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Classics Professor and Students Go Underground Last summer, classics professor David George excavated a series of newly discovered pyramidal structures beneath the city of Orvieto, Italy. It was an exciting project for the professor as well the nine students and six alumni in his crew, who had an experience that very few young archaeologists could put on their resumes. The pyramids are the first structures of their kind discovered in Italy. Professor George and Italian archaeologist Claudio Bizzarri discovered the structures and are co-directors of the excavation. “At the time of their discovery, the structures had been largely filled, leaving only the topmost modern layer which had been modified and was being used as a wine cellar,” says George. The feature that caught his eye was a series of stairs carved into the wall, which were clearly Etruscan. A series of tunnels ran beneath the wine cellar, hinting at the possibility of deeper undiscovered structures. The first objects dug up in May included tennis shoes and 19th and 20th-century broken plates. One meter lower, the diggers reached a medieval floor. Below that, they found 5th century BCE Etruscan pottery, and material dating back to 1200 BCE. To date, the excavators have dug down three meters and the pyramidal structure continues. George believes the subterranean structures were tombs or part of a sanctuary. The site will sit idle until May 2013, when George and his students will also pick up their work at the college’s original dig site in Coriglia, for the eighth season. Tessa Theriault ’15, one of the first students to choose Saint Anselm’s new major in classical archaeology, was thrilled to find herself at the site of a new discovery.

“Knowing that you are among the first people to see this structure and these artifacts for thousands of years is amazing, and knowing that you’re helping expose new information about an ancient culture is a great honor to be a part of,” she says. “Every time someone found a large piece of pottery that included the base of the piece, we were eager to clean it off quickly to see if there might be an inscription on it. The energy level was always high.” The discovery made news all over. (If you can read Russian, German, or Polish, we’ll send you the links.) Learn more about the dig, see photos, and watch an interview with David George and Tessa Theriault ‘15 at www.anselm.edu/pyramid.

See more photos & watch videos at

www.anselm.edu/pyramid College Helps Grads Find Success The college has two new initiatives to help students and new grads in their pursuit of internships and employment. The Office of Career Services recently added an associate director for employer relations, Sarah Mockler, to cultivate and develop relationships with employers and alumni leading to expanded opportunities and greater graduate success. The Office of Career Services also began a partnership with the athletics department and Career Athletes, a provider of athlete-to-athlete mentoring, networking, professional development and job posting services. Any current or former Hawk athlete can sign up for free and gain online access to 100,000+ members, 450 company recruiters and 58,000 job and internship opportunities “Given the rigorous demands of being a student-athlete at Saint Anselm College, this partnership will help us to help them in gaining traction and leverage in the job market,” says Sam Allen, director of the Office of Career Services. Alumni seeking ways to connect with students and new grads are encouraged to contact Mockler at smockler@anselm.edu.

Find a Job! Post a Job!

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Alumnus, Abbot and Chancellor - Fall 2012  

The Magazine of Saint Anselm College

Alumnus, Abbot and Chancellor - Fall 2012  

The Magazine of Saint Anselm College