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Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Winter 2005

Basilica 100th Anniversary In 2005 Saint Vincent will celebrate the 100th anniversary of the completion of the Archabbey Basilica on August 24, 2005. In honor of the occasion a special picture book featuring a history of the parish and the construction and consecration of the Basilica is currently in production by Saint Vincent Archabbey Publications. The book will include a reprint of The Sportsman’s Hall Parish, Later Named Saint Vincent, 1790-1846, by Father Omer U. Kline, O.S.B., which has long been out of print. A color map of the Basilica’s interior is being designed by mapmaker Bill Metzger. The map will allow visitors to easily identify the various windows and artwork inside, and will be included in the forthcoming book. Additionally, Metzger and Charles Martin have been documenting the building and its contents with large-format photography which will be included in the book. The Saint Vincent story begins in 1763, the year the French and Indian War ended, after which John Fraser purchased the original 300 acres, the sale which became known as the Fraser Purchase. This name is still retained in the address of Saint Vincent. This land was earlier called the Sportsman’s Hall Tract because it was used for hunting. In January of 1790 a Franciscan Friar from Holland, Father Theodore Brouwers, O.F.M., sailed to America to become a missionary. He came to this area and bought this property from Joseph Hunter. He established a Roman Catholic Parish in a humble

BLESSED SACRAMENT CHAPEL K

To Andrew Hall

A sample of some of the historic photos being considered for publication in the forthcoming book commemorating the construction of the Archabbey Basilica. Photo retouched from original glass plate negative by Kim Metzgar. Saint Vincent Archabbey Archives. house of hewn logs, which was known as “Sportsman’s Hall,” called after the name of the tract itself. The Parish was first called “Sportsman’s Hall Parish,” then later Saint Vincent. The parish still survives after 214 years, the oldest Catholic Parish west of the Allegheny Mountains. The parish community was composed of immigrant farmers and labor-

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Abbot's Throne

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ers. Times were very tough, as this was still the “Frontier” of the United States. Father Brouwers, the founder, died less than elevens months after his arrival. The people relied on interim pastors and missionaries for many years. In 1835, the members of the congregation built a brick church to accommodate the parish’s growth. It stood behind

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Portion of the map of the Basilica’s interior being developed by mapmaker Bill Metzger. 2

Volume 15, Number 2


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart,

from the Latin “Cor ad Cor Loquitur,” or “Heart Speaks to Heart,” is the motto of Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B. It refers to the Archabbot’s prayer that giving and receiving authentic love may always be the chief characteristic of the Saint Vincent monastic community. This was also the motto of Cardinal John Newman. This newsletter is published by the Benedictines of Saint Vincent Archabbey. Publisher Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B. Development Director William P. Malloy Director of Archabbey Public Relations Kimberley A. Metzgar Contributors to this issue: Br. Nathan Cochran, O.S.B. Br. Nicholas Koss, O.S.B. Rev. Omer U. Kline, O.S.B. Bill Metzger & Chuck Martin Don Orlando Ana Lucia Pereira Rev. Noel H. Rothrauff, O.S.B. Theresa Schwab Cover photo: Statue of the Blessed Virgin in the Chapel of the Immaculate Conception, Archabbey Basilica, by Bill Metzger and Chuck Martin Saint Vincent Archabbey 300 Fraser Purchase Road, Latrobe, Pennsylvania 15650-2690 724-805-2601 kim.metzgar@email. stvincent.edu http://benedictine. stvincent.edu/archabbey/

Heart to Heart Winter 2005

Archabbot’s Message Dear Friends, The year 2004 is an exciting time here at Saint Vincent as we launched the Year of the Eucharist, which continues into 2005, and we prepare to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Dogma of the Immaculate Conception, as well as the 100th anniversary of the dedication of the Archabbey Basilica. The cover of the Heart to Heart is a picture of the statue of the Blessed Virgin which is located in the Chapel of the Immaculate Conception in the Archabbey Basilica. The Blessed Virgin is the patroness of the United States. The centennial of the Archabbey Basilica’s dedication will occur in August, and we are currently in the planning stages for this event. As we begin the New Year, our hearts are filled with gratitude for the blessings God has bestowed on us. Each day we are particularly grateful for the friendship and support of you,

Inside This Issue . . . Basilica Anniversary............ 2, 5 Archabbot’s Message............. 3 Archabbey News.................. 4, 6 Alumnus of Distinction............ 4 Colloquium............................... 7 New Assignments.................... 7 Rogers Center Grant......... 8, 10 New Novices............................ 9 Four Over 90............................. 9 Steelers Gift........................... 10 Training Camp........................ 10 Paschal Kneip Honored........ 11 Stained Glass......................... 11 Orchestra In Visit................... 12 Oblate Day ............................ 12 Scholarship Announced........ 13 New Bishop Installed............ 13 New Statues........................... 14 Computer Lab........................ 14 Recyclage in Rome............... 15 Admitted to Candidacy......... 15

our readers. We promise you our continued prayers and gratitude. Sincerely,

Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B.

Heritage Tour......................... 15 Published................................ 15 Reflections Book..............16-17 Parish Cookbook................... 17 Vocations Web Page............. 17 President Will Honored....18-19 New Ornaments..................... 18 Brazil Vows............................. 19 Ministry of Acolyte................. 19 Commission on China........... 20 Red Mass............................... 21 Vows Made............................. 21 Beatification in Rome.......22-23 Founders’ Day........................ 24 Retreats Planned................... 25 Mark Gruber Book................. 26 Best in Show.......................... 26 Harvest Blessing.................... 27 Tribute Gifts............................ 28 Development Corner............. 29 Obituaries..........................30-31 Archabbey Publications........ 31 Fireworks................................ 32

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Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Winter 2005

Father Sebastian Alumnus of Distinction Saint Vincent College honored five Alumni of Distinction at the Alumni Reunion Weekend, held recently. Those honored included Rev. Sebastian A. Samay, O.S.B., C’54, S’59, of the Saint Vincent Archabbey community. Father Sebastian, emeritus professor of philosophy, has served as a faculty member of Saint Vincent College since 1964 and was named an associate professor at the College in 1971 and a professor in 1981. He has served as chair of the Philosophy Department and has been academic dean, director of institutional research, and is currently a member of the Saint Vincent College Board of Directors. He also has served on a number of committees and councils and in 2000 was named to the adjunct faculty of Saint Vincent Seminary. He was named a librarian’s assistant in 1998 and is the coordinator of Formation Programs for Saint Vincent Archabbey. Father Sebastian earned a bachelor of arts degree in philosophy from Saint Vincent College in 1954 and attended

News From Around The Archabbey Father Paschal Morlino, O.S.B., has been coordinating efforts to choose 50 Oblates of Saint Benedict from the United States to attend a first-ever worldwide meeting of Oblates in Rome, September 19-25, 2005. Father Paschal moderates the Baltimore Deanery for the Oblate program. Saint Vincent Archabbey will be represented by two Oblates. *****

Rev. Sebastian A. Samay, O.S.B. Saint Vincent Seminary from 1955 to 1959. He received a licencie en philosophie in 1962 and a docteur en philosohie in 1963 from the Université Catholique de Louvain, Belgium. He made simple profession of monastic vows July 2,

Rev. Cyprian G. Constantine, O.S.B., organist, presented a recital on November 14 at Trinity Lutheran Church, Latrobe. Members of the Saint Vincent Archabbey and Saint Vincent Seminary Scholas also performed. The recital was part of the church’s “Music at Trinity” series. Father Cyprian received his undergraduate education in violin and organ at the University of Colorado. He received the Master of Music degree in organ and church music from Northwestern University in 1979 and the Doctor of Musical Arts degree from the University of Colorado in 1992. Fr. Cyprian has served as organist/ choirmaster of Saint Vincent Archabbey, as Director of Music for Blessed Sacrament Cathedral in Greensburg, Pennsylvania, and has appeared often as an organ recitalist. While on loan to the Archdiocese of Denver, Colorado,

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1955, and solemn profession of vows July 11, 1958. He was ordained a priest at Blessed Sacrament Cathedral in Greensburg by the late Bishop Hugh Lamb on May 23, 1959. Father Sebastian holds memberships in many professional organizations including Delta Epsilon Sigma, the Western Pennsylvania Philosophical Society, the American Philosophical Association, Phangams (Philosophes Anglo-Americains); the Metaphysical Society of America, the Benedictine Academy and the Philosophical Committee on the Foundations of Moral Education (Washington, D.C.). He is a charter member of the Jaspers Society of North America. His books include Reason Revisited: The Philosophy of Karl Jaspers published by Gill & MacMillan, Ltd., Dublin and London (1971), and the University of Notre Dame Press (1972), and Act and Agent: Philosophical Foundations for Moral Education and Character Development (co-authored), published in 1986 by the University Press of America. He also has written a number of articles and addresses.

Fr. Cyprian served as organist for the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception and as Director of Liturgy for the Archdiocese of Denver. When he returned to Saint Vincent in 1998, Fr. Cyprian served as chairman of the Department of Fine Arts at Saint Vincent College from 2002 until 2004, when he was named Academic Dean of Saint Vincent Seminary. He continues to teach organ lessons for Saint Vincent College. He also teaches music in the Saint Vincent Seminary and serves the Benedictine community as organist/choirmaster and director of the Archabbey Schola. Fr. Cyprian is also a member of the Novitiate faculty. The Saint Vincent Archabbey Schola is a choral group comprised of members of the Saint Vincent Benedictine Community, and the Seminary Schola consists of seminary students. The Scholas provide vocal music during various monastic and Seminary worship services. ***** (Continued on Page 6)

Volume 15, Number 2


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Winter 2005

Basilica Anniversary Coming In 2005 (Continued from Page 2) the present-day Basilica. When it came time to bless the church, the people of the Parish wrote to the Bishop of Philadelphia, Bishop Kenrick. The Bishop’s custom was to name the church for whatever saint’s feast day it happened to be when he came to bless the church. He arrived at the Parish on the feast of Saint Vincent de Paul. Thus, when he blessed the church, he named it Saint Vincent de Paul Parish. The church which was built in 1835 was destroyed by fire in 1963. On October 21, 1846, a German monk named Father Boniface Wimmer arrived at the Parish with 18 young companions. They came from Bavaria to be missionaries, to found churches, and to establish schools. Wimmer was installed as pastor of Saint Vincent three days later. Shortly thereafter, he simultaneously founded the first Benedictine Monastery, College, and Seminary in North America. His dream was to build a church that would show the world what God can do. He wanted to honor the determination and fortitude of the early immigrant people of the area who had survived many hardships but stayed together. The church was Wimmer’s dream. Wimmer and the New York architect William Schickel began work on designing the Basilica in the mid-1880s. It was

Photo of one of the back towers of the Basilica, taken by Bill Metzger and Chuck Martin.

Builders of the Basilica. Photo retouched from original glass plate negative by Kim Metzgar. Saint Vincent Archabbey Archives. to be a Rheinish-Romanesque structure in the ancient Basilica Hall Style of architecture. Sadly however, Wimmer died on December 8, 1887, before construction was even begun. Four years later the project finally had sufficient resources for construction to begin. Archabbot Andrew Hintenach, Wimmer’s successor, appointed Brother Wolfgang Traxler to oversee the massive undertaking. Archabbot Andrew also assigned 75 monks to assist the 75 lay craftsmen in building the church. Ground was broken on December 21, 1891. Instead of the usual groundbreaking ceremonies, the monks and parishioners decided to let the children of the parish do the job. On that wintry day, 140 children of Saint Vincent Parish — armed with shovels, trowels, and buckets — spent the afternoon digging up dirt, getting muddy, and having a great time. The children were chosen because they were seen as the future of the church. The children, thus, would remember this day for the rest of their lives and pass the story down through generations. The Romanesque style of architecture hearkens back to ancient Rome and

Greece — nearly 2500 years ago. The name itself connotes the historic usage of the building. The name Basilica derives from an ancient Greek word: Basiloikos. This word is composed of two Greek words, namely: Basil — which means, “king”, and Oikos — which means, “house.” Hence, Basiloikos or Basilica, literally means “house of the King.” In ancient Rome and Greece the Basilicas were the government buildings. They were where people went to see the Governor or Emperor — to have a case tried — to learn of the latest legislation — to hear a decree read. The Basilicas were similar to the U.S. Capitol Building in Washington, D.C. Brickmakers, working on the premises, turned out as many as 15,000 bricks a day. The building, which took 14 years to complete, is 230 feet long, 75 feet wide at the nave and choir, and it is 112 feet wide at the crossing. The vaulting above the main altar rises to 68 feet. More information on the Basilica book will be forthcoming as the project progresses. Online ordering will be available at www.stvincentstore.com.

Volume 15, Number 2

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Saint Vincent Archabbey

Archabbey News (Continued from Page 4) Father Paul-Alexander Shutt, O.S.B., and Brother Benoit Alloggia, O.S.B., each received Master of Arts degrees in Italian from Middlebury College Language Schools this summer. Both teach at Saint Vincent College. Father Paul-Alexander received a bachelor of arts degree in French from Thiel College in 1975, and a master of arts degree in French from Middlebury College in 1980. He has done other studies at the Université de Strasbourg and the Université Catholique d’Angers. He received a master of divinity degree from Saint Vincent Seminary in 1997. In 2003 he began additional studies at Middlebury College. Before entering the monastery, Father Paul-Alexander was a foreign language teacher at Sewickley Academy for 12 years, and a cellist with the Westmoreland Symphony Orchestra. Since 1995 he has taught Latin at Saint Vincent Seminary and taught French, Italian and Latin in the Modern and Classical Languages Department at Saint Vincent College. Brother Benoit entered the novitiate at Saint Vincent Archabbey in July of 2001, and made his first vows on July 10, 2002. He began graduate studies at Middlebury College in Vermont in 2003. In 2004, He was appointed to the Saint Vincent College Faculty and also serves as Socius of Novices in the Archabbey. ***** The staff of the Center for Northern Appalachian Studies at Saint Vincent College recently completed a new book, They Say There Was a War,

Heart to Heart Winter 2005

set for release toward the end of 2004. Father Mark Gruber, O.S.B., contributed to the book’s foreword materials. Father Mark has also been promoted to Professor of Anthropology at Saint Vincent College. ***** Father Wulfstan Clough, O.S.B., was named English Department Chair at Saint Vincent College. He is currently an assistant professor of English. He has been faculty secretary (19921993), instructor in the Opportunity Program (1992-1993), part-time instructor in the English Department (19921996); coordinator of the Logistical Services Committee, Middle States (1996-1997) and faculty council member (1997-present). ***** The first installment of the Breakfast with Benedict series was held on Tuesday, October 5, in the Shack. Fr. Tom Hart, O.S.B., spoke about Benedictine Hospitality. ***** Father Matthew T. Laffey, O.S.B., (pictured) and Father Mario Fulgenzi, O.S.B., were named to the Saint Vincent College Board of Directors. Father Matthew is currently the campus minister at Penn State University, while Father Mario is the pastor of Saint Gregory the Great Parish in Virginia Beach. ***** Father Brian D. Boosel, O.S.B., has been named to the Saint Vincent Alumni Council for the term 2004-2007. Father Anthony J. Grossi, O.S.B., was reelected to another three-year term.

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***** Religious education students at Saint Benedict Parish, Carrolltown, raised $3,800 to be applied toward the Parish Handicapped Accessibility Fund. Father Vincent Zidek, O.S.B., Pastor, was pictured in The Catholic Register, accepting the check from members of the religious education committee. ***** The Saint Vincent Alumni Council has begun planning for the Father Gilbert J. Burke, O.S.B., Easter Ball, which will be held for alumni, guests and friends of Saint Vincent College, Preparatory School and Seminary on Saturday, March 5, 2005, at the East Club Lounge at Heinz Field in Pittsburgh. Proceeds from the Ball will benefit the Alumni Council Endowed Scholarship Fund which was established in 2001 to provide scholarship support to full-time students with academic merit and financial need. The scholarship fund was established to heighten student interest in alumni activities in order to ensure that Saint Vincent remains an important part of the lives of students after graduation and to provide an example of philanthropy that current students may one day follow. The scholarship fund balance currently stands at about $33,000. Benedictines on the Easter Ball committee include Father Brian Boosel, C’96, S’02; Father Gilbert Burke, P’53, C’58, S’62 and Father Anthony Grossi, C’93. The dance is named in honor of Father Gilbert, administrative assistant to the Archabbot, a former alumni director and Saint Vincent Seminary Alumni Director. For more information regarding the event, please contact the Alumni Office at 724-537-4568 or e-mail alumni@stvincent.edu. ***** Father William Beaver, O.S.B., had a short story, “Praying to the Saints for Miracles,” published in this year’s issue of The Catholic Yearbook. Volume 15, Number 2


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Nature of God Discussed at Colloquium Lebanon Valley College’s 2004–05 Colloquium, God in the 21st Century, explored the nature of the Divine in a panel discussion that brought together area clergy representing four of the world’s major religions. Titled “What’s Really Real? An InterReligious Dialogue on the Nature of the Divine,” the discussion was held in Leedy Theater of the Mund College Center. Panelists included: Amjad Khan of the Islamic Society of Greater Harrisburg; Sensei J. Anthony Stultz, spiritual director of the Blue Mountain Lotus Society, Rabbi Eric Cytryn, of Temple Beth El, Harrisburg, and Father James Podlesny, O.S.B., of Holy Spirit Roman Catholic Church in Palmyra. The panel’s moderator was the Rev. Timothy Dewald, who is both an administrator and a faculty member at LVC, as well as an ordained minister in the United Church of Christ. The colloquium reflected popular culture’s renewed interest in religion, shown in the recent success of Mel Gibson’s movie, The Passion of the Christ, and Dan Brown’s book, The DaVinci Code, as well as thriving evangelical and newage movements. Across the country, college humanities and social sciences departments have been coming to terms with the “return of religion” in their respective disciplines. Throughout the academic year, the LVC colloquium will host speakers on church-and-state issues, the relationship between religion and science, non-Western religions, religion and philosophy, Gospel music, religion in America, religion’s response to the Holocaust, and the future of Christianity. In conjunction with the colloquium topic, there is also a Colloquium Film Series on select Sundays at the Allen Theatre in Annville.

Heart to Heart Winter 2005

New Pastoral Assignments

DIOCESE OF GREENSBURG Father Meinrad Lawson, O.S.B. Pastor of Saint Vincent Basilica Parish, Latrobe

DIOCESE OF ALTOONA-JOHNSTOWN Father Matthew Laffey, O.S.B. Director of Campus Ministry Penn State Catholic Center

Father David Griffin, O.S.B. Rector, Benedictine Community at State College

Father Gilbert J. Burke, O.S.B., Senior Priest Saint Vincent Basilica Parish; Assistant to the Archabbot

Father Chad Ficorilli, O.S.B., Pastor Saint Gertrude Parish, Vandergrift

Father Boniface Hicks, O.S.B., Campus Ministry Penn State Catholic Center

Father Thaddeus Rettger, O.S.B. Pastor, Saint Bernard Parish, Hastings

Father Nathan Munsch, O.S.B., Pastor, Saint Benedict Parish, Marguerite

DIOCESE OF PITTSBURGH Father Ralph Tajak, O.S.B., Pastor, Saint Peter Parish, North Side, Pittsburgh

DIOCESE OF ERIE

Father John-Mary Tompkins, O.S.B. Pastor, Queen of the World Parish, Saint Marys (photo not available)

Father Benjamin Walker, O.S.B., Senior Priest, Saint Peter Parish, North Side, Pittsburgh

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Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Winter 2005

Fred M. Rogers Center Receives Grant The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania has committed $5 million to the construction of The Fred M. Rogers Center for Early Learning and Children’s Media at Saint Vincent College. At a press conference in the Robert S. Carey Student Center, Senator Allen G. Kukovich read a message from Governor Edward Rendell to publicly report major funding for the project in the 39th senatorial district. The grant will be applied toward construction of the Center’s planned $12 million building project and will be made through the Pennsylvania Redevelopment Assistance Capital Program (RACP), a Commonwealth of Pennsylvania grant program administrated by the Office of the Budget for the acquisition and construction of regional economic, cultural, civic and historical improvement projects. “I am honored to be able to make this announcement on behalf of Governor Rendell and the people of Pennsylvania,” Senator Kukovich said. “We all share enormous pride in the accomplishments of the late Fred Rogers, a native son whose life and work are well known throughout the world. We are equally proud that he and his wife decided, before his untimely death on February 27, 2003, to locate the Center which would carry on his work at Saint Vincent College, near to the place of his birth in the very first Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood.” “We are certainly honored that Fred’s

Mrs. Joanne Byrd Rogers and Senator Allen G. Kukovich discuss the grant for The Fred M. Rogers Center for Early Learning and Children’s Media at Saint Vincent College.

Attending the announcement of a $5 million grant from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania to The Fred M. Rogers Center for Early Learning and Children’s Media at Saint Vincent College were, from left, Mr. McFeely from Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood; Mrs. Joanne Byrd Rogers; Mr. James F. Will, College President, Senator Allen G. Kukovich, who made the announcement, Mrs. Laney Crozier, sister of Fred Rogers, and Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B., Chancellor. widow, Joanne Byrd Rogers, could be here with us today to join us in celebrating this important milestone,” Senator Kukovich added. “We are also happy that she brought Mr. McFeely with her to give ‘Speedy Delivery’ to this important message from the governor.” Saint Vincent College President James F. Will responded by expressing his thanks, on behalf of the students, faculty, administrators and staff of Saint Vincent, to Senator Kukovich and the Commonwealth for recognizing the important work that the Center was committed to accomplishing. “This grant is a crucial step in fulfilling our vision for the Rogers Center,” Mr. Will said. “The Rogers Center facilities will include a multimedia center, special suites for the archives and for visiting experts in early learning and children’s media, and an early learning demonstration center,” Mr. Will explained. “The facilities will also accommodate larger conferences, workshops and meetings. The space design and the technological capabilities within the Rogers Center facilities will support our action plan by accommodating statewide and national seminars and conferences, the demonstration of effective early learning programs, and the application of multimedia for the communication of new

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knowledge and improved practices.” Saint Vincent College will construct the Rogers Center facilities on its campus in Latrobe. The total estimated cost of this building project is $12 million. Matching funds from private sources will support the remaining costs. “Through its leadership programs, the expanded access to the Rogers archives, and its work in promoting and demonstrating effective practices, the Rogers Center responds to the need in Pennsylvania and nationally to improve educational and social supports for children at a critically formative stage of development,” Mr. Will said. “Over the long term, the Center’s strategic collaborations with other key organizations to influence the social-emotional-cognitive development of children will have an impact on school readiness, literacy, productivity and citizenship within the Commonwealth.” The Fred M. Rogers Center for Early Learning and Children’s Media at Saint Vincent College was established in September 2003 to serve as a national and international resource for addressing emerging issues affecting children and families. Staying true to the vision of Fred Rogers, and emulating the guiding principles of his life’s work, the Center’s (Continued on Page 10) Volume 15, Number 2


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Winter 2005

Two Novices Join Monastic Community Two men have joined the Saint Vincent Monastic Community as novices, Brother Bonaventure Curtis and Father Peter Augustine Pierjok. The novitiate is a year of prayer and study designed to aid them in determining their vocation as Benedictine monks. Brother Bonaventure is the son of the late John F. Curtis, Sr., and Veronica Frances Curtis. He has a sister, Loretta Ann Curtis of Los Angeles. He is a 1964 graduate of LaSalle Institute Prep. He earned a bachelor of science degree in English in 1968 from the University of Minnesota, and a juris doctor degree in law from Western State University in 1978. He has also studied at Hebrew University, Jerusalem; St. Mary’s College and the Cite University of Paris. He is a member of the California Bar Association, American Bar Association, Los Angeles County Bar Association, National Trial Lawyers Association, Entertainment Lawyers’ Bar Association (Los Angeles Chapter), Minnesota Federation of Teachers, American Federation of Teachers, Hollywood Local II of the Musicians Union, the Small Business Association of America, Knights of Columbus and the Kiwanis Club of San Diego. Father Peter Augustine is the son of the late Harry A. Pierjok, Sr., and Emma L. Pierjok. His sister is Roseanne Pierjok Cross of Centralia, Illinois. He is a 1965 graduate of Nashville

Brother Bonaventure Curtis

Father Peter Augustine Pierjok

Community High School, Nashville, Illinois. He earned a bachelor of arts degree in design from Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, in 1969, studied philosophy at Bradley University, Peoria, Illinois, and earned a master of divinity degree from Saint Vincent Seminary in 1987. On April 16, 1987 he made perpetual vows with the Community of St. Augustine, Peoria. He was ordained a deacon on May 23, 1987, and a priest on May 28, 1988, by Bishop Edward W. O’Rourke. He was named associate director of Highwoods Learning Center, Washington, Illinois, in 1986 before

becoming director in May of 1988. He was also at that time named associate director of St. Augustine Manor and Conference Center and assistant pastor at Saint Vincent DePaul Parish, Peoria. In 1992 he was appointed pastor of St. Mary Church, Kickapoo, Illinois, and in June of 1999 he was named pastor of St. Jude Church, Peoria. In 2003 he served as pastor of St. Mary Church, Henry, Illinois; Immaculate Conception Church, Lacon, Illinois, and St. Joseph Church, Henry, Illinois. In June of 2004 he was released by the Diocese of Peoria to pursue a monastic vocation at Saint Vincent Archabbey.

Four Monks Over Age 90 Saint Vincent Archabbey has four monks who have reached the age of ninety. Pictured in this photo taken by Brother Linus Klucsarits, O.S.B., are, from left, Father Flavian Yelinko, O.S.B., who turned 98 on September 2; Father Paulinus Selle, O.S.B., who reached the age of 90 on February 4; Brother Gerard Klaric, O.S.B., whose 92nd birthday was on September 2, the same as Father Flavian’s birthday; and Brother Lambert Berens, O.S.B., who reached the age of 91 on the Fourth of July.

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Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Winter 2005

Fred M. Rogers Center Receives Grant (Continued from Page 8) mission is to advance the state of early learning and children’s media by acting as a catalyst for communication, collaboration, and creative change across both fields. The planning process for the Rogers Center extended over nearly three years and was guided for most of that time, until his death, by the personal involvement of Fred Rogers. In July 2003 the national Advisory Council assumed the central role in defining the mission and the action plan for the Rogers Center. The search for the Executive Director of the Rogers Center is underway and will be completed by February 2005. Dr. Milton Chen, Executive Director of The George Lucas Educational Foundation, is Chair of the Advisory Council, and Mrs. Joanne Byrd Rogers is Honorary Chair. Nearly 70 experts from state and national organizations attended an invitational symposium held at Saint Vincent College in May 2004 for the purpose of helping to set the agenda for the Rogers Center. Organizations represented included the National Association for the Education of Young Children (Mark Ginsberg, Executive Director) and Pennsylvania Partnership for Children (Joan Benso, President and CEO), as well as the Pennsylvania Department of Education (Susan Enfield and Harriet Dichter). Based on symposium recommendations, the Center’s Advisory Council endorsed an action plan which has the following focus areas: — Through the Fred Rogers Leadership Institute for coalition building and professional development, to establish the Center’s role as a broker for change in response to emerging issues in early learning and children’s media. — Through a broad-based communication program, to promote awareness and advocacy on behalf of children and families. — Through the Fred Rogers archives, to develop the Center as the main repository and access point for materials and knowledge that define Fred Rogers and his approach.

Steelers’ Gift Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B., presented the Holy Father, Pope John Paul II, an autographed Pittsburgh Steelers football, a gift of Dan and Patricia Rooney, during a trip to Rome this fall. Assisting with the presentation were Saint Vincent College President James F. Will and his wife, Mary Ellen.

Training Camp and Benedictines Father Anthony Grossi, O.S.B., manager of the Saint Vincent College Book Store, was pictured on the front page of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette August 6 during Pittsburgh Steelers’ training camp at Saint Vincent. The article, by Rebekah Scott, told how “Benedictine monks welcome Steeler faithful on their yearly pilgrimage.” Scott wrote that “the monks of Saint Vincent don’t see the Steelers as spiritual competition. .. . Benedictines have been hosting pilgrims for centuries. They know how to make this a win-win situation.” Father Rene Kollar, O.S.B., said that

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“The Rule of Saint Benedict says we are to practice hospitality. To me, it’s really just a matter of being friendly with the people wandering on campus, a ‘good morning’ or a ‘how are you doing?’ And it’s not just the monastics. All the people who work here follow that calling, from the security booth to the guy selling souvenirs.” “It is almost like a medieval fair out there sometimes, “ Father Rene said. “The people come with their picnic baskets and stake out a good spot on the hillside overlooking the field. The kids play. The Steelers work out. It’s fun for everyone, out in the fresh air. And it’s free.” Volume 15, Number 2


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Winter 2005

Scholarship Honors Father Paschal Kneip Saint Vincent Archabbey is proud to announce the establishment of The Reverend Paschal N. Kneip, O.S.B., Scholarship Fund. Subtitled “Priests for the Future,” the fund pays tribute to Fr. Paschal’s dedication to the service of Christ and His people as a priest. For nearly 20 years, Father PasRev. Paschal N. chal Kneip served Kneip, O.S.B. as the Pastor of Saint Gregory Parish in Virginia Beach. His commitment to the pastoral needs of the people resulted in a tremendous expanse of the Catholic school and religious education programs, along with a variety of catechetical programs for children, youth and adults. The parish consists of people from a wide range of ethnic and cultural backgrounds. Because of the great spirit of hospitality which is so much a part of the life and personality of Father Paschal, everyone who came to the parish found a welcoming home for spiritual growth. Father Paschal’s deep concern for the poor and marginalized also saw a growth in social services for parishioners as well as for neighbors in need from throughout the area regardless of religious affiliation.

Father Paschal was also a wonderful steward of the resources which were entrusted to his care. The construction of new buildings to meet the needs of a growing faith community along with the creation of programs and services to meet the educational, spiritual, emotional, social and physical needs of those entrusted to his care all became a reality because of his heartfelt dedication to his call to serve Christ as a priest. In addition to the parishioners of Saint Gregory Parish, Father Paschal also served the Bishop and the Dio-

cese of Richmond through participation on diocesan financial committees. His natural talents and management of resources have been a great help both to Saint Gregory Parish and to the Diocese of Richmond. To pay tribute to Fr. Paschal and to help Saint Vincent Archabbey educate more priests like him, please contact Director of Development William P. Malloy, 300 Fraser Purchase Road, Latrobe, PA 15650-2690, Phone: 724532-6740; E-mail: bill.malloy@email. stvincent.edu. To donate online visit www.stvincentstore.com.

Stained Glass Work Brother Mark Floreanini, O.S.B., stained glass artist, has made a limited quantity of stained glass crosses from the old clerestory windows of the Archabbey Basilica. The windows were installed over 100 years ago. These limited edition handcrafted pieces are 15 inches high by 11.5 inches wide. The diamond shape inside of each cross contains the original painted glass from the clerestory windows, while the rest of the glass is the artist’s choice. Each cross is unique. The crosses are available in the college book store, the Basilica Gift Shop and the Gristmill General Store, as well as online at www.stvincentstore.com. Volume 15, Number 2

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Augsburg Orchestra Performs At Saint Vincent

On August 18-20 Saint Vincent Archabbey played host to the student Orchestra of Saint Stephan’s from Augsburg, Germany. On Thursday August 19 the orchestra provided a most enjoyable concert in the Basilica to the delight of many monks, parishioners, and others from the neighborhood. The 60 young musicians, boys and girls aged 12 to 19, and their five teachers/chaperones, demonstrated why they are considered the premiere youth orchestra of southern Germany. Director of the orchestra is Father Anselm Mayer of Saint Stephan’s Gymnasium in Augsburg and a monk of Saint Stephan’s Abbey. He is a friend of Saint Vincent Father Warren Murrman, O.S.B., who helped facilitate the visit and concert. Founded in 1835 for the purpose of the education of youth, Saint Stephan’s was given care of the Gymnasium already established a few years earlier in Augsburg. The foundation was part of King Ludwig I’s effort to reestablish Benedictine monasticism in Bavaria and to use the monks to foster education and culture in his kingdom. Saint Vincent Founder Father Boniface Wimmer, on loan from Saint Michael’s Abbey in Metten, spent some time teaching at Saint Stephan’s and it was from there that his famous article about planting Benedictine monasticism in America appeared in the Augsburger Postzeitung. Saint Stephan’s Abbey today counts about 20 members. In the year 2000 the City of Augsburg took over the management and financial responsibility for the school, which retains a special relationship to the Benedictine community whose tradition it fosters and from which it hires personnel as faculty members. The monastery continues to own and operate the student residence facilities. Only a portion of the 800 students, grades 5 to 13, are resident. The concert at Saint Vincent was the final concert of the Orchestra’s 10th tour of the United States, a history that spans 30 years. This time they visited Chicago, Lisle, other sites in Illinois and Indiana, including Saint Meinrad, St. Louis and Dayton. After leaving Saint Vincent by bus on August 20 the orchestra toured Washington, D.C., and New York City

before flying back to Germany. From there, Father Anselm has written a letter of thanks, which was translated by Father Warren: 24 August 2004. Dear Father Warren, The 10th USA tour of the Saint Stephan Orchestra is now over. It was a wonderful trip. We thank you very much for the hospitality at Saint Vincent and

are happy to have been there again [their last visit here was in 1998]. We will remember the comfortable accommodations, the good food, the concert in the church, and meeting with many confreres of Saint Vincent. We also enjoyed visiting Pittsburgh. Once again, thanks. I wish you health and happiness. Greetings to all our friends at Saint Vincent. Father Anselm Mayer.

Over 100 Attend Annual Oblate Day Over 100 Oblates, family members and guests attended the annual Oblate Day at the Archabbey on September 26. Prior Earl Henry, O.S.B., celebrated Mass for the group. Father Jacques Daley, O.S.B., delivered the main address of the day, entitled “How to Live in God’s Will.” He spoke about prayer as the means to remain in God’s will, about the spiritual struggle and the need to check one’s level of peace, about the value of focusing on Christ and on His divine mercy here and now, about finding the divine will in ordinary events and duties, and about the call to flexibility. After Father Jacques’ conference the group enjoyed a social with some monks in the Parish Center Assembly Room. Then the Oblates joined the monastic community for vespers.

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Bishop Dattilo Scholarship Announced

Saint Vincent Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B., and members of the Dattilo family attended the Saint Vincent Seminary Alumni Day Banquet for the announcement of a scholarship in honor of the late Bishop Nicholas C. Dattilo of the Diocese of Harrisburg. The Seminary initiated the funding with a commitment of $25,000. Bishop Dattilo was a dear friend and strong supporter of Saint Vincent Seminary. He was a member of the Seminary’s Board of Regents for a decade, serving as its vice chairman since 1998. Bishop Dattilo was a 1954 graduate of Saint Vincent College and attended Saint Vincent Seminary before completing his studies for ordination to the priesthood at Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary in Philadelphia. He played an active role on the Board of Regents and was vice chairman of the Seminary’s current Expanding the Vision Capital Campaign. He was the homilist and keynote speaker at the Seminary’s Annual Alumni Day Mass and Banquet in 1999, and a frequent visitor to the Archabbey, College and Seminary. For more information on the scholarship contact Bill Malloy in the Seminary Development office, 300 Fraser Purchase Road, Latrobe, PA 15650-2690, 724-532-6740 or bill.malloy@email.stvincent.edu.

Fall Foliage At Saint Vincent

Episcopal Ordination

Photographer Bill Metzger took this aerial photo of the fall foliage around the Saint Vincent campus in mid-October. This view of the campus shows the monastery in the foreground, and behind it, the Seminary buildings, Leander Hall and the Elizabeth J. Roderick Center. The Archabbey Basilica is shown from behind.

Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B., and Father Kurt Belsole, O.S.B., traveled to Harrisburg on Thursday, December 9 for the Episcopal Ordination and installation of Most Rev. Kevin C. Rhoades as the Ninth Bishop of the Diocese of Harrisburg. The ceremony was held Thursday, December 9, the Feast of Saint Juan Diego, in Saint Patrick Cathedral, Harrisburg.

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Admitted To Candidacy Saint Vincent .... Heart to Heart Winter 2005

Saint Vincent Archabbey

First Catholic Slovak Ladies Association Grant Helps Fund Computer Lab Saint Benedict School in Carrolltown received a $75,000 grant from The First Catholic Slovak Ladies Association, a national fraternal benefit society, to add a computer lab to its school. The school was recently featured in the November 17 edition of Johnstown’s Tribune-Democrat for the lab, which includes 48 new personal computers and 25 laptop computers. Twenty-five computers were placed in the school’s computer lab and two into each of the school’s 24 classrooms. The laptops will be used in the classroom and students will be able to take them home. The school also acquired a server to network the computers, digital cameras, scanners and printers.

The November 17 Johnstown Tribune-Democrat featured Saint Benedict School in Carrolltown and its new computer lab. The school is part of Saint Benedict Parish, where Saint Vincent Benedictine Father Vincent Zidek, O.S.B., serves as pastor. In addition to the computers, the school installed a Smart Board, which projects the same image seen on a computer monitor onto a large whiteboard. This enables teachers to show the students what they need to do on their lab computers, and eliminates a good deal of confusion. Father Vincent Zidek, O.S.B., pastor of Saint Benedict Parish, told the newspaper that the grant will “provide our

students with wonderful prospects in a truly remarkable facility.” In addition to adding technology to the classroom, the school plans to hold classes this winter in the evenings to give parents and adults in the community the opportunity to learn about computers. The school’s computers are linked to the Internet system of the AltoonaJohnstown Diocese.

Statues Installed In Carrolltown Saint Benedict Parish in Carrolltown recently added statues of Saint Benedict and Saint Scholastica to the plaza in front of the church entryway. The imported white Carrara marble statues were executed by Mauro Bigarani, a marble carver of Dolfi Statuary and Marble Works, which is situated in the great district of Carrara marble quarries in Marina di Carrara, Italy. Each statue started out as a rough block of marble weighing about 4000 pounds. A limestone pedestal with a recessed decorative light was mounted at the base of each statue for its enhancement, and a bronze crozier (not shown in photos), a sign of their role as a religious superior, was placed in each one’s hand. A brick wall was also built around the statues for their added protection. The project began nearly two years ago when Francis and Nancy Krug suggested the idea and graciously agreed to finance its undertaking, according to Father Vincent Zidek, O.S.B., Pastor. 14

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Benedictine Heritage Tour In Rome Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B. and Saint Vincent College President James F. Will met with U.S. Ambassador Mel Sembler at the U.S. Embassy in Rome on September 29. The meeting was one of the stops on the recent Benedictine Heritage Tour.

Recyclage in Rome

Published Brother Bruno Heisey, O.S.B., has published an article, “Cardinal Newman and Benedictine Education,” in the Fall, 2004, issue of the Newman Studies Journal. The Summer, 2004, issue of Cumberland County History contains two articles by Brother Bruno, “The Works of Henry Ganss” and “The Estate of Peter Helbron.” Father Ganss was an 1876 alumnus of Saint Vincent; Father Helbron was one of the first pastors of the old Sportsman’s Hall parish that became Saint Vincent. Brother Bruno, a member of the Saint Vincent monastic community since 2001, has been writing historical essays and reviews since 1986, and so he continues to publish under his baptismal name, Daniel J. Heisey.

Three Benedictines affiliated with Saint Vincent Archabbey attended The Recyclage, a monastic renewal program for English-speaking monks. The Recyclage was held April 24 to May 25 at Sant’ Anselmo, the international Benedictine college in Rome. The various renewal topics presented at the conference included general church and monastic topics, such as a series of lectures on the latest studies on the Rule of Saint Benedict by Sr. Aquinata Bockmann, O.S.B., who is world-renowned in the field. The photo above was taken in Tivoli. From left are Brother Phillip Wertman, O.C.S.O., Lafayette, OR; Father David Brown, O.S.B., Belmont, NC; Father Lucas Torrell de Almeida Costa, O.S.B., Vinhedo, Brazil; Father Mario Fulgenzi, O.S.B., Saint Vincent; Brother David Manaham, O.S.B., Collegeville, MN; Father Gilbert Burke, O.S.B., Saint Vincent; Brother Christian Leblanc, O.C.S.O., Gethsemani, KY; Brother Camillus Canning, O.C.S.O., Mount Melleray, Ireland; Father Marcus Voss, O.S.B., Cullman; Brother Edmund Costin, O.C.S.O., Mount Melleray, Ireland; Father Joel Derks, O.S.B., Conception Abbey, MO; Brother Lionel Perera, O.S.B., Ampitiya, Sri Lanka.

Admitted to Candidacy Brother Maurus Mount, O.S.B., was admitted to candidacy for Holy Orders on November 19 by Most Rev. Bernard Schmitt, Bishop of Wheeling-Charleston. Pictured from left are Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B., Chancellor; Bishop Schmitt; Brother Maurus and Very Rev. Kurt Belsole, O.S.B., Rector.

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Parish Column Results In Reflections Book When Father Philip M. Kanfush, O.S.B., served as Parochial Vicar at Saint Vincent Basilica Parish, he wrote a column which appeared regularly in the Parish Bulletin, called “Reflections from the Rocking Chair.” Selections from those reflections, and many new ones have been compiled into a book called Renewed Each Morning, which is now available from Archabbey Publications. The book’s reflections are about the wisdom and grace that we need to lead healthy, happy lives rooted in the teaching of Jesus Christ. Such wisdom is very ordinary and exceedingly practical. These stories provide a framework for illustrating life’s lessons and the opportunities for spiritual growth that can result from being attentive to the voice of God in the surprisingly ordinary moments of daily life. Beginning with the choices we make each day and progressing through brief essays on “coming home” to the Lord, the power of God’s love working in our lives and more, these reflections provide practical wisdom, gleaned from both Scripture and contemporary life, which can be easily applied in our daily lives. Below is one of the reflections from the book, which is available from www.stvincentstore.com.

A Lesson About Love By Father Philip M. Kanfush, O.S.B. I once met a woman named Ella. I was working as a Financial Aid Director at the Community College of Allegheny County in Pittsburgh. Ella was a single mother. She had only one child, a son, whom she had named Joseph. I came to know them when Joseph applied to study at the College. He was eighteen years old and just graduated from high school. It was very important to Ella that Joseph receive an education. He came to me when his application for federal student aid was denied. As I reviewed his application results, I realized that Joseph’s application had not really been denied, it had been rejected because too much information was missing for the Department of Education to deter-

Renewed Each Morning

reflections from the rocking chair Philip M. Kanfush, O.S.B.

mine his eligibility. In the course of our interview, I discovered, not surprisingly for a new high school graduate, that Joseph had had no job and no income. I also came to recognize that like many young students, Joseph had no idea whatsoever what his mother’s income was. So I gave him a questionnaire for his mother to complete that might shed some light on the needed information. If anything at all could be said for young Joseph, it would be that he was a man of great patience and perseverance. At least five times, he brought the questionnaire to me, each time without the needed information. Gauging from her responses on the forms, Ella had no income whatsoever. As the weeks wore on, the questions I gave him to take home to Ella became simpler and more direct. Finally, I was asking questions like, “do you own your home or do you rent?” The response came back that Ella rented their home. Then, I asked, “how much rent do you pay each month?” I no longer recall the exact amount she indicated, but I do remember that it was very low. Gradually, through an exhausting volley of questions and answers like this that grew to include inquiries about such items as the weekly grocery bill, and the electric and phone bills and from what sources they were paid, I hoped to get a handle on Ella’s income so that I could complete Joseph’s application for

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financial aid and get him enrolled. Each and every time, however, Ella’s reported expenses were quite reasonable, but she maintained that her income was zero. Ella and I even had several telephone conversations about their financial situation, but she stalwartly maintained that she had no income. I could never allow Joseph to submit an application that indicated no family income because the government would assume that an error had occurred in the completion of the form. Even in kind support has a monetary value. Finally, on one fateful morning, Ella accompanied Joseph to the Financial Aid Office to meet with me. I was not expecting her, but I was very glad to meet with her because I believed that finally the confusion could be resolved. What I did not imagine was that our brief encounter would touch me so profoundly that some fifteen years later, I can recall every detail. Joseph waited in the hall while his mother and I met. As Ella faced me across my desk, I beheld the visage of a woman aged some twenty to thirty years beyond her chronological age. I surmised that life had not been easy for Ella. I pulled Joseph’s file and began to ask her the same questions that she had already attempted to answer in the mountain of paper I had sent home with Joseph in the preceding weeks. After about fifteen minutes of pointless questions, Ella broke. With tears of shame trickling down her withered cheeks, Ella told me, “I will tell you how I get money, but you can’t tell Joseph. Joseph can never know.” I recall that a huge knot formed in my stomach as I pondered what to do in this situation. I was all of twenty-four years old. I did not know how to handle this. I imagined that she must be involved in something illegal and had no idea how I should handle whatever she might reveal to me. Meanwhile, I must have been staring at her with a blank look on my face, because Ella continued, “If Joseph found out what I do, he would hate me, and I can’t have that, I just can’t.” She sobbed, “He’s all I have.” I never let Ella tell me what she did to get the money she needed to keep a roof over her son’s head and food in his (Continued on Page 17) Volume 15, Number 2


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Reflections Book (Continued from Page 16) belly. To do so would have been to allow her to disgrace herself before me unnecessarily, and I gathered that life had already shamed her more than enough. Instead, what I did was listen and learn. I listened to a story about a woman who had never known a decent opportunity in her life, a woman who had known only one joy, the son with whom she had discovered herself pregnant and abandoned, cast off mercilessly by her family. I heard the story of a woman who had named her son Joseph in the faithful hope that his fate might turn out as triumphantly as that of Jacob’s son, “in the Bible, you know,” Ella reminded me, as though I might never have read it. And as I listened, I learned. I learned that dignity doesn’t come from having fancy degrees. I learned that integrity doesn’t come from having money. I learned that love is so powerful a force that it must be protected at all cost. I learned that grace comes even where opportunity is lacking, and perhaps precisely because opportunity is lacking. And in the face of this impoverished, broken woman whom life had beaten into gold, I felt exceedingly small. On my drive home that evening I had an hour to reflect on Ella and Joseph. I came to understand the compassion that Jesus showed to the woman whose sins he forgave because she loved much. I came to recognize the incredible gift I had been given that day, and I cried. With my meager help, Joseph did get to go to college, the first one in her family, Ella assured me proudly, to make such an achievement. Before the Christmas break that first semester, Joseph appeared at my office door. I thought something must be wrong. Everything was fine. His mother had sent him to bring me a Christmas card from the two of them. It was an inexpensive card, not really very pretty, but not surprisingly, it was my most prized gift that year. I do not know what happened to him and Ella, but I have never forgotten to pray for them. My prayer is that Joseph has overcome his poverty and become rich in money as well as grace. My prayer is that he has taken care of Ella and that her old age has been an easy one. I’ll never know, but I pray for them all the same. Ella’s story teaches us a powerful

lesson. So often in life we find ourselves confronted with what seem to be insurmountable difficulties and limitations. But if we take a careful look at them, I wonder if they really are so impossible to overcome? Sometimes, when I’m feeling as though I can never succeed at something I’m trying to do, or that my plans will never work out, I have to stop and remind myself that the struggles I have to deal with are pretty insignificant compared to those of others. Most of us have it pretty easy in life when you stop to think about it. Perhaps we should stop every now and again to take stock of our problems. Are they really as bad as they seem, or like Ella, when life shovels dirt on us, can we learn to just shake it off and take a step up out of the hole in which we find ourselves? Consider the story in Genesis of Joseph, Jacob’s son. Though his brothers cast him in a cistern and left him for dead, he wound up second in command of the Pharaoh’s dynasty. Comfort, give comfort to my people says your God. Every valley shall be filled in, every mountain and hill shall be made low (Is 40: 1, 4). No matter how busy you are, you owe it to yourself to spend some moments allowing the Lord to fulfill His promise of comfort in your life. Then, take a moment to share that comfort with someone else. Father Philip Michael Kanfush earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Secondary Education at the University of Pittsburgh and a Bachelor of Arts degree in Philosophy at Saint Vincent College. Father Philip completed both the Master of Arts degree in Sacred Scripture and the Master of Divinity degree at Saint Vincent Seminary. He holds a Master of Business Administration degree and a Master of Education degree in Special Education from the University of Pittsburgh. Licensed as a Secondary Social Studies teacher, Special Educator and Reading Specialist in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Father Philip currently teaches at the Clelian Heights School for Exceptional Children in Greensburg, and serves as an adjunct faculty member in the Education Department at Saint Vincent College.

Basilica Parish Cookbook Celebrates 100 Years Just in time for the centennial celebration of the completion of the Archabbey Basilica in 2005 is a new cookbook published in September. “Celebrating 100 Years: A Collection of Recipes by Saint Vincent Basilica Parish” has a variety of recipes, from appetizers and beverages, soups and salads, vegetables and side dishes, main dishes, cookies and candy, to breads and rolls and desserts. Section dividers feature historic photos from Saint Vincent. The cookbook is available at the Parish Center or online at www.stvincentstore.com.

Vocations Web Page Updated The Saint Vincent Archabbey Vocations Web Page has been updated with new information, new photos and a new domain name. While all of the Saint Vincent family of web sites can be accessed from http://benedictine.stvincent.edu, the vocations site can be accessed directly at www.stvincentmonks.com. For more information on the abbey vocations program, contact Father Fred Byrne, O.S.B., vocations director, at fred.byrne@email.stvincent.edu.

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Saint Vincent President Honored Saint Vincent College President James F. Will was honored as Volunteer of the Year on National Philanthropy Day in Western Pennsylvania November 18 by the Western Pennsylvania Chapter of the Association of Fundraising Professionals at the Pittsburgh Hilton Hotel. Mr. Will was nominated for the award by Sr. Mary Vincent, administrator of the Little Sisters of the Poor, who noted his involvement with their organization for over 30 years as a benefactor, chair of the advisory board, and active volunteer who led a fundraising effort of $15 million for their capital campaign and $2 million for annual operating expenses. When Mr. Will was named the 15th president and the first lay president of Saint Vincent College on July 1, 2000, he became a unique volunteer fundraiser for his alma mater. He does not accept a salary for the job. Instead, he has deferred his salary into a scholarship fund for needy students — a fund that is now over $500,000. He has voluntarily given of himself to bring about important and significant changes at his alma mater. Mr. Will is using all the skills he developed during four decades as a steel company executive in the service of Saint Vincent, a 158-year-old Catholic, Benedictine, liberal arts college. After assuming the presidency of Saint Vincent College, he announced an ambitious three-point plan that would

President James F. Will

increase enrollment, improve student life and achieve national prominence in academic excellence. A $75 million comprehensive capital campaign announced last summer will provide the underpinning for the plan. Now Mr. Will is applying his considerable managerial skills in promoting and improving all areas of the College operation and enlisting the services of many volunteers — top business executives, community leaders and educators (as well as many alumni) — who serve on the Board of Directors, in a bold initiative to achieve a national reputation for Saint

New Ornaments Available The new Christmas ornament for the Archabbey Basilica and the new Gristmill ornament are now available. The new window ornament is The Baptism of the Lord Window from the Basilica. It is available for $11.95 through www.stvincentstore.com or at the Basilica Gift Shop. The new Gristmill ornament retails for $13.95 and can also be ordered online or purchased at the Gristmill General Store. There are a limited number of the Millstone and Gristmill painting ornmanets from previous years, as well as the Basilica Facade, Adoration of the Magi and Lamb of God ornaments from previous years. The Basilica ornaments are all limited edition collectables. 18

Vincent College. In addition to his volunteer service at Saint Vincent over the years, Mr. Will also has served on the board of directors of Carlow College and has been a board member, chairman of the board and chairman of the Bishop’s annual dinner for Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Pittsburgh. He also has been a member of the board of the Latrobe Area Hospital and Adelphoi USA and is member chairman of the Community Partnership Committee of the Latrobe Area Chamber of Commerce. President Will also has been a board member and chairman of the board of the Greater Pittsburgh Council of the Boy Scouts as well as a board member of several Pittsburgh organizations serving families, including Little Sisters of the Poor, Miryams Women’s Shelter, the Epiphany Association and St. Francis Hospital, in addition to serving on the board of several other community organizations that enhance the quality of life for families in the region including the Pittsburgh Opera, Pittsburgh Cultural Trust and the Pittsburgh Regional Alliance. In appreciation for his volunteer efforts, he has been presented with numerous awards including the United Way of Westmoreland County Leadership Award, American Jewish Committee Human Rights Award, Association of Governing Boards Distinguished Service in Trusteeship Award, the Greater Pittsburgh Council of the Boy Scouts Silver Beaver Award and Eagle Scout Class Award, and the Diocese of Pittsburgh Caritas Award for Leadership presented by Catholic Charities. He has received honorary doctoral degrees from both Saint Vincent College and Washington and Jefferson College. He also was presented with the Presidential Medal of Honor by Saint Vincent College and was named a Distinguished Alumnus by Duquesne University and an Engineer of the Year by Penn State. President Jim Will’s appointment as president of Saint Vincent College came after years of volunteer service to his alma mater, having served as a member of the Saint Vincent College Board of Directors for more than a dozen years, including serving for four years as chair. He also chaired two successful Saint Vincent College capital fundraising (Continued on Page 19) Volume 15, Number 2


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President (Continued from Page 18) campaigns, the $10 million Campaign for Saint Vincent College completed in 1993 and Campaign 150, a successful $20 million campaign completed in 1999. Last summer a record-setting $75 million capital campaign which Mr. Will conceived was formally launched. With its theme, Forward, Always Forward, Everywhere Forward, the current campaign underscores the ambitious plan for the future of the College. Campaign contributions already exceed $50 million, and the results of the fundraising are being realized and appreciated. The campaign has already made possible the renovation and expansion of the student center, now known as the Robert S. Carey Student Center featuring a renewed gymnasium, fitness center, lounge, wellness center, book store, offices, club rooms, and a new student chapel. Other buildings are being renovated and upgraded including a former residence hall that will soon house the Alex G. McKenna School of Business, Economics, and Government and its associated programs. The campaign is also raising funds for endowment, professorships, scholarships and special projects. The campaign supports the reorganization of the college academic departments into four new schools including the recently announced School of Humanities and Fine Arts, the School of Natural Sciences, Mathematics and Computing, and the School of Communication, Education, and Social Sciences. Also being developed in the campaign is the Fred M. Rogers Center for Early Learning and Children’s Media which is expected to begin construction next year. Mr. Will has often talked about the value of his education at Saint Vincent College and how important the Benedictine presence was in his life as a young student. When he talks with alumni about joining him in giving back, he points out that Saint Vincent set him on the course of his life and helped him attain personal success beyond his “wildest dreams.” In the spirit of genuine philanthropy, he is giving back to Saint Vincent in many ways, as he has with other community groups, by giving of his time, talents and financial resources. President Will believes that the need for a values-based liberal arts college has never been greater.

Solemn Vows In Brazil Brother Adriano Goldoni de Sá, O.S.B., signs his Solemn Vows document in the presence of Father Thomas Acklin, and Prior Lucas Costa, who received the vows in the name of Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B.

Father João Almir Paim, O.S.B., of São João Gualberto Monastery, in Pirituba, São Paulo, Father Thomas Acklin, O.S.B.—who was representing Saint Vincent Archabbey at the celebration—Brother Adriano Goldoni de Sá, O.S.B., Prior Lucas T. de A. Costa, O.S.B., and Father Luiz Pedro Soares, O.S.B., of São Bento Monastery in Olinda, Pernambuco, before the Solemn Vows ceremony that took place at the Chapel of Our Lady in Exile at São Bento Monastery, in Vinhedo, São Paulo, Brazil.

Ministry of Acolyte Most Rev. Donald Trautman, Bishop of Erie, installed three Benedictines to the Ministry of Acolyte at Saint Vincent Seminary this fall. Taking part in the installation were, from left, Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B., Chancellor; Brother Stephen Patrizio, who was installed; Bishop Trautman; Brother Shawn Anderson, who was installed; Brother Matthias Martinez, who was installed, and Very Rev. Kurt Belsole, O.S.B., Seminary Rector.

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Benedictine Commission On China At Work By Brother Nicholas Koss, O.S.B. When I first went to Beijing in 1990, I visited the Church of St. Joseph, which is also called the East Church, because of its location on the east side of Beijing. Beijing also has a North Church, South Church and West Church. The East Church has a history of over three hundred years. When I first visited there, it had only been recently reopened as a Church after having been closed for many years during the Cultural Revolution (1966-76) and the subsequent decade. Sunday Mass was very early in the morning and was in Latin. No

homily was permitted. The congregation prayed quietly and quickly left after the end of Mass. The Church itself was tightly enclosed by a forbidding wall. On a recent Sunday I was again in Beijing and attended the eight o’clock Mass. The wall around the Church had been torn down. The Church was jampacked when I entered as the seven o’clock Mass was just ending and parishioners were also pouring in for the eight o’clock. Not only were there the elderly generation of believers, but also young mothers and fathers with their children were in ample number.

Brother Nicholas Koss, O.S.B., conducts a Latin Class. Sr. Beppo Wang, O.S.B., sits to the right of Brother Nicholas, and Sr. Immanuel Hsiang, O.S.B. on his far right. The face to his left is that of a postulant, Ms. Hung.

The Study of Latin in Taiwan By Brother Nicholas Koss, O.S.B. One of the projects that I have been involved with as Dean of the Fu Jen Catholic University College of Foreign Languages is the setting up of a summer program teaching courses related to the Western Classical and Medieval periods. These courses were first offered in the summer of 2003 and were offered to students from all the colleges and universities in Taiwan. The courses dealt with Classical and Medieval history, philosophy, literature, art and so on. There were also courses offering instruction in Latin and Greek. Right before the classes were to begin, the Latin teacher announced that she had to return to Europe immediately. I decided to teach the course, as I had studied Latin for many years when I was a student at St. Vincent Prep School, College and Seminary. Originally I thought that perhaps ten or fifteen students might be taking the

course. You cannot image my surprise when I arrived in class for the first time and discovered forty students there all eager to study Latin. We spent six weeks together having three hours of class four days a week. The students studied very hard and learned a great deal of Latin. Last summer, we again offered Latin instruction. This time we were able to get another Benedictine to help with the teaching: Fr. Anthony Wesolowski, from our Benedictine High School in Savannah, Georgia. He usually helps out at our Priory during the summer and has taught Latin for many years. Fr. Anthony then had fifty students for first-year Latin. Following my first summer of teaching Latin, I started to teach Latin weekly to the Benedictine Sisters In Taiwan who sing Gregorian chant on occasion for their liturgy. They wanted to understand better what they were singing.

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I watched carefully as a mother took the hand of her very young daughter and put it in the Holy Water Fount, and then taught her how to say, “In the name of the Father . . .” The Mass was all in Chinese. The priest was young and delivered a lively sermon. The singing filled the large Romanesque structure. When it came time for the “Our Father,” the celebrant urged the entire congregation to hold hands and sing the prayer taught to us by Christ. So there I was in the middle of this wonderful Chinese congregation demonstrating their faith in our Father and their love for each other. The Church is indeed fully alive once again in China. The Benedictines of Saint Vincent Archabbey and those from other Benedictine monasteries throughout the world have been helping the Church in China since the mid-1990s. At that time a Benedictine Commission on China was set up by the Congress of Abbots to coordinate Benedictine work related to China. Archabbot Douglas was one of the founding members of this Commission and continues to serve as a member.  I also am a member of this Benedictine Commission on China and am the Executive Secretary for it. One very important work that Saint Vincent Archabbey does for the Church in China is the training of Chinese seminarians at Saint Vincent Seminary. In the late 1990s, two seminarians from the Diocese of Beijing studied at Saint Vincent. After their studies they returned to Beijing and were ordained. A seminarian from the province of Sichuan, in southwest China, is now studying at Saint Vincent.   At the same time, Saint Vincent has not forgotten the educational work that it did in China in the 1920s and 1930s when it set up Fu Jen Catholic University in Beijing.  Archabbot Douglas is working closely with the Beijing Alumni Association of Fu Jen Catholic University to help develop the educational training center that is now run at the site of the old Fu Jen. Saint Vincent also helps to give information about China to students and faculty of Saint Vincent College and to the people of Western Pennsylvania. In September 2001 the Loe China Studies Center was established.  Each year this center sponsors a conference on one aspect of China. The most recent conference was on Chinese medicine. Volume 15, Number 2


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Winter 2005

Red Mass

Monsignor Brian E. Ferme, J.C.D., above, right, Dean of the School of Canon Law at The Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C., was the homilist at the annual Red Mass, sponsored jointly by The Diocese of Greensburg and Saint Vincent Archabbey, College and Seminary. This year’s Red Mass was held at The Saint Joseph Center. In the photo at top left, Most Rev. Lawrence Brandt, Bishop of Greensburg, celebrates the Liturgy of the Eucharist, flanked by Father William Rathgeb, left, Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B., third from left, and Monsignor Ferme.

First Profession, Vow Renewal Brother Linus Klucsarits, O.S.B., left, and Brother Matthias Martinez, O.S.B., made first profession of monastic vows this summer before Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B. Renewing their vows were junior monks, from left, Brother Bruno Heisey, O.S.B., Brother Maurus Mount, O.S.B., Brother Benoit Alloggia, O.S.B., Brother Shawn Anderson, O.S.B., Brother Stephen Patrizio, O.S.B., Brother Michael Gabler, O.S.B. and Brother Fernando Lanas, O.S.B. (Photos by Father Noel Rothrauff, O.S.B.)

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The Beatification Mass on October 3, 2004, showing the portraits of the five new Blesseds displayed on the façade of Saint Peter’s Basilica and the altar set up in the square.

An overview of Saint Peter’s Square showing the estimated 50,000 people attending the Beatification Mass.

Four of Emperor Karl’s living children attended the Beatification. From left to right: Archduke Rudolf of Austria (who has visited Saint Vincent numerous times), Archduke Karl Ludwig and his wife Archduchess Yolanda, Archduke Felix, Archduchess Margherita (widow of Archduke Robert), and Archduchess Regina (wife of Archduke Otto, the oldest son of Emperor Karl, who is next to her but can not be seen in this picture).

Some of the cardinals attending the Mass. 22

Emperor Karl I’s Beatification In Rome Held October 3

Pope John Paul II entering the Paul VI Audience Hall the next day to meet with the pilgrims coming to Rome for the Beatifications.

Volume 15, Number 2


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Winter 2005

Emperor Karl I’s Beatification In Rome Held October 3

The day after the Beatification, October 4th, Br. Nathan is presented to the Holy Father by Msgr. Reinhard Knittel, Vice-President of the Emperor Karl League of Prayers.

After the Holy Father proclaimed the Decree of Beatification the relics of the new Blesseds are brought to the altar. In the center is Severin Meister, carrying the relic of his great-grandfather.

Brother Nathan Cochran, O.S.B., spent the past several months in Rome, working on preparations for the beatification of Emperor Karl I of Austria, which occurred on October 3. The canonization effort has been going on for decades, and Brother Nathan has been involved since 1986. In 1996, Brother Nathan became the American-Canadian delegate to the Presidium of the League of Prayers. The process of canonization is complex, he noted, and there was work to do in Rome both before and after the beatification. The various leaders of the cause for canonization are from Austria, Germany, northern Italy, Switzerland, Belgium, Poland, France, Hungary, Madeira and other European nations, he said. Thus, a centralized “pointman” was needed in Rome to coordinate everything between the League, the Congregation of Saints and various Vatican offices. Materials were developed and distributed, such as short biographies, pamphlets, holy cards and religious medals and images. A lot of the materials need to be in various languages because of the cause’s multi-national and international nature. The languages included English, French, German, Hungarian, Italian, Czech, Polish, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Slovenian and Croatian.

Before the audience with the Holy Father, Br. Nathan exchanges greetings with Archduke Lorenz of Austria-Este and Prince of Belgium and his wife, Archduchess Astrid, Princess of Belgium. Br. Nathan A view of the altar in Saint Peter’s Square during the Eucharistic worked closely with Archduke Lorenz during his time Prayer. Blessed Karl is in the tapestry on the right. in Rome. Volume 15, Number 2

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Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Winter 2005

Father Hemrick Founders’ Day Speaker Father Eugene F. Hemrick, syndicated columnist for the Catholic News Service and founding director of the National Institute for the Renewal of the Priesthood of the Washington Theological Union, was the principal speaker at the Saint Vincent Founders’ Day Vespers and Honors Convocation on November 18 at the Archabbey Basilica. At the convocation, students who were named to Who’s Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges were recognized, and the Thoburn Excellence in Teaching Award was presented. A priest of the Diocese of Joliet, Illinois, Father Hemrick resides at Saint Joseph’s on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., where he serves as a research associate at the Life Cycle Institute of The Catholic University of America. He also is director of research at the Washington Theological Union, where he founded and serves as director of the National Institute for the Renewal of the Priesthood. Father Hemrick was ordained a priest for the Diocese of Joliet in 1963. He completed his seminary education with a bachelor of arts degree in philosophy and a master of arts degree in theology from Saint Mary of the Lake Seminary in Mundelein, Illinois. After being ordained, he earned a master in religious education in 1968 from Loyola University and a Ph.D. in education from the University of Notre Dame. Father Hemrick established and directed the research department for

Saint Vincent Basilica at sunset.

Father Eugene F. Hemrick gives the keynote address during the Saint Vincent Founders’ Day Vespers and Honors Convocation. the United States Catholic Conference of Bishops from 1976 until 1996. At Catholic University of America, he served as an assistant professor of education from 1984 until 1989. He also has taught at Illinois Benedictine College. The Catholic Education Association presented him with the John Henry Newman Award in 1982. In 1997 he became director of research for the Washington Theological Union, where in 2001 he became the founding director of the National Institute for the Renewal of the Priesthood. The institute is “dedicated to energizing the spiritual and intellectual

life of the priesthood through an ongoing dialogue via the Internet.” This web site, www.jknirp.com is a first of its kind effort to create a national dialogue with bishops, priests, deacons and lay persons on the major issues facing the priesthood. Since 1980 Father Hemrick has been a weekly syndicated columnist for the Catholic News Service. He has written about 75 articles relating to multi-cultural, social justice and educational issues as well as approximately 100 national studies on various church ministries and national church trends. He has written extensively for The Priest (published by Our Sunday Visitor), as well as Origins, Liguorian, U.S. Catholic and for the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops and the National Catholic Educational Association. He is the author of several books, including One Nation Under God: Religious Symbols, Quotes and Images in Our Nation’s Capital (Huntington, IN, Our Sunday Visitor, 2001) and The Promise of Virtue (Notre Dame, IN, Ave Maria Press, 1999). Father Hemrick has served on several boards and is a member of the Council of Advisors for the Saint Vincent College School of Humanities and Fine Arts. Founders’ Day is a special observance in honor of Boniface Wimmer and the Benedictine founders of Saint Vincent Archabbey, College, Seminary and Parish.

Photo by Mrs. Rita Malloy

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Saint Vincent Archabbey

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Retreats Planned For 2005 Six retreats have been scheduled for summer 2005 at Saint Vincent Archabbey, according to Brother Hugh Lester, O.S.B., Director of the Retreat Program. Retreats and the retreat masters are as follows: “A retreat for Oblates of Saint Benedict and those interested in Benedictine spirituality,” by Father Donald Raila, O.S.B., May 20-22; “A retreat for women” by Father Thomas Acklin, O.S.B., May 27-29; “A retreat for married couples,” by Father Thomas More Sikora, O.S.B., May 13-15; “A retreat for fathers and sons,” by Father Fred Byrne, O.S.B., June 17-19; “A retreat of charismatic prayer,” by Father Jacques Daley, O.S.B., June 10-12; and “A fourday retreat for men,” by Brother Elliott C. Maloney, O.S.B., July 21-24. Check-in time for retreats is fivethirty p.m. Fridays, while check-out time is one p.m. Sundays. On-line registration is now available at http: //www.stvincentstore.com. Time Received as a Gift and Managed Gracefully: Ordering Each Day in a Christ-centered Way In an age when we humans often hurry through time in a frenzied, disordered way, the Gospel and the Rule of Saint Benedict offer us a very different option. Christ is to be Lord over our time, and time is to be received as a gift and “managed” in a grace-filled way. This retreat will reflect on ways in which Christians can order their days in fuller obedience to Christ, with the help of the book, The Rule of Benedict for Beginners, by Wil Derkse. This will be a silent retreat. Retreat Master: Fr. Donald Raila, O.S.B., is Director of Oblates and Director of Monastery Music. Being a Disciple of Jesus The mother of Jesus, Mary, is an example for all women of how to be a disciple of Jesus. We will reflect upon

her faithfulness, self-abandonment, and virginity as these can apply to our lives, and her role as mother of the Church. Retreat Master: Fr. Thomas Acklin, O.S.B., teaches courses in theology at Saint Vincent Seminary. Marriage: A Reflection of the Christian Covenant “’For this reason a man shall leave his father and mother, and shall cling to his wife, and the two shall be made into one.’ This is a great foreshadowing; I mean that it refers to Christ and the Church.” (Ephesians 5:31-32). The Catholic tradition articulates this profound basis upon which we claim marriage as a Christian sacrament. This retreat will reflect upon marriage as a true representation of the New Covenant of Christ, which brings to perfection the Covenant manifested throughout the Old Testament. Please bring a Bible to this retreat. Retreat Master: Fr. Thomas More Sikora, O.S.B., teaches Religious Studies at Saint Vincent College. Jesus, Teach Us to Pray: Fathers and Sons Learning and Praying Together This retreat will be directed by Father Fred Byrne, Archabbey vocation director, and assisted by two young monks in formation, Brother Shawn Anderson and Brother Stephen Patrizio. Together they plan to create a prayerful environment where fathers and sons can learn to pray together. The ancient Benedictine way of prayerful reflection on the Bible, known as lectio divina, will be explained and practiced. There will also be times for adoration of the Blessed Sacrament, celebration of Reconciliation, joint recreation, and plenty of opportunity for father and son bonding. Fathers and sons of all ages are encouraged to help each other to attend this

special weekend retreat. Please do not let cost stop you from attending; contact Father Fred for retreat scholarship. As this retreat ends on Father’s Day, it will end early at 10:15 a.m. Retreat Master: Fr. Fred Byrne, O.S.B., Vocation Director, Saint Vincent Archabbey. A Spiritual Journey with Saint Faustina This retreat is on Saint Faustina, her spiritual journey, and her mission to remind the world of Divine Mercy. She is a fascinating Saint. The retreat will focus on her diary as well as a personal account of those who knew her. Jesus appeared to her 30 times; his words will fill you with a new hope and a deeper joy on your spiritual journey. Father Jacques will share especially his trip to Poland where he traced Faustina’s footsteps. Faustina is a mystic who found God in her daily duties and she will teach us how to do the same. Retreat Master: Fr. Jacques Daley, O.S.B., has made many presentations on EWTN and teaches courses on saints at Saint Vincent Seminary. Living the Christian Message in Our World Today This retreat will be a Scripture-based look at how Catholic Christians are directed by the Church to make a difference in the world by following the directives of our Sacred Scriptures. We shall examine the basic message of Jesus, the Kingdom of God, in the Gospels and review the position of Saint Paul on Christian relations with the world-at-large. Please bring a Bible to this retreat. Retreat Master: Br. Elliott Maloney, O.S.B. is professor of Biblical Languages and New Testament at St. Vincent Seminary.

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Saint Vincent Archabbey

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Father Mark Gruber Authors New Book Father Mark Gruber, O.S.B., has published a new book, Deep Calls Unto Deep, How the Scripture Challenges

Us, which is now available. The book is one in a series of books based on his retreats. The book’s title is taken from Psalm 42: Deep calls unto deep in the roar of your cataracts; All your breakers and your billows pass over me. By day the Lord bestows his grace, and at night I have his song. The waterfalls addressed by the Psalmist are, in fact, the series of cascades formed by the cataracts of the Nile River. Standing along the river, one can hear the roar of one cascade echoing from the next one. The river dialogues with itself, and the observer is aurually submerged in their discourse. For the Psalmist, these waterfalls represent the human soul in the presence of God. God communicates from His fathomless depth (His Word) unto us, who hear and respond from our own depths

with worship and clarity. God releases from our depths the mysteries locked up therein: Deep calls unto deep. The paperback book is available for $19.95 plus $3 shipping and handling from Saint Vincent Spirituality Publications, 300 Fraser Purchase Road, Latrobe, PA 15650-2690. For more information on Saint Vincent Spirituality Publications, call 724-532-0955. Father Mark is a professor in the Department of Sociology/Anthropology at Saint Vincent College. He received a bachelor of arts in philosophy and a master of divinity from Saint Vincent College and Seminary, as well as a master of arts and doctorate in anthropological sciences from the University of New York at Stony Brook. He has lectured widely in both anthropological and religious circles; his articles on religious themes have appeared in a number of Catholic publications.

Best in Show A photograph by Father Philip M. Kanfush, O.S.B., at left, “By the Dawn’s Early Light,” was Best of Show in the 2004 Juried Photo Show at The Ligonier Valley Library. The show, which ran September 15 through October 6, was judged by Tribune-Review photographer Barry Reeger, who wrote that “The prize winning photographers captured their subjects in a unique manner. Although there were many photographers who took pictures in morning or evening light, none uses light and composition in such a beautiful manner as that of the Best in Show Winner. Soft light on the flag contrasted the stark silhouette of the church. This scene was developed by the photographer’s vision.” Another photograph by Father Philip, “Graceful Grove,” was also chosen for show. 26

Volume 15, Number 2


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Winter 2005

Annual Blessing Ceremony Held At Gristmill The annual Blessing of the Harvest was held November 24, the day before Thanksgiving, at the Saint Vincent Gristmill. Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B., Father Paul R. Taylor, O.S.B., and the Benedictines who serve on the Gristmill Committee and work at the Gristmill were among those taking part. Also invited to the ceremony this year were members of the Latrobe Rotary Club, who donated $7,500 for the construction of an educational observation deck for environmental studies for students and visitors to the Gristmill and the adjacent wetlands. At top left, members of the Rotary Club inspect the completed deck. Pictured are, from left, Archabbot Douglas, Ron Pastor, George Kacenga, Joe Horancy, Mark Kessler, Jack Townsend, John Graziano, Richard Kovach, David McNichol and Father Paul. At bottom left, Archabbot Douglas prepares to bless the Gristmill, with the assistance of Father Paul, left, and Father Warren Murrman, O.S.B., who also serves on the Gristmill Committee.

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Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Winter 2005

Tribute, Memorial Gifts To give a tribute or memorial gift, please make a donation to Saint Vincent Archabbey in honor of or in memory of a friend, colleague or family member. Donations should be mailed to Mr. William P. Malloy in the Archabbey Development Office, 300 Fraser Purchase Road, Latrobe, Pa., 15650-2690, 724532-6740. Donors from May 11, 2004 to November 18, 2004, include:

IN HONOR OF: CHARLES AND SUZANNE GENNAULA Chris Gennaula MRS. BLANCHE M. HIPPS Rita, Carl and Jennifer Catalano Jill and Larry Clements REV. CAJETAN HOMICK, O.S.B. Mr. William N. Hamilton, Jr. LUCINE AND JOHN MAROUS Mr. and Mrs. John M. Wolfe BR. MATTHIAS T. MARTINEZ, O.S.B. Ricardo and Helen Febry REV. PAUL RUBADUE, O.S.B. Mr. John Roslevich MRS. HELEN YANDURA Mr. and Mrs. Mike Blumish

IN MEMORY OF: +REV. ALBERT C. BICKERSTAFF, O.S.B. Mr. William W. Shearouse, Jr. +ELEANOR BUKOVAC Mr. Brian D. Urik +REV. GODFREY F. BURKHARDT, O.S.B. Joseph and Jean Rubino +REV. ANTHONY J. BURLAS, O.S.B. Mrs. Rita B. Daugherty +DECEASED CHELKO FAMILY MEMBERS Mrs. Lena A. Chelko +BR. PLACID CREMONESE, O.S.B. Mr. and Mrs. Leo Bacha Joe and Philomena Barauskas Caroline and John Berg Mr. Rocco Blasiole Mrs. Annette C. Brownfield Mrs. Ann Capone and Family Ms. Mary Cirelli Mrs. Catherine Cremonese

Mr. Ralph A. Volpe Mrs. Gertrude Wuenschel +STELLA AND CYRIL HENRY Mr. and Mrs. Bernard J. Nowicki Wimmer Corporation +MR. CLARENCE JOHNSON Mr. David F. Collins +F. JAMES KLARIC Dr. and Mrs. Robert E. Kelly, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Klaric Mrs. F. James Klaric Mr. and Mrs. James D. Klaric Mr. and Mrs. Robert Klaric Mr. and Mrs. Mark Krynicki Mr. and Mrs. William Meidus Ms. Mary Ann Wuyscik +CHARLES J. KRULY Mr. and Mrs. Robert N. Kessler, Jr. Mrs. Mary Kruly Janet R. O’Connor Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Skubak +FRANK L. KUSS Mr. Thomas J. Kuss +ANGIE MASTRODONATO Chuck Stegman +PAUL ONDERKO Ms. Patricia A. Cervone Mr. and Mrs. Samuel A. Folby Mr. and Mrs. William J. Fromme General Carbide Corporation Mr. and Mrs. John P. Rysinski Mr. Richard Schober +MERLE PARRISH Mr. Jason E. Farabaugh +REV. CLAUDE W. POLLAK, O.S.B. Mr. David F. Collins Ms. Sheila McGillion Mr. and Mrs. Chris C. Yin +VINCENT RETTGER Mrs. Rose Mary Neubert +WILLIAM W. SHEAROUSE, SR. Mr. William W. Shearouse, Jr. +DONALD J. SNYDER, SR. Wimmer Corporation +RUTH ULISHNEY Mr. and Mrs. Benedict A. Troy +ANDREW R. URIK Mr. Brian D. Urik +REV. REMIGIUS B. VEROSTKO, O.S.B. Mr. and Mrs. Donald S. Pawlak +MR. FRANK ZIEMKIEWICZ Robert and Amy Sorg +ARTHUR C. ZITTERBART, JR. Arthur and Jane Zitterbart

Mr. Jim Cremonese Joe and Dorothea Cremonese Louis L. Cremonese Family Nick and Carol Cremonese Bonnie Del Duca Mr. Anthony DePrimio Clarina DiPietro Ida Duva Mrs. Mary Ann Facetti Fran Gigliotti Mrs. Kitty Good Ann C. Just Mr. Stanley Kowalsky Miss Elizabeth Kozak Mrs. Josephine R. Kozak Angela and Jeff Kucenic Mary Marven Arlene and Claude Petroy Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Peterinelli Donna and Vince Petroy Mr. Ben Policastro, Sr. Andrea and David Raimondo Mr. and Mrs. Ronald N. Raimondo Donna Rhodes Philomena Rossi Dorothy and Marty Strosko Margaret Taylor Mrs. Bonnie Wall +DON DLUSKY Nancy A. Dlusky +MRS. MARIE FAJT Mr. and Mrs. Carl D. Burlas +JACQUELYN A. FISH Mr. Paul W. Fish +REV. PHILIP GHYS, O.S.B. Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Fennell, Sr. St. Gregory Mens Club +REV. CLEMENT J. HEID, O.S.B. Toni and Bob Cray Mrs. Alma Demyan Julie and Gerald Dodds First Catholic Slovak Ladies Association, Branch 233 Sam and Mary Folby Mr. and Mrs. Edward A. Gromek Mr. and Mrs. Richard B. Guskiewicz Don Haas Family Rev. William J. Homolak Miss Mary E. Kornides Mr. and Mrs. Robert Martin Ms. Mary Anne Odendahl Mrs. Eileen M. Schaaf Mr. and Mrs. Larry Smith Irene Tarasovitch

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Volume 15, Number 2


Development Corner: Charitable Gift Annuities A MEANINGFUL GIFT WITH A GUARANTEED INCOME Given recent economic uncertainties and the unstable stock market, many Saint Vincent Archabbey supporters are turning to the guaranteed returns of a charitable gift annuity. A charitable gift annuity is a planned giving vehicle that provides a lifetime income, a charitable tax deduction and a way to make a meaningful gift to Saint Vincent Archabbey. Charitable gift annuities typically enjoy a higher rate of return than most conservative investments. Despite this, they are never subject to market fluctuations!

William Malloy Director of Development

ONE LIFE AGE RATE 60 65 70 75 80 85 90

(payment assumes annuity of $10,000) ANNUAL PAYMENT 5.7% $570 6% $600 6.5% $650 7.2% $710 8% $800 9.5% $950 11.3% $1130

TWO LIVES AGE RATE 60/60 65/65 70/70 75/75 80/80 85/85 90/90

(payment assumes annuity of $10,000) ANNUAL PAYMENT 5.4% $540 5.6% $560 5.9% $590 6.3% $630 6.9% $690 7.9% $790 9.3% $930

What is a charitable gift annuity? A charitable gift annuity is a contractual arrangement between you and Saint Vincent Archabbey. You make a donation of cash or marketable securities in exchange for a fixed annual payment for the rest of your life. At your death, the remaining value of the gift passes to Saint Vincent Archabbey. The amount of the annual payment depends upon your age at the time the gift is made (see chart). The good news is that the rate is guaranteed, regardless of how long you live or what happens to the economy. What is the minimum gift? For as little as $5,000, you can enjoy the benefits of a charitable gift annuity with Saint Vincent Archabbey. There is no upper limit, and you can establish additional gift annuities whenever you wish. This way, you can take advantage of higher annuity rates as you get older. Several supporters have established multiple annuities with Saint Vincent Archabbey and enjoy the convenience of receiving a single, combined payment at the period of their choosing – quarterly, semiannually, or annually. How do I obtain a free calculation of benefits? If you would like more information on a charitable gift annuity with Saint Vincent Archabbey, please fill out and return the card below or call Bill Malloy at (724)532-6740. It takes only a few minutes to provide the information we need to prepare a personalized gift annuity proposal for you. There is no cost or obligation and your inquiry will be treated in complete confidence.

Name Address City Zip

State Phone

Birthdate of Annuitant ______ / ______ / ______ Birthdate of Second Annuitant (if any) ______ / ______ / ______ Proposed Gift Amount ($5000 Minimum) Please Return Card To:

Mr. William P. Malloy Director of Development Saint Vincent Archabbey 300 Fraser Purchase Road, Latrobe, PA 15650-2690, Phone: 724-532-6740 E-mail: bill.malloy@email.stvincent.edu

Charitable Gift Annuities Offer These Benefits • Fixed Income for Life — a charitable gift annuity provides payments on a quarterly, semi-annual, or annual basis. A portion of the payment is tax-free. • Guaranteed Payments — your payments are backed by the assets of Saint Vincent Archabbey. • Federal Income Tax Charitable Deduction — part of the fair market value of your gift is deductible if you itemize your deductions. • Capital Gains Tax Savings — if the annuity is funded with appreciated securities, no capital gains tax is due at the time a gift annuity is established. A portion of the capital gain on gifts of long-term, appreciated securities is avoided entirely, and the reportable capital gain is spread out over the annuitant’s actual life expectancy at the time of the gift. • Federal Estate Tax Savings — assets used to fund a one-life charitable gift annuity are removed from the donor/annuitant’s taxable estate. In a two-life annuity, only the value of the survivor annuitant’s interest is included. • Personal Satisfaction — by making a gift of lasting significance to Saint Vincent Archabbey you are ensuring that the work of the Benedictine monks can live on for years to come.


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Obituaries prefect and as a reserve chaplain in the Belgian Army (1955-1978). In 1961 he was assigned to Shaba Province in Congo, Africa, where he advanced to administrative director. He entered Saint Vincent Archabbey in 1970 and was assigned to teach in Savannah in 1971. At Benedictine Military School, Savannah, Father Philip taught earth science, Bible study, biology, algebra, geometry, religion and physical education and served as assistant headmaster (1975-

Father Philip Ghys, O.S.B. Father Philip Ghys, O.S.B., the son of the late Edouard Ghys and Maria (Moorkens) Ghys, died on September 25, 2004. He was eighty years old. Father Philip was born on June 7, 1924 in Assebroek, Belgium. He was the brother of Rev. Edmond Ghys of Brugge, Belgium, Marie Therese Ghys of Brussels, Belgium, and the late Philippe Ghys. He attended Dames de Andre and Institute of St. Francis Xaverius grade schools, and graduated from Koninklijk Atheneum Brugge High School in 1941. He graduated from Catholic University, Louvain, in 1946, where he studied to be a chemical agricultural engineer and engineer of the agricultural industries. He studied philosophy at Saint Andrew Abbey, Bruges, until 1949, and theology at the same abbey until 1953. Father Philip made his simple profession of monastic vows January 6, 1948, at St. Andrew Abbey, Bruges. His solemn profession of monastic vows was made on January 15, 1951 at St. Andrew Abbey. Ordained on July 25, 1953, at St. Andrew, he served as a teacher and

Father Clement J. Heid, O.S.B. Father Clement J. Heid, O.S.B., the son of the late Frank and Anna (Schwab) Heid, died on October 25, 2004. He was 88 years old. Father Clement was born in Erie, Pennsylvania on February 21, 1916. He was one of six children. His other brothers are John and Leonard Heid, of Erie, and the late Martin Heid, Father Roland Heid, O.S.B., who was also a Benedictine monk of Saint Vincent Archabbey, and Francis Heid. He attended Saint Mary Grade School, Erie, and was a 1934 graduate

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77). From 1981 until 1995 he served in the administration there, overseeing the bookstore and cafeteria. He returned to Saint Vincent Archabbey in March of this year. Distinctions Fr. Philip earned include being named Ridder (knight) in de Kroonorde, April 7, 1967, Ridder in de Leopoldsorde, April 7, 1972, and Officer in de Kroonorde, July 20, 1977 Father Philip became an American citizen on April 28, 1978.

of Saint Vincent Preparatory School. He received a bachelor of arts degree in philosophy from Saint Vincent College in 1941. He attended Saint Vincent Seminary from 1938 to 1944, and did graduate studies at Marquette University, and the University of Pittsburgh, where he earned a master of letters degree in mathematics in 1949. He entered the Benedictine monastic Community of Saint Vincent Archabbey in 1937. He made simple profession of Vows on July 2, 1938, and solemn profession on July 11, 1941. He was ordained a priest by the late Hugh C. Boyle, Bishop of Pittsburgh, on June 11, 1944. Father Clement served the Archabbey primarily in its educational apostolates. At Saint Vincent Scholasticate he was a prefect (1938–1940), and at Saint Vincent Preparatory School he was a teacher (1943–1945). At Saint Vincent College, he was assistant Archabbey librarian (1940-42), a professor of mathematics (1947–1981), and Chair of the Mathematics Department (1955–1960). In 1985, he was named Professor Emeritus of Saint Vincent College. From 1944–1988, he served in numerous weekend mission assignments throughout the Diocese of Pittsburgh. He was an assistant pastor at Saint (Continued on Page 31) Volume 15, Number 2


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Obituaries Mary Parish, Erie (1945–1947), a prefect at Saint Vincent Seminary (1952-1963), Chaplain of the monastic infirmary (1965–1988), and Director of the Lay Retreat Program (1982–1983). He was also Director of Health Care Benefits for the Archabbey (1982-1990) and Director for Mass Intentions for the Archabbey from 1982 to 2002. He was curator of the Archabbey Coin Collection.

Brother Placid Cremonese, O.S.B. Brother Placid Cremonese, O.S.B., died Monday, November 1, 2004. Born in Greensburg on March 2, 1914, he was a son of the late Vincenzo and Anna Gloria Cremonese. Brother Placid was one of thirteen children. He is survived by a brother, Gerald Cremonese and his wife Olive of Albuquerque, New Mexico; a sister, Josephine Kozak and her husband Andrew of Greensburg; his nephew Father Dominic J. Petroy, O.S.B., also a member of the Saint Vincent monastic community, and many nephews, nieces,

great-nephews and great-nieces. He was preceded in death by ten brothers and sisters, Antoinette Cremonese, Gaetano Cremonese, Ann Macko, Joseph Cremonese, Mary Petroy, Salvatore Cremonese, Nicholas Cremonese, Louis Cremonese, Thelma Sofranko and Isabella DeBone. He attended the Sixth Ward School, Greensburg, and entered the Benedictine Monastic Community of Saint Vincent Archabbey in 1940. He made simple profession of vows on February 2, 1942, and solemn profession of vows in 1964. Brother Placid served the monastic community in the laundry and at the dairy farm (1940–42), as night watchman (1942–43), as the harness repairman and caretaker of the courtyard lawns (1942–50), as the shoemaker and baker of the famous Saint Vincent Bread (1942–67), and as bellringer (1944–50). From 1942 until his retirement he was the barber for the monastic community. He was best known as a baker of the famous Saint Vincent Bread, which was a staple in the Saint Vincent and Latrobe area community until a fire destroyed the bakery in 1963. He was also cellist for the College and Community Symphony Orchestra (1960-1964). He played the harmonica, organ, mandolin, guitar and cello. He published the following articles for Confluence magazine: “Mother Nature Offers Best Tranquilizers,” “Saint Vincent Bread,” “Our Mother Mary,” “What Do the Brothers Want,” “Environment,” and “Report on Christ’s Personality.”

Memorial contributions may be made to the Benedictine Health and Education Fund at Saint Vincent Archabbey, 300 Fraser Purchase Road, Latrobe, PA 15650.

The 2004-2005 Saint Vincent Archabbey Publications catalogue is now in print. The catalogue features books written by monks of the Archabbey, including those by Father Demetrius Dumm, O.S.B., Brother Elliott Maloney, O.S.B., Father Kurt Belsole, O.S.B., Brother Benedict Janecko, O.S.B., Father Philip Kanfush, O.S.B., Father Rene Kollar, O.S.B., and Father Mark Gruber, O.S.B. Additionally, the catalogue has a limited quantity of items from the Gristmill General Store, such as the Saint Vincent Gristmill history book, the Gristmill recipe book, the Gristmill videotape and Gristmill Christmas ornaments. A limited number of items from the Basilica Gift Shop are also featured, such as the Basilica window ornaments and Basilica facade ornaments, as well as a ceramic replica of the Basilica. Rounding out the publication are tapes by Father Jacques Daley from his popular Eternal Word Television Network programs, and Jerome Oetgen’s history of Saint Vincent and his biography of Boniface Wimmer. For a free copy of the catalogue, write to Archabbey Publications, 300 Fraser Purchase Road, Latrobe, PA 15650.

Volume 15, Number 2

31


Saint Vincent Archabbey

Heart to Heart Fall 2002

Founders’ Day Fireworks Saint Vincent Archabbey 300 Fraser Purchase Road Latrobe, PA 15650-2690 724-539-9761 http://benedictine.stvincent.edu/ Address Service Requested

The First Benedictine Monastery in the United States, Founded in 1846 32

NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION U.S. POSTAGE PAID PERMIT NO. 110

Heart to Heart Winter 2005  

An update on the Basilica Anniversary Book was given, with a photograph of the Blessed Virgin Mary statue in the Chapel of the Immaculate Co...

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