***** Father Jim Podlesny, O.S.B., pastor of the Church of the Holy Spirit in Palmyra, PA, spoke recently at the Diocese of Harrisburg’s Conference on Health Care Ministers on: “The Moral and Ethical Ramifications of Pastoral Care.”

Father Fred Byrne, O.S.B.

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Tribute, Memorial Gifts To give a tribute or memorial gift, please make a donation to Saint Vincent Archabbey in honor of or in memory of a friend, colleague or family member. Donations should be mailed to Mr. Paul R. Whiteside, Archabbey Development Office, 300 Fraser Purchase Road, Latrobe, Pa., 15650-2690, 724-5326740. Donors from November 17, 2007 to May 9, 2008, include:

IN HONOR OF: REV. THOMAS P. ACKLIN, O.S.B. Mrs. Gertrudann Keddie Tatananni BR. ELIJAH CIRIGLIANO, O.S.B. Mr. and Mrs. Selim G. Noujaim REV. PATRICK CRONAUER, O.S.B. Mrs. Marion Cronauer BR. BONAVENTURE CURTIS, O.S.B. Mr. and Mrs. Israel Barken REV. WILFRED M. DUMM, O.S.B. Ms. Lois M. Dowell FAMILY MEMBERS Mrs. Helen K. Barnett LAURIE AND DONALD HEELON Syma and Patrick Mulich REV. BONIFACE P. HICKS, O.S.B. Mr. and Mrs. Greg Forbes REV. OMER U. KLINE, O.S.B. Mr. William T. Gasper REV. PASCHAL N. KNEIP, O.S.B. Dr. Teofilo C. Mascarinas, Jr. Mrs. Barbara Sauter Mr. Paul A. Trovato VERY REV. JUSTIN M. MATRO, O.S.B. Mrs. Ilse T. Hilliard REV. NATHAN J. MUNSCH, O.S.B. Mrs. Orma S. McKeon REV. JOHN J. PECK, O.S.B. Mr. and Mrs. James R. Long MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH C. PEVARNIK Mr. Stephen M. Pevarnik MR. JUSTIN TONER Mr. Dennis J. Papciak MS. BARBARA TROILO Mrs. Lena A. Chelko REV. FRANK E. ZIEMKIEWICZ, O.S.B. Mrs. Orma S. McKeon

IN MEMORY OF: +REV. ALBERT C. BICKERSTAFF, O.S.B. Mr. and Mrs. William W.Shearouse, Jr.

+DONNA CHELKO BONO Mrs. Lena A. Chelko +JENNY BRACALIELLO Jim and Shirley Marone +NONA R. BURGER B. J. Burger-Loy and George Loy +ANTHONY J. CHELKO Mrs. Lena A. Chelko +THERESA R. COOPER Syma and Patrick Mulich +REV. J. DAVID CROWLEY Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Aiello Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Eismann Ms. Marge Chervenak Mr. and Mrs. R. F. Dacal Ms. Sylvia Goda Mr. and Mrs. John Hannon Ms. Loan B. Lang Mrs. Patricial Long Mr. and Mrs. David Pferdehirt Ms. Celestine Roberto Mr. and Mrs. John L. Sammons Jay and Michele Simard Mr. and Mrs. Barry Sokolow Mr. and Mrs. F. Christopher Spina Guy M. Stofman, MD, FACS Mr. Michael Summa Mr. and Mrs. William Summa +STELLA M. CUDNIK Mr. and Mrs. Fortunato A. Cusato Mr. Aloysius S. Jezewski Mr. and Mrs. Mark A. Mitrisin Mr. and Mrs. Edward Nowicki Larry, Katie and Stacy Nowicki Dean and Sylvia Sickenberger Ms. Patricia A. Smiy Loretta Sowinski Mr. and Mrs. Arthur D. Stewart +THOMAS CURRY, SR. Ms. Kate Czarkowski +REV. MARION J. EMLING, O.S.B. John and Patricia Donlon +AMBROSE FRANKOVICH Mr. Brian D. Urik OUR BELOVED GRANDPARENTS Michele and Anthony Rash +GEORGETTA GRAYBILL Syma and Patrick Mulich +PHILLIP GRAYBILL Syma and Patrick Mulich +PEG GRIFFIN Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Fennell, Sr. +MISS MARGARET M. GUZIK Mr. and Mrs. W. Paul Matty HAECK AND OBRINGER FAMILIES Mr. and Mrs. Regis J. Obringer

+DR. THOMAS K. HEALY Ms. Mary Joan Wilt +WALTER B. HOBART Mr. and Mrs. Walter B. Hobart, Jr. +REV. CLARENCE F. KARAWSKY, O.S.B. Ms. Pearl Karawsky +ANNA KOSTRUB Ms. Jacqueline M. Bour +WILLIAM L. KUBIC Dick and Thea Brown Clemens Fischer and Family Mr. and Mrs. Charles M. Fischer Mr. and Mrs. Ralph E. Graff Anna Marie Grec Mr. and Mrs. Edward E. Hisker Charles R. Kubic and Family Mary K. Kubic Mr. and Mrs. Sam Laciak Mr. and Mrs. Richard Magyar Mr. and Mrs. Richard E. Morgan Ginny Puskar Jerry and Betsy Sherbondy Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Urban Paula Ziegenfus +FRANK L. KUSS Mr. Thomas J. Kuss DECEASED FAMILY OF MARK AND JOY LANG Mr. and Mrs. Mark C. Lang +HERMAN LIEB Mrs. Rose Marie Lieb +REV. GERMAIN L. LIEB, O.S.B. Mr. and Mrs. William J. McGarrity +CLARA P. LOY B. J. Burger-Loy and George Loy +REV. HUBERT MACKO, O.S.B. Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Wisnosky +LOUIS AND JOSEPHINE MARONE Jim and Shirley Marone +HELEN MCCRACKEN Larry McCracken and Family +MRS. CONNIE MITRISIN Mr. and Mrs. Mark A. Mitrisin +BEVERLY NASCA Syma and Patrick Mulich +BR. NICHOLAS NICOL, O.S.B. Ed and Mary Ann Graf +DANIEL J. O’CONNELL Mrs. Mary Ellen O’Connell PINKOVSKY AND SCHOLIK FAMILY Donald and Dolores Scholik +MRS. ADELINE RAILA Ms. Cecilia Indyk (Continued on Page 30)

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Tribute, Memorial Gifts (Continued from Page 29) +REV. EMMERAN A. RETTGER, O.S.B. Michael, Kathleen and Ryan Lecker +EDMUND R. RIGATTI Edward and Linda Knorr +ROBERTA Mr. and Mrs Robert D. Klug +VINCENT AND PHYLISS ROBERTO Anita and Domenic DiPilato +JOSEPH AND EVELYN SCHMIDT Rhonda and William Schmidt +WILLIAM W. SHEAROUSE, SR. Mr. and Mrs. William W. Shearouse, Jr. +THOMAS Q. SPITZER Quinn Spitzer +LEO A. STAUB Mr. Scott A. Staub +MARIE STEINER Mr. Richard N. Steiner +REV. BRINSTAN G. TAKACH, O.S.B. Mrs. Stella Papson +REV. SIMON J. TOTH, O.S.B. Mr. Daniel Allen Barty Ambrose Anonymous Larry and Ruth Apone Kathy and Bob Appleby Mrs. Barbara L. Bacha Ms. Kathleen A. Bacha Ms. Michele L. Baum Mr. Thomas B. Bayne Mrs. Loretta M. Bell John and Josephine Bidese Joseph and Elise Bizup John and Charmaine Borris Bobby and Alicia Bozzuto Mr. Hank Brown Joseph and Deborah Burdick Carl and Charlotte Burlas Ms. Marcy Canterna Dodo and Shirley Canterna Joan and Gerald Catello Mrs. Marion Cronauer Bernadette C. Davis Marilyn and Richard Davis Ms. Doris Dovyak Mrs. Mollie R. Dovyak Carol and John Durco David and Kathy Dynes Mr. Carl L. Eckels Rachel Fasson Esposito, D.O. Ms. Dolores Fink Sam and Mary Folby Mr. and Mrs. William Foski Andrew and Ella Gasper

Ms. Fran Gigliotti Mr. and Mrs. Edward A. Gromek Mr. and Mrs. Richard B. Guskiewicz Elder and Anna Kay Hall and Family Mrs. Jean Hammer Mrs. Margaret M. Hipp Wayne Jones and Family Mr. and Mrs. Robert Kiral and Rob Mr. James G. Klocek Rose Kmetz Family Mr. and Mrs. Ron Kurant Mr. Andrew Lang, Jr. Mr. Mark Lieb Mrs. Mary Louise Lieb Dr. Ronald J. Lieb Ms. Theresa Lieb Ms. Florence L. Marsh Ms. Cheryl Marie Matta Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Miller and Family Mr. and Mrs. Leonard R. Monticue Mr. and Mrs. Roland J. Mueller Ms. Jane Anne O’Brien Miss Sally O’Lleary Ms. Anne R. Pacek Mr. Carl A. Paullet Mrs. Pauline Pfeifer Power Family Mr. Andy Rasperger Charlene Ringer and Family, Roger, Cheryl, Christina, and Robert Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Rissling Ms. Sandy Ross Patty, Tom, Caitlin and Carly Shean

Delbert and Patricia Short Mrs. Janet O. Shrum Robert and Marlene Shusko Mr. Francis Sirocky Mrs. Josephine M. Smart Ms. Charlotte Smith Mr. and Mrs. Edward Sorice Ms. Mary A. Spenger Nick and Pat Sracic Roy, Daniel and Trudy Starr Mrs. Celine Steinmiller Michael and Margaret Toth-Stepic and Jen Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert J. Sulkey Ms. Mary Szalankiewicz Craig, Jessica and Grace Toth Dana Toth Paul and Helen Toth Paul W. Toth William and Charlene Toth Mark, Donna, Joseph and Brandon Vasinko Steve and Diana Vasinko Mr. Alex Watkins Rev. George A. Wilt +ROBERT J. UNITES Mrs. Robert J. Unites +REV. REMIGIUS B. VEROSTKO, O.S.B. Mr. and Mrs. Donald S. Pawlak +REV. BENJAMIN R. WALKER, O.S.B. Mr. Thaddeus Konefal Mrs. Rosemary O’Brien-Clark +DEACON JAMES S. WILSON, JR. Mr. and Mrs. Walter B. Hobart, Jr.

Novices, novicemaster Father Sebastian Samay, O.S.B., and Archabbot Douglas meet with Lady Abbess Franziska Kloss, Abbess of Saint Walburga Abbey, Eichstätt, Germany.

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Confessing Our Sins By CASSANDRA KANE Staff Writer, Lebanon Daily News (Reprinted with permission) PALMYRA—The image is one of faith and forgiveness. As Catholic penitents enter the confessional at the Church of the Holy Spirit in Palmyra, they find light-rose tiled walls adorned with a framed picture of Jesus Christ, who has an arm around the shoulder of a young man with his head in his hands. Two brass birds, their wings spread in flight, hang on both sides of the Christ picture, symbols of being set free. A Bible is open to Chapter 15 of Luke, the story of the prodigal son who asks for forgiveness and is greeted by his father with open arms. “This should be our experience when we are confessing our sins to God,” said the Rev. Jim Podlesny, who has served as the priest at Church of the Holy Spirit, Palmyra, for more than eight years. This bright, open setting is far different from traditional confessionals, in which the priest and penitent are in separate, darkened compartments and speak to each other in hushed tones through a grid or lattice. Many confessionals now comprise just one room. At Holy Spirit, penitents have the option to kneel behind a green curtain to confess anonymously or to sit to the right of Podlesny and speak face to face. But that is only one part of the evolution of confession. According to local clerics, the rite, also known as the sacrament of penance or sacrament of reconciliation, has evolved into a celebration rather than the traditional way it has been seen: as a dark revealing of sins. “‘Celebration’ is a word we haven’t often associated with the sacrament of reconciliation,” Podlesny said. “But in Jesus’ parable (Chapter 15 of Luke), it is obviously important and imperative. ‘Quick!’ said the father. ‘Let us celebrate.’ And why? Because a sinner has converted, repented, confessed and returned.” The rite comprises several mandatory steps. At Church of the Holy Spirit, the penitent is greeted by Podlesny and states the time of his last confession. After the confession of sins, Podlesny proposes an act of penance, and the

penitent recites an Act of Contrition, which begins “My God, I am sorry for my sins with all my heart.” Absolution is then granted, and the penitent is asked to perform an act of kindness for another person to show he is truly sorry. “Even if it’s just letting someone in front of you in line at the grocery store, doing something for another person shows God you are grateful for his forgiveness,” Podlesny said. In order for the sacrament to be valid, he added, the penitent must do more than simply confess his known mortal sins to a priest. “The penitent must be truly sorry for each of the sins he committed, and he also must have a firm intention not to commit them again,” he said. On average, six to 10 people enter the confessional during the Saturday hour. Although national reports published in previous years show waning numbers of Catholics taking part in the important tenet of their faith, Podlesny says that’s not the case in the Lebanon Valley. Compared to decades ago, however, Podlesny said, it appears fewer parishioners attend weekly confession and instead come once a month or once every six months. Attendance picks up during the seasons of Lent and Advent, when parishioners feel a need to renew their faith. Back in the 1950s and ’60s, penitents lined up outside parishes, and priests talked for hours on a weekly or even biweekly basis. Podlesny added, “If this was 1950, you would see a lot more.

“Today, it’s not about the numbers, though, for area priests. “I’m here to help them grow with their relationship with God,” Podlesny said. “I would like to see more people lined up because there is a net effect in you, and you turn your life over to the Lord.” As a congregation, Church of the Holy Spirit continues to grow. During Mass on Sunday mornings, an overflow room is set up with chairs and televisions with a live video feed from the altar. Plans are under way for the construction of a new church in the adjacent parking lot west of the building. Of the roughly 2,600 members, about one-quarter are under the age of 14. This year, 47 second-graders participated in their first reconciliation. “We have a very young parish, and hopefully that’s a sign that children will grow up to be active members of the faith,” Podlesny said. Some clerics say the rise in therapy may be a contributing factor in the decline of confession attendance, and Podlesny asserts that he and his colleagues are not social workers or psychiatrists. Confessing is not about “unleashing dirty laundry,” he said. On the other hand, Podlesny views his role in the confessional as a guide leading penitents on the right spiritual path. Common confessions concern relationships, such as an adult being too quick to get angry at a spouse, or a young adult disobeying parents or teachers. A reason why penitents still seek to be absolved, though, is the one-on-one experience they have with Christ in the confessional, Podlesny said. “An important element of what Jesus said and did was hands-on,” he said. “We should not just know that God has forgiven our sins but celebrate it. To have that experience, authoritatively declared by an official representative of Christ, makes a real impact on people.” Podlesny said penitents feel they have been touched by God and leave the reconciliation room “visibly more joyful.” “To deepen that loving relationship with God and to see them walk out of here, on the right path, then I’m happy, too,” he added.

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Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Spring/Summer 2008

Digitization Of Abbey’s Glass Plate Collection Completed By Kelly Bridges The past and future are brought together on campus as new buildings and renovations are juxtaposed with the timeless architecture of buildings such as the Basilica. The buzz of construction is ongoing while the Fred Rogers Center nears completion, reflecting the growth of Saint Vincent College as a leader in childhood education. Across the street from the Fred Rogers Center is the monastery and the Basilica, reinforcing the long-standing Benedictine tradition. In the fall of 2007, the Bearcat football team played its first home game in the new Chuck Noll Stadium after a 45 year hiatus, allowing alumni to relive fond memories of football at Saint Vincent. Meanwhile, archivists in the Archabbey have been hard at work bringing the past back to life by scanning, cataloguing, and retouching the images of the glass plate collection. “The Saint Vincent Archabbey archives houses a collection of glass plate negatives dating from the latter 19th century through the early 20th century,” said Father Brian Boosel, O.S.B., archivist. The collection, consisting of more than 600 various images, ranges from portraits of monks to Prep School and College athletes to buildings and architecture around campus. Jillian Gundy, who served for a year and a half as assistant to the archivist, scanned all of the glass plate negative images into a computer. The public relations staff has now begun the tedious process of retouching the digital images, which Gundy has catalogued and organized. “One of the most interesting parts of the project was seeing buildings and architecture that doesn’t exist on campus anymore,” Gundy said. “Sometimes you can also see buildings in a new light, as in one glass plate depicting Maur Hall covered with ivy.” Scanning and cataloguing the glass plates into a computer has not been an easy task. She described the process as “tedious” due to the delicate nature of some of the older glass plates. She has been retouching the glass plate images for future publication. “We’re going to make a few books featuring the images, possibly one about the 100 most interesting images at Saint Vincent, then perhaps a few others featuring only sports images or seminary images,” she said. The glass plate project started with student interest in the Archabbey’s collection. Dr. Holly Rine’s public history class began sorting and cataloguing the plates. Gundy became involved when she contacted history professor Dr. Timothy Kelly about potential archival internships. “He put me in touch with Father Brian Boosel and Kim Metzgar. I began as an intern and in September 2007 I was hired part-time as assistant to the archivist,” she said. Gundy graduated in 2005 from Saint Vincent College with a bachelor of arts degree in History and has also taken graduate courses at Duquesne University and Villanova University. She recently accepted a job as an archives technician with the National Archives in Washington, D.C. “We are greatly appreciative of Jillian’s hard work and dedication for assisting in the preservation and cataloging of this valuable piece of Saint Vincent history,” Father Brian said, noting that photo books featuring many of the images are in the planning process. 32

Volume 19, Number 1


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Spring/Summer 2008

Sampling Of Photos From Glass Plate Collection On page 32, top photo: Jillian Gundy with some of the boxes of glass plate negatives she has catalogued for the Archabbey Archives; sampling of photos from the collection, including one from Saint Vincent Lake with a train seen in the background. On this page, musicians, picnickers and an interesting farm scene.

Journal Books Feature Hand-Woven Covers

Father Thomas More Sikora, O.S.B., has woven table runners, wall hangings, and a variety of other items. The latest items to come from his studio are handwoven and hand-made journals, which artists and writers can use. For additional information on his hand-woven works, please contact Father Thomas More at 724-532-6772 or thomas. sikora@email.stvincent.edu. His website is www.stvincentartisans.com. Volume 19, Number 1




Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Spring/Summer 2008

Obituary

Father Simon Toth, O.S.B., died Thursday, April 10, 2008. He was born September 7, 1931, in Slickville, Pennsylvania, a son of the late Laszio Sandor Toth and Theresa (Milotoriz) Toth. He was one of ten children. He was predeceased by his brothers, Julius, Louis and William, and his sisters, Mary Majoris, Anna Davis, Helen Christian, and Theresa Kempka. Surviving are his sisters Elizabeth Kurant of Slickville and Margaret Stepic of Export, and a number of nieces and nephews.

He attended Salem Township Elementary School, Slickville, and is a 1949 graduate of Bell Township High School, Salina. He earned a bachelor of arts degree from Saint Vincent College in 1956, a master’s degree in Spanish literature from Indiana University of Pennsylvania in 1977 and also attended New York University in Madrid (1970) and Saint Vincent Seminary (1953-1959). He studied Spanish in Saltillo, Mexico (1968) and pursued Spanish studies in Cochabamba, Boliva (1990). He made simple profession of monastic vows on July 2, 1953, and solemn profession of vows on July 11, 1956. He was ordained a priest on May 23, 1959, by the late Bishop Hugh Lamb of the Diocese of Greensburg. At Saint Vincent he served as a prefect in the Scholasticate Prep School (1953-1959) and as dorm moderator at Saint Vincent College (1967-1983). He has also served as chaplain of Camp Rosary, Laurel Mountains (1959); associate pastor of Saint Bartholomew Parish, Crabtree (1959-1962); associate pastor of Saint Joseph Parish, Johnstown (1962-1966); associate pastor of Saint Benedict Parish, Baltimore, Maryland (1966-1967); prefect at Saint Vincent College; associate professor of Spanish

A Life of Service

Enclosed is my gift of:

Rev. Simon Toth, O.S.B.,

The Benedictine Community of Saint Vincent has 200 monks who devote their lives to serving the needs of people through a wide variety of pastoral, educational, and missionary works, both at Saint Vincent and throughout the world. While the older monks remain active well past retirement age, they face the same financial hardships that other retirees do — rising health care costs and increasing living expenses. The Monastery Health Care and Retirement Fund provides older priests and brothers the care they need after their many years of service to the people of God.

$50 $100 $500 $1000 Other __________ My company will match my gift. Enclosed is the form.

at Saint Vincent College (1971-2008); prison chaplain at Southwest Regional Correctional Facility, Greensburg (19731990). He served as pastor at Saint Boniface Parish, Chestnut Ridge from 1992 to 2008. He received the Student Faculty Award of Saint Vincent College in 1976. His language studies in Spain enabled him to travel to his parents’ birthplace in Hungary. Father Simon had a deep devotion to the Blessed Virgin Mary and offered Mass each week for a Marian prayer group. He also visited a number of Marian shrines, including Fatima (Portugal), Lourdes (France), Medjugorje (Bosnia-Herzegovina), and Guadalupe (Mexico). He was a man of deep prayer and a great outdoorsman. He loved his students and his parishioners, always willing to extend himself to meet a need. Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated in the Archabbey Basilica by Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B. on April 14, 2008, followed by the rite of committal in Saint Vincent Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be made to the Benedictine Health and Welfare Fund at Saint Vincent Archabbey, 300 Fraser Purchase Road, Latrobe, PA 15650.

Please make checks payable to Saint Vincent Archabbey Benedictine Health and Welfare Fund Saint Vincent Archabbey 300 Fraser Purchase Road, Latrobe, PA 15650-2690.

Gifts are tax-deductible. Name Address

City Zip

State Phone

E-Mail

34

Volume 19, Number 1


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Spring/Summer 2008

Development Corner You’ve Got a Friend in Saint Vincent Archabbey One of our dear friends recently wrote a letter to us regarding tribute gifts to the Benedictine Health and Welfare Fund in memory of her beloved husband of 55 years. I called to thank her for the beautiful way in which she chose to memorialize her loved one, and much to my surprise we had a lovely conversation about the impact of the Benedictines on her and her family. “Mary,” as I will call her, proceeded to tell me about the many wonderful Benedictine monks had helped her and family through some very difficult times. She specifically mentioned Father Peter Augustine Pierjok (who came to her home in the wee hours of the morning to administer the Anointing of the Sick to her husband), Father Aaron Buzzelli, and the late Father Joel Lieb—all of whom had a tremendous impact on her life. Mary’s story is one of many that I am privileged to hear on a regular basis. It is the stuff that makes working at Saint Vincent Archabbey a true pleasure. Part of my job is to ensure that ALL who are interested or who have an affiliation with the Abbey receive

Paul R. Whiteside Director of Development

please feel free to email editor Kim Metzgar at kim.metzgar@email. stvincent.edu. Your address requests and updates can be processed in this way as well. “Mary”, if you are reading this, thank you for your uplifting message. As for the rest of you, if you have an uplifting story that you would like to share regarding a Benedictine monk from Saint Vincent, please feel free to write or email me at paul.whiteside@email. stvincent.edu. My direct address is: Paul R. Whiteside Director of Development Saint Vincent Archabbey 300 Fraser Purchase Road Latrobe, PA 15650 Thank you and have a peaceful and grace-filled summer.

the opportunity to keep up with our news. One of the best ways we can do this is through the distribution of this newsletter. We receive many positive comments about the stories, and we want to be sure that we are reaching as many people as possible. Currently, our mailing list consists of over 12,000 names. However, you can help us greatly if you know friends or relatives who may also want to receive the newsletter. If you do, please take a moment to fill out the card below and mail it into us. We will be pleased to add the new names to our mailing list. Also, if you have internet access

PLEASE ADD ME TO THE HEART TO HEART MAILING LIST Name ___________________________ Address _________________________ ________________________________ City ____________________________ State _________ Zip Code __________

Name Address City

State

Zip

Phone I am interested in discussing estate planning. I am interested in discussing a contribution of: I am interested in supporting the education of a monk. Stock Real Estate Annuities I would like to pledge $ _______ per month. Enclosed is my year-end gift. Please Return Card To: Mr. Paul R. Whiteside, Director of Development Saint Vincent Archabbey 300 Fraser Purchase Road, Latrobe, PA 15650-2690, Phone: 724-532-6740 E-mail: paul.whiteside@email.stvincent.edu

Volume 19, Number 1




Easter Vigil at Saint Vincent Basilica.

(Kim Metzgar photo)

Saint Vincent Archabbey 300 Fraser Purchase Road Latrobe, PA 15650—2690 724—539—9761 http://www.saintvincentarchabbey.org

The First Benedictine Monastery in the United States, Founded in 1846

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Profile for Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Spring/Summer 2008  

This 36-page color issue includes an article honoring the Most Reverend David A. Zubik, Bishop of Pittsburgh, who was the commencement speak...

Heart to Heart Spring/Summer 2008  

This 36-page color issue includes an article honoring the Most Reverend David A. Zubik, Bishop of Pittsburgh, who was the commencement speak...

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