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SAINT VINCENT ARCHABBEY Winter 2016

Pope Francis: Visit To The United States


Heart to Heart

winter 2016

Archabbot’s Message Dear Friends, The year 2016 is off to an exciting start. Bishop Edward C. Malesic of the Diocese of Greensburg has designated Saint Vincent Archabbey Basilica as a pilgrimage church during the Jubilee Year of Mercy that Pope Francis proclaimed. On December 13, a Mass was offered to celebrate the opening of the Holy Door, at Saint Vincent Basilica. On April 30, 2016, Saint Vincent Parish will mark its 225th anniversary of its founding with a special Mass. Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap., of Philadelphia will serve as as celebrant and homilist and Bishop Malesic will concelebrate. We also recently marked the 100th anniversary of the Parish Rosary Altar Society, and the 50th anniversary of Pittsburgh Steeler Training Camp at Saint Vincent. Photo coverage of these events is included in this issue. Occasions were also celebrated off campus, as monks, along with seminarians, parishioners and college students of Saint Vincent traveled to Washington, D.C., and Philadelphia to see Pope Francis

during his first visit to the United States. A special photo section in this edition of Heart to Heart commemorates the historic visit of Pope Francis. Artistic endeavors of our monks, as well as friends of the Archabbey, were recently featured in gallery exhibits, with the work of Father Vincent de Paul Crosby, O.S.B., Father Robert Keffer, O.S.B., Brother Mark Floreanini, O.S.B., and Brother Etienne Huard, O.S.B. Roman J. Verostko, a contemporary American artist and former member of the Saint Vincent community, also presented an exhibition, “Algorithmic Transformations: From Art by Hand to Art by Code,” and delivered a public lecture as part of the College’s Threshold Series. The gallery also hosted an exhibition of the photography of Terry Deglau, a local photographer and longtime friend of Saint Vincent, whose work has received international recognition. Saint Vincent welcomed alumnus John M. Elliott, Esq., as the keynote speaker at the 48th Annual Red Mass. He is chairman and chief executive officer of the Elliott

Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B.

Greenleaf law firm in Philadelphia. Please save Saturday, March 5, on your calendars as Maestro Manfred Honeck will come to campus with The Pittsburgh Symphony and The Mendelssohn Choir of Pittsburgh for a special performance of Bach’s Saint John Passion. Pray that we continue to be blessed with vocations to the monastic life. May God’s blessings be with you. Know that you are remembered in the daily prayers of our community. Sincerely in Christ,

Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B.

from the Latin “Cor ad Cor Loquitur,” or “Heart Speaks to Heart,” is the motto of Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B. It refers to the Archabbot’s prayer that giving and receiving authentic love may always be the chief characteristic of the Saint Vincent monastic community. This was also the motto of John Henry Cardinal Newman.

This newsletter is published by the Benedictines of Saint Vincent Archabbey.

Director of Archabbey Public Relations/Editor Kimberley A. Metzgar

Publisher Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B.

Public Relations Associate Seth Harbaugh

Executive Director, Archabbey Apostolates and Endowments Paul R. Taylor, O.S.B. Director of Archabbey Development Bonaventure Curtis, O.S.B.

Contributors to this issue:

Saint Vincent Archabbey 300 Fraser Purchase Rd., Latrobe, PA 15650-2690 724-805-2601 kim.metzgar@email.stvincent.edu www.saintvincentarchabbey.org

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Jordan Hainsey Seth Harbaugh L’Osservatore Romano Barbara McAllister Kim Metzgar Rev. Donald Raila, O.S.B. Cover: Many members of the Saint Vincent community—Archabbey, College, Parish and Seminary—had the opportunity to see Pope Francis, either in Washington, D.C., New York City, or Philadelphia. A special insert in this issue is provided as a keepsake commemorating his visit.

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Saint Vincent Students, Monks Welcome Pope Francis To U.S. Saint Vincent College President Brother Norman Hipps, O.S.B., Archabbey Vocation Director Father Maximilian Maxwell, O.S.B., Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B., novices, seminarians from Saint Vincent Seminary and Saint Vincent College students were among the millions who traveled to Washington, D.C., and/or Philadelphia to welcome Pope Francis during his historic first visit to the United States September 22-27. Seminarians from across the country, including Saint Vincent, attended the Pope’s Mass in Washington, where he canonized Blessed Junipero Serra at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception. During his visit Pope Francis visited President Obama at the White House and prayed with the nation’s bishops at the Cathedral of Saint Matthew the Apostle, addressed a joint session of Congress, visited Saint Patrick Church, and met with Catholic Charities clients, staff members and volunteers. Before going to Philadelphia, Pope Francis traveled to New York City, where he attended vespers at Saint Patrick Cathedral, addressed the United Nations General Assembly, held an ecumenical religious service at the Memorial site of 9/11, visited a school in Harlem, met New Yorkers in Central Park, and celebrated Mass at Madison Square Garden. In Philadelphia, students from Saint Vincent College participated in the Festival of Families on September 26. Pope Francis spoke about immigration and religious freedom in Independence Mall. They attended Mass at Saint John the Evangelist Church the same afternoon, celebrated by Bishop Mark Bartchak of the Diocese of AltoonaJohnstown. The Mass was followed by performances by Italian tenor Andrea Bocelli, Columbian rock musician Juanes and the Philadelphia Orchestra. They also attended the Papal Mass on the afternoon of September 27 on the Parkway. Volume 26, Number 1

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Father Paschal Morlino, O.S.B., gave the advent retreat for employees at EWTN on December 5. EWTN’s employees and friars gathered at the Shrine of the Most Blessed Sacrament in Hanceville, Alabama, for the retreat. Father Paschal has been pastor of Saint Benedict Parish in ‪Baltimore‬ for the past 30 years. The retreat mass was televised. A link to the retreat can be found on the parish website: http:// www.saintbenedict.org/fr-paschal. ***** Father Michael Antonacci, O.S.B., recently presented a poster for the grand opening of the Biomedical Research Imaging Center at the University of North Carolina, where he is studying physics in the graduate program at Chapel Hill. ***** Father Matthias Martinez, O.S.B., earned a master of science degree in library science from Clarion University of Pennsylvania. He completed the degree program in July. Father Matthias has been serving for five years as assistant to the director of libraries at Saint Vincent College. ***** Father James Podlesny, O.S.B., pastor of the Church of the Holy Spirit, Palmyra, spoke on “Catholic Perspectives on Cloning and Genetics” this fall at an Interfaith 4

winter 2016 Dialogue hosted by Lebanon Valley College in Annville. Participants included representatives from the Jewish, Islamic, Hindu, Buddhist, and Pennsylvania non-believers communities in Central Pennsylvania. Also in September, he spoke on Pope Francis’ encyclical: Laudato Si at a Presbyterian Church in Carlisle. In October Father Jim spoke on “Catholic Perspectives on Euthanasia of the Young” at an Interfaith Dialogues hosted by Lebanon Valley College in Annville. Participants again included representatives

from the Jewish, Islamic, Hindu, Buddhist, and non-believers communities in Central Pennsylvania. Also in October, he led a public forum on Pope Francis’ encyclical: Laudato Si, which was hosted by Lebanon Valley College. In November 2015, Father Jim spoke on Pope Francis’ encyclical: Laudato Si at Harrisburg’s interfaith service and rally for climate justice and peace in preparation for the 21st Conference of the Parties (COP21) to the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change, held in Paris from November 30 to December 11, 2015. Other speakers included former Senator Franklin Kury and Professor John Dernbach, a delegate to the Paris Summit. ***** (Continued on Page 6)

LeVar Burton Speaks On Campus LeVar Burton, award-winning actor, producer, writer and literary advocate, spoke as part of the Saint Vincent College New Horizons Speakers Series this fall. Several members of the monastic community attended the lecture, including Brother Pio Adamonis, O.S.B., pictured with Burton above. Burton launched his acting career while still a student at the University of Southern California. Cast in the groundbreaking role of Kunta Kinte in the landmark television series Roots, at 19 he found himself on the cover of Time magazine. It was a seemingly impossible act to follow, but Burton managed to do so in dramatic fashion, achieving further global acclaim as chief engineer Geordi La Forge in the iconic Star Trek: The Next Generation. But it has been his role as host and executive producer of the beloved PBS children’s series Reading Rainbow of which he is most proud. Airing from 1983 to 2009, it was not only one of the longest-running children’s television shows in history but also one of the most acclaimed, earning more than 200 awards including multiple Emmys and a Peabody. Burton, a member of the board of advisors of the Fred Rogers Center for Early Learning and Children’s Media at Saint Vincent College, was the keynote speaker at FredForward, a national conference of the center held at the Senator John Heinz History Center, Pittsburgh, June 1-3.

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Parish Opens 225th Anniversary The Basilica Parish opened the celebration of its 225th anniversary with a Mass celebrated by Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B., (bottom photo) assisted by, from left, Father Thomas Curry, O.S.B., pastor; Brother David Klecker, deacon; Father Maximilian Maxwell, O.S.B.; Father Daniel O’Keefe, O.S.B., parochial vicar; and Brother Pio Adamonis, O.S.B., deacon. At the dinner following, Benedictines led in singing “Happy Birthday” to the parish, including, from left, Archabbot Douglas, Father Paul-Alexander Shutt, O.S.B., Father Dan, Father Cyprian Constantine, O.S.B., Father Donald Raila, O.S.B., Father Thomas More Sikora, O.S.B., Father Thomas, Father Maximilian, and Father Meinrad Lawson, O.S.B. During the dinner the Archabbey’s string quartet provided musical selections. From left are Father Cyprian, Father Thomas More, Father PaulAlexander and Father Donald.

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(Continued from Page 4) Father Jeremiah Lange, O.S.B., has been named pastor of Saint John University Parish, the Catholic parish for West Virginia University, and director of Campus Ministry. ***** Father Brian Boosel, O.S.B., has joined the faculty of Saint Vincent College full-time for the 2015-2016 academic year. He will serve as assistant professor of history. After graduating from Saint Vincent Seminary, he earned a master of arts degree in Medieval and Renaissance European history from Slippery Rock University and is completing his Ph.D. in early modern European history from The Catholic University of America. He previously taught at Saint Vincent Archabbey, College and Seminary and served as director of campus ministry and archivist. *****

Father Nathan Munsch, O.S.B., was on the steering committee of the Benedictine Pedagogy Conference held at Saint Vincent this summer. It was held at Saint Vincent for the second year in a row, with about 50 participants registered. He gave a presentation on the topic “Conversatio Morum: a Key to Understanding the Rule of Benedict.” Father Benoit Allogia, O.S.B., and Father Nathan again organized a soccer game of Benedictines versus religious education students at Saint Michael’s Parish, West Salisbury. The students won 6 to 5. ***** Father Maurus Mount, O.S.B., successfully defended his doctoral dissertation in July at the University of Vienna, Austria. The dissertation, in classical philology, was a commentary on the Sixth Book of the Vita Sancti Martini by Paulinus of Périgeuex. He is now on the Seminary faculty, teaching Latin and Greek.

***** Father Stephen Concordia, O.S.B., directed the Gregorian chant summer workshops at Saint Vincent, that included a performance at Saint Paul’s Cathedral, Pittsburgh. The Tribune-Review featured Father Stephen’s chant workshop, which drew students from as far as Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Writer Stacy Federoff noted that the students filled a classroom “with music that is more than a thousand years old.” “Father Steven is one of the very, very few people in the United States who teaches this,” said Raymond Henderson, a choir director from Long Island, N.Y. Father Stephen is sacred music professor and director of sacred music programs at the college, and studied and taught chant in Rome prior to coming to the Archabbey. “Whenever chanting is used—maybe it’s not as prevalent as it used to be—that’s still the tradition of chanting the Mass that comes from the time of Gregorian chant,” he told Federoff, who wrote that “Chanting notation directs the singer’s inflection, not just the rhythm and the pitch like the modern scale. That gives emphasis to certain words in the Biblical text that might have different meaning when read. We sort (Continued on Page 8)

Camerata Performs In Steubenville, Basilica The Saint Vincent Camerata, directed by Father Stephen Concordia, O.S.B., presented Mass in G and Dona Nobis Pacem with the Schola Cantorum of Franciscan University of Steubenville and the Academy Chamber Orchestra at Saint Peter’s Church, Steubenville, and Saint Vincent Archabbey Basilica. 6

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Monks Advance In Seminary Formation Five monk-seminarians were instituted into the Ministry of Acolyte and two were admitted to Candidacy for Holy Orders by Most Rev. Edward C. Malesic, Bishop of Greensburg, on October 12 at Saint Vincent Seminary, Latrobe.

An acolyte is appointed to aid the deacon, to minister to the priest at the altar and to serve as a special minister to give Holy Communion to the faithful at Mass and to the sick. Acolytes may also expose the Eucharist for public adoration in the absence of a priest or

deacon. Candidacy for Holy Orders is a declaration by the candidate that he is committing himself to a  program of formation for service to God and to the Catholic Church as an ordained minister. It is also the public acceptance by the bishop of the aspirant into the ranks of the candidates for Holy Orders. CANDIDATES FOR HOLY ORDERS Brother Canice (Daniel) McMullen, O.S.B., is the son of Craig and Ruth McMullen of State College. He is a 2006 graduate of State College Area High School. He earned a bachelor of science degree in accounting from Pennsylvania State University in 2010. Brother Matthew Nguyen, O.S.B., is the son of Thuc Van and Nam Be Thi Vo Nguyen of Vinh Long, Vietnam. He attended Hieu Phung High School, Vinh Long, graduating in 1999. He was a member of the Cistercian Saint Joseph Monastery in Lucerne Valley, California, prior to transferring to Saint Vincent.

In the top photo, Brother Matthew Nguyen, O.S.B., and Brother Canice McMullen, O.S.B., were admitted to Candidacy for Holy Orders. In the bottom photo, instituted into the Ministry of Acolyte by Bishop Edward C. Malesic, were, from left, Brother Martinho Zevallos, O.S.B.; Brother Joachim Morgan, O.S.B. and Brother Lawrence Machia, O.S.B., all of Saint Vincent Archabbey; Brother Dominic Leo, O.S.B., Saint Peter’s Abbey, Saskatchewan, Canada; and Andrew Boyd, Diocese of Erie.

ACOLYTES Brother Lawrence (Shawn) Machia, O.S.B., is the son of Keith and Louise Machia of Swanton, Vermont. He is a 2004 graduate of Missisquoi Valley Union High School. He earned a bachelor of arts degree in theology in 2008 from Eastern University. Brother Joachim Morgan, O.S.B., was born in Plattsburgh, New York. He is the son of Charles and Laura Morgan of White Lake, Michigan. He is a 2006 graduate of Ludington High School and earned a bachelor of science degree in French from Central Michigan University in 2009. Brother Martinho Zevallos (Chávez), O.S.B., is the son of Luis Ariel Zevallos Perez and Teresa Sara Chávez de Zevallos of Arequipa, Peru. He graduated from high school in Coronel Gregorio Albarracin, Tacna, Peru, in 1989 and received a bachelor’s degree from the University of San Agustin, Arequipa, Peru, in 1995, where he studied physics. He earned a doctorate in physics from the University of São Paulo, Brazil, in 2003.

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(Continued from Page 6) of lost that in the last thousand years.” Father Stephen also led a workshop on Gregorian chant and spoke to a graduate choral conducting class at Bard College Conservatory. James Bagwell, a choral and orchestral conductor, and head of the graduate program at Bard, invited Father Stephen to talk to his graduate choral conducting class. Father Stephen conducted a choral workshop for the National Pastoral Musicians Association, Greensburg and attended the Boston Early Music Festival and the Dolcroze Eurhythmics Summer Workshop at Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh. The NPM workshop included organists, music directors, and cantors from throughout the Diocese of Greensburg and focused on preparing a performance of compline (night prayer), which was broadcast live on WAOB radio. ***** The Tribune-Review and Latrobe Bulletin featured the work of Father Robert Keffer, O.S.B., in recent articles. Father Robert’s painting “The Hero,” was one of two chosen by students at Greater Latrobe Senior High School to join the collection of about 200 pieces of art lining the walls of the school. The program is part of The Greater Latrobe School District Art Conservation Trust. A gala attended by nearly 500 people was held in early November to announce the finalists for the year. Students have been collecting paintings for the program since 1938. Father Robert painted a firefighter surrounded by iconography reminiscent of a saint, surrounded by the words, “Saint Florian, pray for us” in Latin, acknowledging the patron saint of firefighters. Father Robert also gave a talk on Salvador Dali at Seton Hill University. He plans two other talks on the subject of Dali, one 8

Father Earl Named Alumnus Of Distinction Saint Vincent College honored eleven graduates with the presentation of Alumni of Distinction or Recent Alumnus Achievement Awards this fall during the annual Alumni Homecoming and Fall Family Weekend. Among those honored was Father Earl Henry, O.S.B., prior of the Archabbey, pictured second from left. At left is Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B., and third from left is Brother Norman Hipps, O.S.B., college president. They are with Julie Claybaugh Selep, past president of the alumni association. Father Earl graduated from Saint Vincent College with a bachelor of arts degree in philosophy in 1960 and from Saint Vincent Seminary with a master of divinity degree in 1964. A 1955 graduate of Saint Vincent Prep School, he entered Saint Vincent Archabbey in 1957 and was ordained a priest in 1964. He was the associate pastor at Saint Gertrude Parish, Vandergrift. Then he returned to Saint Vincent to hold the positions of director of food service, director of intramurals, dean of students and director of admission and financial aid. He studied at the International Benedictine College of Sant’Anselmo, Rome, Italy, and served as administrator of Saint Nicholas Parish, Nicktown, and rector of Penn State Catholic Center. For the past 19 years, Father Earl has been the prior of Saint Vincent Archabbey and for 22 years served as president of Wimmer Corporation. at the Saint Vincent Science Center and one at the Westmorland Museum of Art. Father Robert also gave the retreat at the Oblate Day of Recollection held this fall at the Archabbey. ***** Father Rene Kollar, O.S.B., edited Renaissance Philosophy and the Mediaeval Tradition by Paul Oskar Kristeller, the 15th lecture in the Wimmer Memorial Lecture Series. He attended the Pontifical John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and Family at the Catholic University of America and the Gaudium et Spes Conference in Washington, D.C. ***** Father Thomas Hart, O.S.B., traveled with

students of TH 380, World Religions class, to tour the Islamic Center and Sri Venkateswara Temple, Pittsburgh and attended the Benedictine Pedagogy Conference held at Saint Vincent this summer. ***** Father Cyprian Constantine, O.S.B., gave a music workshop for the music ministers at Saint Matthew Catholic Church in Winder, Georgia, in the Archdiocese of Atlanta (Continued on Page 10) Volume 26 Number 1


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All Souls Day At Mausoleum Chapel

Members of the monastic community and the local community gathered on All Souls Day to remember those who have died in the past year. Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B., conducted the special service, held at the Mary, Mother of Mercy Mausoleum Chapel at Saint Vincent Cemetery. In addition to offering prayers for the recently deceased, the names of those loved ones were read during the service.

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visiting priors Last summer priors from other Benedictine abbeys visited Saint Vincent. Members of the group included, front from left, Prior Michael Calhoun, O.S.B., Saint Bede Abbey, Peoria, Illinois; Prior Gerard Garrigan, O.S.B., Saint Louis Abbey, Creve Coeur, Missouri; Prior Timothy Buyansky, O.S.B., Saint Andrew Abbey, Cleveland, Ohio; Prior Daniel Petsche, O.S.B., Conception Abbey, Conception, Missouri; Father Earl Henry, O.S.B., Saint Vincent Archabbey; middle from left, Prior Justin McCreedy, O.S.B., Saint Martin’s Abbey, Lacey, Washington; Prior Jeremy Heppler, O.S.B., Saint Benedict’s Abbey, Atchison, Kansas; Prior James Doran, O.S.B., Saint Benedict Abbey, Still River, Massachusetts; Prior Daniel Walters, O.S.B., Glastonbury Abbey, Hingham, Massachusetts; back from left, Prior Christopher Kirschgessner, O.S.B., Belmont, Abbey, Belmont, North Carolina; Prior Matthias Durette, O.S.B., Saint Anselm Abbey, Manchester, New Hampshire; and Prior Jerome Borski, O.S.B., Saint Mary’s Abbey, Morristown, New Jersey. (Continued from Page 8) on August 1. The pastor of the church is a seminary alumnus, Father Gilbert Exumé. ***** Father Isaac (Paul) Haywiser, O.S.B., who was ordained to the priesthood on May 2, has been assigned as parochial vicar of Saint John University Parish, the Catholic parish for West Virginia University, and associate director of Campus Ministry. ***** A typographical error in the previous Heart to Heart is corrected with this entry: Brother Gabriel Evan Neely, N.O.S.B., is the son of Jerry Wayne Neely and Geralyn Marie Neely. 10

***** Father Thomas Acklin, O.S.B., and Father Edward Mazich, O.S.B., recently presented the reflections for the annual Diocese of Greensburg Priests’ Convocation, held on October 14-15 at the Chestnut Ridge Resort and Conference Center in Blairsville. The topic was Pope Francis’ call for a “Year of Mercy,” examined from the perspectives of God’s mercy as it is described in the Sacred Scriptures and as it unfolds through the sacramental life of the Church. The two also attended the annual Diocese of Harrisburg Priests’ Convocation, held at the Hunt Valley Inn Conference Center near Baltimore. Father Edward gave the annual monastic

retreat on the theme “The Instruments of Good Works from the Rule of Saint Benedict” for the community of Assumption Abbey in Richardton, North Dakota in the spring. In June he offered the annual retreat for the Benedictine community at Saint John’s Abbey in Collegeville, Minnesota on the topic of “The Second Vatican Council— Fifty Years Later.” In July Father Edward gave the retreat for the priests of the Diocese of Beijing, China, reflecting on the theme “The mission of the Church in China in the TwentyFirst Century.” Father Edward also wrote a review of Annette Schellenberg’s commentary Kohe(Continued on Page 12) Volume 26 Number 1


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Event photos by Karen Hauser.

Rosary Altar Society Turns 100 The Rosary Altar Society of Saint Vincent Basilica Parish celebrated a century of service to the community with a special anniversary Mass and dinner on October 18. Pastor Father Thomas Curry, O.S.B., celebrated Mass prior to the Sunday afternoon luncheon. In the photo at top, taken by Karen Hauser, attendees gathered with some of the Benedictines who have served the parish over the years. Father Philip Kanfush, O.S.B., (below) who was parochial vicar from 2000-2003, was the guest speaker. He spoke on the Blessed Virgin Mary. In the photo at right, the society officers are pictured with members of the Knights of Columbus who attended

the Mass. In the first row, from left, are Kathy Fajt, treasurer; Leann Falbo,

president; Dee Rubino, vice president and Marian Wisneski, secretary. Knights in the second row, from left, are Gabriel Pellathy; Anthony Caviggia; Henry Novak; Robert Dietrich and James Ferranti. In the back, from left, are John Smetanka; James Singer; Robert Trainer and Ronald Sherer.

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(Continued from Page 10) let from the Zürcher Bibelkommentare series; the review was published in the Catholic Biblical Quarterly. *****

Brother Matthew Hershey, O.S.B., and Brother Mark Liatti, O.S.B., spent several days in a summer immersion experience, part of their seminary formation, at Clelian Heights School for Exceptional Children, Greensburg. ***** Brother Elliott Maloney, O.S.B., presented a Day of Recollection for the priests of the AltoonaJohnstown Diocese on December 17. The Day at the Mount Assisi Friary in Loretto started with a penance service at 1 p.m. followed by two conferences with question periods by Brother Elliott. The event concluded with the participants dining with the Franciscan Community. ***** Brother Norman W. Hipps, O.S.B., president of Saint Vincent College, presented the Projektenmacher Award to Winnie Palmer Nature Reserve Director Angela Belli during the fall honors convocation. Belli was named the fifth annual winner of the Projektenmacher Award in recognition of her initiatives that, in the spirit of Saint Vincent founder Boniface Wimmer, 12

Brother Mark Floreanini, O.S.B., associate professor of fine arts, was commissioned to paint a banana split mural by Valley Dairy Restaurants, Latrobe. In addition to the colorful depiction of a banana split, the mural includes reminders of “Latrobe, Pennsylvania 1904” as “Home of the Banana Split” under a colorful banner which includes the Valley Dairy Restaurant’s logo. The mural took nearly 50 hours to complete, and is permanently installed at the downtown Latrobe restaurant on Jefferson Street. It was a feature of the third annual Great American Banana Split Celebration in August, which was sponsored by the Greater Latrobe Laurel Valley Chamber of Commerce. Brother Mark also attended the Saint Andrei Icon Studio Workshop in Scranton. “have brought vision to reality through hard work and perseverance.” “Boniface Wimmer’s fellow monks were derisive of his vision for a mission to America, and even nicknamed him, ‘DerProjektenmacher, that big plan-maker! That dreamer!’,” Brother Norman said. “But at the end of Wimmer’s life, after 40 years of extraordinary accomplishments in America including the establishment of seven monasteries, 75 schools and 152 parishes, ‘Projektenmacher’ came to identify an individual who got things done, to realize visions, to enlist support and collaboration of his fellow monks and lay colleagues. “Today, at a time when Pope Francis has elevated the importance of environmental issues in our world, we recognize the work of Angela Belli, director

of the Winnie Palmer Nature Reserve, where she has overseen the creation and continued development of a signature program on the Saint Vincent campus,” Brother Norman said. “The Reserve is a refuge of wilderness on the boundary of campus, a place for a quiet walk, a chance encounter with local wildlife, or an opportunity to see the colors and smell the fragrances of the seasonal variations of plant life. It is a place to learn, to relax, to grow in awareness and appreciation of blessings of our natural world.” The programs Belli develops serve senior researchers, freshman seminar students, the college’s education majors and many preschoolers in Tiny Wonder Time, Nature Story Time, and summer camps (Bug, Fur and Feathers, and Slime and Scales). “All that she does is informed by an eye of integral ecology and the importance of the care we must give and the appreciation we must have for the gift of our common home,” Brother Norman said. Volume 26 Number 1


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The Saint Vincent Archabbey Retreat Office has announced its 2016 retreat schedule, which includes six retreats, one on Benedictine spirituality, one on charismatic prayer, a men’s retreat, a father and son retreat, a silent retreat and a self-directed retreat weekend. BENEDICTINE SPIRITUALITY Never Lose Hope in God’s Mercy: Mercy In Saint Benedict’s Rule and in Daily Life Friday, May 13, 5:30 p.m. to Sunday, May 15, 1 p.m. At first glance, the Rule of Saint Benedict includes some measures that seem very harsh. However, if one delves more deeply into the Rule, one will notice numerous exhortations to practice mercy, compassion, and kindness, both among the monks and to outsiders. This retreat, occurring during the Year of Mercy, will focus on the dimensions of the Rule that deal with God’s merciful love and practical ways to live in His mercy. Retreat Master: Father Donald Raila, O.S.B., is director of Oblates at Saint Vincent Archabbey and the author of Lessons from Benedict: Finding Joy in Daily Life. He also edited The Rule in Bits and Pieces, a book of 140 reflections on The Holy Rule. Charismatic Prayer Contemplating the Face of Mercy Friday, June 10, 5:30 p.m. to Sunday, June 12, 1 p.m. In his Bull of Indiction for the Jubilee Year of Mercy, Pope Francis wrote, “May the Holy Spirit who guides the steps of believers in cooperating with the work of salvation wrought by Christ, lead the way and support the People of God so that they may contemplate the face of mercy.” In this retreat we will reflect on the mercy of God, communicated

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2016 Retreat Schedule Announced to us through the Holy Spirit, which opens us up to praise and thanksgiving for all that He has done for us. There will also be opportunities for individual confession, a praise meeting with an opportunity to be prayed over, and Eucharistic adoration. Retreat Master: Father Boniface Hicks, O.S.B., was ordained to the priesthood in 2004. He has served as an adjunct faculty member at Saint Vincent College and assists with programming at WAOB Radio. Retreat WEEKEND Friday, June 17, 5:30 p.m. to Sunday, June 19, 1 p.m. This retreat is designed as a selfdirected retreat. Retreatants are welcome to pray and to attend mass with the monastic community. There are no conferences. There are opportunities for spiritual direction if desired. Retreat Master: Father Thomas Acklin, O.S.B., is a former rector of Saint Vincent Seminary and the author of two books, The Unchanging Heart of the Priesthood and The Passion of the Lamb. SILENT RETREAT Merciful Like the Father Friday, June 24, 5:30 p.m. to Sunday, June 26, 1 p.m. In his Bull of Indiction for the Jubilee Year of Mercy, Pope Francis wrote, “We want to live this Jubilee Year in light of the Lord’s words: Merciful like the Father. … Jesus’s command is directed to anyone willing to listen to his voice (cf. Lk 6:27). In order to be capable of mercy, therefore, we must first of all dispose ourselves to listen to the Word of God. This means rediscovering the value of silence in order to meditate on the Word that comes to us. In this way it will be possible to contemplate God’s

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mercy and adopt it as our lifestyle.” In this retreat we will allow the Word of God to bring us into an encounter with our merciful Father and guide us in how we might better put that mercy into practice in our lives. Retreat Master: Father Boniface Hicks, O.S.B. (refer to biography listed previously). MEN’S RETREAT Jesus and the Kingdom of God Friday, July 22, 5:30 p.m. to Sunday, July 24, 1 p.m. The main teaching of Jesus was about the Kingdom of God, a striking new presence of God in human life brought about by the life and death of Jesus. In this Holy Year of Mercy, we shall examine Jesus’ teaching of the compassion God has for us and our mission as Church to be a witness of mercy to the world. Retreat Master: Brother Elliott Maloney, O.S.B., is professor of New Testament and Biblical Languages at Saint Vincent Seminary and the author of two books, Saint Paul: Master of the Spiritual Life ‘In Christ’ and Jesus’ Urgent Message for Today. FATHER AND SON RETREAT Saints Rich in Mercy Friday, July 29, 5:30 p.m. to Sunday, July 31, 1 p.m. The saints are our friends and intercessors on the journey of faith. Inviting saints to be a part of our families and to inspire us, whether we are fathers or sons, is an important part of the life of faith. In this Jubilee Year of Mercy, Pope Francis invites us to reflect on saints who are rich in mercy: “Our prayer also extends to the saints and blessed ones who made divine mercy their mission in life.” In this retreat, we will reflect on the lives of the saints in order to open up the riches of mercy in our own families. Retreat Master: Father Boniface Hicks, O.S.B. (refer to biography listed previously). 13


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Father Vincent de Paul Crosby, O.S.B., at work in his studio at Saint Vincent Archabbey.

Father Vincent Designs Altar Linens For Pope Francis’ Visit Father Vincent de Paul Crosby, O.S.B., has been designing and making vestments for Saint Vincent Archabbey, since 1991. His ministry started as a side project, but it quickly grew into his primary form of ministry. Recently, his already-celebrated work received national and international recognition when he was asked by the Archdiocese of Philadelphia to design linens for Pope Francis to use at the two Masses he celebrated during his visit to the city in September. The Archdiocese asked for two sets of Papal altar linens: one with a Marian theme for Mass in Saints Peter and Paul Basilica and one with a Christocentric theme for Mass on the Parkway. As a result, articles on Father Vincent de Paul’s work appeared in local and regional newspapers, as well as in Our Sunday Visitor. “I had some art connections there,” he told OSV writer Maryann Eidemiller. “And over the years, I’ve done a lot of

work for parishes in the archdiocese, and for the cardinals and bishops. I’ve made vestments and mitres for them, and so they know of me. “I love my work, and I feel very privileged to be able to do it,” he said. “I also see it as something that is not apart from my priestly ministry but an important part of it, because beauty is one of the most effective ways that one comes to know and experience the transcendent. So I feel that as an artist, making beautiful things available gives honor and glory to God.” The linens included a corporal upon which the chalice is placed, two palls to be placed on top of the chalice and over the hosts, a purificator used to clean the vessels, and a hand towel used for the washing of the hands in each set. The Marian linens include the traditional “Ave Maria” symbol surrounded by a border of 12 stars. The Christocentric linens use a traditional symbol of the Risen Christ, a Greek Cross with

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“IC XC NIKA,” meaning “Jesus Christ, Victor.” “Of all the things that the Holy Father uses at these masses, the most intimate are the linens that he’s actually touching,” Father Vincent said. “For me, that will be a very personal connection to him.” The linens were embroidered by CM Almy of White Plains, New York, a company specializing in religious apparel and furnishings. Father Vincent had worked with the company previously, when a representative approached him last February and asked him to create new vestment designs for its fall catalogue. He was asked to propose eight designs with the thought that three would be selected. The company chose seven of the designs. The designs include the Saint Benedict and Saint Scholastica collections, a tribute to Father Vincent de Paul’s Benedictine life; as well as the Life of Mary; the Resurrection, Lent; and the Apostles. Volume 26, Number 1


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Father Vincent de Paul Crosby, O.S.B., created simple designs for the two Papal Masses in Philadelphia in September. The Eucharistic theme of the public outdoor Mass near the Benjamin Franklin Parkway (top photo) was reflected by a red and gold cross superimposed over a square with the Greek words “IC XC NIKA,” which means “Jesus Christ is victorious.” The Mass at the Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul had a Marian theme. For those linens (middle photo) the central design is a gold crown over the letters “A” and “M,” for Ave Maria, with blue stars around the borders. Below, Pope Francis venerates the altar during the opening procession of the Mass on the Parkway. Father Vincent is a 1962 graduate of the Buffalo Diocesan Preparatory Seminary. He received a bachelor of arts degree in philosophy in 1966 from Saint John Vianney Seminary, and a master of divinity degree in 1972 from Saint Vincent Seminary. He did further studies at Tyler School of Art, Temple University, and earned a bachelor of fine arts degree in 1974. That was followed by a year of independent art studies in Rome. Specializing in fabric art, he earned a master of fine arts degree from The Catholic University of America in 1976. He has been a member of the monastic community at Saint Vincent Archabbey since 1967 and was ordained a priest in 1972. Father Vincent has lectured widely on the subject of art and environment for worship and serves as liturgical consultant to churches that are undergoing renovation. He is the Archabbey consultant for monastic environment and art. Father Vincent oversaw the successful restoration and renovation of the Archabbey Basilica, the monastic refectory and most recently, the renovation of the Basilica Crypt. He is also coordinator of the Archabbey’s ongoing renovations. In 2012 he served as artistic consultant for the building of the Catholic Chapel at Penn State University. In 2013 he served as artistic consultant for Mary, Mother of Mercy Mausoleum Chapel at Saint Vincent Cemetery. Volume 26, Number 1

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Saint Vincent Archabbey Basilica Designated As Pilgrimage Site Most Rev. Edward C. Malesic, Bishop of Greensburg, has designated Saint Vincent Archabbey Basilica as a Church of Pilgrimage with a Holy Door for the Year of Mercy declared by Pope Francis. “The Door of Mercy is a special Holy Door which Pope Francis has asked to be opened in every Diocese on the Third Sunday of Advent, December 13,” Bishop Malesic wrote. “The Doors of Mercy will allow the faithful during the Jubilee Year to experience the Mercy of the Father in its fullness. The Churches of Pilgrimage will be places where major diocesan events will be celebrated, as well as Churches where pilgrims can come to experience mercy by walking through the Doors of Mercy, touring the Church, and celebrating the Sacrament of Reconciliation. “I have decided that it is advantageous that we have one Church of Pilgrimage in each county, with the exception of Westmoreland County, where there will be two Churches of Pilgrimage: Blessed Sacrament Cathedral, 300 North Main St., Greensburg, and Saint Vincent Basilica, 300 Fraser Purchase Road, Latrobe. “During this Extraordinary Jubilee of Mercy, Pope Francis concedes a plenary indulgence, with the customary conditions (sacramental confession, Eucharistic communion, and prayer in keeping with his prayer intentions), to all members of the faithful, until November 20, 2016, the Solemnity of Our Lord Jesus Christ, King of the Universe. The Jubilee Indulgence can also be obtained for the deceased. “To obtain the Indulgence, the faithful are called to make a pilgrimage to the Holy Door of Mercy and pass through it or fulfill one of the other conditions under which Pope Francis grants the Indulgence: • Those that perform a corporal or spiritual work of mercy. • The sick and elderly who offer their suffering. • The imprisoned who visit the prison chapel and direct their thought and prayer to the Father of Mercy each time they cross the threshold of their cell, signifying for them passage through the Holy Door. “To fulfill the final actions, the faithful should first and foremost, participate in the Sacrament of Reconciliation and the celebration of the Holy Eucharist with a reflection on mercy. These celebrations are to be accompanied by the profession of faith (Creed) and prayer for the Holy Father and his intentions.” —Pope Francis, Letter of Indulgence, September 1, 2015.


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Above, clockwise from top left, are works that were on exhibit from Brother Etienne Huard, O.S.B., Brother Mark Floreanini, O.S.B., Father Vincent de Paul Crosby, O.S.B., and Father Robert Keffer, O.S.B.

Work Of Four Monks Featured In Fall Gallery Show The work of four monks—three from Saint Vincent Archabbey—was featured

in the fall 2015 show at Saint Vincent Gallery. The exhibit featured the work of fabric artist Father Vincent de Paul Crosby, O.S.B., art professor Brother Mark Floreanini, O.S.B., and painter Father Robert Keffer, O.S.B., all of Saint Vincent Archabbey, as well as that of photographer Brother Etienne Huard, O.S.B., a monk of ConcepFrom left, Father Vincent de Paul Crosby, O.S.B., Brother tion Abbey, MisMark Floreanini, O.S.B., Brother Etienne Huard, O.S.B., and souri. Father Robert Keffer, O.S.B. “I experiment 18

with materials and learn what I can in order to inspire my students,” said Brother Mark, who works in a variety of mediums. “There should be a spiritual message within each piece I make.” Brother Mark, of Alliance, Ohio, has been a member of the monastic community since 1998. He earned an associate degree in fine art from Sinclair Community College in 1987, a bachelor of arts degree in studio art from Saint Vincent College in 2001, a master of arts degree from Saint Vincent Seminary in 2004, and a master of fine arts degree from Savannah College of Arts and Design in 2005. A tenured member of the faculty at Saint Vincent, he creates stained-glass windows, paints, and also spins wool and crochets. “I seek to express my monastic spiriVolume 26, Number 1


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Clockwise, from top, left, portrait of Father Thomas Curry, O.S.B., by Father Robert Keffer; detail of stained glass piece by Brother Mark Floreanini, O.S.B.; detail of photo by Brother Etienne Huard, O.S.B.; and an applique, entitled Holy Trinity, in mixed fabrics, by Father Vincent de Paul Crosby. O.S.B.

tuality and priesthood in subject matter that is ‘non religious’,” noted Father Robert. “A landscape can express monastic solitude, or a character study can represent a virtue or vice.” Father Robert, a Connellsville native, attended the Ivy School of Professional Art in Pittsburgh, and the Academy of Art College in San Francisco, and received an associate degree. He entered the Cistercian Abbey of Our Lady of Spring Bank in Sparta, Wisconsin, in 1989 and was ordained a priest in 1995. He studied Biblical exogenesis and philosophy

at The University of Fribourg in Switzerland, at Saint John’s University in Collegeville, Minnesota, and at the Angelicum in Rome, Italy. His monastic formation took place at the Abbey of Hauterive in Switzerland. He officially transferred to Saint Vincent in May 2014. He is a hospital chaplain for Excela Health in Latrobe and works with Campus Ministry at Seton Hill University. “A good photograph should make us wonder, and then prod us to go forward,” said Brother Etienne, who specializes

in macro photography. A seminarian at Saint Vincent Seminary, he earned a bachelor of arts degree in philosophy from Conception Seminary College in 2009. He worked for Lawrence Photo in Wichita, Kansas, as a professional camera equipment sales person, where he learned about the art of photography. “My conviction is that vestments are real clothing, not costumes. They reveal who the person really is, not who he or she is pretending to be,” said Father Vincent. More of his work was featured on page 14 of this issue.

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Red Mass Honors Members Of Bench, Bar John M. Elliott, Esq., was the keynote speaker at the 48th Annual Red Mass, held this fall at Saint Vincent. The event is sponsored by Saint Vincent Archabbey, College and Seminary and the Diocese of Greensburg. Elliott, a Saint Vincent College graduate, is chairman and chief executive officer of the Elliott Greenleaf law firm. He graduated from Saint Vincent College with highest honors in economics and from Georgetown University Law Center in 1966 with highest honors in constitutional law, conflicts of law and legal ethics. He is admitted to practice in the United States Supreme Court; the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit; the United States District Courts for the Eastern, Western and Middle Districts of Pennsylvania; the District of Columbia; and the Supreme, Superior and Commonwealth Courts of Pennsylvania. Several of Elliott’s family members, who are also members of the Pennsylvania Bar, attended, including his wife Eileen, a former prosecutor, and his son Kyle, a litigator. Also attending were his daughter Heather and grandson Timmy. (Elliott has three other sons, Jack, Kirwan and Tom, who were unable attend.) Elliott noted that when he was in New York City on business, he attended an All Saints Day Mass celebrated by its rector, Monsignor Anthony DallaVilla, who shared the following spiritual wisdom. He said: “Saint Patrick’s welcomes you here today, on All Saints Day. Throughout this Cathedral, you see statues representing the Church’s official saints, men and women whose exemplary lives of faith, sacrifice, love and courage have been officially recognized by the Church. “However, I urge you to look beyond these statues and into your own life’s experiences to see the other saints, the real life men and women—parents,

John M. Elliott, Esq., chairman and chief executive officer of the Elliott Greenleaf law firm, gave the keynote address at the 48th annual Red Mass. teachers, nuns, priests, police, firemen, coaches, doctors and nurses— who are spiritual difference makers. “They are the everyday saints whose sacrifices, good works and leadership daily breathe life, hope and vitality into the Church. “Remember that every day you walk among these real world saints, who make the world a better place.” In speaking about Saint Thomas More, the lawyer and the saint, and about his turbulent 16th-Century Renaissance world, Elliott noted that Thomas More “wasn’t always a saint. First, he was a uniquely gifted human being, who exercised legal, political, diplomatic, academic, and judicial power and responsibility at the highest levels of England’s political and legal structure. “He began his classical studies at Oxford in 1492, just as Christopher Columbus burst open the New World’s vast opportunities. “After two years, Thomas’ precocious talents quickly moved to the Inns of Court. “He later served as High Steward for the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge. “His friend, the distinguished theologian and humanist Erasmus of Rot-

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terdam, said that Thomas seriously considered joining a Carthusian Monastery near London. “Thomas was an author (Utopia in 1516), a humanist, a philosopher, and the most influential lawyer in England. “His extensive public service included serving as an elected member of Parliament and as the elected speaker of England’s venerable House of Commons. Thomas also served as undersheriff of London, a wise Privy counselor to King Henry VIII, as King Henry’s secretary and personal advisor, as a trusted and effective diplomat, and as Lord Chancellor—the highest position in England’s legal system. “Thomas—the man—was also a very significant political player in the dangerous and spiritually challenging real politick world of King Henry VIII’s nascent English nationalism. His life straddled two great movements that changed the world, and challenged the primacy of the Catholic Church— the Renaissance and the Reformation.” Elliott noted that “Thomas’ world was the most dynamic and transformational in medieval history—the new world was discovered, new religions Volume 26, Number 1


Heart to Heart were formed, and new spiritual and national interests emerged.” King Henry, despite six marriages, had never had the son he desperately wanted to secure his dynastic succession, Elliott noted. King Henry, he said, “was a popular King until he started cutting off his subjects’ heads. Henry terminated two of his marriages by beheading his wives, the more remembered being Ann Boleyn and the lesser-known eighteen-year-old Catherine Howard. “In one of history’s great ironies, Henry’s daughter with Ann Boleyn, Queen Elizabeth I—the Virgin Queen—ruled England for forty-four years, to be succeeded by the Stuarts of Scotland, then the Dutch William of Orange, and finally the German Kings of Hanover, whose ancestors still occupy the English throne—after changing their name from Battenberg to the anglicized, more benign Windsor and Mountbatten.” Thomas More, Elliott said, “realized that he was dealing with political dynamite, and that he was surrounded by a treacherous group of opportunists who plotted his demise to curry Henry’s favor, including Cardinal Wolsey, Thomas Cromwell (who replaced Thomas as Henry’s chief

winter 2016 advisor), Thomas Cramner (the spiritually deficient Archbishop of Canterbury), and the infamous Richard Rich (the solicitor general whom Cromwell manipulated to testify perjuriously that Thomas denied that King Henry was the legitimate head of the Church). “Even though the Duke of Norfolk warned that ‘the consequences of royal anger is death,’ Thomas courageously spoke the truth to the King’s power, and when he could not reconcile his conscience to the King’s demands, he resigned his powerful office as Lord Chancellor. “Thomas’ principled opposition to King Henry’s marriage to Ann Boleyn, his refusal to legitimize her by attending her coronation, and his refusal to sign the Act of Succession led to his execution for treason, at age 57, on July 6, 1535, dying as ‘the King’s good servant, but God’s first.’ In less than a year, Ann Boleyn, the authoress of Thomas’ demise, followed him to the chopping block. “Today,” Elliott said, “Saint Thomas More’s memory and spirit are universally venerated for his principled courage and integrity in the face of lethal power, while his enemies have descended into historic disrepute. “Although our life experiences fall

Among those in attendance at the 49th annual Red Mass, were, from left, Most Rev. Mark Bartchak, Bishop of Altoona-Johnstown, who is a canon lawyer; Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B.; John M. Elliott, Esq., chairman and chief executive officer of the Elliott Greenleaf law firm, who spoke, and Most Rev. Edward C. Malesic, Bishop of the Diocese of Greensburg, which co-sponsors the event. Bishop Malesic is also a canon lawyer.

dramatically short of Saint Thomas More’s heroic example, we can all draw great inspiration from him—both from the man and the Saint as we try our best to do the right thing in difficult circumstances regardless of personal consequences, and as we try to stand on the side of truth and justice, with the compassion and humanity that formed the essence of Saint Thomas More’s faith. “Thus, while Saint Thomas More’s example is inspirational to all of us, it is particularly relevant to those of you who are on the front line of public service, including those serving in the difficult ‘judging’ end of the legal profession. You have the difficult responsibility of applying the rule of law fairly to protect the interests of society, while balancing the rights of the individual. This is not an easy balance.” He noted that “Saint Vincent’s Benedictine values and education have prepared generations of lawyers, who then ascended to distinguished careers of public service on the bench. “Significantly, the Church extends Saint Thomas More’s spiritual protection to politicians, lawyers, statesmen, civil servants, court clerks, difficult marriages, adopted children, stepparents, and widowers,” he said. “Thus, as we leave this magnificent Basilica on this beautiful Western Pennsylvania day, let us also remember the special mission of Saint Vincent—America’s first Catholic Church west of the Allegheny Mountains— and its indomitable first Archabbot Boniface Wimmer, an immigrant from Bavaria, who challenged us and Saint Vincent always to move ‘Forward, Always Forward, Everywhere Forward.’ “As we move forward together, let us think and act in this spirit, as we carry Saint Thomas More’s and Saint Vincent’s spirit, values and legacy into the challenges of the 21st century and beyond. “God bless you, Saint Thomas More and the Saint Vincent community as you continue your important work in the pursuit of justice.”

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Ann Holmes, Director of the Saint Vincent Gallery, American Artist Roman Verostko and Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B., at the opening of the exhibit “Algorithmic Transformations: From Art by Hand to Art by Code.” Below right, Verostko during the lecture. The inset is from a recently-published Princeton University Press book, “Mathematics + Art: A Cultural History,” by Lynn Gamwell, that includes Verostko’s work.

Aware of the awesome power of algorithmic procedure, he began experimenting with code and exhibited his first coded art program, the “Magic Hand of Chance,” in 1982. In 1987 he modified his software with interactive routines to drive pens and brushes mounted on a pen plotter drawing arm. He holds the SIGGRAPH (Special Interest Group on Graphics and Interactive Techniques) “Distinguished Artist Award for Lifetime Achievement” (2009) and has had work included in “The American Algorists Linear Sublime” (New York Digital Salon School of Visual Arts, 2013), “Digital Pioneers” (Victoria and Albert Museum, London, 2009), “The AlgorithmicREvolution” (Medienmuseum at the Zentrum fur Medientechnologie, Karlsruhe, 2005) and many other exhibitions worldwide. The exhibit booklet is available for viewing online at https://issuu.com/ saintvincentcollege.

Threshold Series Lecture: American Artist Roman Verostko American artist and educator Roman Verostko was the featured speaker in the Saint Vincent College Threshold Lecture series this fall. The title of his talk was “Algorithmic Transformations: From Art by Hand to Art by Code.” The lecture was given in conjunction with the opening of an exhibit of art by Verostko in The Saint Vincent Gallery. Verostko, co-founder of the “Algorists,” creates code-generated imagery known as algorithmic art. He maintains an experimental studio in Minneapolis where he has developed original algorithmic procedures for creating his art. More than 40 original works, many now in the Archabbey’s collection, were exhibited. A year after graduating from the Art Institute of Pittsburgh in 1949, he entered monastic life at Saint Vincent Archabbey, where he studied philosophy and theology and was ordained a priest, he then pursued post-graduate studies in New York and Paris. He taught at Saint Vincent College and served as staff editor for art and

architecture for the first edition of the New Catholic Encyclopedia (McGraw Hill, 1967). Artwork from his monastic period included a series of “New City” paintings and “BROTHER,” an 8-foot load-bearing wall cast in concrete for the newly constructed Saint Vincent Monastery (1967). During this same period he created electronically synchronized audiovisual programs for spiritual retreats. He departed from his monastic life in 1968, married Alice Wagstaff and joined the humanities faculty at the Minneapolis College of Art and Design.

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Savannah Board members visit

Members of the Board of Directors of Benedictine Military School, Savannah, visited Saint Vincent this summer for the board’s annual retreat, held in Latrobe for the first time. Attending were board members and their spouses, employees, and monks who have been affiliated with the school, which is run by Saint Vincent Archabbey Benedictines. Seated, from left, are Mrs. Mary Ann Schmidt, spouse of board Chairman William E. Schmitt; Kathy H. Siler, board member; Mrs. Rhonda Shearouse, wife of board member William W. Shearouse, Jr.; Barbara Evans, director of operations and finance; Selena Solitario, board member; Susan Shawe, wife of board member Mark Shawe. In the middle row, from left, are Board Vice Chairman Mark T. Shaw; Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B.; Rev. Daniel F. Firmin, J.C.L., board member; Jim Siler, husband of board member Kathy Siler; Andrew C. Ambos, board member; Rev. Jason P. Adams, board member; Rev. Frank Ziemkiewicz, O.S.B., headmaster; Principal Dennis Daly; Gregory Markiton, director of advancement; Martin S. Hogan, board member; Cynthia Phillips, wife of board member Christopher W. Phillips; Kathy Moore, wife of board member Charles Moore. In the back row, from left, are Jacob Horne, assistant principal; William W. Shearouse, Jr., board member; William E. Schmitt, chairman of the board; Charles H. Moore, Jr., board member; Rev. Meinrad Lawson, O.S.B., former board member; Christopher W. Phillips, board member; and Rev. Philip M. Kanfush, O.S.B., board member.

DEGLAU EXHIBIT Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B. was among the more than 230 persons who welcomed photographer Terry Deglau, center, at the opening reception for his exhibition of photography, “Striking Images: Lifetime Work of Terry Deglau.” Flying in to surprise his friend at the opening was, left, Skip Cohen, president of Skip Cohen University, former president of Hasselblad, the camera company, past president of Rangefinder Publishing and co-author of six books on photography. Included in the exhibit book were photographs Deglau recently took (summer 2015 issue of Heart to Heart) of the Archabbey Basilica, of the new organ and rose window in the back of the Basilica, and of Archabbot Douglas. The exhibit book is available online at https:// issuu.com/saintvincentcollege. Volume 26, Number 1

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Ornament celebrates anniversary The 2015 ornament is the 20th in the series featuring aspects of the Archabbey Basilica, and already has been one of the most popular ornaments the series has ever sold. This ornament celebrates the 225th anniversary of Saint Vincent Parish, which was founded on April 16, 1790. The corpus above the altar was carved in the 1860s by a nineteenth century monk of Saint Vincent Archabbey. It is a Lucan corpus, meaning that there is no crown of thorns on Jesus as he is portrayed in the Gospel of Luke.This ornament sold out prior to Christmas, but is once again available. Past ornaments include 2014, Saint Benedict; 2013, Saint Francis of Assisi; 2012, Pentecost; 2011, Jesus Teaching in the Temple; 2010, Jesus Blessing the Children; 2010, The Resurrection; 2009, Boniface Wimmer; 2009, The Good Shepherd; 2008, Transitus of Benedict; 2007, Guardian Angels; 2006, Saint Benedict and Saint Scholastica; 2005, Saint Vincent de Paul; 2004, Baptism of the Lord; 2003, Agnus Dei; 2002, Basilica Facade; 2001, Childhood of Jesus; 2000, Adoration of the Magi; 1999, Nativity Window. The first window was the Basilica Facade without steeples and is no longer available. To order visit www.stvincentstore.com.

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Oblate Groups Active The Oblates of Saint Benedict affiliated with Saint Vincent Archabbey have a small, but growing presence throughout the region, with regular meetings being held in Baltimore, Annville, Philadelphia, State College, Virginia Beach, Palmyra, Savannah, St. Marys, and Latrobe. Benedictines from the Archabbey serve some of these parishes, and in other cases, travel to parishes to pray, to meet with Oblates and to discuss Benedictine spirituality with members of the Oblate community. While the program has been directed by Father Donald Raila, O.S.B., since 1988, monks assisting with the program include: Brother Joachim Morgan, O.S.B., who is assistant director of Oblates; Father Job Foote, O.S.B., pastor of Saint Paul the Apostle Parish in Annville; Father Paschal Morlino, O.S.B., pastor of Saint Benedict Parish in Baltimore; Father James Podlesny, O.S.B., pastor of Holy Spirit Parish in Palmyra; Father Alfred Patterson, O.S.B., pastor of Saint Mary’s Parish, St. Marys; Father Ronald Gatman, O.S.B., who moderates a group in Savannah; Father David Griffin, O.S.B., who moderates a group in State College; Father Killian Loch, O.S.B., director of Campus Ministry at Saint Vincent College; Father Lee Yoakam, O.S.B., who moderates the group at Saint Gregory the Great Parish, Virginia Beach and Father Vincent de Paul Crosby, O.S.B., who travels to Philadelphia for regular meetings in an Episcopalian church there. Lay moderators also serve groups in various locations, ranging from Pittsburgh to Williamsport to Somerset to Southern Pines, North Carolina, to Niagara, Ontario, Canada. The Oblate program has the largest following in Latrobe, where Father Donald schedules monthly meetings with special guest speakers, who are generally monks of the Archabbey. During the past year guest speakers have included Brother Hugh Lester, O.S.B., who spoke on holiness and Benedictine spirituality; Father Wulfstan Clough, O.S.B., who spoke on prayer in Benedictine spirituality; Father Justin Matro, O.S.B., who talked about hospitality; Brother Ignatius Camello, O.S.B., who spoke on the topic of Lectio Divina;

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Brother Matthew Hershey, O.S.B., who spoke on poverty and simplicity of life; Father Jean-Luc Zadroga, O.S.B., who discussed obedience; Brother Matthew Lambert, O.S.B., who talked about silence, and Father Edward Mazich, O.S.B., who discussed “Conversatio morum.” In September the group had a nonmonk guest speaker, Nicholas Parrendo, an Oblate who is a stained-glass artist. Father Boniface Hicks visited in November to speak on the topic of work, and in October Brother Mark Liatti, O.S.B., discussed Saint Benedict and his Rule. Father Donald concluded the year by speaking on the Liturgy of the Hours. Additionally, each fall Oblates have an Oblate Day—this year’s speaker was Father Boniface, as well as a day of recollection, with Father Robert Keffer, O.S.B., serving as retreat master this past October. This year’s meeting speakers include: Brother Raphael Dos Santos, O.S.B., “On Holiness and Benedictine Spirituality,” Sunday, January 17; Father Killian Loch, O.S.B., “Prayer in Benedictine Spirituality,” Sunday, Febraury 21; Father Chad Ficorilli, O.S.B., “Conversatio morum,” Sunday, March 20; Father Maurus Mount, O.S.B., “Saint Benedict and His Rule,” Sunday, April 17; Father Thomas Hart, O.S.B., “The Eucharist in Benedictine Spirituality,” Sunday, May 15; Father Vincent de Paul Crosby, O.S.B., “Work,” and on the “Ecumenical Group in Philadelphia,” Sunday, June 12; Father Shawn Matthew Anderson, O.S.B., “Silence in Benedictine Spirituality,” Sunday, July 17; Brother Lawrence Machia, O.S.B., “Hospitality in Benedictine Spirituality,” Sunday, August 21; Brother Dominic Leo, O.S.B., Saint Peter’s Abbey, Saskatchewan, Canada, “Obedience in Benedictine Spirituality,” Sunday, September 18; Brother Joachim Morgan, O.S.B., “Lectio Divina,” Sunday, October 23; Father Anthony Grossi, O.S.B., “The Liturgy of the Hours,” Sunday, November 20; Brother Pio Adamonis, O.S.B., “Simplicity of Life,” Sunday, December 18. Bishop Edward Malesic will speak to Oblates at 7 p.m. November 20 in the Foundations Room at Saint Vincent. Volume 26, Number 1


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Monk Directs New Transition Program Father Philip Kanfush, O.S.B., assistant professor of education at Saint Vincent College, is executive director of a new program at Saint Vincent College called Bearcat B.E.S.T. (Building Excellence Through Skills Training). The program has 11 students participating in the new transition program for 18 to 21-year-olds with intellectual and developmental disabilities. It allows students to be on campus with similarly aged young adults. “Their peers have moved on, but now so have they,” Father Philip told the Tribune-Review. “It’s not for every kid, but the benefit is that these kids are now on a college campus.” Students begin each day in the Bearcat Center, located in the former Gristmill Coffeehouse. It includes a kitchen, laundry facilities and computers. Students study math and writing and literature, then spend time on realworld measurements including money and time. Their classes take place both at the center and in various classrooms around campus. Leann Downs, who earned a master’s degree in special education at Saint Vincent, and who teaches in the program,

BEARCAT B.E.S.T. Building Excellence through Skills Training

BEARCAT B.E.S.T. Building Excellence through Skills Training

The first full class of Bearcat B.E.S.T. students visits the Rogers Center with teachers Leann Downs, third from left, and Philip Pisone, right. noted that students are intermingled with the college population and participate in clubs with college students. Five students have joined the Equestrian Club. College students also work with the B.E.S.T. program students. They also attend sporting events, lectures and concerts on campus and have lunch in the college dining hall every day. “The benefit goes beyond just our

Father Philip Kanfush, O.S.B., executive director of Bearcat B.E.S.T., second from left, and Mary Collins, vice president for student affairs at Saint Vincent College, talk with students and a parent at the get acquainted picnic for the opening of the Bearcat B.E.S.T. program.

student population,” said teacher Philip Pisone. “The whole Saint Vincent population is getting exposure to the kids and to have an exerience they’re not familiar with.” The students are growing in academics, social skills, independent living and job experience. A recent project in the Employment Skills course had them working in groups to develop short videos that displayed certain skills needed in the workplace. Students created the videos while learning about and understanding those roles. Each group had a director, writers, stage director, actors and a camera person, with all skits entirely student-made, including ideas, scripts, props and filming. The skits were entitled “Good and Bad Interview Skills,” “Dealing with Angry Customers,” and “Calling Off Work.” The program has a Facebook page, https://www.facebook.com/bearcatbest/, and several pages on the Saint Vincent College website which detail the course offerings, staff biographies, admission requirements and frequently asked questions, https://www.stvincent.edu/bearcatBEST/.

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Steelers Mark 50 Years At Saint Vincent

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On Sunday, July 26, a special Mass was held to mark the opening of the 50th Pittsburgh Steeler Training Camp at Saint Vincent. The Mass was celebrated by Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B., and concelebrated by Father Paul Taylor, O.S.B., and attended by many persons affiliated with the Steelers, as well as by parishioners and many of the fans who travel to Latrobe each year to visit training camp. Brother Norman Hipps, O.S.B., president of Saint Vincent College, also participated in the Mass. Arthur Rooney II, president of the Pittsburgh Steelers, and Kevin Colbert, general manager of the team, proclaimed the readings while coaches and staff members presented the gifts. Ambassador Daniel Rooney, chairman, and Arthur Rooney, Jr., and son Mike were among those who attended the Mass. Following Mass an opening ceremony was held at Chuck Noll Field, prior to the opening of the first practice. From top, left, James Harrison, Bud Dupree, Alejandro Villanueva, Will Johnson; row two, Antonio Brown, Markus Wheaton; row three, Heath Miller, Le’Veon Bell; bottom, Ben Roethlisberger.

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Obituaries

Father blane resko, O.S.B. Father Blane L. Resko, O.S.B., a monk of Saint Vincent Archabbey, died Friday, August 7, 2015, at the Archabbey. He was born February 26, 1930 in Patton, Pennsylvania, a son of the late Eli Resko and Mary (Halusha) Resko. He was one

Father Jacques depaul daley, O.S.B. Father Jacques DePaul Daley, O.S.B., a monk of Saint Vincent Archabbey,

of ten children, including Irene (Resko) Guidas of Patton; Louise (Resko) Niemiec of Patton; Carol Resko of Patton and Dr. John Resko of Portland, Oregon; the late Verna (Resko) Dolges, Mary (Resko) Bartell and Joseph, Alfred and Donald Resko. He was a 1948 graduate of Saint Vincent Preparatory School and received a bachelor of arts degree in philosophy from Saint Vincent College in 1953. He completed his priesthood studies at Saint Vincent Seminary. Father Blane blessed the lives of many people in a long life of service as a Benedictine priest. He made simple profession of vows 64 years ago on July 2, 1951 and was ordained a priest in the Archabbey Basilica on May 26, 1957. Father Blane’s life was a life of service. This is a list of the assignments he received: High school prefect at Saint Vincent; faculty of James Barry-Robinson School in Norfolk, Virginia; assistant headmaster and faculty member of Benedictine Military School in Savannah, Georgia; pastor of Saint George Parish

in Patton, Pennsylvania, pastor of Saint Mary Parish in Patton, pastor of Saint Benedict Parish in Carrolltown and Saint Lawrence Parish in Saint Lawrence, pastor of Saint Bruno Parish in South Greensburg, and Archabbot’s Delegate for Pastoral Concerns. In addition, after his retirement and return to live at the Archabbey, Father Blane faithfully responded to requests of the Prior for assignments such as hearing confessions at Seton Hill or filling in for a special need in a parish. Father Blane fulfilled every assignment and responsibility wholeheartedly in the spirit of service to others. A Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated Tuesday, August 11, in the Archabbey Basilica by Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B., followed by the Rite of Committal at the Mary, Mother of Mercy Mausoleum Chapel at Saint Vincent Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be made to the Benedictine Health and Welfare Fund, 300 Fraser Purchase Road, Latrobe, Pennsylvania 15650 or online via www.stvincentstore.com/archabbey.html.

died Sunday, October 25, 2015. Born in Detroit, Michigan, on January 8, 1936, he was the son of the late Roy Scarpace and Marjorie Daley Sherman, and stepson of the late Robert Sherman. He is survived by his sister, Lynn Sherman Blaszkiewicz, and her husband, Dennis, of Au Gres, Michigan. Father Jacques attended Guest Grade School in Detroit, Michigan, and was a graduate of Coley High School, Detroit. He earned a bachelor of arts degree in philosophy from Saint Vincent College in 1966, and a master of divinity degree from Saint Vincent Seminary in 1971. He also earned a master’s degree in French literature from Middlebury College, Middlebury, Vermont in 1972; a Diplôme Supérieur in French literature from La Sorbonne, Paris; a Licentiate in Spiritual Theology from the Pontifical Angelicum University, Rome, in 1989; and a doctorate of Sacred Theology from the Pontifi-

cal Angelicum University, Rome, in 1991. He entered the monastic community of Saint Vincent Archabbey in 1964. He made simple profession of vows on July 11, 1965, and solemn profession of vows on July 11, 1968. He was ordained a priest in Saint Vincent Archabbey Basilica by the late Bishop William G. Connare of Greensburg, on May 22, 1971. Following completion of his doctoral studies on the writings and spirituality of Saint Thérèse of Lisieux, Father Jacques gave numerous retreats to religious communities and parishes throughout the United States. He was a spiritual director to many seminarians, priests and religious throughout Western Pennsylvania. He was well known for his work with Mother Angelica of the Eternal Word Television Network (EWTN) from 1995 to 2006. A regular guest on Mother Angelica’s EWTN, he served as host and commentator for three mini-series on Saint

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Volunteers Honored Recently The Saint Vincent Gristmill General Store and Basilica Gift Shop recently honored five volunteers who have been assisting with sales since the shops opened 17 years ago. All five are from the Latrobe area. The volunteers include Loretta Durishan, Eileen Foski, Florein Mueller, Marie Kostelnik and Ann Pakos. They are pictured with Benedictines Brother Mark Floreanini, the late Father Jacques de Paul Daley, Father Jean Luc Zadroga, Brother André Melli and Brother Matthew Hershey. Brother André is director of both shops.

Obituaries Thérèse of Lisieux, Saint Catherine of Siena and Saint Faustina. Father Jacques had a photograph of Saint Thérèse of Lisieux on the card celebrating the 50th anniversary of his vows as a Benedictine. The life of both Thérèse and Father Jacques may best be summarized by the affirmation of biblical faith reflected on the card: “Everything is a grace.” Father Jacques served in a number of assignments, which included monastic guestmaster (1965–1968); instructor in French and Religious Studies at

Saint Vincent College (1973–1977), and adjunct faculty member of Saint Vincent Seminary (1993-2011). His pastoral assignments included parochial vicar of Sacred Heart Church, St. Marys, Pennsylvania (1977–1980); associate pastor at Saint Louis d’Antin, Paris, France (1981–1983); and chaplain at Jeannette Memorial and Monsour Hospitals, Jeannette, Pennsylvania (1984–1986). From 1991-2014, Father Jacques was chaplain at Excela Westmoreland Hospital. He loved his special ministry to the sick and hospitalized. His outgoing and

friendly personality enabled him to inspire hope in those who confronted disabling physical and mental challenges, or personal losses. A Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated on Wednesday, October 28, in the Archabbey Basilica by Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B., followed by the Rite of Committal at Saint Vincent Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be made to the Benedictine Health and Welfare Fund, 300 Fraser Purchase Road, Latrobe, Pennsylvania 15650 or online via www.stvincentstore.com/archabbey.html.

Please Help Support A Monk’s Life of Service The Monastery Health and Welfare Fund provides older priests and brothers the care they need after their many years of service to the people of God. Enclosed is my tax-deductible gift of:

$50

$1000

$100

$500

Other __________

My company will match my gift.

Name Address

City Zip E-Mail

State Phone

Please make checks payable to Saint Vincent Archabbey Benedictine Health and Welfare Fund 300 Fraser Purchase Road, Latrobe, PA 15650-2690

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Heart to Heart

To give a tribute or memorial gift, please make a donation to Saint Vincent Archabbey in honor of or in memory of a friend, colleague or family member. Mail to Rev. Bonaventure Curtis, O.S.B., Archabbey Development Office, 300 Fraser Purchase Road, Latrobe, Pa., 156502690, 724-532-6740. Donors from May 17, 2015 to December 20, 2015, include:

Rev. Thomas P. Acklin, O.S.B. Ms. Molli E. Vassar Mrs. Elizabeth Deluca Dr. and Mrs. Richard A. Memo Mrs. Ethel J. Galli Mrs. Mary Lynn Nicklas Br. Edward V. Grinder, O.S.B. Mr. and Mrs. Walter B. Hobart, Jr. Very Rev. Earl J. Henry, O.S.B. Mr. and Mrs. Walter B. Hobart, Jr. Dr. and Mrs. Richard A. Memo Mr. Walter J. Samul, Jr. Br. Matthew Hershey, O.S.B. Ms. Patricia E. Glatz Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Hershey Rev. Boniface P. Hicks, O.S.B. Mrs. Katharine S. Tittmann Br. Norman W. Hipps, O.S.B. Mr. and Mrs. Walter B. Hobart, Jr. Rev. Vernon A. Holtz, O.S.B. Dr. and Mrs. Richard A. Memo Mrs. Eleanore Jenkins Ms. Patricia Dowden Rev. Justin L. Nolan, O.S.B. Dr. and Mrs. Charles G. Manoli, Sr. Mr. Fred R. Nene Rev. Jerome J. Purta, O.S.B. Mr. and Mrs. Edward A. Gromek Rev. Noel H. Rothrauff, O.S.B. Mrs. Eleanor D. Baenig Mr. and Mrs. Paul F. D’Antonio, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Donald L. Ewbank Ms. Alessandra Busatta Gruelle Mrs. Crystal J. Hall Mr. Vernon E. Litzinger Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. McAllister Mrs. Deborah G. Miller Ms. D. Linda Monroe Mr. and Mrs. Edward G. Nemanic, Sr. Mrs. Agnes C. Peters Mr. Michael J. Reynolds Mr. and Mrs. Gerald B. Riddle Ms. Ruth S. Rusnock Mr. Robert W. Sibert Ms. Brittany J. Sossong Mr. and Mrs. Mark Sossong Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey J. Stephens Mr. and Mrs. Paul Stevens Rev. Msgr. John R. Sasway Mrs. Dolores M. Sasway Rev. Chrysostom V. Schlimm, O.S.B. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Duran

winter 2016

Mr. and Mrs. Peter Engelberg Ms. Denise A Hegemann Dr. and Mrs. Richard A. Memo Mr. Walter J. Samul, Jr. Mr. James Sparks Mr. and Mrs. Patrick A. Mulich Br. Timothy E. Waid, O.S.B. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Duran Ms. Denise A Hegemann Rev. Justin M Withrow, O.S.B. Mr. Samuel T. Berish + Mr. Edward C. Angelilli Mr. Charles Angelilli Ms. Tess Cox Mr. and Mrs. Harry A. DiLisio Ms. Maxine S. Duzicky + Frank and Anna Baric Mr. and Mrs. Joseph J. Baric + Louise Beck Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert D. Pastor + Rev. Albert C. Bickerstaff, O.S.B.

Mr. and Mrs. William W. Shearouse, Jr.

+ Rev. Boniface Buerkle, O.S.B. Mr. and Mrs. James P. Murray + Rev. Gilbert J. Burke, O.S.B. Mr. and Mrs. Lester E. Brownfield + Rev. Msgr. William G. Charnoki

Mrs. Elizabeth R. Campbell Ms. Patricia Lawlor Ms. Susanne Lawlor + Eugene F. Citrone, Sr. Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Citrone + DR. Peter J. Citrone Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Citrone + Ms. Kathleen M. Ciulla Mr. and Mrs. Patrick A. Mulich + br. nathan cochran, o.s.b. Mr. Michael A. Quick + Rev. Jacques dePaul Daley, O.S.B. Mrs. Barbara L. Bacha Rev. James M. Bachner Mr. and Mrs. John C. Benyo Mr. and Mrs. Darrell Bryte Mr. and Mrs. Carl D. Burlas Ms. Philomena A. Burrell Ms. Philomena F. Caldwell Ms. Marilyn C. Cantwell Mr. and Mrs. Amil A. DiPadova Mrs. Orlie S. Ferretti Ms. Christine L. Foschia Mr. and Mrs. Edward A. Gromek Dr. and Mrs. Clement A. Guarlotti Ms. Katie Horvath Ms. Linda L. Jenkins Mrs. Rosalie Kasperik Mr. and Mrs. Albert F. Kave, Jr. Rev. Joseph J. Kleppner Mr. and Mrs. Zoltan Kristof Mr. and Mrs. Rene A. Marquis

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Ms. Donna K. Mayton Mrs. Dolores M. Monaco Ms. D. Linda Monroe Mr. Edward S. Nowicki Mr. Lawrence J. Nowicki Mr. and Mrs. Paul J. Parkman Ms. Laura Marie Parrish Ms. Susan Parrish Mr. John S. Perry Ms. Lynne E. Peterson Mr. and Mrs. Louis Radkowski Mr. and Mrs. Ronald N. Raimondo Mrs. Andrew Rezsutek Rhoda Wise Shrine, Inc. Mr. Richard Rutyna Ms. Gloria Schwartz Mr. Thomas V. Seminara Ms. Patricia A. Shaffer Mrs. Charlotte E. Spino Mrs. Irene S. Taylor + Mr. Earl Dalton Mrs. Bertha K. Dalton Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. Gray Ms. Patricia Lawlor Ms. Susanne Lawlor + Mr. Frank DeCarlo Mr. Donald G. DeCarlo + Ms. Agnes DeCarlo Mr. Donald G. DeCarlo + Ms. Victoria DeCarlo Mr. Donald G. DeCarlo + Mr. Eugene DEgidio Mr. John E. DeGidio + Joseph C. Delsordo Mrs. Joanne K. DelSordo + Mr. Carmen Deluca Dr. and Mrs. Richard A. Memo + Thomas Demangone Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Demangone Mrs. Rosalie Kasperik + Rev. Demetrius R. Dumm, O.S.B. Mr. and Mrs. Clair J. Dumm The Honorable and Mrs. John K. Lewis + Rev. Wilfred M. Dumm, O.S.B. Ms. Lois M. Dowell Mr. and Mrs. Clair J. Dumm + Rev. Conan E. Feigh, O.S.B. Mr. and Mrs. Otto Cronan + Mr. Walter C. Furman Mrs. Angela Furman + Rev. Cuthbert Gallick, O.S.B. Mr. and Mrs. James P. O’Sullivan + Rev. Ronald R. Gorka, O.S.B. The Honorable and Mrs. John K. Lewis + Elisabeth Guttendorf Ms. Ann Guttendorf + Mrs. Bernice MARIE Hazi Mrs. Denise A. Musch + Mr. Donald Hite Mr. Robert J. Naggy

Volume 26, Number 1


Heart to Heart + Ms. Karen B. Hull Mr. Roger Gorg, Jr. + Rev. Cuthbert A. Jack, O.S.B. Mr. and Mrs. John W. Barley Mr. and Mrs. Louis F. Bowden Rev. Michael M. Camara Mr. and Mrs. Edward A. Gromek Mr. and Mrs. Terry Hamel Rev. Deacon and Mrs. John M. Hanchin Mr. David S. Jack Mr. and Mrs. Larry E. Jack Ms. Burnadette C. Jack Dr. and Mrs. Charles G. Manoli, Sr. Ms. Elizabeth F. Martin Mr. Joseph P. Petruna Mr. and Mrs. Richard L. Ruff Mr. and Mrs. Charles Matthew Schellhaas Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Toman Ms. Judie Jo Vayda Ms. Denise E. Weber + ROBERT L. KASPERIK Mrs. Rosalie Kasperik + MICHAEL P. KENNEY Mr. and Mrs. Patrick A. Mulich + Rev. Omer U. Kline, O.S.B. Mr. and Mrs. James P. O’Sullivan Dr. and Mrs. Michael F. Spagnolo + Rev. Paschal N. Kneip, O.S.B. Mr. Thomas K. Bush Mr. and Mrs. James P. O’Sullivan Sister Brenda Query + Simon C. Kralik Mrs. Theresa J. Kralik + Joseph and Eolunda Lagana Dr. Joseph F. Lagana + Mr. Wesley Lindner Mr. Richard H. Lindner + Frank and Catherine Loch Mr. Edward J. Loch Rev. Killian R. Loch, O.S.B. + Mr. Nick L. Loperfito Apollo Trust Company Ms. Heather Blystone Ms. Paula A. Carpentieri Mr. and Mrs. Gary M. Demboski Mr. and Mrs. Alex DiBiasio Ms. Vickie L. Difilippo Mr. William J. Englert Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth J. Hayes Ms. Jean L. Holmes Mr. and Mrs. Michael G. Kakias Kiski Valley Water Pollution Control Authority Mr. Larry D. Loperfito Mr. Joseph J. Mazur Ms. Elain McCullough Mr. and Mrs. William N. Michaels Mr. and Mrs. Aldo A. Pacchioni Dr. David F. Ranieri Mr. Gerald D. Rossman Mr. Eugene J. Shiamone Tripp Umbach Healthcare, Inc. Vandergrift Festa Italiano, Inc. + Ms. Ramona Mallison Mr. and Mrs. David A. Perry, Sr. + Mrs. Elizabeth K. Manno Rev. John K. Manno

winter 2016 + Giovanna and Carmen Marchetti Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert D. Pastor + Mr. John H. Mark Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert D. Pastor + Sr. Linda McCutcheon Mrs. Diana Holnaider + Mrs. Jean McLucas Mr. and Mrs. Joseph M. Dudzinsky + Joan McSweeney Mr. John McSweeney + Mr. and Mrs. John Memo Dr. and Mrs. Richard A. Memo + Rev. John F. Murtha, O.S.B. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph E. Koch + Dr. Vincent M. Pacienza Mr. and Mrs. Adam Blasiole Mr. T. Richard Campbell Ms. Marguerite D. Chattaway Mrs. Rosemary Gates Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Kolbosky Mr. and Mrs. Paul R. Learn Mr. and Mrs. Richard G. McGreevy Mrs. Mildred Pacienza Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. Rhodes Mr. and Mrs. Paul A. Schreckengost Ms. Mary Ann Weaver + Anna and George Pastor Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert D. Pastor + FAMILY OF MR. & MRS. Michael Pustay Ms. Frances R. Kucia + Sr. Michele Ransil Mr. and Mrs. Edward A. Gromek + Rev. Blane L. Resko, O.S.B. Mr. and Mrs. William G. Anzur Mrs. Barbara L. Bacha Ms. Diane M. Bartell Mr. and Mrs. Thomas C. Burlas Ms. Julia A. Cavallo Mr. and Mrs. Jesus S. Cenizal Mr. and Mrs. James A. Cherubini Mr. and Mrs. Otto Cronan Mr. and Mrs. Carl D’Angelo Mr. Blane Dolges Mr. and Mrs. Paul Dolges Mr. Joseph Dolges Ms. Joann T. Donahue Mr. and Mrs. Derrik Eckenrode Ms. Ann M. Giacobbi Ms. Mary A. Giacobbi Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Giacobbi Mr. and Mrs. Timothy L. Goswick Mr. and Mrs. Edward A. Gromek Ms. Marcia Guzik Ms. Constance B. Hanna Mr. and Mrs. Timothy C. Hoagland Mrs. Diana Holnaider Mrs. Mary Kirk Mrs. Doris Lacue Mr. and Mrs. Roger C. Lapson Mr. and Mrs. Perry Leo Mr. and Mrs. George Lubert Mr. and Mrs. Gregory J. Moran Mr. and Mrs. Albert J. Novak, Jr. Ms. Carolyn B. Resko Mrs. Diana T. Salamie Mr. and Mrs. Guenter Samhuber

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Semelsberger St. Bruno Church St. John the Evangelist Church Ms. Greta M. Stevens Mr. David L. Todaro Mrs. Joseph Valentine + Rev. Melvin C. Rupprecht, O.S.B. Mr. John C. Rapa + Rev. Sebastian A. Samay, O.S.B. The Honorable and Mrs. John K. Lewis + Helen Samul Rev. Chrysostom V. Schlimm, O.S.B. + Walter Samul, SR. Rev. Chrysostom V. Schlimm, O.S.B. + Mr. Louis Scanga Mrs. Dorothy Keddie Keddie Chevrolet Mrs. Gertrudann Keddie Tatananni + Mr. Vincent B. Schlimm Rev. Chrysostom V. Schlimm, O.S.B. + Mrs. Florence M. Schlimm Rev. Chrysostom V. Schlimm, O.S.B. + Ms. Celine M. Schlimm Rev. Chrysostom V. Schlimm, O.S.B. + Mrs. Patricia J. Schweizer Mr. O. A. Schweizer + Ms. Mariann Sekula Mr. and Mrs. Walter Sekula + Rev. Paulinus J. Selle, O.S.B. Mrs. Ruth J. Rupprecht + Dr. Richard J. Semelsberger Mr. and Mrs. Bernard J. Dillon + Mrs. helen Theresa Setting Mr. and Mrs. Joseph M. Dudzinsky + Dorothy L. Soisson Dr. Fred L. Soisson, Jr. + Mrs. Josephine Stevens Mr. Larry D. Loperfito + Mr. Matthew J. Tarosky Mr. David P. Tarosky + Juliana J. Uram Mr. Andrew G. Uram + Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Wass Miss Susan M. Krouse + Mr. John E. Yakubisin Mr. and Mrs. Donald R. Bishop Mr. John M. Yakubisin + Ms. Amelia Zakour Mr. and Mrs. Donald J. Accorsi & Family Bethlen Communities Mr. and Mrs. Carl D. Burlas Mr. and Mrs. Louis T. Congelio Ms. Helene H. Dal Canton Mr. and Mrs. Gregory W. Glendenning Mr. and Mrs. Robert B. Halula Mr. and Mrs. Zoltan Kristof Mr. Woody L. Landers Ms. Patricia Lawlor Dr. and Mrs. Charles G. Manoli, Sr. Mrs. Loretta McBroom Ms. Fotenie M. Mongell Mr. and Mrs. Gary Nelson Mr. and Mrs. David E. Obenski Mr. and Mrs. Donald A. Orlando Mr. Richard A. Zakour

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Saint Vincent Archabbey 300 Fraser Purchase Road Latrobe, PA 15650—2690 724-539-9761 http://www.saintvincentarchabbey.org

NON—PROFIT ORGANIZATION U.S. POSTAGE PAID PERMIT NO. 110

UPCOMING EVENTS

24 HOURS FOR THE LORD March 4, 2016 Penitential Liturgy at Saint Vincent, Archabbey Basilica Noon-9 p.m. Confessions; 7 p.m. Confessions/Stations of the Cross ; Benediction (following Stations) BACH’S SAINT JOHN’S PASSION March 5, 2016 Saint Vincent Archabbey Basilica 7:30 p.m. Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra Mendelssohn Choir of Pittsburgh Maestro Manfred Honeck, Conductor. For tickets call 724-805-2177 FEAST DAY OF OUR HOLY FATHER BENEDICT April 5, 2016, 4 p.m., Archabbey Basilica Bishop Edward C. Malesic SPRING THRESHOLD SERIES LECTURE THE PROMISE OF FRANCIS: THE MAN, THE POPE AND THE CHALLENGE 7:30 p.m. April 13, 2016 BBC Correspondent David Willey Carey Performing Arts Center, Saint Vincent College

225TH ANNIVERSARY OF SAINT VINCENT PARISH April 30, 2016 Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap., Celebrant Bishop Edward C. Malesic 5 p.m. Mass, Archabbey Basilica 7 p.m. Jubilee Dinner, Carey Center

HIGHER EDUCATION AND THE NEW EVANGELIZATION: A PLACE OF GOD’S MERCY AND HOPE—THE VISON OF POPE FRANCIS May 23-25, 2016 Saint Vincent College Cardinal Donald Wuerl, Archbishop of Washington; Dr. Carolyn Woo, CEO, Catholic Relief Services; Bishop Robert Barron, Auxiliary Bishop of Los Angeles; Dr. William Portier, University of Dayton; Claudia Herrera, Saint Thomas University; Dr. James Maher, provost emeritus, University of Pittsburgh; Msgr. Ray East, Saint Teresa of Avila Parish, Washington, D.C.; Mercel LeJune, Texas A&M. For information: 724-805-2177 or visit: stvincent.edu/NewEvangelization PRIESTHOOD ORDINATION Most Rev. Edward C. Malesic, Bishop of Greensburg, will ordain Saint Vincent monks Brother Pio Adamonis, O.S.B., and Brother Matthew Lambert, O.S.B., to the priesthood May 21, 2016 DIOCESAN DAY OF MERCY AT SAINT VINCENT ARCHABBEY BASILICA October 8, 2016 5 p.m. Mass Bishop Edward C. Malesic, Celebrant/Homilist 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Reception: Rogers Center CLOSING OF THE HOLY YEAR DOOR OF MERCY November 20, 2016 Mass 9:30 a.m. Saint Vincent Archabbey Basilica


Special Papal Visit Section


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Crossing Barriers, Blazing Trails, Moving Forward During Pope Francis’ visit to the United States, thousands, perhaps hundreds of thousands of photos were taken—by the media, clergy and members of religious orders, and by the many pilgrims who followed him to Washington, D.C., New York City, and/ or Philadelphia, where the World Meeting of Families was held. Regardless of whether he was arriving at an airport, driving in a motorcade, or visiting a church or school, there were always photos of Pope Francis with children, some who exuberantly broke through security lines to vie for a hug, such as the young girl on the cover of this special issue. All sought and received his blessing. In this special section of Heart to Heart, I am pleased to be able to share with you some special moments and memories from the Pope’s historic visit. During the canonization Mass of Junípero Serra in Washington, D.C., we heard Pope Francis speak about the missionary work of this new saint: “Junípero Serra was excited about blazing trails, going forth to meet many people, learning and valuing their particular customs and ways of life. He learned how to bring to birth and nurture God’s life in the faces of everyone he met; he made them his brothers and sisters.... Father Serra had a motto which inspired his life and work, not just a saying, but above all a reality which shaped the way he lived: ‘siempre adelante!’ Keep moving forward! For him, this was the way to continue experiencing the joy of the Gospel, to keep his heart from growing numb, from being anesthetized. He kept moving forward, because the Lord was waiting. He kept going, because his brothers and sisters were waiting. He kept going forward to the end of his life. Today, like him, may we be able to say: Forward! Let’s keep moving forward!” Anyone familiar with the history of Saint Vincent’s founder Boniface Wimmer will see a similarity to Archabbot Wimmer’s famous quote, “forward, always forward, everywhere forward!”

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ll of us benefit from remembering our past. A people which remembers does not repeat past errors; instead, it looks with confidence to the challenges of the present and the future!” ―Pope Francis, Canonization Mass, Junípero Serra

Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B. During his visit to a school in Harlem, Pope Francis told the children: “You have a right to dream and I am very happy that here in this school, in your friends and your teachers, you can find the support you need. Wherever there are dreams, there is joy. Jesus is always present, because Jesus is joy, and he wants to help us to feel that joy every day of our lives.” During a visit to the 9/11 Memorial, where he met family members of some of the first responders and some who were injured on that day, he said: “Here, amid pain and grief, we also have a palpable sense of the heroic goodness which people are capable of, those hidden reserves of strength from which we can draw. In the depths of pain and suffering, you also witnessed the heights of generosity and service. Hands reached out, lives were given. In a metropolis which might seem impersonal, faceless, lonely, you demonstrated the powerful solidarity born of mutual support, love and self-sacrifice. No one thought about race, nationality, neighborhoods, religion or politics. It was all about solidarity, meeting immediate needs, brotherhood. It was about being brothers and sisters. New York City firemen walked into the crumbling towers, with no concern for their own well-being. Many succumbed; their sacrifice enabled great numbers to be saved. “This place of death,” he said, “became a place of life too, a place of

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saved lives, a hymn to the triumph of life over the prophets of destruction and death, to goodness over evil, to reconciliation and unity over hatred and division.” In Philadelphia, Pope Francis once again included parts of this nation’s history to his message, noting that the Quakers who founded Philadelphia “were inspired by a profound evangelical sense of the dignity of each individual and the ideal of a community united by brotherly love. This conviction led them to found a colony which would be a haven of religious freedom and tolerance. That sense of fraternal concern for the dignity of all, especially the weak and the vulnerable, became an essential part of the American spirit. “All of us benefit from remembering our past,” Pope Francis said. “A people which remembers does not repeat past errors; instead, it looks with confidence to the challenges of the present and the future. Remembrance saves a people’s soul from whatever or whoever would attempt to dominate it or use it for their interests. When individuals and communities are guaranteed the effective exercise of their rights, they are not only free to realize their potential, they also contribute to the welfare and enrichment of society.” Sincerely in Christ,

Archabbot Douglas R. Nowicki, O.S.B. Volume 26, Number 1


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iempre adelante! Keep moving forward! For him, this was the way to continue experiencing the joy of the Gospel, to keep his heart from growing numb, from being anesthetized. He kept moving forward, because the Lord was waiting. He kept going, because his brothers and sisters were waiting. He kept going forward to the end of his life. Today, like him, may we be able to say: Forward! Let’s keep moving forward!” ―Pope Francis, Canonization Mass, Junípero Serra Volume 26, Number 1

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Pope Francis smiles and waves at the tens of thousands of people who lined the streets of Washington on September 23 to catch a glimpse of him after he left a meeting with President Obama at the White House. In the popemobile with the Holy Father is Cardinal Donald Wuerl (left), the Archbishop of Washington, who hosted the pope in the first city of his visit to the United States. Catholic Standard photo by Eddie Arrossi. Used with permission.

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ur efforts must aim at restoring hope, righting wrongs, maintaining commitments, and thus promoting the well-being of individuals and of peoples.”

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―Pope Francis, address to U.S. Congress

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would like all men and women of good will in this great nation to support the efforts of the international community to protect the vulnerable in our world and to stimulate integral and inclusive models of development so that our brothers and sisters everywhere may know the blessings of peace and prosperity which God wills for all his children.” ―Pope Francis, Address at the White House, Washington, D.C.

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n this land, the various religious denominations have greatly contributed to building and strengthening society. It is important that today, as in the past, the voice of faith continues to be heard, for it is a voice of fraternity and love, which tries to bring out the best in each person and in each society.� ―Pope Francis, Address to United States Congress, Washington, D.C.

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he joy of men and women who love God attracts others to him; priests and religious are called to find and radiate lasting satisfaction in their vocation. Joy springs from a grateful heart.”

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―Pope Francis, Saint Patrick’s Cathedral, New York City

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nce we come to realize how much God has given us, a life of self-sacrifice, of working for him and for others, becomes a privileged way of responding to his great love.” ―Pope Francis, Saint Patrick’s Cathedral, New York City

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“H

ere, amid pain and grief, we also have a palpable sense of the heroic goodness which people are capable of, those hidden reserves of strength from which we can draw. In the depths of pain and suffering, you also witnessed the heights of generosity and service. Hands reached out, lives were given. In a metropolis which might seem impersonal, faceless, lonely, you demonstrated the powerful solidarity born of mutual support, love and self-sacrifice. No one thought about race, nationality, neighborhoods, religion or politics. It was all about solidarity, meeting immediate needs, brotherhood. It was about being brothers and sisters. New York City firemen walked into the crumbling towers, with no concern for their own well-being. Many succumbed; their sacrifice enabled great numbers to be saved.� ―Pope Francis, Address at 9/11 Memorial

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round Zero: that place which speaks so powerfully of the mystery of evil. Yet we know with certainty that evil never has the last word, and that, in God’s merciful plan, love and peace triumph over all.” ―Pope Francis, Farewell Address

his place of death, became a place of life too, a place of saved lives, a hymn to the triumph of life over the prophets of destruction and death, to goodness over evil, to reconciliation and unity over hatred and division.”

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―Pope Francis, Address at 9/11 Memorial

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overnment leaders must do everything possible to ensure that all can have the minimum spiritual and material means needed to live in dignity and to create and support a family, which is the primary cell of any social development. In practical terms, this absolute minimum has three names: lodging, labor, and land; and one spiritual name: spiritual freedom, which includes religious freedom, the right to education and all other civil rights.� ―Pope Francis, Address to the United Nations General Assembly

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“I

think this is truly the most wonderful experience we can have: to belong to a people walking, journeying through history together with our Lord, who walks among us! We are not alone; we do not walk alone. We are part of the one flock of Christ that walks together.” ―Pope Francis, The Church of Mercy

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Philadelphia Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap., welcomes Pope Francis to the Shrine of Mary, the Undoer of Knots, at the World Meeting of Families in Philadelphia.

PRAYER TO MARY UNDOER OF KNOTS Dearest Holy Mother, Most Holy Mary, Mary, the Undoer of Knots, is a favorite icon of Pope Francis. As the Mother of Jesus, she intercedes on our behalf to “undo” life’s knots—the difficulties we encounter in our lives.

You undo the knots that suffocate your children, extend your merciful hands to me. I entrust to you today this knot and all the negative consequences that it provokes in my life. I give you this knot that torments me and makes me unhappy and so impedes me from uniting myself to you and your Son Jesus, my Savior. I run to you, Mary, Undoer of Knots, because I trust you and I know that you never despise a sinning child who comes to ask you for help. I believe that you can undo this knot because Jesus grants you everything. I believe that you want to undo this knot because you are my Mother. I believe that you will do this because you love me with eternal love. Thank you, Dear Mother. Mary, Undoer of Knots, pray for me. Amen.

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“I

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n the family, indeed, there are difficulties. But those difficulties are overcome with love. Hatred is not capable of dealing with any difficulty and overcoming any difficulty. Division of hearts cannot overcome any difficulty. Only love. Only love is able to overcome. Love is about celebration, love is joy, love is moving forward.”

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―Pope Francis, World Meeting Of Families

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o out to others and share the good news that God, our Father, walks at our side. He frees us from anonymity, from a life of emptiness and selfishness, and brings us to the school of encounter. He removes us from the fray of competition and self-absorption, and he opens before us the path of peace. That peace which is born of accepting others, that peace which fills our hearts whenever we look upon those in need as our ―Pope Francis, World Meeting Of Families brothers and sisters.”

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“B

ut in families, there is always, always, the cross. Always. Because the love of God, of the Son of God, also opened for us this path. But, in families as well, after the cross, there is the resurrection. Because the Son of God opened for us this path. Because of this, the family is—forgive the term I’ll use—it is a factory of hope, of hope of life and of resurrection. God was the one who opened this path.” ―Pope Francis, World Meeting Of Families

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“S

o we might ask ourselves: How are we trying to live this way in our homes, in our societies? What kind of world do we want to leave to our children? We cannot answer these questions alone, by ourselves. It is the Spirit who challenges us to respond as part of the great human family. Our common house can no longer tolerate sterile divisions. The urgent challenge of protecting our home includes the effort to bring the entire human family together in the pursuit of a sustainable and integral development, for we know that things can change. May our children find in us models and incentives to communion! May our children find in us men and women capable of joining others in bringing to full flower all the good seeds which the Father has sown!� ―Pope Francis, Laudato Si

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“L

ove is shown by little things, by attention to small daily signs which make us feel at home. Faith grows when it is lived and shaped by love. That is why our families, our homes, are true domestic churches. They are the right place for faith to become life, and life to become faith.”

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Pope Francis’ Prayer for the Extraordinary Jubilee Year of Mercy Lord Jesus Christ, you have taught us to be merciful like the heavenly Father, and have told us that whoever sees you sees Him. Show us your face and we will be saved. Your loving gaze freed Zacchaeus and Matthew from being enslaved by money, the adulteress and Magdalene from seeking happiness only in created things, made Peter weep after his betrayal, and assured Paradise to the repentant thief. Let us hear, as if addressed to each one of us, the words that you spoke to the Samaritan woman: “If you knew the gift of God!” You are the visible face of the invisible Father, of the God who manifests his power above all by forgiveness and mercy: let the Church be your visible face in the world, its Lord risen and glorified. You willed that your ministers would also be clothed in weakness in order that they may feel compassion for those in ignorance and error: let everyone who approaches them feel sought after, loved, and forgiven by God. Send your Spirit and consecrate every one of us with its anointing, so that the Jubilee of Mercy may be a year of grace from the Lord, and your Church, with renewed enthusiasm, may bring good news to the poor, proclaim liberty to captives and the oppressed, and restore sight to the blind. We ask this through the intercession of Mary, Mother of Mercy, you who live and reign with the Father and the Holy Spirit for ever and ever.

Amen.

Pope Francis opens the Holy Doors, Year of Mercy Volume 26, Number 1

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Heart to Heart Winter 2016  

This issue pays tribute to the recent visit of Pope Francis to the United States with a special insert honoring the Pope. News from around t...

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