Page 1

Winter 2007

The Two Benedicts: Building A Civilization Of Love

Saint Benedict

Pope Benedict XVI

“Prefer Absolutely Nothing to Christ.”

“Give Yourself to Christ.”


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Winter 2007

Archabbot’s Message Dear Friends, At the start of a new year, many of us take the time to review the past year’s accomplishments and set goals for the future. It’s a time of looking at the past as well as what lies ahead. As Benedictine monks we have a long history, dating back fifteen centuries. We still follow the Rule of Saint Benedict. But we live in a modern-day society which is changing every day. Saint Vincent and our various missions are growing every day, as evidenced from some of the articles in this issue. We continue to expand our campus, with the creation of additional dormitory space for our increasing student population. We anticipate the completion of the construction of the Fred M. Rogers Center on our campus. With the inauguration of a new college President, Jim Towey, we look forward to contingued growth and change. In this issue of Heart to Heart, we also examine the works of some of our monks to build up our missions, both here and abroad, as well as by the written word through our continuing work with Archabbey Publications. No matter where the works and activities of our monks are taking place, Saint Benedict reminds us that “wherever we may be, we are in the service of the Lord.” The New Year reminds us of the words of Boniface Wimmer: “May unbounded thanks be given to God a thousand times for He chose and made use of us as instruments for the execution of His designs.” Sincerely in Christ,

Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B.

Campus Construction There were a number of construction projects on campus during the past year. At top, Saint Vincent College completed 16 apartments in Rooney Hall and a 94-bed addition to Saint Benedict Hall (pictured), part of a $6.6 million project. A paving project (center) at the entrance to the Monastery and Seminary was one of several capital improvements undertaken this past summer. At bottom is an image of earth moving for the new Fred M. Rogers Center at Saint Vincent College.

2

Volume 17, Number 2


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Winter 2007

Heart to Heart,

from the Latin “Cor ad Cor Loquitur,” or “Heart Speaks to Heart,” is the motto of Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B. It refers to the Archabbot’s prayer that giving and receiving authentic love may always be the chief characteristic of the Saint Vincent monastic community. This was also the motto of Cardinal John Newman. This newsletter is published by the Benedictines of Saint Vincent Archabbey. Publisher Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B. Development Director Paul R. Whiteside Director of Archabbey Public Relations/Editor Kimberley A. Metzgar Public Relations Associate Liz Cousins Contributors to this issue: Liz Cousins Annette Hart Josh Whiteside Paul R. Whiteside Cover photo: Pope Benedict XVI and fresco of Saint Benedict at Subiaco Abbey, Italy. The Archabbey will celebrate Saint Benedict’s Day with Mass at 4 p.m. Wednesday, March 21. A campus ministry Mass will be held at 12:05 p.m. Saint Vincent Archabbey 300 Fraser Purchase Road, Latrobe, Pennsylvania 15650—2690 724—805—2601

kim.metzgar@email.stvincent.edu http://benedictine.stvincent.edu/ archabbey/

Fred Rogers Center Under Construction Work is progressing on the new Fred M. Rogers Center at Saint Vincent College. A design firm and architectural drawings were approved, and groundbreaking ceremonies were held early in 2006. Actual construction work started this fall. The location for the Rogers Centers will be across the present Fraser Purchase Road from the main campus; however, as part of that construction project, the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation will be relocating the main entrance road to the Saint Vincent campus, so students, staff and visitors will not have to cross the public road from the parking areas to access the main part of campus. Thus far the parking lot has been relocated and building construction is scheduled to start in January of 2007. Saint Vincent College President Jim Towey noted that the Rogers Center received a $206,000 grant from the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation for the project to pilot an early learning leadership and professional development program drawing from the work of Fred Rogers, who was a longtime friend and benefactor of Saint Vincent. Through an 18-month project, the Fred Rogers Center will establish regional and national partnerships for the development, piloting and distribution of an early learning professional development approach that will link standardsbased competencies for educators with core principles of child development as exemplified in the work of Fred Rogers. Additional funding for the project also includes a grant of $60,000 from the

Grable Foundation of Pittsburgh. The project addresses the need for early learning professional development that includes: a holistic emphasis on the social, emotional, cognitive and physical development of young children; leadership development; and an expanded role for higher education in the credentialing of early learning educators. The venture will focus on professional development opportunities for educators working in school-based and center-based early learning programs. The major components of the project include: access to materials of the Fred Rogers Archive; a new Early Learning Leadership graduate course and a series of eight professional development modules; a symposium on best practices in early learning professional development; and “packaging” and piloting the professional development modules. The Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation is an independent foundation established in 1944 by Michael and Sarah Benedum, natives of West Virginia and over 50-year residents of Pittsburgh. Since 1944, 6,600 grants have been awarded totaling $285,000,000. This project is a collaboration between the Rogers Center and the Saint Vincent College School of Social Sciences, Communication, and Education. According to the Center’s Executive Director, William H. Isler, “Its role in project continuance will be in line with the Roger Center’s mission to act as a catalyst for communication, collaboration and creative change in response to emerging issues.”

Volume 17, Number 2

3


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Winter 2007

News From Around The Archabbey Father James F. Podlesny, O.S.B., pastor of The Church of the Holy Spirit, Palmyra, joined in a Panel Discussion on “End of Life Issues,” held at the Cardinal Keeler Center, Harrisburg, October 30. ***** Fr. Thomas Hart, O.S.B., Instructor, Religious Studies, was invited to give the inaugural lecture October 26 for the newly established “Saint Luke Society of the Diocese of Greensburg,” speaking on “Healing and Sacred Scripture.” The Saint Luke Society was established to help men and women in the health care professions to promote their spiritual, intellectual and social welfare, in order to bring healing of mind and body to the persons the Society serves. ***** Brother Benedict Janecko, O.S.B., recently gave a workshop on the Psalms at Saint Benedict Parish in Baltimore, Maryland, where Father Paschal Morlino, O.S.B., is pastor. Brother Ben related the Psalms to

Seeing Double

Danielle (left) and Delaney Dumm, identical twin daughters of Darrell and Donna Dumm of New Germany, celebrated their second birthdays October 1. The girls’ great uncles, Donald Dumm (bottom, left) of Ebensburg and his twin brother, Father Demetrius Dumm, O.S.B. (bottom, right) of Saint Vincent Archabbey, were born October 1, 1923. Fred Thomas of Tyrone (top, left) and his twin, Patrick Dumm of New Germany (top, right) were born ten years later. Patrick is the girls’ grandfather. the Benedictine Rule and prayer since Benedictine Oblates (about 55) were in attendance for a regional Oblate meeting. ***** Saint Vincent College Education, Natural Science, and Mathematics faculty participated in Math and Science Collaborative Network Connections held at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center on October 24. Saint Vincent is one of four institutes of higher education involved in the National Science Foundation funded Math and Science Partnership of Southwestern Pennsylvania, a five—year project to improve science and mathematics education at all levels of instruction and involving 48 school districts in the region. Brother Norman Hipps, O.S.B., Dean of the School of Natural Sciences, Math-

4

ematics and Computing, gave mathematical—content insights in a public lesson study demonstration conducted with students from Franklin Regional High School by Bill Jackson, a nationally renowned expert in lesson study. Lesson study is being implemented throughout the partners in the Math and Science Partnership as a research—based technique for enhanci ng student learning. ***** Father Demetrius Dumm, O.S.B., was (Continued on Page 6) Volume 17, Number 2


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Winter 2007

Fabric Art Exhibition Father Vincent Crosby, O.S.B., fabric artist, had an exhibition of his work at the Baum School of Art in Allentown in September. Father Vincent is a fabric artist specializing in the design and execution of quality pieces for the Liturgy. As an artist, he is concerned not only with fulfilling ritual requirements but even more so with revealing meaning, capturing imagination and pointing to the mystery of Faith. This is no mere exercise in “ecclesiastical interior decoration; it is an essential outward manifestation of Faith,” Father Vincent notes. This studio is dedicated to working with God’s people to reveal the sacrament of beauty in all things. Father Vincent’s website is http://www.fabricart.net.

Fr. Paul Taylor New Vice President Of Institutional Advancement Rev. Paul R. Taylor, O.S.B., was recently named vice president for institutional advancement at Saint Vincent College, by President Jim Towey. Father Paul has served as the associate vice president of institutional advancement since 2002 and prior to that was the director and dean of admission and financial aid at the College (1997— 2002). In his new post he will be responsible for fund raising, and the long—range planning and management of the departments of alumni relations, foundation and government grant seeking, planned giving, phonathon, prospect management and the annual fund. He earned a bachelor of arts degree with highest honor from Saint Vincent College in 1987 and a master of divin-

ity degree with honor from Saint Vincent Seminary in 1992. In 1993, he earned a master’s degree in mathematics from Duke University and completed his Ph.D. in higher education administration at Boston College in 1998.

Fr. Paul has served the College as a residence hall director (1990—1992), SAT preparation course instructor (1991) and instructor in mathematics (1989 and 1999). He has also served as the secretary and a member of the strategic planning committee of the Saint Vincent College Board of Directors (1988—1990). Father Paul entered Saint Vincent Archabbey in 1987 and professed his solemn vows in 1991. The Most Rev. Anthony G. Bosco, former bishop of the Diocese of Greensburg, ordained him to the priesthood in 1992. In addition to his College services, Fr. Paul is the director of the historic Saint Vincent Gristmill. A 1983 graduate of Elk County Christian High School, he is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Taylor of St. Marys.

Volume 17, Number 2

5


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Archabbey News (Continued from Page 4) the guest speaker at the meeting of the Oblates of Saint Benedict affiliated with Saint Vincent Archabbey recently. Father Demetrius reflected on his latest book So We Do Not Lose Heart: Biblical Wisdom for All Our Days. ***** Fr. Stephen R. Honeygosky, O.S.B., Chaplain—Associate Director of Campus Ministry and Assistant Professor of English at Seton Hill U n i v e r s i t y, G re e n s b u rg , is about to release a new book, Religion and Spirituality: Steps Toward Bridging the Gap. The oft—repeated phrase “I’m spiritual but not religious” is heard more and more lately. The book grew out of the 2003 symposium at Penn State which he organized to consider the perceived dichotomy between religion and spirituality. Father Stephen observes that religion too often presumes spirituality, and spirituality just as often dismisses religion. Each camp takes to the high ground, with the fallout of judgment, disconnection and mutual exclusion, instead of to the plain where real conversation and communion can foster both compatibility and mutual growth of both religion and spirituality. Contributors included Father Vernon Holtz, O.S.B., Father Demetrius Dumm, O.S.B., and Father Stephen. Father Stephen presented at the summer conference of the Association of Student Affairs at Catholic Colleges and Universities (ASACCU), at Seton Hall University, South Orange, NJ. The conference was entitled “Thinking Globally, Acting Locally.” Father Stephen spent six weeks at Georgetown University, Washington D.C., researching 17th—century texts at the Folger Shakespeare Library. Father Stephen’s recently finished

Heart to Heart Winter 2007

his forthcoming book on Religion and Spirituality and completed an article on the use of the Psalms in seventeenth century British culture. He will begin a book on the spirituality of the Psalms. ***** Brother Francis Ehnat, O.S.B., will be leaving Savannah in January to begin studies for the priesthood at Saint Vincent Seminary. He made simple profession of monastic vows on July 10, 1985 and solemn profession of vows on July 11, 1988. Prior to his service at Saint Vincent, he was a lab technician at HuntWesson Foods, Inc., in Savannah, and did volunteer work at a night shelter in Savannah for 11 years. At Saint Vincent, he has served as miller at the gristmill (1985-1988); manager of the gristmill (1986-1988); assistant sacristan at the Archabbey Basilica (1985-1988). In 1988 he was assigned to Benedictine Priory in Savannah. There he has been archivist since 1989. He became maintenance director of Benedictine Military School in Savannah in 1997. ***** Brother Shawn Matthew Anderson, O.S.B., was profiled in the spring 2006 issue of Pharmacy News, a publication for alumni and friends of the Duquesne University Mylan School of Pharmacy. The story, which is headlined “Alumni and Students Serve God by Serving Their Communities,” describes Brother Shawn’s former career as a pharmacist and notes that he did not consider the priesthood until his search for personal fulfillment brought him closer to God. After graduating from the Duquesne University School of Pharmacy in 1992, Brother Shawn worked as a pharmacist for eight years before entering Saint Vincent monastery

6

in 2001. “I always wanted to serve others. That is why I became a pharmacist,” Brother Shawn noted. “If you see pharmacy in the right way, it can be a powerful encounter with God. He works through pharmacists to alleviate human suffering.” ***** Father Mark Gruber, O.S.B., professor of anthropology, presented a lecture to the Washington D.C. chapter of “Legatus” at the Hotel Marriott in Tyson’s Corner. Legatus is a Catholic lay leadership businessmen’s association widely distributed across North America. The lecture concerned the essential sociological and cosmological distinctions between Judeo—Christian and Islamic perspectives of the contemporary world. ***** Brother Mark Floreanini O.S.B., assistant professor of fine arts, attended a workshop on Manuscript Illumination and Gilding. The workshop took place at Saint Michael’s Institute of Sacred Art on Enders Island, Connecticut. ***** Brother Bruno Heisey, O. S. B., has had an article published in an online journal. The article, “Old Wine, New Wineskins: Resources for (Continued on Page 8)

Volume 17, Number 2


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Winter 2007

Father Cajetan Homick Named to Head New Foundation Father Cajetan (Paul) Homick, O.S.B., J.D., has been named the president of the Saint Benedict Education Foundation. As president, Father Cajetan is responsible for raising awareness and funds in North America for the International Benedictine University in Rome, the Pontifical University of Sant’ Anselmo. Established by the Vatican, Sant’ Anselmo is administered by the monks of the Benedictine order, and is the principal intellectual and cultural center of the Benedictine Confederation. The Saint Benedict Education Foundation is a U.S.-based 501(c)3 organization focused on providing the means for Sant’ Anselmo to continue the educational mission of Saint Benedict. Father Cajetan earned a bachelor of arts degree in political science, with highest honor, from Saint Vincent College in 1991 and a juris doctor degree from Duquesne Law School in 1994. He earned a Bachelor of Sacred Theology degree, magna cum laude, from the Pontifical Ateneo di Sant’ Anselmo, Rome, Italy, in 2002. He then went on to pursue graduate studies in canon law at the Pontifical Lateran University in Rome. While in Rome he served as a deacon at the U.S. Naval Base in Gaeta, Italy, during the 2002-2003 academic

Father Cajetan Homick, O.S.B., president of the Foundation, accompanied the Primate. Abbot Notker spoke first with the sisters at the Holy Name Monastery, then with the monks at Saint Leo Abbey. Following his talks, a press conference was held in Saint Leo Hall, located on the Saint Leo University Campus. year. Prior to his arrival at Saint Vincent he served as an attorney for Fried, Kane, Walters, Zuschlag and Grochmal of Pittsburgh (1994-1998); vice president of the Catholic Cemeteries Association, Inc., of the Diocese of Pittsburgh (1996-1998); vice president of the Penn-

Courtyard with the statue of Sant’ Anselmo.

sylvania Fire Services Institute, Inc., Harrisburg (1996-1998). He is presently a member of the American Bar Association, Pennsylvania Bar Association and the Allegheny County Bar Association. He made simple profession of vows on July 9, 1999, and solemn profession of vows on July 11, 2002. He was ordained to the diaconate on July 13, 2002. He was ordained to the priesthood on July 12, 2003, by Bishop Anthony G. Bosco of Greensburg. He was appointed as Administrative Secretary to the Archabbot in 1999 and Assistant Fire Chief with the Saint Vincent Fire Department. He served as Assistant Director of the Vocation Office (1999-2000). In 2000 he was named socius of novices for the Archabbey, a position he held until 2001, when he began graduate studies in Rome. For the 2006-2007 academic year, he is also serving as the coordinator of the Pastoral Stewardship Program and on the staff of the Formation Program at the Seminary. For more information about the Saint Benedict Education Foundation, visit the website at www.stbenedictfoundation.org.

Volume 17, Number 2

7


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Winter 2007

Archabbey News (Continued from Page 6) Teaching Monastic History,” appeared in the May, 2006, issue of Hortulus (www.hortulus.net), an online journal of medieval studies. Brother Bruno has had other publications on the Internet. In 2001 he had an article on American history published in an online journal begun by his alma mater, Dickinson College: “George W. Morrow, Class of 1798: ‘Record Unknown’,” The Liberty Cap (http:// chronicles.dickinson.edu/libertycap). Also, Brother Bruno has contributed four entries to the Encyclopedia Dickinsoniana (http://chronicles.dickinson. edu/encyclo); the entries are on John Dickinson, Sylvester Sadler, Boyd Lee Spahr, and Henry J. Young. Brother Bruno is currently studying at Cambridge University. ***** Father Philip M. Kanfush, O.S.B., recently earned the professional credential of Board Certified Behavior Analyst. This advanced certification, offered by the national Behavior Analyst Certification Board, entitles Father Philip to work either as an independent practitioner or as an employee of an agency providing behavioral health and rehabilitation services to children and adults having physical, mental, or behavioral disabilities. Eligibility for Board certification requires a minimum of Masters degree and a supervised internship, as well as successful completion of the Board examination. Father Philip earned a Master of Education degree in Special Education at the University of Pittsburgh in 2003, completed a post-graduate certificate in Applied Behavior Analysis at the Pennsylvania State University in 2005, and completed his clinical internship in Applied Behavior Analysis at the

A weekly gathering of teens to enjoy music, games and fellowship which was sponsored by the Saint Vincent Archabbey Vocations Office this summer was the subject of an article in the Tribune—Review on July 7. The story, by writer Maryann Gogniat Eidemiller, described the program known as “Ultimate” as weekly gatherings of “food, fun, friends and faith.” The gatherings served as a prelude to the Ultimate 4JC (for Jesus Christ) Fest, a large Catholic youth rally held August 18 and 19, and organized by Santos Hernandez, director of the youth ministry at Our Mother of Sorrows Church in Murrysville. Clelian Heights School for Exceptional Children in 2006. He successfully sat for the Board examination in August, 2006. He is employed as a Behavior Specialist Consultant for Paula Teacher & Associates, and is currently completing the required coursework for a Doctoral degree in Special Education at the West Virginia University. Father Philip teaches in the Education Department at Saint Vincent College, where his courses include the Education of Students Having Severe Emotional Impairment, Inclusionary Education, and Psychology and Education for Exceptional Students. In addition to being a Board Certified Behavior Analyst, Father Philip holds certification by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in the areas of Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, Secondary Education, Special Education and Business, Computers and Technology Education. He also holds certification as a Reading Specialist in the Commonwealth. ***** Brother Dominic Greco of Monongahela recently entered the novitiate at Saint Vincent Archabbey. The novitiate is a year of prayer and study for men contemplating life as a Benedictine monk. Brother Dominic, from Monongahela, attended Donora Elementary Center

8

and graduated from Ringgold High School in 2002. He earned a bachelor of arts degree in history from Saint Vincent College in May of 2006. Prior to entering the monastery, Brother Dominic worked as an assistant for Pittsburgh Steeler Coach Bill Cowher during training camp at Saint Vincent. ***** Father Cyprian G. Constantine, O .S.B., performed as part of the Saint Vincent College Concert Series December 2 in the Archabbey Basilica. To help usher in the holidays, Father Cyprian performed seasonal organ works by Bach, Mendelssohn, Franck and more, including Biery’s “Three Christmas Preludes.”

Volume 17, Number 2


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Winter 2007

High Praise For Father Demetrius’ Writings Terrence G. Kardong, O.S.B., of Assumption Abbey, Richardton, North Dakota, reviewed Praying the Scriptures by Father Demetrius Dumm, O.S.B., in the March, 2006 issue of the American Benedictine Review. All of Father Demetrius’ books “are characterized by certain common traits,” Kardong writes. “They are all unpretentious, short, small in format; they are simple, perhaps deceptively simple, but at least not loaded with wissenschaft; they are profound, with no frivolity but also with no unnecessary heaviness. In my opinion, these are classic works that will be fresh and life—giving for a long, long time.”

He notes that Father Demetrius’ work is the culmination of a lifetime of biblical study. “His latest offering is a book on prayer. It is not a “how to” sort of book, but rather a study of what the Bible has to say about prayer. Of course, it has a great deal to say, and Dumm makes no attempt to synthesize it all, but he does a good job exploring biblical prayers and biblical people at prayer.” One thing that makes Fr. Demetrius’ writing consistently charming is his regular habit of storytelling. These stories are never very elaborate, and they always contribute to his argument. He is not afraid to talk fondly about his early days as a farm boy in the mountains of

SVFD Certified Emergency Medical Service Institute regional licensing manager Scott Crawford presented a Pennsylvania Department of Health certification plaque to the Saint Vincent Fire Department represented by Nathan Harig, Josh Trbovich and chief Terry Noel. Saint Vincent Fire Department is now a certified Pennsylvania Department of Health Quick Response Service (QRS). Fire Chief Terry Noel explained that this certification was completed through a lot of hard work by Josh and Nathan Harig (2nd Lieutenant) who put this all together.” Br. Joe Adams, O.S.B., is the EMS division advisor and assistant fire chief who oversaw the QRS project. Mr. Harig and his parents also donated their used minivan to provide a quick response vehicle for the Saint Vincent Fire Department. Since January the department has responded to nearly 90 calls. The department is growing with 25 firefighters on the roster this year. The membership roster for this year includes: Terry Noel, Chief, Employee; Brother Joseph Adams, O.S.B., Assistant Chief, Monastery; Brother Anthony Kirsch, O.S.B., Engineer, Monastery; William Goetz, Captain, Senior; Daniel Soltesz, 1st Lieutenant, Senior; Nathan Harig, 2nd Lieutenant, Junior; Joshua Trbrovich, EMS Captain, Senior; Tirzah Creel, Junior; Robert Debiec, Junior; Walter Drennan, Sophomore; Josh Kearns, Sophomore; Jeff Klocek, Employee; Nicholas Lippert, Senior; Michael Palcsey, Junior; Jennifer Rihn, Senior; Audrey Rossowski, Sophomore; Henry Scheuermann, Sophomore; John Wojtila, Senior.

Pennsylvania.” “What I find fascinating about this book, and about all Dumm’s work, is the way he is able to bring to focus his extraordinary understanding of what is, after all, a very difficult subject, and distill it into a form that anyone can grasp. After all, the Bible was not written for scholars but for everyone. Yet we ordinary folks need help to gain access to the ancient texts so as to appropriate the grace and salvation they offer. Demetrius Dumm offers that access. “One can also say that his achievement constitutes a sort of model of what religious learning ought to be,” Kardong continues. “Anybody who has gone through the hard work of learning the ancient languages and then exploring the sometimes baffling world of the Bible knows that it is easy enough to simply stop with exegesis. Dumm has not done that; he has pushed on to hermeneutics and he has made it his business to tell us all in plain language what he has found. This little book is the fruit of a lifetime of hard work and, I am sure, personal prayer. Prosit!” The Bible Today, December 2006, issue included a review of So We Do Not Lose Heart: Biblical Wisdom for All Our Days. The reviewer noted that “readers will welcome the wisdom that is refected on every page.” It was also noted that Father Demetrius is “well known to our readers for his works in the area of biblical spirituality.”

Volume 17, Number 2

9


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Winter 2007

Archabbey Basilica Featured On WQED’s onQ A recent episode of WQED-13’s Emmy-winning onQ featured an 11minute segment about the Saint Vincent Archabbey Basilica and its 100-year anniversary. The segment featured onQ’s managing editor, Micheal Bartley, touring the basilica and conducting the interviews. Producer was Nathalie Berry. “Its presence is so overwhelming,” Bartley said to open the segment, “That it can be seen for miles around Latrobe, Westmoreland County.” Among those interviewed for the 11-minute segment were Archabbot Douglas Nowicki, O.S.B., and Brother Nathan Cochran, O.S.B., director of the Saint Vincent Gallery. Members of the parish were interviewed as well. “It dominates the area,” said Brother Nathan, “when you drive down Route 30, or when you drive through the

Brother Nathan Cochran, O.S.B. (above, left), Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B., and several parishioners from Saint Vincent Parish were interviewed for a special onQ Magazine segment on the Archabbey Basilica for WQED television in Pittsburgh. Also pictured are the show’s host, Michael Bartley, center, and videographer Paul Ruggieri. area.” The piece featured photos of the 15-year building process as well as photos of the builders. Bartley also told viewers about the challenges the builders and Saint Vincent Parish

Builders of the Archabbey Basilica. 10

faced while completing the structure, including the lack of funds. Brother Nathan, in his role as Art Gallery director, discussed the art that adorns the basilica walls and windows, which cameraman Paul Ruggieri captured in detail. “But those who regularly worship and pray here, come not only for divine peace and inspiration,” Bartley said. “They come to bask in the beauty of this great basilica.” Beauty, is “handcrafted into every architectural detail. From its colorful stained glass windows to its gold frescoes, rich Italian marble altars and statues.” Brother Nathan also talked about the construction of the basilica, including the lumber that was carried eight miles and used to craft the pews, and the stone masons who worked at the site with chisels and hammers. The Emmy-winning onQ, now in its fourth season, is live every weeknight on WQED-13, the Pittsburgh-area public television station. For more information about onQ, visit www. wqed13.org. To order a copy of the Basilica’s 100-year anniversary book, visit the Saint Vincent webstore at www.stvincentstore.com. Volume 17, Number 2


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Winter 2007

Benedictine Study Tour of China Father Anthony Wesolowski, O.S.B., and Brother Nicholas Koss, O.S.B., will once again take part in an annual study

tour of China. The three-week tour, to take place in June of 2007, focuses on places where the Benedictines have

had an impact on mainland China. Saint Vincent Benedictines founded the original Fu Jen University in China in 1925, and Brother Nicholas currently teaches at Fu Jen in Taiwan. The tour will introduce the work of Benedictines in China before 1949, and show what Benedictines are now doing in China, and explore possibilities for future Benedictine Work. The tour, sponsored by the Benedictine Commission on China (on which Brother Nicholas and Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B. serve), will begin in Beijing. Two seminaries in Beijing will be visited, both of which have priests who were educated at Benedictine seminaries in the United States and Europe, including Saint Vincent. Participants will then visit Jilin, a province in which Tutzing Missionary Benedictine Sisters are currently working in a hospital built by funds raised by Abbot Primate Notker Wolf. Other stops will include Meihekou, Xian, Shijiaz and Nanjing. Brother Nicholas teaches in the Graduate Institute of Comparative Literature and in the Graduate Institute of Chinese Literature at Fu Jen and has for many years been translating works of Chinese literature into English. Father Anthony has taught at Benedictine Military School in Savannah for thirty-five years and, in summers, at Fu Jen. For further information on the tour contact Father Anthony at 912-644-6550 or via email at sean@ix.netcom.com. Above, the 2006 tour group is pictured at Fu Jen.

Monstrance, Other Items Donated Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B., accepted a gift of ciboria, chalices and a monstrance from members of the First Catholic Slovak Union of Independence, Ohio. The items were from the Chapel of the Immaculate Conception affiliated with an orphanage the union operated near Cleveland. Pictured are, from left, Kenneth Arendt, Andrew Harcar, President Andrew Rajec, Archabbot Douglas and former President Thomas Hricik.

Volume 17, Number 2

11


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Winter 2007

Saint Marys Pastor Returns From Service As Chaplain In Iraq By Jason Koshinskie FaithLife editor (Reprinted with permission) ST. MARYS – For the past year, providing spiritual and psychological counseling to U.S. troops in Afghanistan and Iraq has been part of Father Frank Ziemkiewicz’s mission to serve God and country. Father Frank, OSB, recently returned stateside and to the Diocese of Erie after a 12-month deployment overseas as a member of the U.S. Army Reserves where he served as chaplain. He has resumed his duties as pastor of St. Mary Parish in St. Marys. In July 2005, his reserve unit was deployed to Kandahar, Afghanistan, for what was expected to be a 12- to 18-month deployment. After serving in the ground forces command in Afghanistan for six months, Father Frank was transferred to Baghdad, Iraq, in January, where he oversaw the chaplaincy of all U.S. Army forces in the country. “It was a very rewarding experience,” Father Frank said. “There was a lot of interest about maintaining strong family ties and in general about how to be a better leader. They wanted to know how to best conduct their relationships in a theater such as this.” The Army has been a large part of Father Frank’s life for some time. He received a commission in the Army’s engineer branch in 1971 through ROTC and served on active duty until 1978. He left active duty to enter the monastery at St. Vincent Archabbey in Latrobe, and has served as a reserve officer since his ordination when he transferred from engineer branch to chaplain branch. He also holds the rank of colonel. He currently serves in the 464th chemical brigade out of Johnstown. Previously he was associated with the 339th general hospital unit of Pittsburgh, which has an element in Erie. He serves as chaplain for both. “The purpose of the reserves is to augment the active component of the military. I’ve always believed in the mission of the reserves and its position in

Rev. Frank Ziemkiewicz, O.S.B. Middle East policy,” Father Frank said. “It was consistent with my own support for those missions. For me, it was like putting your money where your mouth is.” His daily duties in Afghanistan and Iraq included ministering to units located in his compound as well as “lots of staff work.” When in Iraq, Father Frank was the senior Catholic priest in the country. His position was to advise the command concerning placement and the need for Catholic chaplains throughout Iraq. He visited bases to offer Mass for troops on a weekly basis. Confessions were also heard frequently. “It was a very rewarding task,” he said. “Typically I’d hear confessions after Mass but troops would stop by the office and ask me to hear them.” Faced with looming mortality on a daily basis, troops came to Father Frank for one-on-one counseling on how to handle it. They wanted to better their relationships both on the battlefield and back home. They also wanted to develop their relationship with God-some for the first time. In Afghanistan, he saw a half-dozen troops brought into the church through the Military Archdiocese’s RCIA program. Nine more came through the program in Iraq. Dealing with war-time casualties and

12

its effects hits on the most emotional aspect of Father Frank’s ministry. “In a way it’s totally different, and in a way it’s similar to tragedy here,” he said. “People are always shocked in the moment and coming to grips with a loss, especially when it’s someone you’ve been working with very closely. You’re always grappling with the idea, ‘Why did this one have to die?’ By the same token, we aren’t doing our deceased friends any good service by not following the beliefs that this country gave us to instill in this land. That comes at a price, and these people have paid a very heavy price. You keep your head and realize that most of the people out there want what you want.” The principle aim of the reserve forces has been to train the Afghani and Iraqi armies, Father Frank said. Religious differences were never the cause to any fighting. He recalled a conversation with a company commander who was also an Afghan soldier, who was at pains to say that religious differences between Christians and Muslims were not the dividing line there; it was terrorists. “He said, ‘Our enemies are your enemies,’” Father Frank recalled. “The terrorists are trying to eliminate any possibility of people growing up in a free society. He supported our presence and welcomed it. He wants to raise his family in a peaceful environment.” While he describes his service as chaplain as a fulfilling experience, Father Frank admits he was anxious to return to St. Marys and the 1,600 families at St. Mary Parish, where he has served as pastor since 1999. “I missed the interaction,” he said. “I think we have a great parish and community in general here in St. Marys. The support from the people here has been unbelievable.” During his service, he was flooded with cards, e-mails and care packages. The St. Marys confirmation classes and local scouts sent gifts for him and the troops. “I’ve been so grateful for the attention that they gave,” he said. “They never left any doubt that we were in their prayers and best wishes. I can’t say enough.” Volume 17, Number 2


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Winter 2007

Father Paschal Kneip, O.S.B.

Parish Center Dedicated in Virginia Bishop Francis X. DiLorenzo recently dedicated a new 6,000 square foot parish center at Saint Andrew Parish in Chincoteague, Virginia, where Father Paschal Kneip, O.S.B., serves as pastor. The center has three classrooms and a kitchen. The Catholic Virginian noted that when Father Paschal came out of retirement “to minister to the small waterfront community, it seemed like a perfect assignment for a priest in his golden years. But it didn’t take long for Father Paschal to assess the needs of the parish and spearhead one more building project. To those who knew him it came as no surprise.” During the homily the Bishop thanked Father Paschal and the parish for their vision and generosity, adding “a building is not the church but one environment where we do churchy things.” At the end of the Mass Father Paschal thanked parishioners for their time, talent and funds and led the people in a prayer to Our Lady of Guadalupe. The newspaper reported that the deep regard parishioners have for the priest was evident by the surprise presentation of a plaque naming the newly dedicated hall in his honor. “During every homily Father Paschal reminds us that God loves us and asks us if we’re ready to love him back,” parishioner Giovanni Rosanova told the audience. “Father Paschal came not knowing any

of us but because of his love for God and the Church, he put his whole heart into the people and the project and now we want to return the favor and say ‘Fr. Paschal we love you. Your hard work and dedication has made our dream come true.’” Taking pride in the fact that the $500,000 parish center is debt free, Bill Farley, chair of the Finance Committee, called Father Paschal a magician. Summer residents who have homes on the island as well as tourists were included in the capital campaign. During the summer months the small Catholic community of St. Andrew the

Apostle more than triples in size requiring additional Masses. Since the present church seats only 150 people, the new parish hall, which accommodates 400, will serve as a worship space during the summer months, eliminating the need for a third Mass. Also present at the celebration were Benedictine priests, Fathers Mario Fulgenzi, Luke Policicchio, Cristiano Brito and about 25 parishioners from St. Gregory the Great. Also concelebrating were Fathers John A. Prinelli and Louis Benoit, former pastors at St. Andrew’s, and Fr. Andrew Fontanella.

Blessing of the Harvest Brother Michael Gabler, O.S.B., left, Father Warren Murrman, O.S.B., center, and Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B., take part in the blessing of the harvest at the Saint Vincent Gristmill recently. The artwork of students of Brother Mark Floreanini, O.S.B., was on exhibit in the Gristmill Museum at the time of the blessing.

Volume 17, Number 2

13


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Winter 2007

Two Monks Profess Solemn Vows July 11

Brother Michael Gabler, O.S.B., (center) and Brother Fernando Lanas, O.S.B., (right) make solemn profession of monastic vows before Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B.

Studying At Oxford Father Edward Michael Mazich, O.S.B., is writing the dissertation for his doctorate in theology at Oxford University. The dissertation will examine the views of John Henry Newman and Frederick Denison Maurice on the reasons for and the means by which Christian teaching develops through history. He received a bachelor of science degree in mathematics from Penn State University in 1994. He received a master of arts degree in theology from Saint Vincent Seminary in May of 1998. He is a member of Phi Eta Sigma Honor Society and Phi Beta Kappa. In 2000 he began graduate studies in Rome at the Pontifical Biblical Institute, receiving the licentiate in sacred scripture in 2003; he continued his studies at the Gregorian University in Rome, completing a licentiate in fundamental theology in 2005. Fr. Edward made his simple profession of vows July 10, 1995, at Saint Vincent, and his solemn profession of vows on July 11, 1998. He was ordained to the priesthood on July 14, 2001. 14

Brother Michael Gabler, O.S.B., and Brother Fernando P. Lanas Medina, O.S.B., made solemn profession of monastic vows on July 11 in the Saint Vincent Basilica before Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B. Brother Michael is the son of Michael F. and Margaret A. Gabler of St. Marys. He attended St. Marys parochial school and is a 1985 graduate of Elk County Catholic High School. He earned a bachelor of science degree in management information systems from Penn State University in 1989. He has two sisters, Lori A. Lingenfelter of Ridgway, Melanie A. Meyer of St. Marys, and a brother, Sean, of St. Marys. Brother Michael entered the Saint Vincent monastic community in 2002 and made first profession of vows on July 10, 2003. In 2003 he was named assistant manager of the Gristmill General Store, assistant building manager and miller at Saint Vincent Gristmill, and assistant in the Archabbey Public Relations office. In 2004 he was named building manager of the Gristmill. He was installed in the Ministry of Reader on March 20, 2006 by The Most Rev. Wilton D. Gregory, Archbishop of Atlanta, in the Saint Vincent Archabbey Basilica. Brother Fernando P. Lanas is the son of Fernando Lanas and Guadalupe Medina de Lanas of Quito, Ecuador. He attended Colegio Frances elementary school in Quito and is a 1989 graduate of Colegio Benalcazar in Quito. He earned a bachelor of arts degree in finance and management from Universidad San Francisco de Quito in 1997. His sisters are Elisa and Vanessa Lanas of Quito. He entered the Saint Vincent monastic community in 2002 and made first profession of vows on July 10, 2003. He served as assistant master of ceremonies and sacristan (2003-2004). In 2005 he was named assistant to the archabbey prior. Volume 17, Number 2


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Winter 2007

Two Novices Profess First Vows Two monks at Saint Vincent Archabbey made first profession of monastic vows in the Saint Vincent Basilica before Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B., on July 10. Making first vows were Brother Elijah Cirigliano, O.S.B., of Waccabuc, New York, and Brother Nathanael Polinski, O.S.B. of Duquesne. Brother Elijah is the son of Caesar and Patricia Cirigliano of Waccabuc, New York. His sister is Patricia Cirigliano

Kohn and his brother is Caesar. He is a 1990 graduate of John Jay High School. He earned a bachelor of arts degree in English from Duke University in 1993. Brother Elijah entered the novitiate at Saint Vincent Archabbey in 2005. Brother Nathanael is the son of Mary Ann Polinski of Duquesne and the late Raymond E. Polinski. He has two brothers, Raymond of New Kensington and

Richard of Bethel Park. He is a 1983 graduate of Serra Catholic High School and earned a bachelor of science degree in metallurgical engineering from the University of Pittsburgh in 1987. He received a master of business administration degree from the University of Pittsburgh in 1993. Brother Nathanael entered the novitiate at Saint Vincent Archabbey in 2005.

Brother Nathanael Polinski, O.S.B., (at left before the archabbot) and Brother Elijah Cirigliano, O.S.B. (at right before the abbot) make their first profession of monastic vows on July 10. Brother Elijah Cirigliano, O.S.B.

Brother Nathanael Polinski, O.S.B.

In addition to the profession of first vows, four other monks renewed their monastic profession. They included: Brother Matthias E. Martinez, O.S.B., of Bernardstown, Massachusetts; Brother Bonaventure J. Curtis, O.S.B., of Los Angeles; Father Peter Augustine Pierjok, O.S.B., of Nashville, Illinois; and Brother Michael Miller, O.S.B., of Allison Park.

Volume 17, Number 2

15


On October 2, 2006, H. James Towey (right, middle) was inaugurated as president of Saint Vincent College. He was appointed to the position on April 18, 2006, and began to serve as president on July 1, 2006. Over 2,000 guests attended the ceremony and dinner. Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B., (top, left) offered Mass in the Mary Mother of Wisdom Chapel at noon. Bishop Lawrence E. Brandt (bottom, right) of the Diocese of Greensburg, presided and spoke at vespers. Mrs. Mary Towey (top, right), the president’s wife, read the Scripture passage for the vesper service. In the photo at bottom, left, the Toweys are pictured with Archabbot Douglas and their childen: James Marion, Joseph Marius, Maximilian Marian, John Mariano and Marie Therese. (Photos by Kim Metzgar)


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Winter 2007

Brother Filipe Ordained Deacon On Saturday, July 22, at the Church of Our Lady in Exile, in the presence of family, friends and his monastic community of São Bento Monastery in Vinhedo, Brother Filipe Robson José de Almeida, O.S.B., was ordained to the diaconate by Archbishop Bruno Gamberini of the Archdiocese of Campinas. Among those attending was Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B., who was in Vinhedo for his annual visitation of the São Bento community. The Archabbot thanked Archbishop Bruno for the ongoing support and friendship the Archdiocese of Campinas has extended to the Benedictine ccommunity in Vinhedo. He also expressed his gratitude to the community, in the person of Prior Lucas Torrell de Almeida Costa, O.S.B., for the help the confreres have given to Brother Filipe since his arrival at São Bento. Brother Filipe’s grandmother and sister, Mrs. Sebastiana and Miss Maria José de Almeida flew from their home state of Pernambuco to attend the ceremony and reception that followed at the Siloé Retreat Center. Also present was seminarian Alexandre Moura, of the Archdiocese of Campinas, who is studying at Saint Vincent Seminary. Brother Filipe is currently serving the community as procurator while attending classes at the Pontifical Catholic University of Campinas, where he is pursuing

Above, Archbishop Bruno Gamberini hands the book of the Gospels to Brother Filipe de Almeida, O.S.B., during the rite of ordination to the diaconate. Below, are, from left, seminarian Alexandre Moura; Archabbot Douglas; Brother Filipe; Archbishop Bruno Gamberini of the Archdiocese of Campinas; Abbot Joaquim Zamith, O.S.B., retired Abbot of Mosteiro de São Bento in São Paulo and Abbot President of the Brazilian Congregation; Father Paulo Panza, O.S.B., Subprior and Prior Lucas Torrell de Almeida Costa, O.S.B. a bachelor’s degree in theology. He also assists with Eucharistic celebrations on weekends at Santa Casa (Mercy Hospital) in downtown Vinhedo.

Above, the new deacon, Brother Filipe de Almeida, O.S.B.,with his grandmother and sister. Mrs. Sebastiana and Miss Maria José de Almeida following his ordination to the diaconate.

18

Volume 17, Number 2


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Winter 2007

Mission to Brazil In the photo at right, Archabbot Douglas with Sister Rita and Mother Maria de Lourdes of the Missionary Sisters of Christ. During his visitation of the community of São Bento Monastery in Vinhedo, Archabbot Douglas visited the Missionary Sisters of Christ in Jundiaí, São Paulo, Brazil. The sisters received the students from Saint Vincent College during their service trip last spring. The students worked with the poor children who are served by the Missionary Sisters of Christ. Pictured below is the group from Saint Vincent College Campus Ministry which visited Brazil in the spring of 2006. Campus Ministry will return March 2-10, 2007.

New Chapel Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B., with representatives of the Committee for the Construction of the new Saint Anthony Church, at Caixa D’Água, Vinhedo. The community is one of five within the Parish of Our Lady of Lourdes. It was founded by Father Ermin Smith, O.S.B., during his service as a missionary in Vinhedo. Saint Vincent Archabbey has been assisting the community during construction of the new chapel and catechetical center.

Volume 17, Number 2

19


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Winter 2007

Father Flavian Turns 100 By Vanessa Shepherd “I asked him where the shelves were, then he pointed them out to me. They were there on the floor. He said ‘it’s your job to put them together and fit them in this room. You have until the opening day of school to get this all together,’” recounts Father Flavian Yelinko, O.S.B. The year was 1930, Pluto had just been discovered, sliced bread was just made available to con-

sumers, and Vatican City had just been instituted as an independent state. At this time, the newly appointed Archabbot Alfred Koch put Father Flavian, a young seminarian and Benedictine monk just 24 years old, as the new charge of the Saint Vincent Library. Father Flavian categorized the books according to the Dewey Decimal System and set up chairs and tables for study centers. He also

Father Flavian Yelkinko, O.S.B.

Benedictines At Seminary Benedictine monks studying at Saint Vincent Seminary this year come from Conception Abbey in Missouri and Saint Benedict’s Abbey in Atchison, Kansas; Subiaco, Arkansas; as well as from Saint Vincent Archabbey. Pictured above, with seminary faculty members are, from left, Br. Gregory Dulmes, O.S.B., Saint Benedict’s Abbey; Rev. Patrick Cronauer, O.S.B., junior master; Rev. David Brzoska, Vice Rector; Very Rev. Justin M. Matro, O.S.B., Rector; Rev. Cyprian Constantine, O.S.B., Academic Dean; Rev. Charles Byrd, Director of Spiritual Formation. Row 2: Br. Michael Endres, O.S.B., Subiaco Abbey, Arkansas; Br. Jeremy Heppler, O.S.B., Saint Benedict’s Abbey; Br. Bonaventure Curtis, O.S.B., Saint Vincent Archabbey; Br. Nathanael Polinski, O.S.B., Saint Vincent Archabbey; Br. Joseph Michael Adams, O.S.B., Saint Vincent Archabbey; Br. Michael Gabler, O.S.B., Saint Vincent Archabbey; Br. Frowin Reed, O.S.B., Conception Abbey. Row 3: Br. Matthias Martinez, O.S.B., Saint Vincent Archahbbey; Br. Shawn Anderson, O.S.B., Saint Vincent Archabbey. 20

instituted a “check-out” procedure for the books. Monks and students were used to taking books in and out as they pleased, so the system change did not go over so well at first. Another difficulty Father Flavian ran into was trying to create an inter-library loan relationship with other, larger, libraries in the area. The Carnegie Library in Pittsburgh wanted nothing to do with the small college library; however, the Carnegie Library shortly found that Saint Vincent was a valuable resource. Since the Saint Vincent Library was registered with the Library of Congress in Washington D.C., the Carnegie Library was able to find a book missing from their collection at Saint Vincent. In fact, Saint Vincent had two copies of the book. Carnegie asked to borrow the book and Saint Vincent’s first interlibrary loan program was established. Father Flavian would continue working as librarian at Saint Vincent for ten more years before he began his pastoral assignments. He has not only witnessed the beginnings of the Saint Vincent Library, but nearly every change on the Saint Vincent campus and many in the world around it. Father Flavian is also the only monk at Saint Vincent who has (Continued on Page 17) Volume 17, Number 2


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Winter 2007

Jubilarian Day Among the monks honored at Jubilarian Day this summer were, from left, Brother Gerard Klaric, O.S.B.; Father Paschal Kneip, O.S.B.; Father Gilbert Burke, O.S.B.; Father Vernon Holtz, O.S.B.; Brother Stephen Nazurek, O.S.B.; Father William Beaver, O.S.B., and Father Lee Yoakam, O.S.B. Others marking jubilees but not pictured include Father Leo Rothrauff, O.S.B. and Brother Tobias Yott, O.S.B.

Father Flavian Turns 100 (Continued from Page 16) met every archabbot in Saint Vincent’s history (except Boniface Wimmer, who died in 1887). Turning 100 on September 2, 2006, makes Father Flavian the longestliving monk in the history of Saint Vincent Archabbey. “It was a very significant milestone in the life of our community,” Archabbot Douglas said. The monastic community held a dinner in Father Flavian’s honor. Father Flavian was born in Palmerton, Pennsylvania, in 1906, the year Kellogg’s started to sell Corn Flakes and the infamous San Francisco Earthquake occurred. As a young boy Father Flavian was attracted to the Benedictine Order. He arrived at Saint Vincent in 1920 for four years of Preparatory School and two years of college education. In 1920, the cost for one year’s tuition, room, and board was $350.00. He witnessed the construction of a new Seminary residence building, Aurelius Hall, which would later be converted to a freshman dorm for Saint Vincent College. Father Flavian also recounts that “when I got here, the whole place had one telephone, manned by Brother Jake in the monastery. When he was mowing the lawn, there was no one to answer the

phone.” Father Flavian made his first vows as a Benedictine monk on July 2, 1927, and professed his solemn vows on July 11, 1930. During these three years, bubble gum was invented, penicillin was discovered, and the Stock Market Crash of 1929 affected thousands of lives. However, Father Flavian pressed forth in his mission. He completed his four years of theological study and was ordained a priest by Bishop Hugh Boyle of Pittsburgh in the Saint Vincent Archabbey Church on June 18, 1933 – just about five months after Adolf Hitler became Chancellor of Germany. After forty-three years of pastoral assignments, a world war, the invention of the automobile, Vatican II, and the onset of the age of technology, Father Flavian retired on August 1, 1978, and returned to Saint Vincent. Due to his knowledgeable background in the history of Saint Vincent, Father Flavian served as Seminary Archivist from 1981-1985. He established the archives as well as set up a directory of all Seminary alumni. Today, at age 100, he is a valuable member of Saint Vincent as he continues to grace and charm the Saint Vincent community with his years of wisdom and experience.

Liz Cousins Named Public Relations Associate Liz Cousins has been appointed as a public relations associate in the Saint Vincent Archabbey and Seminary Public Relations Office. She was most recently employed as a writer/editor at West Virginia University Hospitals, where her responsibilities included science writing and organizing the speakers bureau. She has also served as managing editor for NASA’s Aerospace Technology Innovations magazine, and as a project manager for The Brandon Group. Liz earned a bachelors degree in journalism from West Virginia University and an MBA from Wheeling Jesuit University. She is currently restoring and renovating her Colonial home in Mount Pleasant.

Volume 17, Number 2

21


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Winter 2007

Archabbey Publications Releases Three New Books Emma’s Wetlands Adventure The Story of the Monastery Run Improvement Project Wetlands at Saint Vincent By Philip M. Kanfush, O.S.B.

Emma’s Wetlands Adventure Saint Vincent Archabbey Publications announces the release of Emma’s Wetlands Adventure, a picture book which tells the story of the Monastery Run Improvement Project Wetlands at Saint Vincent. The wetlands are a passive abandoned mine drainage purification system located next to the Gristmill along Beatty Road in Unity Township. Noted historian and author Christopher Dawson (1889-1970) “campaigned for an integrated study of Christian philosophy, history, Authored by Father Philip Kanfush, literature, and art in the same way as literae humaniores had studied every the aspect of classical culture. this, he believed, could O.S.B., book wasOnly developed in colovercome the schism between religion and culture in the West.” laboration Vincent College Dawsonwith made histhe name Saint as a scholar outside of traditional academic circles, but in 1958, at the age of sixty-nine, he and his Environmental Education Center. wife, Valerie, traveled to Harvard University where he would occupy the Stillman Chair in the Divinity School until 1962. During his time Rich with color photography, the in America, Dawson was invited by Archabbot Denis Strittmatter, the monastic superior Saint Vincent Archabbey, and Fatherflora bookO.S.B., explains the athistory, science, Quentin Schaut, O.S.B., the President of Saint Vincent College, to give and thefauna of Dawson’s this never-before-published wetlands 1960 system. Wimmer Lecture. talk, “The Movement Towards Christian Unity in the Nineteenth Century,” Seenexplores through the eyes of a child, the the rebirth of English Catholicism and how it sought to heal religious divisions created by misunderstanding and centuries of bookthe takes “Emma” and her father on a intolerance. Christopherassignment/scavenger Dawson’s 1960 Wimmer Lecture still has relevancehunt homework today in a world split by discord, religious division, and schism within through the wetlands, with each stop Christianity. providing educational information about how the wetlands system works. Cierra Smith, daughter of Skip and Saint Vincent Archabbey Publications 300 Fraser Purchase Cher Smith of Road Hillside, served as the Latrobe, PA 15650 http://www.stvincentstore.com model for “Emma.” Her parents and her sister Maia also appeared in the book. Father Philip, a Benedictine monk of Saint Vincent Archabbey, received a Catholic Press Association Award for his first book, Renewed Each Morning: Reflections from the Rocking Chair. A member of the Education Department faculty at Saint Vincent College, he is a doctoral student in special education at West Virginia University and holds a post—graduate certificate in Applied Behavior Analysis from the Pennsylvania State University. A veteran teacher, he holds current Pennsylvania Teaching 22

Certifications in the areas of Early Childhood Education; Elementary Education; Secondary Education; Business, Computers and Technology Education; and Special Education. Additionally, he is certified as a Reading Specialist in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and is a nationally—certified Behavior Analyst. The book is appropriate for grades four and up. It is available for $12.95 from Archabbey Publications, http:// www.stvincentstore.com.

The Movement Towards Christian Unity in the Nineteenth Century Christopher Dawson Edited by Rene Kollar, O.S.B.

A Wimmer Memorial Lecture Saint Vincent Archabbey Publications Latrobe, Pennsylvania

The Movement Towards Christian Unity in the Nineteenth Century A never—before published lecture by noted historian and author Christopher Dawson (1889—1970) has been released by Saint Vincent Archabbey Publications. The book, The Movement Towards Christian Unity in the Nine-

teenth Century, is based on a lecture Dawson gave at Saint Vincent in 1960. Dawson campaigned for an integrated study of Christian philosophy, history, literature, and art in the same way as litterae humaniores had studied every aspect of classical culture. Only this, he believed, could overcome the schism between religion and culture in the West. Dawson made his name as a scholar outside of traditional academic circles, but in 1958, at the age of sixty— nine, he and his wife, Valerie, traveled to Harvard University where he would occupy the Stillman Chair in the Divinity School until 1962. During his time in America, Dawson was invited by Archabbot Denis Strittmatter, O.S.B., the monastic superior at Saint Vincent Archabbey, and Father Quentin Schaut, O.S.B., the President of Saint Vincent College, to give the annual Wimmer Lecture. Dawson’s lecture explores the rebirth of English Catholicism and how it sought to heal the religious divisions created by misunderstanding and centuries of intolerance. Born in 1889, Christopher Dawson was educated at Trinity College, Oxford, where he studied modern history, and while an undergraduate, he converted to Roman Catholicism. Dawson graduated in 1911, and his reputation as a historian and writer grew. “At Harvard, Dawson presented lectures dealing with the relationship between Catholicism and western culture, the Reformation, and a series of lectures describing the movement toward Christian unity in the nineteenth century,” said Father Rene Kollar, O.S.B., who authored the introduction to the new publication. “The latter formed the basis for his Saint Vincent College Wimmer Lecture.” “Dawson and his wife spent much time traveling throughout America, a country Volume 17, Number 2


Saint Vincent Archabbey which he admired,” noted Father Rene. “They accepted numerous invitations to lecture on Catholicism. Officials at Saint Vincent College recognized Dawson’s importance as a spokesperson for Catholic values and the liberal arts, and invited him to speak at the Latrobe campus.” The correspondence between Saint Vincent and Harvard, which appears in this book, not only reveals how valued Christopher Dawson had become as a lecturer in America, but also the hectic nature of his schedule and his failing health. “After some laudatory remarks about American Catholicism, Dawson discussed the rebirth of English Catholicism and the part played by John Henry Newman, Nicholas Wiseman, and Edward Manning in this spiritual and intellectual renaissance. Both Newman and Manning, he pointed out, had succeeded in breaking down the ‘cultural division which had so long separated Catholicism from the life of the nation’,” Father Rene said. Father Rene added that “according to Dawson, schism is evil because it destroys God’s plan for unity among people. Dawson ended his lecture with a plea for Christian unity: ‘And the tragedy is that schism could be removed if all Christians willed it, as for the most part they say they do—and they are usually sincere or not consciously insincere in saying so.’ Christopher Dawson was certainly optimistic as the Catholic Church prepared for the upcoming work of Vatican Council II, and had he lived longer, Dawson would have approved of the Council’s decree on unity among Christians.” After Dawson returned to Harvard, the process to have the Wimmer Lecture published was begun, but due to Dawson’s failing health, the work was never completed. “Christopher Dawson’s 1960 Wimmer Lecture still has relevance today in a world split by discord, religious division, and schism within Christianity,” Father Rene concluded. The book is available for $8.75 plus shipping from Archabbey Publications, http://www.stvincentstore.com. Volume 17, Number 2

Heart to Heart Winter 2007

Saint Vincent Seminary from its Origins to the Present Daniel J. Heisey with a Foreword by Jerome Oetgen

for $14.95 plus $4.95 shipping from Archabbey Publications, 300 Fraser Purchase Road, Latrobe, PA 15650— 2690. Pennsylvania residents must also include state sales tax. The book can also be ordered online by visiting the Archabbey Publications webstore at http://www.stvincentstore.com.

Saint Vincent Archabbey Publications 2006

Saint Vincent Seminary From Its Origins To The Present Saint Vincent Seminary is the oldest major seminary in the United States operated by Benedictine monks. Canonically established in 1855 by Pope Pius IX, the Seminary’s roots lie much farther back in time. With the new millennium, the Seminary enters its third century; during that time it has given the Church more than forty bishops and abbots, both in America and in Europe. Also among its alumni are musicians and historians, labor priests and biblical scholars. This history traces the growth of the Seminary from its origins in Bavaria to its activities today, while keeping in view the wider field of Christendom. This new book was written by Brother Bruno Heisey, an alumnus of Dickinson College, where he studied classics, and Saint Vincent Seminary, where he studied theology. He is currently pursuing medieval studies at the University of Cambridge. He is a Benedictine monk of Saint Vincent Archabbey, The book is available

New Ornament Features Saint Benedict and Saint Scholastica Window The 2006 Saint Vincent Christmas ornament features the Saint Benedict and Saint Scholastica triptych window from the Archabbey Basilica. Saint Benedict and Saint Scholastica were twins. They met once per year at a small house between their two monasteries. On this occasion, the two have spent the entire day praying, studying Sacred Scripture and sharing a meal together. Benedict prepares to leave. Scholastica asks him to stay a little longer. Benedict refuses. Suddenly, the winds pick up and heavy rains begin to fall. Benedict exclaims, “Woman! What have you done?” Scholastica states that since her brother would not listen, she asked someone who would listen to her—namely, God. The weather was so inclement that Benedict had to stay the night. He and his sister prayed, studied more Scripture and had a meal in the morning. As he was nearly back to his monastery, he received news that his sister had died. She knew her time on earth was coming to a close and she wanted to spend it with her brother. The window teaches that we must never discount the power of prayer and the virtue of charity. —From The Saint Vincent Basilica, One Hundred Years. The limited edition ornament is available online as well as in the College Bookstore and the Basilica Gift Shop. 23


Saint Vincent Archabbey

24

Heart to Heart Winter 2007

Volume 17, Number 2


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Winter 2007

Training Camp 2006 The Super Bowl champion Pittsburgh Steelers drew record crowds to training camp in 2006. Players pictured include Quarterback Ben Roethlisberger, #7; strong safety Troy Polamalu, #43; tight end Heath Miller, #83; running back Verron Haynes, #34; cornerback Deshea Townsend, #26; split end Cedrick Wilson, #80; wide receiver Santonio Holmes, #10; cornerback Ricardo Colclough, #21; and outside linebacker Joey Porter, #55. Strong safety Troy Polamalu was featured in the Pittsburgh Catholic as an NFL superstar who happens to be a man of faith. “Football gives me confirmation of how I can carry out my faith. It’s my way to glorify God,” he told correspondent Gina Mazza Hillier. Polamalu recalled kneeling before the altar in the Saint Vincent Basilica before his first training camp with his wife Theodora. Man, it was so beautiful, so powerful,” he said of the crucifix hanging over the altar. “Church was just emptying out. We sat silently in a pew. A few moments passed. We looked up. Light was shining through the stained glass window right on us—and ONLY on us. Sitting there with Theodora in that stream of sunlight, I just burst into tears, I was so overcome.” Pictures by Kim Metzgar, except photo of Joey Porter, which was by Josh Whiteside. Volume 17, Number 2

25


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Winter 2007

Obituaries

Father Damian A. Abbaticchio, O.S.B. Father Damian Albert Abbaticchio, O.S.B., a monk of Saint Vincent Archabbey, died Monday, June 19, 2006. He was a son of the late Edward and Anne (Connor) Abbaticchio. Born in Latrobe, on February 3, 1917, Father Damian was one of Ed Abbaticchio’s seven children. His siblings, Dr.

Father Benjamin R. Walker, O.S.B. Father Benjamin Walker, O.S.B., a monk of Saint Vincent Archabbey, died

Edward Abbey, Mrs. Catherine McGilvery, Howard, Mrs. Martha Bland, Rose and Anne, are deceased. He is survived by many nieces and nephews. He attended Holy Family Grade School in Latrobe, and was a 1936 graduate of Saint Vincent Preparatory School. He graduated from Saint Vincent College in 1941 and Saint Vincent Seminary in 1945. He entered the Benedictine monastic community of Saint Vincent Archabbey in 1938. He made simple profession of vows on July 2, 1939, and made solemn profession of vows on July 11, 1943. He was ordained a priest in Saint Vincent Archabbey Church by the late Hugh C. Boyle, Bishop of Pittsburgh, on November 4, 1945. Father Damian began serving the monastic community as socius of novices (1939—1941); a prefect in Saint Vincent Scholasticate (1943—1945); and as a prefect (1945—1953 and 1955—1957), director (1957—1958) at the James Barry—Robinson Home for Boys in Norfolk, Virginia. In the Archabbey’s apostolates, he was assistant pastor at Saint Bar-

tholomew Parish, Crabtree (1953—1955) and Saint Joseph Parish, Johnstown (1968—1972). From 1967—1968 he was chaplain at Saint Vincent Seminary. He was also pastor at Saint Gregory the Great Parish, Virginia Beach, Va. (1958— 1965); Saint Gertrude Parish, Vandergrift (1965—1967); and Saint Mary Parish, St. Marys (1972—1992). Since 1992, he served as a senior priest at Saint Gregory the Great Parish in Virginia Beach with special pastoral ministry at Saint Benedict Chapel. He also served as part—time chaplain at DePaul Medical Center, Norfolk, Virginia. Father Damian’s father, Ed, was an infielder who played for four Major League teams between 1897 and 1910, and played on the 1909 Pirates team which won the World Series. He was also a professional football player, and was known as the creator of the spiral punt. Ed Abbaticchio was effectively the first two—sport professional athlete. Memorial contributions may be made to the Father Damian Abbaticchio, O.S.B., International Students Fund at Saint Vincent College, 300 Fraser Purchase Road, Latrobe, PA 15650.

Thursday, December 14. He was a son of the late Benjamin L. Walker, Sr. and Margaret C. (Bannon) Walker. One of eight children, he was preceded in death by his sisters Helen O’Brien and Margaret Garman and his brothers Harry and Edwin. He is survived by his brothers Benjamin of Norfolk, Virginia and William of Virginia Beach, Virginia, and his sister Jane Ann O’Brien of Virginia Beach. Born in Norfolk, Virginia, on September 24, 1930, Father Benjamin attended Holy Trinity Parochial School and the James Barry-Robinson High School. He graduated from Saint Vincent Preparatory School in 1951. He received a bachelor of arts degree in philosophy from Saint Vincent College in 1957, and a master’s degree in public administration from North Texas State University in 1977. He graduated from Saint Vincent Seminary in 1960.

He made simple profession of monastic vows on July 2, 1954, and solemn profession of vows on July 11, 1957. He was ordained a priest on June 4, 1960 by the late Bishop William G. Connare of Greensburg at the Archabbey Basilica. He has served in the parish apostolates, including Ascension Church, Jeannette and St. Mary’s Parish, North Side, Pittsburgh. He was later assigned as pastor of St. Bede Parish, Bovard (19811984); St. Joseph Parish, Johnstown (1984-1993); and Saint Peter Parish, North Side, Pittsburgh (1993 - 2004). In 2004 he was named senior priest of Saint Peter Parish, Pittsburgh. He was a chaplain with the U.S. Navy in Vietnam and a number of U.S. Military bases from 1964-1970; director of personnel for Saint Vincent College and Archabbey (1980- 1983); and special assistant to the Archabbot for pastoral affairs (1983 - 2000); and a member of the Archabbey

26

Volume 17, Number 2


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Winter 2007

Obituaries Human Resources Council (1988- 2000). He also served on the Archabbey Council of Seniors from 1984 through 1991, and has been a member of the Saint Vincent College Board of Directors since 1999. He was elected to Pi Sigma Alpha, the National Political Science Honor Fraternity, in 1977. He was also a member of the Lions Club, and is a member of the Knights of Columbus. A memorial Mass was celebrated by Bishop Paul J. Bradley, administrator of the Diocese of Pittsburgh, at Saint Peter. A Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated by Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B. December 19 in the Archabbey Basilica, followed by interment at Saint Vincent Cemetery.

Father John R. Erickson, O.S.B.

Father John R. Erickson, O.S.B., a monk of Saint Vincent Archabbey, died Tuesday, December 26, 2006. He was born in Erie on September 25, 1925, a son of the late John and Gertrude (Schwab) Erickson. He was predeceased by one sister, Mrs. Mary Ann Dishinger of West Hempstead, N.Y. He is survived by his sister, Gertrude Erickson of Greensburg. He attended St. Mary Parochial School and Erie Cathedral Preparatory School, both of which are in Erie. He is a 1943 graduate of Saint Vincent Preparatory

School, and received a bachelor of arts degree in philosophy from Saint Vincent College in 1948. His priesthood studies were at Saint Vincent Seminary, where he received a master of arts degree in theology in 1950. He undertook graduate studies at Fordham University (1965), Seattle University (1966), Columbia University (1969-1970), and at Oxford University, (1990 and 1991). He entered the Benedictine monastic community of Saint Vincent Archabbey in 1944. He made simple profession of vows on July 2, 1945, and solemn profession of vows on July 11, 1948. He was ordained a priest in Saint Vincent Archabbey Basilica by the late John Deardon, Bishop of Pittsburgh, on June 11, 1950. His pastoral experience included serving as assistant pastor at Saint Joseph Church, Covington Kentucky (19501952), Saint Mary Church, St. Marys (1954-1961), and Fourteen Holy Martyrs Church, Baltimore, Maryland (19611964); associate pastor and hospital chaplain at Sacred Heart Church, Jeannette (1968); administrator of Sacred Heart Church, Youngstown (1978); and pastor of Saint Boniface Church, Chestnut Ridge (1971-1975), and Saint Bede Church, Bovard (1980-1981). Father John also served on the Marriage Tribunal for the Erie Diocese (1955-1961), and was retreat master for summer retreats (1981) at Saint Vincent. At Saint Vincent, he was a prefect in the Preparatory School (1945-1950), food service director (1952-1954), manager of Saint Vincent College Bookstore (19641967), seminary prefect (1964-1965), college prefect (1965-1967), curator of the Saint Vincent Museum (1982-1983), and was caretaker of the Museum collections from 1984 until his retirement. His career as an educator included serving as professor of religious studies at Saint Vincent College (1964-1967), visiting professor at San Beda College in the Philippines (1967-1968), and professor at Saint Vincent College in anthropology (1970-1998) and geology (1987-1998). He was founder of the anthropology

major and minor programs at Saint Vincent, and initiated summer excavation projects for students in Israel. Father John was a lecturer at schools and churches, and an invitational pianist for social and cultural events. He also led numerous summer study tours and conducted summer courses in the Far East, Southeast Asia and Oceania. His memberships included the American Anthropological Association, Society for Scientific Study of Religion, Association for Asian Studies, American Association of Physical Anthropology, New York Academy of Science, and the Biblical Archeology Society in the U.S.A. and Oxford, England. A Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated by Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B., December 30 in the Archabbey Basilica, followed by interment at Saint Vincent Cemetery.

Father Reginald Bender, O.S.B.

Father Reginald G. Bender, O.S.B., died January 8, 2007. He was born April 8, 1932 in Chicago, Illinois, a son (Continued on Page 29)

Memorial Contributions Memorial contributions may be made to the Benedictine Health and Welfare Fund at Saint Vincent Archabbey, 300 Fraser Purchase Road, Latrobe, PA 15650.

Volume 17, Number 2

27


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Winter 2007

Tribute, Memorial Gifts To give a tribute or memorial gift, please make a donation to Saint Vincent Archabbey in honor of or in memory of a friend, colleague or family member. Donations should be mailed to Mr. Paul R. Whiteside, Archabbey Development Office, 300 Fraser Purchase Road, Latrobe, Pa., 15650—2690, 724—532—6740. Donors from April 8, 2006, to November 20, 2006, include:

IN HONOR OF: REV. BR. SHAWN MATTHEW ANDERSON, O.S.B. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Fierle, Jr. MR. AND MRS. STEVE BALAS Patty and Mike Blumish SAINT VINCENT BENEDICTINES Mr. J. Ron Grattan REV. GILBERT J. BURKE, O.S.B. Mrs. Paula A. Maloney BR. ELIJAH CIRIGLIANO, O.S.B. Mrs. Mary Ann E. Polinski Mr. and Mrs. Raymond J. Polinski Ms. Eva Silva Ms. Marianne Young REV. PATRICK CRONAUER, O.S.B. The Cronauer Family BR. BONAVENTURE CURTIS, O.S.B. Mr. John A. Jodell REV. PASCHAL N. KNEIP, O.S.B. Mr. Ralph Costanzo Mr. and Mrs. Edwin F. Jaworski Dr. Teofilo C. Mascarinas, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas McAndrews Mr. R. Bruce McKenna Mr. and Mrs. James O’Donnell Ms. Teri Rose Mr. and Mrs. Donald Rudy Mrs. Barbara Sauter St. Gregory Women’s Club Mr. Joseph Trovato Mr. Paul A. Trovato REV. MAURUS E. MOUNT, O.S.B. Ms. Barbara Jo Loftus BR. NATHANAEL POLINSKI, O.S.B. Mr. and Mrs. Ronald H. Minkus Mrs. Mary Ann E. Polinski Mr. and Mrs. Raymond J. Polinski MS. SUE WEISENBORN Mr. and Mrs. Patrick A. Mulich

IN MEMORY OF: +REV. DAMIAN A. ABBATICCHIO, O.S.B. Mr. and Mrs. Jim Auman Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd W. Bashaw Mr. and Mrs. William A. Bauer Mr. David Burkardt Mrs. Phyllis A. Cook Mr. and Mrs. Pedro M. Evangelista Sam and Mary Folby

Garcia Family Mrs. Fidelis M. Hasselman Mr. and Mrs. Alex Keefe Mr. and Mrs. Ambrose E. Kronenwetter Ms. Patricia Lawlor Ms. Susanne Lawlor Ms. Miriam Meier Mr. and Mrs. John Petrucci Mrs. Anna Marie Piraino Mr. and Mrs. Gerald M. Prechtl Mr. and Mrs. Timothy R. Reuscher Mrs. Ruth J. Rupprecht Ms. Jean Schreiber Sisters of I.H.M. St. Gregory Convent Mrs. Josephine M. Smart Ms. Rita D. Smith Ms. Cecil Y. Tippett Miss Rita Anne Wiesner +REV. ARMAND J. BALDWIN Mr. James J. Valvano +WILLIAM BAUGHMAN, SR. Honorable William H. Baughman, Jr. +MAREA BELL Mrs. Barbara A. Bell John and Dana Grasha and Family Donald and Norma Rath +REV. ALBERT C. BICKERSTAFF, O.S.B. Mr. and Mrs. William W. Shearouse, Jr. +JEAN BOOSEL Mr. and Mrs. Carl D. Burlas Ms. Geraldine A. Whelan Ms. Jo Ann C. Whelan +ANNA CONFORTI Mr. and Mrs. Walter B. Hobart, Jr. +BR. ANTHONY T. COSTELLO, O.S.B. Mrs. Bambi L. Pena +ROBERT B. DAVIS Oblates of St. Benedict +MARY ANN DEAN Ms. Anne F. Sapp THE MOTHER OF PAM ELLIS Mr. and Mrs. Patrick A. Mulich +MRS. BLANCHE M. HIPPS Carl and Charlotte Burlas +LARRY K. KNEPP Mr. James T. Knepp +REV. THOMAS J. KRAM Dr. and Mrs. Lawrence Mulhern +REV. GERMAIN L. LIEB, O.S.B. Monastery Anonymous Larry and Ruth Apone Mrs. Helen Bolgar Mr. and Mrs. Ed Borman Carl and Charlotte Burlas Mr. and Mrs. Patrick D. Byrnes James Cavallo Family Mrs. Rita B. Daugherty Mr. and Mrs. Ray V. DeCesaris Mrs. Alma J. Demyan and Gerard Mrs. Lucille Duman Mrs. Loretta M. Durishan

28

Mr. John Evanick Mr. George A. Firment Sam and Mary Folby Bill and Eileen Foski Mr. and Mrs. Henry V. Giobbi Mr. and Mrs. Richard B. Guskiewicz Elder and Anna Hall Mr. and Mrs. William J. Holtz Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Hoover Mr. John F. Johnston Daniel and Patricia Kelly David and Margie Kirsch Mr. and Mrs. Florentz Kirsch Ms. Virginia Kline Bill and Dorothy Kotsenas George and Donna Krumenacker Bede and Julia Lantzy Mr. Alfred Lieb, Jr. Chester and Louise Lieb Mr. and Mrs. Dan Lieb Ms. Dorothy Lieb Mr. and Mrs. Earl J. Lieb and Family Herman and Rose Marie Lieb Mark and Janet Lieb Mr. and Mrs. Paul Lieb Mr. Raymond A. Lieb Dr. Ronald Lieb Mary and Stephen Lieb Ms. Theresa Lieb Ms. Barbara D. Markess Mrs. Violette McCall Mrs. Christina McFeaters Rosemarie and Bill McGarrity, Children and Their Families Mr. and Mrs. Robert McMullen Mr. and Mrs. Leonard R. Monticue Roland and Florein Mueller Ed and Eleanor Nemanic Bill, Joan, Stephen and Timothy Palko Ms. Gladys Pavlock Miss Dorothy M. Petrosky Chuck and Patti Rebrick Mr. Paul Rettger Mrs. Julia C. Revitsky Donald and Kathleen Rigone Saint Vincent College, President’s Office Mrs. M. Grace Schall Ms. Cecilia Schlosser Mrs. Josephine M. Smart Dave and Pearl Smith Herbert and Alice Smith Joseph and Theresa Stas Mrs. Leona Strittmatter John and Shirley Thomas Mrs. Victoria Valeria Mrs. Virginia Voytek Steve and Carol Yanek Art and Jane Zitterbart +ROBERT MCCARY Mr. and Mrs. Patrick A. Mulich

Volume 17, Number 2


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Winter 2007

Crossroads Foundation Headquarters Dedicated Pittsburgh Auxiliary Bishop Paul Bradley (center) and Pittsburgh Mayor Luke Ravenstahl (left), were among those on hand for the dedication of a new administrative and learning center of the Crossroads Foundation in Pittsburgh’s Hill District. The foundation provides educational opportunities to urban youths who live in economically and socially underserved communities in Pittsburgh. The foundation helps students achieve their potential through social and academic services and tuition assistance to complete a Catholic high school education. Pictured with Archabbot Douglas, third from left, is Janard Pendleton, a Saint Vincent College graduate.

Tribute, Memorial Gifts +JOHN R. MCGINLEY, SR. Wimmer Corporation +ALEEN MCKENNA Mrs. Anita Priddy +REV. ALPHONSE H. MEIER, O.S.B. Marge and Wally Barton Frank, Laurie, Frankie and Bryan Beimel Mr. and Mrs. Gary Beimel and Family Mrs. Dorothy Bender Theresa and Michael Bove Carl and Charlotte Burlas Mario and Dolores Cardamone Mr. Charles H. Decker Mrs. Mary Ann Facetti Mr. and Mrs. John E. Flanigan Sam and Mary Folby Mr. and Mrs. William D. Foski Mrs. Jean Hammer John and Dolores Hrubochak David and Margie Kirsch Zoltan and Laurene Kristof Mr. and Mrs. Joseph W. Labant Roger and Patricia Lapson George and Mary Marcinko Mr. Melvin J. Matty Carey McMonagle, M.D. Mr. Eugene A. Mercurio Mrs. Dolores M. Monaco Roland and Florein Mueller Mrs. Roland Noble Mr. William R. Olson Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. Rebrick Parishioners of Saint Bruno Church Mrs. Barbara Sauter Steve and Barry Smartnick

Dorothy and Fred Soisson Dr. Michael E. Spino Mary and Mike Spino Mr. and Mrs. Joseph E. Stas Conrad and Justina Stumpf Rev. and Mrs. Andrew J. Tibus Joseph and Dorothy Trentin Mr. James J. Valvano Mr. and Mrs. Clark Wallace Ken and Sandra Wilson +THERESA MUSSO Mr. and Mrs. Patrick A. Mulich +MR. LOUIS SCANGA Mr. and Mrs. Walter B. Hobart, Jr. +ROBERT A. SEABOL Mr. and Mrs. Joseph E. Biss Mr. and Mrs. Frank W. Graham Mr. and Mrs. Robert S. Hodder Dr. Sarah Kelley Ms. Janice M. Musingo Dr. Attilio Negro Dr. Brian Nemunaitis Dr. James J. Nolfi Mr. Daniel F. Rafferty Saint Vincent Parish Pastoral Council Saint Vincent Summer Theatre Gala Committee +WILLIAM W. SHEAROUSE, SR. Mr. and Mrs. William W. Shearouse, Jr. +REV. BRENDAN L. SMETANA, O.S.B. Dr. Lisa C. Murcko +REV. REMIGIUS B. VEROSTKO, O.S.B. Mr. and Mrs. Donald S. Pawlak +ARTHUR C. ZITTERBART, JR. Arthur and Jane Zitterbart

Father Reginald (Continued from Page 27) of the late George J. Bender and Barbara (Weimer) Bender. He was one of four children, including James Bender of Chicago, Illinois; Mrs. Ronald (Barbara) Doane of Chicago; and Mrs. Mary Lorden of Peru, Illinois. He attended St. Paul Parochial School, Chicago and was a 1950 graduate of Saint Vincent Preparatory School. He earned a bachelor of arts degree from Saint Vincent College in 1955, attended Carnegie-Mellon University ( summers, 1958-1960), and earned his S.T.L. from the Catholic University of America in 1967. He received his S.T.D. in 1974 from the Catholic University of America. He also studied at Saint Vincent Seminary (1955-1959), and at Union Theological School, New York (summer, 1966). Father Reginald made his simple profession of monastic vows on July 2, 1953, and solemn profession of vows on July 11, 1956. He was ordained a priest in May of 1959 by the late Bishop Hugh Lamb of Greensburg. At Saint Vincent he served as socius of novices (1953-1954), a prefect at Saint Vincent Preparatory School (19541962), football and basketball coach (Continued on Page 31)

Volume 17, Number 2

29


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Winter 2007

Development Corner By Paul R. Whiteside It is once again my pleasure to address you, our valued friend of Saint Vincent Archabbey. For this issue of Heart to Heart, I have decided to make use of this space to provide some education to you regarding a very positive change in the Federal Tax laws that can benefit both you and the Charity of your choice. The specific name of the law is the Pension Protection Act of 2006. On August 17th of this year, President Bush signed the bill for this Act. For the purposes of this article, I would like to summarize the tax benefits to you regarding your IRA. The essential benefit of the new law is this: You can now make a direct gift to charity from your IRA with absolutely no tax consequences. In the past, if you withdrew funds from your IRA, you first had to declare that as income, and then you would also declare the gift to the charity as a deduction. In most cases, this resulted in a negative tax consequence to you, the donor. Under the new law, you can contribute up to $100,000 per year directly from your IRA to a charity of your choosing. For the tax years 2006 and 2007, an IRA rollover gift creates neither new income to report nor taxes to pay. The law also requires the donor to be at least age 70.5 years of age to qualify for the tax exemption. As an example, suppose you intend to donate $100,000 from your IRA to Saint Vincent for the purpose of an academic

2007. As such, it may be important to act soon to take advantage of this regulation change. Please consult your tax attorney or accountant to discuss the specific details of this tax change.

Importance of a Will in Estate Planning

Paul R. Whiteside Director of Development

scholarship. Under the old regulation, if you were in the 35% tax bracket, you would pay $35,000 in taxes, and then claim the $100,000 as a charitable donation. Under the new law, you no longer need to claim the $100,000 as income, nor do you take the $100,000 deduction. The gift is essentially a “wash” from a tax perspective. As a qualified charity, we are hopeful that this law will be extended to future years beyond 2007, but at this time we do not know what will happen beyond

Name Address City Zip

State

Phone

I am interested in discussing estate planning. I am interested in supporting the education of a Benedictine monk. I am interested in discussing a contribution of: Stock Real Estate Annuities I would like to pledge $ _______ per month. Please Return Card To:

Mr. Paul R. Whiteside Director of Development Saint Vincent Archabbey 300 Fraser Purchase Road, Latrobe, PA 15650-2690, Phone: 724-532-6740 E—mail: paul.whiteside@email.stvincent.edu

30

I am sure that our loyal readers understand the importance of Estate Planning, and an up to date Will is a critical element of your plan. Unfortunately, many people do not have a Will. If you are one of these people, please understand that upon your death the state government will distribute your assets according to state laws, with no consideration to your wishes and/or family members. I would not only encourage you to prepare a Will, but to do it NOW. Do not wait for unsettling news to do so. You will want to think it through clearly and calmly in order to ensure that your wishes are spelled out exactly how you would like them to be. A Will is a legal and binding document that ensures the proper transfer of assets. You can rest assured that nothing will be overlooked. If you are still “young” (or young at heart), it is never too early to begin thinking about your Will. If your situation (or heirs) change over time, your Will can also be amended. Your Will can be used to name family members and friends as beneficiaries, and you can continue to provide for your favorite charitable institutions upon your passing. A properly constructed Will reduces the legal costs associated with settling your estate, and can offer considerable estate tax savings also. Any charitable contributions made from your estate immediately reduce the size of the estate, and therefore the amount of money that is paid to Uncle Sam! There are other ways to make planned gifts to charity including Charitable Gift Annuities, Charitable Remainder Trusts, Life Insurance and IRA/401K plans. If you would like more information on any or all of these options, please do not hesitate to contact me. If you have already included Saint Vincent Archabbey in your Estate Plans, please accept my sincere gratitude. A planned gift is a wonderful way to ensure that your wishes are carried out for a long, long time. Volume 17, Number 2


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Winter 2007

The Monk Of Mill Hill: Benedictine Blends Business And Faith To Help Parish Survive By Susan Middaugh Special to The Catholic Review (Reprinted with permission) Father Paschal A. Morlino, O.S.B., 68, could have operated a small business in the Tidewater area of Virginia like his father and grandfather before him. Instead, in 1959, he signed on to become a Benedictine monk, putting his energy and drive into the business of bringing people to holiness. The Benedictine motto is “Ora et Labora,” Latin for “pray and work,” and as the priest soon discovered while serving as pastor of St. Benedict, Baltimore, business acumen can go a long way in helping a faith community. The “monk of Mill Hill” first knew he might have to rely on his keen business sense when vacant and boarded—up houses became a common sight within a mile of his church, which is located in the Mill Hill section of southwest Baltimore. To help ensure the parish’s survival, Father Morlino started a parish volunteer—run business that sells and delivers 200 boxes of codfish cakes each week to local taverns, delis, area churches and residential customers. The priest of 40 years bought the recipe for “the best coddies in Baltimore” from a parishioner who worked out of her home. The coddies, which are now commercially prepared off—site, bring in approximately $30,000 a year in revenue to St. Benedict, Father Morlino said. St. Benedict also operates a successful gift shop, located at the back of the church and staffed by volunteers, that brings in additional income. Father Morlino, who has served as pastor of St. Benedict for two decades, knows a market niche when he sees one. “There’s no religious article store in this area,” he said. “People come in from the suburbs to buy rosaries, wedding gifts and Christmas cards.” Like any successful business that reaches out to its customers, the gift shop also makes house calls. If Father

Morlino is conducting a mission at another church, for example, he’ll ship the religious articles ahead of his arrival or transport the merchandise in his car. “I’m not afraid of hard work,” he said. “My father told me I’d never starve to death.” Those two enterprises, along with income from bingo, church suppers and flea markets, help the parish meet its routine expenses. Unconventional landlord Rental income, another source of revenue for the parish, is of two types: commercial and residential. After the parish school closed in the late 1980s, the building became something of a white elephant to insure and maintain. But like any visionary who has turned lemons into lemonade, Father Morlino has learned to think of church property as an asset. He has leased space in the former school to a variety of nonprofit organizations. Current occupants include a Head Start program, a local council of the Knights of Columbus and Moveable Feast, which prepares and delivers more that 600 meals a day free of charge to homebound AIDS patients in the greater Baltimore metropolitan area and to low—income women recovering from breast cancer. Although reluctant to advertise, Father Morlino has been fortunate to find his tenants by word of mouth. “We specifically wanted a site in the

the city,” said Vic Basile, executive director of Moveable Feast, which has a two—year lease and rents 5,000 square feet of space from St. Benedict’s former school. The nonprofit’s old location had been sold and the 30—employee organization needed office space, kitchen facilities, and room for its eight delivery trucks to restock — in a hurry. “We were looking at Catholic schools that had closed, but none was available,” said Mr. Basile. Then he discovered St. Benedict. It was a win—win for both parties. The priest is president of a group of nine neighborhood associations that meet monthly at the church to work together on common problems. Father Morlino has an ambitious to—do list: finding a tenant for the parish gymnasium, creating low—income housing for seniors on property adjacent ot St. Benedict, raising enough money to repair the church’s stained—glass windows and more. “I feel like I’m making a difference,” he said.

Father Reginald (Continued from Page 29) at Saint Vincent Preparatory School (1954-1962), director of the Archabbey Press (1958-1966), prefect of the College Scholasticate (1964-1966). He was on the board of directors of Wimmer Corporation (1973-1974), was an assistant professor at Saint Vincent Seminary (1970), and served as prior of the Archabbey (1974-1980). He was named procurator of the Archabbey and treasurer of the College and Seminary in 1980, where he served until his appointment as director of archabbey finances and investments in 2001. A Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated by Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B., January 11 in the Archabbey Basilica, followed by interment at Saint Vincent Cemetery.

Volume 17, Number 2

31


Building A Civilization Of Love Throughout his life, Pope Benedict has been deeply influenced by Saint Benedict. He has indicated on numerous occasions that his spirituality is “Benedictine to the core.” Like Saint Benedict, Pope Benedict sees Christ as the center of all life and the key to the development of civilization. In his first encyclical, Deus Caritas Est, he speaks about the development of a civilization of love and how that is reflected in the lives of those who have opened themselves to the transforming power of Christ’s love. Shortly before his election, Pope Benedict XVI gave a talk at Subiaco Abbey in Italy, which was the first monastery established by Saint Benedict. In his address, then-Cardinal Ratzinger spoke about the role of Saint Benedict and the development of western civilization, particularly the impact of Saint Benedict on the spread of Christianity in Europe: What we need above all at this moment in history is people who, through an enlightened and deeply-lived faith, make God believable in this world. The negative testimony of Christians who talked about God and lived in opposition to Him has darkened God’s image and opened the door to unbe-

Saint Benedict’s Day Wednesday, March 21, 2007 Mass at 4 p.m. Archabbey Basilica

lief. We need people who keep their gaze fixed on God, learning true humanity from that point. We need people whose intellect is illuminated by the light of God and whose heart is opened by God, so that their intellect may speak to the intellect of others and their heart may open the heart of others. Only through people who have been touched by God can God return among mankind. We need people like Benedict of Norcia who, during a lifetime of dissolution and decadence, immersed himself in the most extreme solitude, succeeding, after all the purifications he had to undergo, in climbing back up to the light, returning and founding at Montecassino the city on a hill which, in the midst of so much ruin, gathered together the forces from which a new world took shape. The Holy Father selected for himself the name Benedict as a tribute to Saint Benedict and to Pope Benedict XV. A pope’s choice of a name is a highly personal one, yet a highly public one. Much as a parent carefully selects a name for a newborn baby, a new pope’s choice of a name says much about his hopes and dreams for what his tenure as pope will come to mean in the minds and hearts of Catholics and non-Catholics around the world. Through his choice of name, he wanted, he explains, “to create a spiritual bond with Benedict XV” who was pope from 1914 to 1922. The majority of his pontificate took place during the First World War, and he tried desperately to avert what he called

“the suicide of Europe.” When that failed, he tried just as desperately to help end the war. Among the reasons for choosing Benedict, the Pope said, is “to place my ministry at the service of reconciliation and harmony between persons and peoples.” The Pope was born and raised in Bavaria, home to 17 Benedictine monasteries. He often made his annual retreat at one of them, and there is a tale that he at one time considered becoming a Benedictine himself. The Pope has also cited two other reasons for his choice to associate his pontificate with Saint Benedict. The first is the role that Benedictines played in spreading Christianity across Europe. When the Roman Empire was close to its end, the Benedicitine order was rising and spreading throughout Europe. Benedictine monasteries were the schools through which the wisdom and learning of the past were spread. Through their labors, the great works of ancient learning and Christianity were preserved, passed from generation to generation in hand-written copies. Saint Benedict’s spirituality is the second reason that Pope Benedict cites for his choice of names. The monks’ purpose is the search for God—to this purpose they dedicate their lives. Over the hundreds of years, Benedictines developed a rich treasury of spiritual wisdom and produced many classic works of Christian spirituality that still have the power to move and instruct. Benedict XVI is often heard quoting an expression from the Benedictine Rule “Prefer nothing to the love of Christ.” And as he began his pontificate, he prayed to Saint Benedict “to help us keep Christ firmly at the heart of our lives.” Through his choice of a name, Pope Benedict XVI has indicated to the world his drive to be a force for peace in our time.

Saint Vincent Archabbey 300 Fraser Purchase Road Latrobe, PA 15650—2690 724—539—9761 http://benedictine.stvincent.edu/ Address Service Requested

The First Benedictine Monastery in the United States, Founded in 1846

NON—PROFIT ORGANIZATION U.S. POSTAGE PAID PERMIT NO. 110

Profile for Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart of Heart Winter 2007  

Pope Benedict XVI and Saint Benedict are featured on the cover. A campus construction update is given. Father Vincent Crosby had a Fabric Ar...

Heart of Heart Winter 2007  

Pope Benedict XVI and Saint Benedict are featured on the cover. A campus construction update is given. Father Vincent Crosby had a Fabric Ar...

Advertisement