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Saint Stephen’s Church Annual Report and Accounts 31 December 2018 Charity number 1165483


The Community of Saint Stephen’s Annual Report & Accounts 2018 Contents: Introduction

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Ministry Reports Priest-in-Charge Churchwardens PCC Secretary Deanery Synod Facilities Manager Treasurer Prayer & Pastoral Leadership Development Discipleship Safeguarding Resonate Children & Young People Women Only Men’s Ministry Monday Lunchtime Concerts Aslan Bookshop Bristol Street Pastors

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PCC Membership

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Annual Accounts Independent Examiner Report Statement of Financial Activities Balance Sheet Notes to the Financial Statements

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Saint Stephen’s Church 21 St Stephen’s Street, Bristol BS1 1EQ email: info@saint-stephens.com Registered Charity Number 1165483

tel: 0117 922 5267 www.saint-stephens.com 1


Annual Report & Accounts 2018 The Parochial Church Council (PCC) present their report for the year ending 31 st December 2018. OBJECTIVES AND ACTIVITIES Under the PCC (Powers) Measure 1956, the PCC has the responsibility of cooperating with the Priest in Charge, in promoting in the Parish the whole mission of the Church: discipling, pastoral, evangelistic, social and ecumenical. Our vision is “'Reconnecting us to God; Connecting others to God”. PUBLIC BENEFIT The PCC is aware of the Charity Commission's guidance on public benefit in "The Advancement of Religion for the Public Benefit" and have regard to it in their administration of the Parish. The PCC believes that, by fulfilling its responsibility to work together with the Priest-in-Charge to co-operate in all matters of concern and importance for the promotion of the whole mission of the Church, it provides a benefit to the public by: • Providing resources and facilities for public worship, pastoral care and spiritual, moral and intellectual development, both for its members and for anyone who wishes to benefit from what the Church offers. • Promoting Christian values to the benefit of individuals and society as a whole. RESERVES The PCC is required to operate on a going concern basis. It is the policy of the PCC to hold in reserves the equivalent of two months’ running costs plus the costs which would arise directly from ‘closure’ of the PCC, the two together currently estimated at £22,000. The PCC’s free reserves at the end of 2018 are £29,550. This small surplus over the minimum is considered appropriate so as to cover unforeseen liabilities.

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MINISTRY REPORTS The reports below replace the spoken reports at our Annual Parochial Church Meeting and help us to get a broader picture of the life of Saint Stephen’s over the last year. If you have any questions to the reports please speak to the person who has written it or ask a question at the APCM.

Priest-in-charge Report Lee Barnes

‘Celebrating all that God has done in 2018’

There is not enough space for me to name everyone I would like to thank and everything I would like to mention related to the mission, worship and ministry of Saint Stephen’s, so, basically, if you are reading this – thank you, as I am sure you have contributed to our wonderful community in serving God in our midst! But I do want to mention a particular thank you to my Clergy Colleagues, Churchwardens, PCC members and employees for your hard work, support and prayers. There have been joys and challenges in 2018 and we have journeyed together into a place of asking questions around mission, purpose and identity but even with concerns for the future I want you to be encouraged that God has, and is, still at work in expected and unexpected places. We have continued to grow in our partnership with Holy Trinity, increasingly recognising that we are called together and need to work together in sharing resources and gifts in ministry. We have also continued to build upon existing meeting points and developed some new initiatives / events to grow in relationship and faith together as sisters and brothers in Christ, such as PCC Away-Days, Churchwardens meeting with the Clergy, encouraging attendance at The Forum, Resonate, Taize, Evensong, Mini-Communities, Engage, Arts Trail Weekend, Women Only, Men’s Ministry, Trinity Lunch Club, Memory Café, Day Retreat, Soup Run, Concerts, Social Gatherings; amongst other events. We have also developed the theme and focus of our joint-gatherings on Sunday and Experimental Sundays to enable a creative opportunity to explore engaging with God in different ways. We launched Small Church to provide opportunity for our young people to engage with God during our Sunday morning worship. Thanks to all those who help organise, oversee, practically serve in all these things, those seen and those unseen, who give of themselves to serve God and our community. Our churches work on different things that impact, engage and influence in numerous ways, both within the community and beyond, some examples include Vocational Exploration, our Trinity Ordinands, PCC Leadership Programme, Learning from LICC, Implementing Policies to build a healthier 3


church community, Engagement with Primary Schools, our Emerging Leaders, our Bristol Church Leaders Prayer Breakfast’s, producing new Welcome Booklets, our Reordering Team taking forward the exploration of transforming our building for the future, providing space for Street Pastors, Lunchtime Live concerts (thanks to David Mowat, Sarah Mitchell and Dave Williams), Self-Help groups as well as our partnership with Aslan Bookshop (thanks to Revd Richard Greatrex) but sadly, over the summer, our partnership with Brandon Trust came to an end (thanks to their Team for the three years) and our Artist-in-Residence exploring the Inuit history connected with the church and local Initiatives and Events. I am thankful and grateful for the support of the ‘Antient Society of St Stephen’s Ringers’, and in particular Richard Tovey, in assisting the fabric of the church and the financial support of ‘St. Stephen’s Ecclesiastical Charity’ towards our mission and ministry. Every person will need to actively participate in the future of Saint Stephen’s to address the challenges and questions; resonating and sharing the life of Christ and being led by the Spirit of God. To you all I am grateful and thankful for your support, encouragement and prayers and look forward to the next year sharing the good news of Jesus alongside you at Saint Stephen’s. Churchwardens’ Report Dave Mitchell and Jeanette Plumb 2018 has been a busy year again for us – the huge variety of Dave climbing on the roof (more than once this year) and Jeanette having coffee with lots of people to keep connections going (now which would you prefer?), keeps us stimulated and alert! Our new administrator Marc van de Griendt began work in 2018 and is proving a great asset as the first contact point to with St Stephen’s for many people. Dave has worked with our Administrator and Caretaker to liaise with contractors about ongoing repairs and urgent response to flooding in the bookshop and the church. Jeanette has hosted a Deanery Chapter, Deanery Synod and a Diocesan ‘Giving to God’ evening and attended a Diocesan day on grants and bidding for them. Jeanette updated her safeguarding training at the Diocese with C2. We met with contractors and owners working on adjacent buildings to ensure ongoing cooperation in use of shared boundaries and with Church Commissioners on their visit. Dave liaised with the architect to ensure the required Quinquennial inspection was completed. With our community link at The Coventry and our Caretaker we worked with Bugs Life to embed plants in the lawn that encourage pollination and support 4


small insects. We helped organise the successful ‘Peace Feast’ for refugee families. We worked with clergy and other PCC members on the re-ordering plans (how we might best adapt the whole church and grounds to ensure we are a church community space fit for Bristol city centre in the 21st century), looking at ideas for use of the café space, updating our booking terms and conditions and on progressing health and safety issues; such as training for first aiders and fire wardens, booking a fire risk assessment etc. As Brandon Trust finished running the café, we supported Sarah Mitchell in the cleaning and reorganising of the kitchen. We supported our artist and team with an exhibition at the Arnolfini to show how their research is developing and we hosted a final meeting of the year. With Tom and Mary Tippetts (as Caretaker’s Manager and safeguarding lead) and Robin Williams helping with the contract we managed the recruitment and appointment process for our new Facilities Manager as John Rawlings retires in Spring 2019. We are involved in supporting all church services and activities. The Diocesan quiet day for Wardens was an appreciated space for reflection. We thank our spouses for their unstinting support to us. Secretary’s Report Sue Williams There were six PCC meetings held in 2018, and three extraordinary PCC meetings (one held immediately after the APCM, another in June and the final one in September). The Standing Committee met seven times during 2018, as it was agreed it shall have power to transact the business of, and serve the PCC as directed. The PCC agreed to devote an hour of each PCC meeting discussing focus items before dealing with general church business. Such subjects discussed were: the Re-ordering project, St Nicholas Church (the city centre resource church), Health & Safety, Lee’s forthcoming EMDL (Extended Ministerial Development Leave) and Pastoral provision. Some of the general business covered in PCC meetings during 2018 included the development of St Stephen’s house, the artist-in-residence project, the future 5


of the café space, the ongoing problems with the alleyway, etc. The PCC also agreed the updated church policies. We publicise the dates of PCC meetings on our church online calendar, and sometimes in the Community News email, so that congregation members can submit questions or suggestions for the PCC to discuss. In practice this happens very rarely, and there were no such requests during 2018. Deanery Synod Report Vanessa Stevenson A number of us from both Holy Trinity and St Stephen's have enjoyed attending Deanery Synod meetings through the year which continue to be stimulating, informative and challenging and a vital means of connecting with and learning from other deanery churches and of tapping into local and national church resources. Topics covered have included presentations and discussions on creating family focused expressions of church and a culture of invitation, a foundation of prayer and the parish giving scheme. St Stephen's hosted one of the meetings, at which Chris Parkman gave a presentation on the deanery Uganda link with its exciting focus on creation care and the challenge of mission. Members of the church family are welcome to come along to Deanery Synod meetings. There are just four scheduled meetings a year which provide excellent opportunities to visit other local churches, meet members from other local congregations and share church initiatives across the City Deanery. Meeting dates for 2019 are 27 February, 18 June, 12 September and 13 November. Facilities Manager’s Report Tom Tippetts and John Rawlings This is an overview summary of regular reports made to the PCC thought the year, with regards to the Facilities Manager role (previously known as “Buildings Caretaker” role). John and Tom continue to have regular “One to One meetings” and keep in regular contact via the telephone and John continues to address maintenance issues in order of agreed priority.

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The job description title, has been amended to reflect the position from “Buildings Caretaker” and will now be titled “Facilities Manager” - this is to reflect the job role. Jonny Treloar was appointed as “Facilities Manager” as from the 14 January, 2019, after a formal interview taking place, chaired by the two Church Wardens, with the panel also consisting of Tom Tippetts (Line Manager). Jonny will work alongside and shadow John Rawlings, for a probationary period of three months, whilst he learns the job. John Rawlings is due to retire on the 14 April, 2019, but has agreed and volunteered to continue work within the garden (as a volunteer) upon his retirement. Tom Tippetts thanks John for this generous offer. John Rawlings has been a Loyal and dedicated worker, in the position for the past 22years. John will be a hard act to follow, but Jonny Treloar will, I am sure, be a successful and equally hard-working replacement. There are now new working hours (with flexibility) for the Facilities Manager(s), which will be as follows: Monday and Tuesday: 0700hrs- 1200hrs and Friday: 0900hrs-1400hrs Welcome Jonny, to the Team and thank you John for being Jonny’s mentor in this transition period. We will continue to work and support the Clergy and PCC in this vital and key role of Facilities Manager of Saint Stephen’s Church. Treasurer’s Report Robin Williams We continue to be blessed by God’s faithful provision in relation to our finances. Financial numbers for the year are reported later in this report but in summary, income was £81k, spend at £78k hence a small surplus for the year. There were no unexpected significant items of income or expense during the year. The surplus compares with a slightly higher surplus of £6k in each of the two prior years. Various small items explain this such as lower revenue from café bookings and a higher Parish Share. As with prior years, both income and spend remain steady, the main variable being ad hoc repairs to the church building e.g. expense for 2018 includes £8k 7


for roof repairs, matched in income by funding from the Antient Society of St Stephen’s Ringers. Income continues to comprise a wide variety of sources. We continue to be blessed by both regular donations from members of our community as well as a monthly grant from the St Stephen Ecclesiastical Charity (each contributes c30% of our income), together with smaller annual grants from other local charities. These donations and grants are freely given and are much appreciated by the PCC as indeed is the continued financial support offered by the Ringers (as evidenced in the preceding paragraph). Year-end reserves therefore remain little changed at £31k. At time of writing, 2019 spend is likely to include a number of significant oneoffs e.g. repairs costs arising from our recent Quinquennial survey and the planned appointment of a temporary ‘Reordering Project Manager’. The PCC are currently fund-raising such that the spend does not fall upon our reserves. It should also be noted that our Reserves policy was reviewed and approved by PCC early 2019. Going concern At year-end 2018, the PCC believes there to be no material uncertainties which might impact on its ability to continue operating during 2019, as such the trustees believe it to be appropriate to prepare the accounts under the going concern basis. Prayer & Pastoral Report Chris Parkman The partnership of Holy Trinity Hotwells and Saint Stephen’s means that prayer and pastoral activities are approached holistically. The annual report therefore covers both churches. Prayer Sunday worship continues to be the place where we most often and consistently pray together as communities. At the end of our services, we are always available for pastoral prayer for anyone seeking it and encourage prayer to be an organic activity. Outside of our Sunday services, at Holy Trinity Hotwells we meet weekly at 11am to pray for our church communities, the locality and the world. There is an email 8


address for requests to this group (prayer.holytrinity@gmail.com) and we also have requests from our websites. Other activities associated with prayer have included:  The prayer focused Thursday lunchtime service (‘Peace Space Breathe’) at Saint Stephen’s. We also ran a seasonal version for the whole week running up to Christmas.  We held another 24/7 prayer event at Holy Trinity in May, with various ‘stations’ contributed by members of the community.  The prayer tree and prayer guide continue to be available for visitors to leave prayer requests at Saint Stephen’s  The Archbishops’ prayer initiative ‘Thy Kingdom Come’ between Ascension and Pentecost, promoting ideas for prayer and holding a community prayer walk around the parishes! Pastoral Pastoral care is achieved primarily on an informal basis, as members of our communities respond to the needs of other members and those around them. Formal places where our pastoral provision is worked out are primarily the Trinity Lunch Club at Holy Trinity Hotwells (see separate report) and through the occasional offices (baptisms, weddings and funerals) which we carry out. At Trinity Lunch Club, as well as the lay members of the church who get involved, a member of the clergy team is also always present to offer prayers and generally be available. We have had a focus discussion at our PCCs on the pastoral approach of our two churches and will be implementing the outcome of that in 2019. Leadership Development Report Frances Houghton Please see below a summary of 2018 leadership development activities. Leadership Breakfast Workshops June 2018: Bob Goff on Love Takes Action (the importance of accomplishing those things which we are passionate about) September 2018: Danielle Strickland on Getting It Right (reaching your leadership potential through the process of self-analysis, humility and dependency on God). 9


Global Leadership Summit This was the third GLS conference of its kind that PCC members and emerging leaders have attended in Bristol which took place this year in November, providing an opportunity to hear well-known speakers on leadership development. 13 PCC and emerging leaders attended and the theme for the conference was developing and growing leadership skills through the experience of mistakes and failings. PCC Annual Away Day This was held in May in the Hotwells church hall and was split into three sections, as follows: Revd Lee Barnes – who reflected on the Vision Sunday talk and Vision/Mission review. Revd Chris Parkman – who facilitated group discussions on how we can become more whole-life discipleship focussed in the life of the church. Revd Richard Croft and Revd Frances Houghton – who facilitated group discussions on how we can live out our Christian life every day of the week and share our faith in context. Summary There are some leadership axioms that have endured the test of time such as ‘When a leader gets better, everyone benefits’ and ‘We cannot become what we need to be by remaining what we are.’ This is why it is important for us to continue investing our time in leadership development and get better at what we do, honing and developing our leadership skills from experience and also from our mistakes and failures. In the culture we live in when busyness can take over our daily lives, we recognise the significant contribution that is made by our church leaders (clergy, church wardens, PCC members, emerging leaders and group leaders) and would like to acknowledge our appreciation for all the hard work and commitment invested by those who serve the church in this way. Discipleship Lee Barnes Jesus tells us in one of the Gospels ‘go and make disciples of all nations’ (Matthew 28:19) and we have aspired to provide resources, spaces and teaching to help each of us to grow as followers of Christ. We recognise that it can be both challenging and exciting to live out our faith in the world today. We hope that we will build on our current opportunities for those who are new to faith or have been walking the journey a long time for people to grow as disciples as well as carrying out our mission to make disciples. Discipleship is about growing in our fruitfulness as a follower of Christ, including prayer, worship, scripture, and during 2018, in both of our churches, we endeavoured to provide opportunities for us all to grow in our faith, including the following ways: 10


 Our mini-communities, both for individuals and families.  Asking individuals to ‘disciple’ others by being a companion on the journey.  A five-week Sermon series on ‘Whole-Life Discipleship’.  Completed our churches involvement with London Institute of Contemporary Christianity’s ‘Whole-Life Discipleship’ programme, in partnership with Bristol Diocese, which provided learning for our church ministries to grow in its mission of connecting what we do with following Jesus.  Encouraging a culture of prayer through a What’s App group.  Continuing to include Discipleship as an agenda item for our PCC meetings.  Inviting PCC members and Emerging Leaders to attend the Global Leadership Summit.  Hosting a Day Retreat on ‘Finding Stillness in the City’.  A varied, exciting and relevant programme to help develop our faith through The Forum, ((Resonate)) and Engage.  Continuing to have resources available to help people, both within the community and visitors to the church, learn more about what it means to be a Christian. Safeguarding Report Mary Tippetts, Parish Safeguarding Officer ‘We have a responsibility from God to protect all who may be young or vulnerable and to keep them safe.’ This year the PCC has continued taking steps forward in ensuring the safety of our people whilst on church activities. Safeguarding is now embedded deeper in our culture than a year ago. Training During the year various members of the church attended training events as appropriate to keep us in touch with safeguarding requirements and thinking, and to move us forward based on outcomes of the Safeguarding Audit we completed at the end of 2017. Small Church The establishment of our exciting new Small Church has meant we have had to be rigorous in thinking about our safeguarding of young children. All PCC Members and Small Church teachers now require DBS checks, and we have 11


recruited and ensured all volunteers supervising Small Church meet our Safeguarding standards. Working in our parish We have continued to build up a resource of Policies and Risk Assessments so that any areas of difficulty are being considered and potential dangers minimised. All Policies and Risk Assessments are available in the Church Office and will be reviewed regularly. Volunteer roles PCC has approved Work Outlines for the work being done by our volunteers. This is so that our volunteers can understand exactly what is it expected of them. We want our volunteers to feel confident in their roles and where to turn for help and training. General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR) GDPR were enacted in May 2018 and we have worked to ensure all our processes meet these new requirements. In particular, we have:  Risk assessed all information we manage.  Reviewed and updated our contact details of all people (e.g. our Community Directory) and retained the information in line with GDPR.  Promulgated a Data Privacy Notice on our church noticeboards and website. Resonate Report Andy and Julia Busfield ((Resonate))'s mission is to gather as a community and embrace people anywhere on their journey with God:  To share our stories and experiences of worship whether in music, literature, film, social justice or art.  To discuss and reflect on our own journey and perspective.  To create individual and community worship to God and apply to our daily lives. We aim to create a welcoming, challenging, respectful, safe and honest environment and encourage the community to practise these values. We do this by meeting every 1st and 3rd Tuesday of the month. We eat together with food and sharing stories before each session, before sharing stories about where we have seen God in a range of contexts such as music, literature, family, work, food. Examples of sessions this year have included Beer and Carols - a 12


Christmas jolly sing song with a band, Sixty One Prison Gift Box Wrapping - giving gifts to prisoners at Christmas, Peace Feast – sharing food and hearing stories from Refugees, or stories from guest speakers including themes about addiction, mental health or physical health. Attendance fluctuates from around 15-50, with a regular of around 25-30. Going forward into the next year (Jan -Dec 2019) ((Resonate)) aims to engage more with the community in the local area where it serves. A rewarding feature of Resonate is creating space for community members to share their stories with everyone and going forward this is something we want to create more space for. Children and Young People Report Mary Barnes and Jo Parrott At the beginning of the summer 2018 Jo met with Mary Barnes to discuss the possibility of some further provision for the growing number of children attending St. Stephens. Mary had refurbished the children’s area at church in Feb 2017 and provided many resources for the children which have been (and still are) used well and appreciated. As the children are growing it is recognised that further provision would be beneficial to the children, parents and to the community as a whole. Explore (those with younger children) had been discussing how we communicate faith and introduce our children to Jesus; how we provide an environment where it’s as normal to talk about Jesus as it is Batman! I asked the group what they would be blessed by in terms of further children’s work at St. Stephens and asked them if they would be willing to take part in leading such a group. After what felt like quite a long but necessary process of interviews and DBS checks (Mary Tippetts worked relentlessly on this), we now have a regular team of 7 people with at least four in addition, who are willing to step in if needed. Small Church happens every 2nd and 4th Sunday and is aimed at 0-7year olds. I am excited too to have some of our young people from across the two communities helping. We have based the structure of the group on Junior Church run by Mary Barnes at HTH, in order to provide a sense of continuity across the churches, because it’s a great model and the children engage with Jesus through it. The sessions are planned with the principles of freedom of movement, freedom to choose and freedom to repeat; all of which are essential to learning in the early years. 13


The children are beginning their ‘Jesus Journey Books’ (again mirroring the Jesus Journals of Junior Church) in which they can creatively record what they are thinking, feeling, talking about and hearing from Jesus. In future I wonder if we could see Junior/Small Church as one, sharing our ‘people’ resources with Mary/HTH as they have shared theirs with us, remembering a sense of ‘whole community’. Women Only Report Sarah Walker and Jennie Brettell WO is a place for women of both churches (and their friends) to get to know each other and build relationships. We organise an activity every two months, such as a walk, a meal or doing something creative together. Different days and locations work best for different people, so we plan events at a variety of times and places and across the city to give a wide variety of women the opportunity to attend. This has the added benefit that events do not always attract the same group of people. To avoid the men in both churches receiving irrelevant event reminders from Facebook, we now focus our publicity on the news sheet and inviting people by email and, most importantly, in person. In 2018, we met in February (for pancakes), April (clothing and book swap), June (museum visit), August (a walk), October (National Poetry Day) and December (a seasonal social). The number of attendees ranged from between 8 and 30 people. The pancake night was probably the most well-attended, the (now annual) clothing swap remained very popular, and the summer walk drew a good number – for the walk, and others for the tea and treats afterwards. Events are planned on a similar schedule for 2019. Sarah Walker and Jennie Brettell are the current organisers. After three years on the planning team, Jennie has decided to step down after the 2019 APCM. Thank you, Jennie, for all your work, and we hereby put out the call for someone to join Sarah! Many thanks also to all those who attended and hosted in 2018, and we look forward to the gatherings of 2019. Men’s Ministry Report Dave Mitchell and Lee Stephenson The Men’s Ministry is shared between Holy Trinity Hotwells (HTH) and Saint Stephens (SS), so the reports are the same for both. Two main regular meetings form the majority of the dedicated meetings, and are discussed individually below: 14


Bloke’s Prayer: Blokes Prayer continues to meet 7.30 am every Wednesday, in the large upstairs room at Dom's Coffee House near the Hippodrome on the centre. Normally around 4 or 5 of us get together over a cup of coffee to chat, moan about roadworks and politics, and put the world to rights. We also spend time sharing on a more personal level, and supporting one another through prayer. In many ways this group operates as one of our mini-communities. All men from both churches are very welcome to join us - just turn up any Wednesday morning. Men’s Breakfast: Men’s Breakfast meets once a month on a Saturday morning for breakfast at Lloyds Bar on the waterfront. The informal setting usually brings around 5-8 men out for a fry up, with members coming from both Saint Stephens, Holy Trinity and also “none of the above”. Discussions include usual pub chat such as sports results, as well as deeper matters such as politics and belief, all in a very informal atmosphere. With both HTH and SS taking a month each of the Churches Together soup run, and in these months, the breakfast is either postponed, or a curry evening is planned instead. Any interested men are more than welcome to join, with details in community news. Monday Lunchtime Concerts Report David Mowat Introduction: I was responsible in 2018 for 54 concerts. What strikes me as I look back over the year? The role of volunteers - success depends on others. I’d single out Sarah Mitchell for the programme layout, printing and hospitality at most lunchtimes, also Dave Mitchell for helping out with alarms, gig attendance (and bar work). To Dave Williams of the congregation and of Jelli Records, for putting forward artists, for documenting each gig and latterly for co-running a small café when Brandon Trust left us. Also, to J Nelson Price whose own inaugural gig was this year, who helped get an audience for the Russian choir and who’s taken enthusiastic ownership of the little popup fair trade café with Dave. The ‘name’ of Saint Stephen’s is increasing in reach. Going through the list I can pick out 10 acts of beyond-Bristol standing who have noticed the opportunity provided here; an album launch, a promo-filming, a stop point on a national tour. Three choirs came from overseas. Add to this the regular core of professional experienced acts, like Din Ghani early music expert, or Biber Duo, top of their game in the amateur recorder player world, Gordon Pullin tenor 15


singer and Auriol Britton poetry reciter, and you have a top-class cycle of performers. I’ve not even covered Martin Le Poidevin’s excellent Wednesday series. We take risks - we still welcome events that are edgy. For instance, a spiritual but non-Christian music meditation ‘winter to spring’ event led by Michael Stanton, or the free-form music fundraiser event for Keith Tippett. It’s likely the gig of improvising female singers (that I had nothing to do with) was drawn here because of ‘Gateway to Another Dimension’ we ran in 2017. We have fun - I grew up in a middle-class Anglican culture that I remember finding stuffy but there’s none of that here. The Brigstowe Village Band finally succeeded in generating dancing in the aisles, there was the wonderful over the top Fantasy Orchestra and so much more. A few more comments about Concerts at Saint Stephen’s Sarah Mitchell In total, our church hosted 72 concerts in 2018, which is very impressive. As David says above, I make the monthly flyer. I attend as many concerts as possible and welcome people to the church. When people ask, I tell them about the church community, and of course there are leaflets about our church events for people to take. The average audience for concerts far exceeds the number of people who attend church services. People who come to concerts often experience God’s presence, whether they are aware of it or not – peace, joy, belonging, community, and so on. For unavoidable reasons, the church community didn’t have a Carol Service, or any traditional Christmas services in 2018. But the Fantasy Orchestra & Choir told the Christmas story in musical form to a packed church! I sometimes wonder whether the church could work more closely with the concerts. And we would certainly value more people from church attending concerts (and volunteering to help). Please do talk to me if you have any ideas, or want to know more. Aslan Bookshop Report Fr Richard Greatrex 2018 was a mixed year: while Cathedral shop sales rose those at St Stephen’s struggled, yet bookstalls at external events were positive. During the summer we, along with colleagues in the church and café, experienced significant problems with localised anti-social behaviour. These had a major impact on the numbers of customers visiting the shop and caused us to close for safety on 16


Saturdays and the last week of August. The end of the café precipitated a further decline in footfall throughout autumn until serious flooding in November caused a two-day closure, necessitating the removal of some fixtures for drying and the hiring of an industrial de-humidifier to ensure that moisture didn’t affect the books. Thankfully, while the ingress was above the Bibles, only a modest amount of stock was lost and the problem, caused by blocked drains on the flat roof, swiftly rectified by the church team. There were changes among our colleagues over the year as Michael Secker moved on and Dalia Nikadon began her career in scientific publishing. Subsequently, Lizzy Ozolins joined us, splitting her time between St Stephen’s and the Cathedral Shop. In 2019 our challenge remains to attract more customers and to encourage more churches to use the shop as a resource. While re-opening the café space, in some form, and the regeneration of the garden, are vital for our survival we would also love to welcome more of the worshipping community of St Stephen’s and Holy Trinity to the shop. We are open to ideas for stock, events or ways to raise the profile of the business, so please come and talk to us. The forthcoming publication of my book of Eastertide resources and reflections in the Spring also offers new opportunities for us to promote the work of the bookshop and the church. Currently, Aslan Christian Books remains committed to working with St Stephen’s for the mutual benefit of both our ministries and we relish the chance to experience together new ways to share the rich diversity of the Christian faith. Bristol Street Pastors Report Ann Tarr and Helen Harrison Bristol Street Pastors continued to operate from St Stephen’s during 2018 and are grateful for their ongoing support. We strive to be a reflection of God’s love in action on the streets, listening, caring and helping those in need. We welcome new enquiries from those who might be interested in being a street pastor or prayer pastor. There are four teams who between them cover Saturday evenings and go out between 10 pm and approximately 3.30 am. The route covered varies according to need but tends to cover Corn Street, Welsh Back, Narrow Quay, the Waterfront, Frogmore Street, Park Street, The Triangle and University Road. Continued attention is paid to the walkways and roads alongside the harbour and waterfront following a number of deaths as a result of people falling into the water. The hot summer weather saw lots of people enjoying the waterfront and we had some great conversations with visitors from all over the world. We 17


took the opportunity to remind them of the difficulties of getting out of the harbour if they were to fall in and there was lovely, good humoured atmosphere especially during the World Cup. Busy nights see upwards of 35,000 people out enjoying themselves and Bristol City Centre is a lively, noisy, vibrant and surprisingly safe environment. Park Street is especially busy. The teams hand out bottles of water to those who have over celebrated, flip flops to the women who have abandoned high heels, patch up scratches and scrapes and persuade taxi drivers to take people home. There have been a number of people requiring ambulances and we stay with these until the emergency services are able to attend. We have added festival style ponchos to our emergency supplies, and these have been gratefully received by young women who are not always adequately dressed. This can become an issue with couples who row and split up on a night out and the female is sometimes left alone to make her own way home and can quickly become very cold. As well as ponchos, we also supply hugs, comfort and support and try to see if there can be a reconciliation. Often there is. The Council through the Bid Partnership and ourselves have continued to work together at improving the environment through the provision of more rubbish bins which makes the disposal of bottles much easier. Many people cannot afford to drink in the clubs and pubs and so drink outside and leave bottles, some containing a lot of drink still, on the streets. These pose a hazard as they can be used as a handy weapon if there is trouble or smash and cause a danger to the many young women who walk barefoot at the end of the evening. Bristol Street Pastors supported other teams in providing cover at the Summer Solstice celebrations at Stonehenge. It was a perfect summer’s night in the middle of the heatwave and great experience for all. Equally moving, some of the team supported the one-year anniversary of the Manchester bombing in July as Response Pastors – another initiative of Ascension Trust who set up Street Pastors. Our aim in 2018 was to increase the number of Street Pastors in Bristol. A new training programme started in September and we currently have 10 new volunteers in training, and these will shortly be available to join existing teams. This means we can cover all Saturdays in a month (including those with 5) and can start to look to extend to a Friday night. We have also increased the number of prayer pastors who are essential members of our team. We thank all the Churches in Bristol for their continued support and please do continue to pray for Street Pastors and our mission. 18


PCC Membership 2018-9 Our Clergy are all ex-officio members of the PCC: The Revd Lee Barnes – Priest-in-Charge The Revd Frances Houghton – Associate Minister The Revd Dru Brooke-Taylor – Associate Minister The Revd Richard Croft – Curate The Revd Chris Parkman (joined July 2016) – Curate Churchwardens are elected for a 1-year term, and are ex-officio members of the PCC: Dave Mitchell Jeanette Plumb We have one elected Deanery Synod Representative, serving a 3-year term who is an ex-officio member of the PCC: Pippa White (resigned April 2019) Vanessa Stephenson (will finish at APCM 2021) The PCC has 7 elected members. At the 2018 APCM it was agreed the vacancies would be filled as follows: one space for one year and three spaces for three years. Sarah Mitchell (will finish at APCM in 2019) (Electoral Roll Officer) Robin Williams (will finish at APCM in 2019) (PCC Treasurer) Sue Williams (will finish at APCM 2020) (PCC Secretary) Steve Broadway (will finish at APCM 2020) Catherine Phillips (will finish at APCM in 2021) Sam Sayer (will finish at APCM in 2021) Richard Wheeler (will finish at APCM in 2021) In addition, the PCC may co-opt up to 2 members: Jo Parrott (will finish at APCM in 2019) Approved by the Parochial Church Council on ……………………………….. and signed on their behalf by …………………………………………………….. ……………………………………………….. Revd Lee Barnes (Priest in Charge) and Robin Williams (PCC Treasurer)

19


Independent examiner’s report to the trustees of The PCC of St Stephen I report to the trustees on my examination of the accounts of St Stephen’s Church, Bristol (the Charity) for the year ended 31 December 2018. Responsibilities and basis of report As the charity trustees of the Charity you are responsible for the preparation of the accounts in accordance with the requirements of the Charities Act 2011 (‘the Act’). I report in respect of my examination of the Charity’s accounts carried out under section 145 of the 2011 Act and in carrying out my examination I have followed all the applicable Directions given by the Charity Commission under section 145(5)(b) of the Act. Independent examiner’s statement I confirm that I am qualified to undertake the examination because I a member of the Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales, which is one of the listed bodies. I have completed my examination. I confirm that no material matters have come to my attention in connection with the examination giving me cause to believe that in any material respect: 1. 2. 3.

accounting records were not kept in respect of the Charity as required by section 130 of the Act; or the accounts do not accord with those records; or the accounts do not comply with the applicable requirements concerning the form and content of accounts set out in the Charities (Accounts and Reports) Regulations 2008 other than any requirement that the accounts give a ‘true and fair view which is not a matter considered as part of an independent examination.

I have no concerns and have come across no other matters in connection with the examination to which attention should be drawn in this report in order to enable a proper understanding of the accounts to be reached.

20


Ed Marsh BSc (Hons) FCA DChA Burton Sweet Chartered Accountants The Clock Tower 5 Farleigh Court Old Weston Road Flax Bourton Bristol BS48 1UR

Date: …………………………

21


ST STEPHEN'S CHURCH, BRISTOL STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2018 Unrestricted Funds £

Note Income from: Donations and legacies Charitable activities Investment income Other income

2 3

Total income Expenditure on: Charitable activities Ministry

4

Total expenditure Net movement in funds

11

Total funds at 1 January Total funds at 31 December

11

Restricted Funds £

Total Funds 2018 £

Total Funds 2017 £

50,299 11,149 17 474

18,959 -

69,258 11,149 17 474

60,685 14,362 2 350

61,939

18,959

80,898

75,400

58,511

19,893

78,404

69,079

58,511

19,893

78,404

69,079

3,428

(934)

2,494

6,321

26,122

2,667

28,789

22,468

29,550

1,733

31,283

28,789

The Charity has no recognised gains or losses other than the results for the year as set out above. All of the activities of the charity are classed as continuing The notes on pages 24 to 31 form part of these financial statements Comparative fund movements are shown in note 7

22


ST STEPHEN'S CHURCH, BRISTOL BALANCE SHEET AS AT 31 DECEMBER 2018 2018 ÂŁ

Note Fixed assets Office equipment

8

2017 ÂŁ

1

1

1

1

9

9,103 3,029 25,526 37,658

5,875 3,029 26,814 35,718

10

(6,376)

(6,930)

Net Current Assets

31,282

28,788

Net assets

31,283

28,789

29,550 1,733

26,122 2,667

31,283

28,789

Current assets Debtors Short term deposits Cash at bank and in hand

Creditors : Amounts falling due within one year

Funds Unrestricted funds Restricted funds

16

These financial statements were approved by the Parochial Church Council on by:

Rev. L Barnes, Chair

R Williams, Treasurer

The notes on pages 24 to 31 form part of these financial statements

23

and are signed on its behalf


ST STEPHEN'S CHURCH, BRISTOL NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2018 1

Accounting policies The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with applicable accounting standards and the current Statement of Recommended Practice: Accounting and Reporting by Charities preparing their accounts their accounts in accordance with the Financial Reporting Standard applicable in the UK and Ireland (FRS102), and the Financial Reporting Standard applicable in the UK and Ireland (FRS102) and the Charities Act 2011. The trustees consider that there are no material uncertainties about the Church's ability to continue as a going concern. The PCC constitutes a public benefit entity as defined by FRS102. Funds General funds represent the funds of the church that are not subject to any restrictions regarding their use and are available for application on the general purposes of the PCC. These include funds designated for a particular purpose by the PCC. Restricted funds are those derived from gifts which are restricted to a particular purpose. The accounts include transactions, assets and liabilities for which the PCC can be held responsible. They do not include the accounts of church groups that owe an affiliation to another body nor those that are informal gatherings of church members. Income All income is recognised once the PCC has entitlement to the income, there is sufficient certainty of receipt and it is therefore probable that the income will be received, and the amount of income can be measured reliably. Income from gifts Planned giving receivable by standing order is recognised when received. Collections are recognised when received by or on behalf of the PCC. Gift aid is accrued on donations when there is a valid declaration from the donor, and accounted for in the year to which the giving relates. Any Gift Aid amount recovered on a donation is treated as an addition to the same fund as the initial donation unless the donor or terms of the appeal have stated otherwise. Grants Grants to the PCC are included in the SoFA when the PCC becomes entitled to the income, it is probable that the income will be received, and the amount can be measured reliably. Legacy income Legacy income is recognised when receipt is probable, that is, when there has been grant of probate, the executors have established there are sufficient net assets to pay the legacy, and any conditions attached have been met or are in the control of the church. Other income Income to cover the cost of church events is accounted for gross, rather than being netted off against related costs within reported expenditure. Rental income from the letting of the church buildings, dividends and interest are all recognised when receivable. Donated goods, facilities and services Donated goods, facilities and services are recognised as income with an equivalent amount recognised as an expense, except for the contribution of volunteers which it is considered impractical to reliably measure for accounting purposes. The donated goods, facilities and services are recognised on the basis of the value of the gift to the PCC which is the amount that the PCC would have been willing to pay to obtain such services or facilities of equivalent economic benefit on the open market. 24


ST STEPHEN'S CHURCH, BRISTOL NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2018 1

Accounting policies (continued) Interest receivable This is included in the accounts upon notification of the interest by the Bank. Expenditure Liabilities are recognised as expenditure as soon as there is a legal or constructive obligation committing the PCC to that expenditure, it is probable that settlement will be required and the amount of the obligation can be measured reliably. Diocesan parish share The Diocesan parish share is accounted for in accordance with the agreed intention of the PCC. Governance Governance costs represent the expenditure related to statutory requirements such as audit or independent examination and legal advice. They have been included within support costs relating to charitable activities. Fixed Assets Consecrated land and buildings and moveable church furnishings The PCC does not own and hold the church and vicarage. Legal custodianship of the church and vicarage lies with the diocesan authorities and the incumbent. Day to day custodianship is controlled by the incumbent and churchwardens. The churchwardens also have custodianship of the moveable items within the church on behalf of the people of the parish. The PCC supports the incumbent in the day to day care of the people of the parish. Expenditure incurred during the year on consecrated or beneficed buildings and moveable church fittings, whether maintenance or an improvement is normally written off as expenditure in the SOFA and is separately disclosed. Major new capital items are capitalised and depreciated over the greater of their estimated useful working lives. Other fixtures, fittings and office equipment Fixtures, fittings and equipment including IT costing over ÂŁ1,000 are valued at cost, and are depreciated on a straight line basis over the minimum expectation of useful life of the asset at the following rates; over 5 years Fixtures and fittings over 3 years Computers and other IT equipment Current assets Amounts owing to the PCC at 31 December in respect of fees, rents or other income are measured on initial recognition at settlement amount after any trade discounts or amount advanced by the PCC. Subsequently, they are measured at the level of cash or other consideration expected to be received. Cash at bank and in hand Cash at bank and cash in hand includes cash and short term highly liquid investments with a short maturity of three months or less from the date of acquisition or opening of the deposit or similar account. Creditors and provisions Creditors and provisions are recognised when the PCC has a present obligation arising from a past event that will probably result in the transfer of funds to a third party and the amount due to settle the obligation can be measured or estimated reliably.

25


ST STEPHEN'S CHURCH, BRISTOL NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2018 1

Accounting policies (continued) Liabilities are measured on recognition at their historical cost and then subsequently at the best estimate of the amount required to settle the obligation at the reporting date. Pension scheme The church operates a defined contribution scheme for the benefit of its employees. Contributions payable are charged to the statement of financial activities in the year they are payable. 2 Donations and legacies Unrestricted Funds £ Planned Giving: Gift Aided donations Income tax recovered (gift aid) Collections (open plate) at all services Special collections Other donations

16,449 4,665 1,353 3,601 231 -

Grants: St James & St Mary - le Port St Nicholas with St Leonard Educational Charity St James Parish Hall Antient Society of Ringers St Stephen & St Nicholas Charity St Stephen Ecclesiastical Charity DCMS scheme

24,000 50,299

Restricted Funds £ -

159 7,800 9,000 2,000 18,959

Total Funds 2018 £

Total Funds 2017 £

16,449 4,665 1,353 3,601 231

14,976 4,243 1,104 2,751 698

159 7,800 9,000 24,000 2,000 69,258

2,600 415 5,200 2,248 26,000 450 60,685

Total Funds 2018 £

Total Funds 2017 £

3 Charitable activities: Income Unrestricted Funds £ Contributions for use of the Church Common Room Lettings Wedding Services Rental fron Aslan Books Bookshop Miscellaneous income

26

Restricted Funds £

2,973 4,248 194 3,086 647

-

2,973 4,248 194 3,086 647

4,448 5,256 669 3,468 521

11,148

-

11,148

14,362


ST STEPHEN'S CHURCH, BRISTOL NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2018 4 Charitable activities: Expenditure Unrestricted Funds £ Ministry: Diocesan Parish Share Salaries Clergy expenses & staff costs Wedding and funeral expenses Mission Children's Ministry Training Ministry costs Music Events Building maintenance Heat, light & water Cleaning Security costs Insurance Professional fees - operations Telephone, printing, stationery, Governance - accountancy & independent examination Equipment and maintenance Refreshments Sundry

Restricted Funds £

Total Funds 2018 £

Total Funds 2017 £ 18,000 18,501 758 80 60 461 563 550 905 480 7,283 5,925 1,352 1,039 5,524 1,431 2,852 918 1,146 420 832 69,079

21,000 7,530 695 924 144 178 309 45 508 3,467 6,696 1,471 1,078 5,803 1,729 2,740 1,802 1,113 372 907

10,893 9,000 -

21,000 18,423 695 924 144 178 309 45 508 12,467 6,696 1,471 1,078 5,803 1,729 2,740 1,802 1,113 372 907

58,511

19,893

78,404

5 Staff costs 2018 £ Salaries Employer's National Insurance contributions Employer's pension contributions

2017 £

17,664 648 111

18,358 72 71

18,423

18,501

No employee earned more than £60,000 during the year (2017: none). During 2018, the average number of staff employed was 2 (2017: 2) The charity considers the key management personnel to be the trustees (as shown on page 20) the Priest-in-charge, Rev. Lee Barnes, Associate Ministers Rev. Frances Houghton and Rev Dru Brooke-Taylor, and the curates Rev Chris Parkman and Rev Richard Croft. 27


ST STEPHEN'S CHURCH, BRISTOL NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2018 5 Staff costs (continued) The total amount of salaries and benefits received by trustees and key management personnel was £ nil (2017 - £nil). The diocese pay some of the above-named clergy.

6 Related party transactions No remuneration or expenses were paid to the members of the PCC (known as the charity Trustees) or related parties during the year (2017 - £nil ), or were any expenses waived by the trustees during these periods. Donations received by the church from trustees and related parties during the year were £ 9,180 (2017: £7,919).

7 Comparative fund movements Unrestricted Funds 2017 £

Restricted Funds 2017 £

Total Funds

Income from: Donations and legacies Charitable activities Investment income Other income

47,772 14,362 2 350

12,913 -

60,685 14,362 2 350

Total income

62,488

12,913

75,400

Expenditure Charitable activities Ministry

52,768

16,311

69,079

Total expenditure

52,768

16,311

69,079

Net movement in funds

2017 £

9,719

(3,398)

6,321

Total funds at 1 January

16,403

6,065

22,468

Total funds at 31 December

26,122

2,667

28,789

Reconciliation of funds:

28


ST STEPHEN'S CHURCH, BRISTOL NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2018 8

Tangible fixed assets Office equipment £

9

Total £

Cost At 1 January 2018

981

981

At 31 December 2018

981

981

Depreciation At 1 January 2018 Charge

980 -

980 -

At 31 December 2018

980

980

Net book value At 31 December 2018

1

1

At 31 December 2017

1

1

Debtors 2018 £ Trade debtors Other debtors

2017 £

2,090 7,013

868 5,007

9,103

5,875

10 Creditors: amounts falling due within one year 2018 £ Trade creditors Accruals and deferred income Other creditors and accruals

29

2017 £

5,876 500

4,330 2,000 600

6,376

6,930


ST STEPHEN'S CHURCH, BRISTOL NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2018 11 Movement in funds Current Year

Unrestricted funds Restricted funds St James & St Mary Le Port Ecc Trust St Nicholas with St Leonard Educational Charity The Parish Hall of St James Trust The Ancient Society of Ringers St Stephen Ecclesiastical Charity

Total funds

Previous Year

Unrestricted funds Restricted funds St James & St Mary Le Port Ecc Trust St Nicholas with St Leonard Educational Charity The Parish Hall of St James Trust The Ancient Society of Ringers St Stephen Ecclesiastical Charity DCMS scheme

Total funds

At 1 January 2018 £

Income £

26,122

61,939

Expenditure £

Transfers £

At 31 December 2018 £

(58,511)

-

29,550

(1,300)

-

-

1,300

-

-

159

(159)

-

-

1,367 2,667

7,800 9,000 2,000 18,959

(7,434) (9,000) (2,000) (19,893)

-

1,733 1,733

28,789

80,898

(78,404)

-

31,283

At 1 January 2017 £

Income £

Expenditure £

Transfers £

At 31 December 2017 £

16,403

62,488

(52,768)

-

26,122

1,300

2,600

(2,600)

-

1,300

334

415

(749)

-

-

4,431 6,065

5,200 2,248 2,000 450 12,913

(8,264) (2,248) (2,000) (450) (16,311)

-

1,367 2,667

22,468

75,400

(69,079)

-

28,789

30


ST STEPHEN'S CHURCH, BRISTOL NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2018 12 Analysis of net assets between funds

Current year

Fixed assets £

Unrestricted funds Restricted funds

Unrestricted funds Restricted funds

29,549 1,733

29,550 1,733

1

31,282

31,283

Fixed assets £

Other net assets £

Total £

1

26,121 2,667

26,122 2,667

1

28,788

28,789

-

31

Total £

1 -

Previous year

Other net assets £

Profile for Saint Stephen's & Holy Trinity

Saint Stephen's Bristol - Annual Report and Accounts 2018  

Saint Stephen's Church Annual Report and Accounts - 31st December 2018

Saint Stephen's Bristol - Annual Report and Accounts 2018  

Saint Stephen's Church Annual Report and Accounts - 31st December 2018

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