Issuu on Google+

SAINT ANSELM 2013 Summer School


2013 SUMMER SCHOOL

www.anselm.edu/summerschool


CONTENTS Classroom legend................................................................................................ 3 Schedule.................................................................................................................. 4 Tuition/Fees........................................................................................................... 4 General information............................................................................................ 5 Courses offerings................................................................................................. 8

First day session.......................................................................................... 8 Second day session.................................................................................... 9 Third day session......................................................................................... 9

Evening sessions.................................................................................................10 Internships.............................................................................................................. 11 Summer Education Abroad............................................................................. 11 Course descriptions........................................................................................... 12 Spend the summer in Belize......................................................................... 30 Registration...........................................................................................................31 Directions to campus..........................................................Inside back cover

CLASSROOM LEGEND ROOMS

LOCATION

LL1

Alumni Hall – Lower Level through Chapel Arts Lobby

LL2 - LL7

Alumni Hall – Lower Level

5 - 11

Alumni Hall – Third Floor

12 - 16

Alumni Hall – Fourth Floor

1C - 18C

Comiskey Center – Adjacent to Collins & Falvey House

4G - 208G

Gadbois Hall

2111

Goulet Science Center – Lab Room

2205

Goulet Science Center – Perini Lecture Hall

3100 - 3105

Goulet Science Center

4001 - 4007

New Hampshire Institute of Politics & Political Library

005 and 010

Joseph Hall – Ground Floor

110

Joseph Hall – First Floor

209 104 - 108

Joseph Hall – Second Floor Poisson Hall

ACC Room A

Poisson Hall

3


SCHEDULE First Session 5 days/week

May 20 - June 14 (4 weeks) No classes Monday, May 27 Final Exams: Saturday, June 15

Second Session 5 days/week

June 17 - July 12 (4 weeks) No classes Thursday, July 4 Final Exams: Saturday, July 13

Third Session 5 days/week

July 15 - August 9 (4 weeks) Final Exams: Saturday, August 10

Evening Session I 2 nights/week

May 20 - June 26 (6 weeks) Monday & Wednesday No classes Monday, May 27 Final Exams: Wednesday, June 26

Evening I Special Language Session 4 nights/week

May 20 - June 26 (6 weeks) Mon-Tues-Wed & Thurs

Evening Session II 2 nights/week

May 21 - June 27 (6 weeks) Tuesday & Thursday Final Exams: Thursday, June 27

Evening Session III 2 nights/week

July 2 - August 8 (6 weeks) Tuesday & Thursday Final Exams: Thursday, August 8

Evening III Special Language Session 4 nights/week

July 1 - August 8 (6 weeks) Mon-Tues-Wed & Thurs

TUITION $1050.00 / 3 Credit Course $1400.00 / 4 Credit Course

$1750.00 / 5 Credit Course $450.00 / Audit

FEES $65.00 Science lab fee Studio Art fee to be determined by course $50.00 Registration fee Fees are non-refundable unless the course is cancelled All students, including faculty dependents and staff, are required to pay the $50.00 Registration fee.

PAYMENT IS DUE IN THE BUSINESS OFFICE AT THE TIME OF REGISTRATION. 4


GENERAL INFORMATION Academic Regulations

The summer courses at Saint Anselm College are intensive academic experiences. Each class is at least two hours long, providing a highly concentrated continuous immersion in one subject area. The intensity of the program allows for in-depth coverage, well beyond the usual. No student is allowed to take more than two courses in any one session. Students are expected to attend all classes. Instructors may take absences into account when determining a student’s academic standing and course grade.

Accreditation and Memberships

Saint Anselm College is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges. It holds membership in the Association of American Colleges, the American Council on Education, the National Catholic Educational Association, and the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities. For a complete list, please refer to the College Catalogue. Saint Anselm College is a co-educational institution. All courses are on the undergraduate level and have been selected to enable: 1. Undergraduate students to accelerate programs, to supplement their academic programs, and/or to make up deficiencies. 2. High school graduates or competent high school seniors to start their college programs, and/or to strengthen a particular area of academic need. 3. People to undertake studies which will further their personal and vocational goals.

Who May Enroll

Saint Anselm College actively seeks a diversity of students. The college admits students of any race, creed, color, national and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, creed, national and ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarships and loan programs, and athletic and other schooladministered programs.

Transfer of Credit to Other Institutions

College undergraduates who desire that credits earned be applied to their college degree programs should have their summer session course selection approved by an appropriate official of their college or

5


university. All official transcripts must be requested in writing through the Registrar’s Office. Transcripts will be issued only when all financial accounts have been settled. The transcript fee is $5.00 per copy.

Registration

Students may register for courses in the Registrar’s Office on the first floor of Alumni Hall any weekday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Students may also register by mailing the registration form in the back of this catalogue (or available on the Saint Anselm College Web Page at www.anselm.edu/summerschool) with full remittance to: Summer School, Box #1732, Saint Anselm College, 100 Saint Anselm Drive, Manchester, NH 03102-1310. Registrations are not permitted after the second meeting of a class without the permission of the course instructor and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. Registration is not completed until tuition has been paid in full. The college reserves the right to cancel classes due to inadequate enrollment and to close registration for classes which are fully enrolled. There will be NO confirmation of registration sent to the student. Students will be contacted ONLY if classes are canceled. PAYMENT IS DUE IN THE BUSINESS OFFICE AT THE TIME OF REGISTRATION

Payments can be made by cash, personal check, Master Card, and Visa. If calling, please have your credit card number available. Checks are to be made payable to Saint Anselm College.

Financial Aid

There are no specific grants of financial aid made for the summer program.

Housing for Summer School Students

Summer housing will be provided for matriculated Saint Anselm students enrolled in summer classes if they wish to live on campus. Summer residences will open on Sunday, May 19, 2013, and will close on July 13, 2013. Summer housing is available only for the first two sessions of Summer School (day and evening). On-campus housing accommodations are not available for session three. All college rules and regulations will remain in effect, and residents are subject to enforcement of College policy. In addition, summer residence halls are alcohol-free for all residents, regardless of age. The Summer Housing Application and a $135 deposit are due in the Office of Residential Life and Education on a first come, first-served basis. The cost of summer housing will be $135 per week payable to Saint Anselm College and directed to the business office. For more information, please contact Lisa Gowern, Conference and Event Services at (603) 222-4270 or lgowern@anselm.edu.

6


Tuition Refund Policy

A student withdrawing during the summer session will be refunded tuition according to the following percentages: Within the first week 60% Within two weeks 20% Over two weeks 0% In determining the percentage of refund, the date of withdrawal will be the date the student notifies the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs in writing or by submitting the summer course withdrawal form. Absence from class does not constitute withdrawal, nor relieve the student of the responsibility for tuition charges.

Grades

The grades, A, A-; B+, B, B-; C+, C, C-; D+, D, D-; E, are assigned by each instructor to denote the student’s academic performance. A indicates excellent work; B indicates work of above average quality; C indicates average work normally expected of a college student; D indicates below average work, but passing. E indicates a failure. The symbols + and - indicate intermediate levels. In addition, the grades F, I, W, and WF are assigned by the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs with the advice of the instructor. The grade F indicates excessive absences. The grade I indicates that the student’s work is incomplete due to missing a final examination with adequate reasons. After the second week of classes, a student withdrawing from a course will receive a grade of W (withdrawal) or WF (withdrawal/failing) depending upon circumstances. Incomplete work must be made up by November 4, 2013. Any other inquiries may be addressed to: Summer School Office, Box #1732, Saint Anselm College, 100 Saint Anselm Drive, Manchester, NH 03102-1310 or call at (603) 641-7400.

7


COURSE OFFERINGS FIRST DAY SESSION May 20 to June 14, Monday through Friday (no classes May 27) COURSE# SEC

COURSE TITLE

INSTRUCTOR

CREDIT

8:30 TO

10:30 TO

1:30

10:30 AM

12:30 PM

3:30 PM

ROOM

BI 331 A Human Anatomy and Physiology I (w/lab)

Poltak

04

X (8:30am to 12:30pm)

3101

BI 344

A Nutrition

Lavoie

03

X

3104

BI 421

A Independent Research

Staff

by Arr.

BI 422

A Independent Research

Staff

by Arr.

CH 130

A General Chemistry I (w/lab) Parodi

04

X (8:30am to 12:30pm)

3103

CH 250

A Organic Chemistry I (w/lab) Wierda

04

X (8:30am to 12:30pm)

3105

CJ 209

A Criminal Law

Hull

03

CJ 212

A Criminal Procedure

Hull

03

CS 101

A Digital Literacy

Traynor

03

CS 450

A ST: Exploring MS Excel

Traynor Demers

ED 315 A Human Growth & Development

X X

209 LL6

X

Room A

03

X

Room A

03

X

ED 322 A Inclusion, Equity & Diversity in Education Wasielewski 03

X

010 005

ED 350 A ST: Sociocultural Perspectives of Public School Demers

03

EN 103

A Freshman English

Contarino

03

EN 221

A Public Speaking

Bouchard

03

EN 251

A Shakespeare:

Bouchard

03

EN 373 A ST: Literary Genres/ Pulp Fiction & Film Noir

Norton

03

FAH 260 A The Cinematic Eye: A History of Film to 1945

Hoffman

03

FAH 262 A Contemporary Film: 1945 to the Present

Hoffman

03

X

LL3

FAS 260

A ST: Ceramics I

Bogonovich 03

X

11C

FAS 272

A Digital Art & Imaging I

Beaudoin

03

FR 201

A Intermediate French I

Sandstrom

03

X

LL7

HI 101 A Origins of European Civilization

Perrone

03

X

LL4

HI 385

A Vietnam War

Masur

03

HU 201

A Humanities Seminar III

Banach

04

MA 170

A Calculus I

Shea

04

PH 105

B Nature and Human Person Anderson

03

PH 107

A Ethics

Augros

03

PH 321

A Formal Logic

Staley

03

PY 202

A Child Psychology

Flannery

03

PY 205

A Psych of Addiction

Troisi

03

PY 307

A Abnormal Psychology

Wenzel

03

X

3104

SP 201

A Intermediate Spanish I

Orrego

03

X

LL4

TH 100

A Biblical Theology

McMahon

03

X

TH 255

A Religions of the West

Holder

03

8

X

010

X

005

X

LL6

X

LL6

X

X

X

X

LL5 LL3

1C

LL5

X (1:30–4) LL3

X (10:30 -1:00)

X X X

4004 110 110 LL4

X

3102

X

3102

X

LL2 005


SECOND DAY SESSION June 17 to July 12, Monday through Friday (no classes July 4) COURSE# SEC

COURSE TITLE

INSTRUCTOR

CREDIT

8:30 TO

10:30 TO

1:30

10:30 AM

12:30 PM

3:30 PM

ROOM

BI 332 A Human Anatomy and Physiology II (w/lab)

Poltak

04

X (8:30am to 12:30pm)

3101

CH 131

A General Chemistry II (w/lab)

Donais

04

X (8:30am to 12:30pm)

3103

CH 251

A Organic Chemistry II (w/lab) Wierda

04

X (8:30am to 12:30pm)

3105

CJ 101 A Intro to Criminal Justice System

Hull

03

CJ 200

A Statistical Methods for CJ

Hull

03

EN 104

A Freshman English II

Contarino

03

FR 202

A Intermediate French II

Sandstrom

03

X

LL7

HI 199 A America: Origins to World Power

Moore

03

X

LL3

HU 202

A Humanities Seminar IV

Banach

04

MA 180

A Calculus II

Plyukhin

04

PH 326

A Philosophy of God

Larson

03

PH 333

A Business Ethics

Hubbard

03

X

LL5

PY 101

A General Psych I

Flannery

03

X

3102

PY 206

A Health Psychology

Troisi

03

X

3102

PY 210

A ST: Peace Psychology

Brady

03

X

3104

SO 212

A Social Statistics (for Nurses)

Burrill

03

SP 202

A Intermediate Spanish II

Jimenez

03

X

LL6

X

LL6

X

LL3

X (1:30–4) LL3

X (10:30 - 1)

4004

X

LL4

X

LL4

X

LL5

THIRD DAY SESSION July 15 to August 9, Monday through Friday COURSE# SEC

COURSE TITLE

INSTRUCTOR

CREDIT

8:30 TO

10:30 TO

1:30

10:30 AM

12:30 PM

3:30 PM

HI 355 A Modern U.S. Foreign Relations

Masur

03

HI 374 A ST: American History/ Hollywood

Moore

03

X

PH 105 A Nature and the Human Person

Tepley

03

X

X

ROOM

LL3 110 LL5

9


EVENING I SESSION May 20 to June 26, Mondays and Wednesdays 6:30 - 9:30 (no classes May 27) COURSE# SEC

COURSE TITLE

INSTRUCTOR

CREDIT

ROOM

BI 107 A Elementary Biochemistry with lab* BI 108 A Microbiology with lab**

Vallari Tobin

05 04

CJ 211

A Evidence

Hull

03

LL6

ED 350

B ST:Effective Classroom Management

Wasielewski

03

005

EN 373

B ST: British Detective Fiction

Cronin

03

LL3

FAS 240

A Photography I

Voelker

03

LL1

PH 107

B Ethics

Latona

03

LL2

*Because of lab, start time is 5:30, end time is 10:30 pm **Starts at 6:00 pm, ends at 11:00 pm

3101 3100

EVENING I SPECIAL LANGUAGE SESSION May 20 to June 26, Monday through Thursday 6:30 pm - 8:00 pm (no classes May 27) COURSE# SEC SP 101

COURSE TITLE

A Elem Spanish I

INSTRUCTOR Staff

CREDIT 03

ROOM (6:30 pm – 8 pm M T W R)

LL4

EVENING II SESSION May 21 to June 27, Tuesdays and Thursdays 6:30-9:30 COURSE# SEC

COURSE TITLE

INSTRUCTOR

CREDIT

ROOM

CJ 224

A Police and Society

Hull

03

FAS270

A Visual Communication

Beaudoin

03

LL6 1C

FAS340

A Photography II

Voelcker

03

LL1

PH 338

A Cont Images of Man

Banach

03

LL3

EVENING III SESSION July 2 to August 8, Tuesday and Thursday 6:30 to 9:30 COURSE# SEC PH 467

COURSE TITLE

INSTRUCTOR

A Preceptorial: Crime and Punishment

Anderson

CREDIT 03

ROOM 010

EVENING III SPECIAL LANGUAGE SESSION July 1 to August 8, Monday through Thursday 6:30 pm - 8:00 pm COURSE# SEC SP 102

10

COURSE TITLE

A Elementary Spanish II

INSTRUCTOR Staff

CREDIT 03

ROOM (6:30pm – 8:00pm M T W R)

LL5


INTERNSHIPS COURSE# SEC

COURSE TITLE

INSTRUCTOR

CREDIT

BI 451

A

Biology Internship

Lavoie

03

by Arr.

BI 452

A

Biology Internship

Lavoie

03

By Arr.

CJ 450

A

Criminal Justice Internship

Rizzo

12

by Arr.

CJ 451

A

Criminal Justice Internship

Rizzo

06

by Arr.

CJ 453

A

Criminal Justice Internship

Rizzo

06

by Arr.

EC 481

A

Economics and Business Internship

DeLuca

03

by Arr.

EC 485

A

Economics and Business Internship

DeLuca

06

by Arr.

EN 481

A

English Internship

Norton

03

by Arr.

EN 482

A

English Internship

Norton

03

by Arr.

PO 480

A

Gov’t Internship

J. Lucas

03

by Arr.

PO 485

A

Gov’t Internship

J. Lucas

06

by Arr.

PO 487

A

Washington Internship

J. Lucas

06

by Arr.

PO 488

A

Washington Internship

J. Lucas

03

by Arr.

PO 489

A

Washington Internship

J. Lucas

03

by Arr.

PO 494

A

Campaign Internship

J. Lucas

09

by Arr.

PY 402

A

Psychology Internship

Finn

03

by Arr.

PY 403

A

Psychology Internship

Finn

03

by Arr.

SO 454

A

Sociology Internship

Smith

06

by Arr.

SO 455

A

Sociology Internship

Smith

03

by Arr.

SUMMER EDUCATION ABROAD COURSE# SEC

COURSE TITLE

INSTRUCTOR

CREDIT

Belize

by Arr.

BI 340

A

Field Studies in Tropical Biology

Berry

04

by Arr.

BI 340

B

Field Studies in Tropical Biology

LaPlante

04

by Arr.

Italy

by Arr.

CH 405

A

ST: Archeometry

Donais

03

by Arr.

CL 280

A

Archaeological Fieldwork

Rulman

03

by Arr.

CL 280

B

Archaeological Fieldwork

George

03

by Arr.

CL 281

A

Study Tour Seminar

George

03

by Arr.

11


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS BIOLOGY

BI 107: ELEMENTARY BIOCHEMISTRY & LAB

BI 108: MICROBIOLOGY & LAB

BI 331 – BI 332: HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY I AND II & LAB

BI 344: NUTRITION

BI 421 – 422: INDEPENDENT RESEARCH IN BIOLOGY

12

This course seeks to develop an understanding of and appreciation for the chemical basis of life. Fundamental principles of general, organic, and biological chemistry are covered with particular emphasis on clinical applications. Adequate preparation for this course should include a working knowledge of high school level algebra.

This course focuses on the general principles underlying the life processes of microorganisms. Topics include microbial cell structure, metabolism, genetics, and growth characteristics. Emphasis is given to disease-causing (pathogenic) microorganisms and the various systems of defense employed by the human host.

The structure and function of human cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems are considered. The interdependence of these systems is emphasized and related to the total field of biology. Laboratory work includes the dissection of a typical mammal and completion of classical experiments of physiology.

An introduction to the science of nutrition focusing on biochemical foundations (carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals) as they apply to human health (diet, physical activity, and healthful considerations for, for example, fluid balance, and bone and blood health). Eating disorders, food safety, nutrition through the life cycle, and global/cultural considerations are also covered. This course will be offered in alternating years.

Individualized research experience in the biological sciences, under the direction of a science faculty member.


BI 451 – BI 452: BIOLOGY INTERNSHIP

Qualified students may be offered the opportunity to develop, with the aid of the chairperson of the department, an internship experience relevant to their academic needs. Assessment will be based on a portfolio that includes the agency’s outcome assessment, the student’s objective and subjective journal, and a primary-source referenced term paper in an area allied to the internship. Contact Professor Daniel Lavoie (641-7161 or dlavoie@anselm.edu) for more information and to apply for internships before registering.

CHEMISTRY CH 130 – CH 131: GENERAL CHEMISTRY I AND II & LAB

The principles of chemistry with emphasis on the pertinent aspects of chemical theory and behavior. The descriptive chemistry of the more common elements is investigated and correlated to their structures, reactivity and properties. The laboratory work is largely quantitative with particular emphasis on scientific observation, recording of data, and evaluation of results.

CH 250 – 251: ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I AND II & LAB

COMPUTER SCIENCE

CS 101: DIGITAL LITERACY

A study of the structure, nomenclature, preparations, characterization methods and reactions of organic compounds. Modern theories and reaction mechanisms will be used as unifying bases.

Computers and their applications are at the center of our everyday lives. In this course, we explore what it means to communicate effectively and engage in critical thinking and problem solving using computers as a creative tool. Students learn how to analyze information and problem solve using Word Processing, Spreadsheet, Presentation, Database, Cloud Computing, Wiki/Blog and GIS to visualize, organize, present, document, explain, and query information. Students also learn how to create basic Web pages in order to share them with a greater audience.

13


CS 450: SELECTED TOPICS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE: EXPLORING MS EXCEL

CRIMINAL JUSTICE

CJ 101: INTRODUCTION TO THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM

CJ 200: STATISTICAL TECHNIQUES FOR CRIMINAL JUSTICE

CJ 209: CRIMINAL LAW

14

Students will use Microsoft Excel 2010 as a tool to move beyond the basic “point and click” operations, and will be challenged to use critical thinking and analysis to find efficient and effective solutions to real-life situations, as well as build on information literacy. Topics covered will include: statistical analysis, effective data display with charts, what-if analyses and scenarios, goal seek, pivot charts, web queries, and importing data to Excel

Traces the history and philosophy of criminal justice, considers constitutional limitations, studies the roles of varies agencies, reviews the process of justice, and evaluates modern criminal justice.

This course involves the application of statistical techniques to social science data as typically illustrated in the research and writing of criminal justice professionals. As a course for majors, it represents an important part of the student’s methodological training with respect to the statistical analysis of data typically used by social scientists. Students are expected to carry out a number of exercises involving the statistical analysis of data and to interpret the results. The course covers widely used statistical techniques including descriptive and inferential statistics, hypothesis testing, cross­ tabulation, correlation, and linear regression.

The history of criminal law, its development in America, elements of crime, law of arrests, and courtroom procedures.


CJ 211: EVIDENCE

CJ 212: CRIMINAL PROCEDURE

CJ 224: POLICE AND SOCIETY

CJ 450: CRIMINAL JUSTICE INTERNSHIP

CJ 451: CRIMINAL JUSTICE INTERNSHIP

The rules of evidence, types of evidence, principles of exclusion, evaluation and examination of evidence and proof, competency of witness, hearsay rule and opinion, testimony in court.

An examination of the law of search and seizure, including a thorough study of basic concepts in the law of search and seizure, search incident to arrest, search warrants, consent searches, emergency searches, administrative searches, procedural requirements, exclusionary e 足 vidence rule, state statutory provisions relating to search and seizure.

An examination of the police image in a changing society, including police-citizen partnership in crime prevention. Issues in policing, including use of deadly force, stress, education, and corruption together with administrative issues, including recruitment, promotion, and management are considered.

Internships with local, state, and federal criminal justice agencies are available to students of all majors and class levels. The student must spend 40 hours per week with the agency and write a research paper. Twelve credits are awarded for the successful completion of the program. Contact Professor Elaine Rizzo (641-7078 or erizzo @anselm.edu) for more information and to apply for the internship before registering.

Internships with local, state, and federal criminal justice agencies are available to students of all majors and class levels. The student must spend 20 hours per week with the agency and write a research paper. Six credits are awarded for the successful completion of the program. Contact Professor Elaine Rizzo (641-7078 or erizzo @anselm.edu) for more information and to apply for the internship before registering. Course Descriptions continue on page 18

15


Campus Directory 1. 2. 3. 4.

Abbey Church Saint Anselm Abbey Joseph Hall Alumni Hall (Administration,

5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19.

20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28.

Print Shop / Copy Center Coffee Shop and Pub Holy Cross Hall (residence) Building L (residence) Faltin Hall (residence) Boutselis Hall (residence) Dupont Hall (residence) Paul Hall (residence) Reilly Hall (residence) Nivelle Hall (residence) Building F (residence) Curtis Hall (residence) Kelly Hall (residence) Barlow Hall (residence)

29. Goulet Science Center 30. Cushing Student Center (Academic

Admission, Business Office, Alva deMars Megan Chapel Art Center, Financial Aid, President, Registrar, North Hall-residence) Jean Building (Bookstore)

31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36.

Guerin Hall (residence) Dominic Hall (residence) Bradley House (faculty offices) Gadbois Hall (nursing and classrooms) St. Joan of Arc Hall (residence) Baroody Hall (residence) Sullivan Ice Arena Davison Hall (dining) Dana Humanities Center (Humanities Program, Koonz Theatre)

Advising, Academic Resource Center, Campus Ministry, Career and Employment Services, Meelia Center for Community Services, Multicultural Center, Health Services, Mail Center, Student Activities)

Stoutenburgh Gymnasium Carr Activities and Fitness Center New Hampshire Institute of Politics Danais Hall (residence) Primeau Hall (residence) Gerald Hall (residence)

37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50. 51. 52. 53. 54. 55.

Cohen Hall (res Mareski Hall (r Raphael Hall (r Breck House (r Von Dy Rowe Sullivan House Rowell House Brady Hall (res Bertrand Hall ( Hilary Hall (res Poisson Hall (I Geisel Library Comiskey Cent Falvey House ( Collins House Daley Mainten St. Mary Hall ( Benedictine Sis Francis House Izart Observato Parking

Parking

Walkways Walkways

*Saint Anselm Abbey b

16


sidence) residence) residence) residence) House (residence) e (residence) (residence) sidence) (residence) sidence) Information Technology)

ter (Fine Arts) (residence) (residence)

nance Center

(residence)

sters (residence) (residence)

ory (not shown on map)

buildings

Rev. 2/09

17


Course Descriptions continued from page 15

CJ 453: CRIMINAL JUSTICE INTERNSHIP

Available only to students who have successfully completed a six credit Criminal Justice Internship. The student must spend 20 hours per week with the agency and write a research paper. Six credits are awarded for the successful completion of the program. Contact Professor Elaine Rizzo (641-7078 or erizzo @anselm.edu) for more information and to apply for the internship before registering.

ECONOMICS & BUSINESS EC481: INTERNSHIP

Students intern with businesses, organizations and/ or companies throughout the United States. Students must complete at least 120 hours at the internship site, as well as complete academic assignments to successfully meet the requirements of the course. This course is worth three credits at completion and students receive a letter grade. Contact Alane De Luca (641-7310 or adeluca@anselm.edu) for more information and to apply for internship before registering.

EC 485: INTERNSHIP

EDUCATION

ED 315: HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

18

Students intern with businesses, organizations and/ or companies throughout the United States. Students must complete at least 120 hours at the internship site, as well as complete academic assignments to successfully meet the requirements of the course. This course is worth three credits at completion and students receive a letter grade. Contact Alane De Luca (641-7310 or adeluca@anselm.edu) for more information and to apply for Internship before registering.

This course provides a survey of human development through the lifespan with emphasis on aspects relevant to teaching and learning in K-12 classrooms. Various theoretical perspectives on development will be explored. Students will be required to explore how


theories and concepts can be applied through direct observations, projects, and research. It is required of all students in one of the Teacher Education Programs.

ED 322: INCLUSION, EQUITY, AND DIVERSITY IN EDUCATION

ED 350 ST: SOCIOCULTURAL PERSPECTIVES OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS IN THE U.S.

ENGLISH

EN 103 – EN 104: FRESHMAN ENGLISH I & II

This course provides an overview of the characteristics of individuals with disabilities. Emphasis concentrates on different learning styles as well as accommodation and adaptation in K-12 classrooms. Topics include a history of special education, federal and state regulations, differentiated instruction, inclusive education, response to intervention, and other current issues which impact teaching and learning. It is required of all students in one of the Teacher Education Programs. There is a required 20 hour practicum embedded in this course.

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the historical, social, cultural, and political context of public schooling in the United States. We will examine how the complexities of race, socio-economic status, linguistic diversity, culture, and gender shape the educational process in the United States. Readings are placed within the context of public schooling past and present in order to help students (1) identify and unpack the ways that their social location has shaped their educational experiences and (2) uncover the assumptions they have about people who are culturally, linguistically, racially, and economically different from them.

A two-semester sequence designed to help students become better thinkers, readers, and writers and to initiate the training they need to satisfy the demands of their college education. It focuses primarily on the writing process and the interrelated stages of that process. The second semester also introduces students to research methods.

19


EN 221: PUBLIC SPEAKING

EN 251: SHAKESPEARE

EN 373 A: ST: PULP FICTION

EN 373 B: ST: BRITISH DETECTIVE FICTION

20

This course stresses building effective speaking skills necessary for professional careers and participation in civic life. Students learn various strategies that are available for assessing and meeting the demands of speaking situations. Assignments include a series of informative, persuasive, and commemorative speeches.

Close reading of representative comedies, histories, and tragedies.

“Pulp fiction” refers to fantastic, escapist crime and horror fiction printed on cheap “pulp” paper in the first half of the twentieth century, reaching its peak in the 1930s and 1940s. “Film noir” describes stylized Hollywood crime dramas usually featuring hard-boiled detectives and deceitful femme fatales, particularly those produced in the 1940s and 1950s. Both genres, however, have lived on into the twenty-first century and have achieved high cultural status as particular, and peculiar, portrayals of the American psyche. In this class we will read and analyze classic authors such as James M. Cain and Raymond Chandler and watch film renditions of these authors’ works and others. We will also explore contemporary equivalents of pulp fiction and film noir and discuss the development of these genres and what they can tell us about our country and our century.

In this course, students will read and write about detective fiction from its beginnings in America with Edgar Allan Poe’s Dupin stories, then follow the history and development of the form in England. We’ll read the sensation fiction of Wilkie Collins, the Sherlock Holmes stories by Arthur Conan Doyle, the British house mysteries of the twentieth century represented by Agatha Christie and others like Freeman Wills Croft, and then contemporary British detective/police fiction including authors Ian Rankin,


Peter Robinson, and a novel by P.D. James, Tana French, or Elizabeth George. Themes will include the figures of the detective and the criminal; the influences of psychology, gender, and class; and the changing form of the detective fiction. The course will involve a small research project, and we will watch a film.

EN 481 – EN 482: INTERNSHIP

FINE ARTS

FAH 260: THE CINEMATIC EYE: A HISTORY OF FILM TO 1945

Student-originated internships, supervised by the English Department, in areas of communication, publishing, journalism, and theater.

A study of the history of film (motion pictures) as an art form from its origins to the end of World War II. Focus will primarily be on influential European and American films, and major advancements in filmmaking techniques as well as the significance of a film for the society of its time. Different genres of film will be explored as well as the work of major individual directors.

FAH 262: CONTEMPORARY FILM: 1945 TO THE PRESENT

A study of American and Foreign cinema in the post World War II era. The interaction of film and society, as well as specific genres and directors will be considered.

FAS 240: PHOTOGRAPHY I

An introduction to black-and-white photography, including the history, technique, and aesthetics of photography. Students are taught to operate a 35mm camera, develop black-and-white film, and make prints. Assignments stress the different elements involved in making a successful photograph. Students are expected to have their own manually operated 35mm camera. Studio and materials fees charged.

21


FAS 260: SPECIAL TOPICS CERAMICS I

FAS 270: VISUAL COMMUNICATION

FAS 272: DIGITAL ART & IMAGING I

FAS 340: PHOTOGRAPHY II

22

This introduction to ceramics will focus on studio work leading to the completion of several projects. Students will learn the basics of handbuilding, the potter's wheel, kiln firing, glazing, and surface embellishment. Class time will be made up of instructor's demonstrations, group critiques, viewing images/slides, and individual studio work. Projects will stress the sculptural potential of clay and the aesthetic merit of functional vessel making. Gallery and museum visits, introducing students to the work of contemporary clay artists, will provide inspiration and direction.

An introduction to forms of visual communication in contemporary society, highlighting the creative, informative, and persuasive images in print media, computer graphics, and publishing. Lecture and studio projects. Materials fees charged.

An introduction to the use of the computer as an artistic instrument. The intent of this class is to provide students with the fundamental information and skills needed to analyze and produce digital media and apply those skills to both fine art and commercial environments. Creative and expressive approaches are favored. Materials fees charged.

A continuation of FAS240. Technical goals include the ability to use different films properly, control contrast, and produce fine quality prints on fiber based paper. Students will also be introduced to elements of digital photography. Students will work on long-range assignments. Emphasis on personal vision and making clear statements through editing and sequencing photographs. A research paper and presentation on a master black and white photographer or a service learning project providing photographic services to a venue of your own choice is required. Studio and materials fee charged. Prerequisite: FAS240 or permission of instructor.


HISTORY

HI 101: ORIGINS OF EUROPEAN CIVILIZATION

HI 199: AMERICA: ORIGINS TO WORLD POWER

HI 355: MODERN AMERICAN FOREIGN RELATIONS

HI 374: ST: HOLLYWOOD AND U.S. HISTORY

HI 385: ST: VIETNAM WAR

Western Civilization, from its Middle East origins to approximately 1600.

This course covers crucial issues in U.S. History from the American Revolution to the 21st century, with a heavy focus on processes which created, challenged and changed the Constitution and on the United States’ interactions with the rest of the world.

Surveys American foreign relations from the 1890s to the present. The course examines the emergence of the United States as a world power, the challenges of war and peace, and America in the Cold War and post-Cold War world.

Few institutions of pop culture loom larger in the popular imagination than movies. Since the advent of film, movies have reflected social, political, and cultural change, even as they have helped to shape values and ideas in American society at large. This course examines the phenomenon of Hollywood filmmaking and encourages students to “see” movies in a different way – as historical sources, windows through which we can understand the social, political, and cultural transformations of the twentieth-century America.

This course focuses on American involvement in Vietnam from 1954 to 1975, though we will also discuss events before and after this period. Students should note that this is not a course in military history. We will discuss military events, but we will also take a broader view of the conflict. Topics will include the reasons for American intervention in Vietnam, the experiences of people involved in the conflict, the viability of the South Vietnamese state, the causes of America’s defeat (and North Vietnam’s victory),

23


responses on the home front, the war in American memory, and political consequences of the war. The course will consist of lectures and discussions. Readings will include historical monographs, memoirs, primary sources, and literary materials.

HUMANITIES HU 201 – HU 202: HUMANITIES III & IV

The second year of Sophomore Humanities consists of portraits of individuals arranged chronologically from the Italian Renaissance to the 20th century. Each individual, great in his or her own right, has farreaching social, cultural, or political significance.

MATH

MA 170 – MA 180: CALCULUS I & II

A study of the differentiation and integration of algebraic and transcendental functions with applications. Topics in analytic geometry include a study of conics.

MODERN LANGUAGES FR 201 – FR 202: INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I & II

The student is required to undertake a thorough review of grammar, exercises in composition, intensive readings and translations, and correlated laboratory drills. The second semester emphasizes culture and civilization.

SP101 – SP 102: ELEMENTARY SPANISH I – II

SP 201 – SP 202: INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I & II

24

A careful study of the fundamentals of the Spanish language, including conversation with native speakers and laboratory work to reinforce class reading, writing, speaking, and understanding.

An integrated course for students having a basic command of Spanish. Later phases of the course include introduction to a variety of cultural and literary reading selection in Spanish.


PHILOSOPHY PH 105: PHILOSOPHY OF NATURE AND THE HUMAN PERSON This introductory course deals with the traditional topics of speculative philosophy, pertaining to Nature, the human person, and God.

PH 107: ETHICS

PH 321: FORMAL LOGIC

PH 326: PHILOSOPHY OF GOD

PH 333: BUSINESS ETHICS

PH 338: CONTEMPORARY IMAGES OF MAN IN FANTASY NOVELS

A presentation of the principles of moral conduct and their application to specific cases, including a review of some of the major ethical theories.

A critical study of reasoning, including classical syllogistic logic, truth functional logic, formal fallacies, fallacies of ordinary language, and inductive reasoning.

A study of the fundamental philosophical questions regarding the existence and nature of God, our knowledge of God, and the character of religious belief.

An examination of ethical issues in business, including management/employee relations, social justice, advertising, the environment, and the moral responsibilities of multinational corporations.

This course examines the Postmodern situation and the nature of the Human Person in four popular sets of Fantasy Novels. We reveal how we see the limitations contemporary life, man’s place, and the nature of good and evil, by how we alter those limitations in stories that alter the fundamental metaphysical and moral features of our world. We will consider two sets of novels influenced by World War II: Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings and C.S. Lewis’s Narnia series, and contrast them with two recent series: Harry Potter by J.K. Rowling and The Golden Compass

25


series by Philip Pullman. The course will examine what we think of the real, its metaphysics and moral structure, by how we conceive the unreal.

PH 467: PRECEPTORIAL: CRIME AND PUNISHMENT

POLITICS

PO 480: GOVERNMENT INTERNSHIP

PO 485: GOVERNMENT INTERNSHIP

PO 487 – PO 488 – PO 489: WASHINGTON INTERNSHIP

PO 494: CAMPAIGN INTERNSHIP

This course examines the ethical justification for criminal punishment in general and capital punishment in particular.

Students are placed in a federal or state government agency. This course is worth three credits at completion. Contact Professor Jennifer Lucas (222-4151 or jlucas@anselm.edu) for more information and to apply for internships before registering.

Students are placed in a federal or state government agency. This course is worth a total of six credits at completion. Contact Professor Jennifer Lucas (222-4151 or jlucas@anselm.edu) for more information and to apply for internships before registering.

Students are placed in a federal agency in Washington, D.C. Contact Professor Jennifer Lucas (222-4151 or jlucas@anselm.edu) for more information and to apply for internships before registering.

Students work with a national, state, or local campaign for a candidate for public office. This course is worth three credits at completion. Contact Professor Jennifer Lucas (222-4151 or jlucas@anselm. edu) for more information and to apply for internships before registering.

PSYCHOLOGY PY 101: GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY I

Introduces the student to the science of human and animal behavior. The scientific basis of psychology is examined. Basic topics covered are biological and cognitive foundations of behavior, individual

26


differences, measurement techniques, personality theories and development, motivation and emotion, normal vs. abnormal behavior, perception, social behavior and learning.

PY 202: CHILD PSYCHOLOGY

PY 205: PSYCHOLOGY OF ADDICTION AND DEPENDENCY

PY 206: HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY

PY 210: ST: PSYCHOLOGY OF PEACE, CONFLICT, AND VIOLENCE.

The psychological development of the individual from conception to pre-adolescence, including areas of cognition, personality, learning, as well as the physical and the emotional development of the child.

The psychological aspects of addiction and dependency are surveyed. Substances that modify human behavior and emotions are studied as they relate to psychopathology and the functioning of the healthy individual. Psychological diagnosis and treatment of addiction and dependency are stressed.

The role of psychological factors in four healthrelated areas: the prevention and treatment of mental and physical illness; the development of mental and physical illness; the promotion and maintenance of good health behavior; and the organization and formation of health-care policy and the health-care system. The student will be exposed to the underlying psychological theories and methods employed in this area, as well as their clinical applications.

This course will expose students to the theoretical and practical foundations for understanding the sources and resolution of conflict and violence within and between groups, communities, and organizations. The history and evolution of Peace Psychology as a discipline will be examined. Applications to historical and current conflicts will be reviewed. Conflict resolution techniques will be modeled and applied through course didactics, readings, and role plays.

27


PY 307: ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY

PY 402 – PY 403: INTERNSHIP

The classifications and incidence of behavioral disorders. Issues of etiology, causes of abnormality, methods of treatment, and clinical diagnosis are discussed.

Qualified students may be offered the opportunity to work as interns in agencies which offer significant roles for psychologists, e.g., schools, clinics, rehabilitation centers, or in industry or other typical organizations which offer opportunities to integrate academic studies in the liberal arts and in psychology with the practical aspects available in the site locations. These courses are worth three credits each at completion. Contact Professor Paul Finn (641-7131 or pfinn@anselm.edu) for more information and to apply for internship before registering.

SOCIOLOGY SO 212: SOCIAL STATISTICS

An introduction to the logic and techniques of statistical analysis as applied to human behavior, including organization and presentation of statistical data, measures of centrality and dispersion, probability, sampling, hypothesis testing, estimation, tests of association and significance, and an introduction to multivariate techniques.

28

SO 454: SOCIOLOGY INTERNSHIP

Provides qualified students with supervised experience in a professional setting to enhance the academic learning received in the classroom. It may include work experience in human service, a business environment, or government agency. Participation may take such forms as a supervised case worker, research analyst, or other approved roles. This internship is worth six credits at completion. Contact Professor Michael Smith (656-6003 or msmith@ anselm.edu) for more information and to apply for internship before registering.


SO 455: SOCIOLOGY INTERNSHIP

THEOLOGY

TH 100: BIBLICAL THEOLOGY

TH 255: RELIGIONS OF THE WEST

Provides qualified students with supervised experience in a professional setting to enhance the academic learning received in the classroom. It may include work experience in human service, a business environment, or government agency. Participation may take such forms as a supervised case worker, research analyst, or other approved roles. This internship is worth three credits at completion. Contact Professor Michael Smith (656-6003 or msmith@anselm.edu) for more information and to apply for internship before registering.

An introduction to Divine Revelation enabling students to gain an understanding of the total Bible – the Old Testament and the New Testament.

A study of the major monotheistic religious traditions originating in the Ancient Near East: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The course concentrates on the history, thought, and practice of the three great Abrahamic traditions. Special attention is given to the contemporary varieties of each tradition.

29


FIELD STUDIES IN TROPICAL BIOLOGY: BELIZE Course dates: May 15 - June 29, 2013 Application deadline: March 13, 2013 Estimated course fees: $3200 - $3800* (includes airfare) Prerequisite: 1 yr of college-level biology, permission to register by instructor *final cost will depend on enrollment and airfare prices. Costs will be finalized April 2013 BI340: FIELD STUDIES IN TROPICAL BIOLOGY A 4-credit course offered in the first summer session. This course introduces students to the biological complexity of the tropics through participatory field experiences in the ecologically diverse Central American country of Belize. Field trips and exercises are conducted in two of the most species-rich ecosystems on the planet: the neo-tropical rainforest and barrier coral reef. Saint Anselm faculty (Dr. Eric Berry and Dr. Lori LaPlante) and local experts will lecture on a variety of topics including the natural history of tropical biota, patterns of species diversity, rainforest ecology and conservation, ethnobiology, fish diversity/behavior, coral reef ecology, and mangrove ecology. A $500 deposit is due with your application. The deposit will be credited against your course fees. INCLUDES: • Round-trip airfare to and from Belize • Saint Anselm tuition (4 credits) • 1 day of savannah field studies at Monkey Bay Wildlife Sanctuary www.monkeybaybelize.org/ • 3 days of rainforest field studies at Cockscomb Basin Wildlife Sanctuary / Jaguar Reserve www.belizeaudubon.org/protected_areas/cockscomb-basin- wildlife-sanctuary • 6 days of coral reef field studies at Tobacco Caye www.tcmsbelize.org/ • 1 night accommodation in or near Belize City • 4 nights dorm accommodations at Saint Anselm College • All housing, ground transfers, and most meals in Belize OTHER: • This course is open to all majors meeting the prerequisite • Participation is limited to 12 students • A $500 deposit (nonrefundable) will be due with your application • Financial aid may be available - Contact Mac Broderick mbroderick@ anselm.edu

(phone: 641-7110)

For additional information visit the course website: www.anselm.edu/Belize or contact Dr. LaPlante or Dr. Berry.

30


SUMMER SCHOOL REGISTRATION 2013 Please complete this form and submit with full remittance to: Summer School Office Saint Anselm College, Box #1732 100 Saint Anselm Drive, Manchester, NH 03102 Fax: 603-656-6297 Name________________________________________________________________________ Address______________________________________________________________________ City__________________________________ State____________ Zip___________________ Social Security #________________________ Student ID #____________________________ Phone________________________________ E-Mail__________________________________ In case of emergency, please call: Name_______________________________________________ Phone___________________ Relationship to student______________________________________

Are you a Saint Anselm College student?  yes

 no

If not, what is your home institution?_____________________________________ Where did you learn about Saint Anselm College summer courses?  summer school catalog  Saint Anselm College website  other:_____________________________________________________________ COURSE INFORMATION Course #

Course Title

Session

Credits

Charge $ $ $ $

Registration Fee

$50.00

Lab Fee $_________

 Check enclosed

Total Amount Due $_________

 Charge to:  MasterCard

 Visa Card Number_________________________________ Expiration Date___________________ Name on Card__________________________________________________________________ Billing Address (if different from above)_____________________________________________ Signature_____________________________________________________________________ FULL PAYMENT IS DUE AT TIME OF REGISTRATION Signature Date________________________________________________________________

 __________________________________________________________________________ FOR INTERNAL USE

31 31


DIRECTIONS TO CAMPUS FROM SEACOAST Take Rt. 101 West then continue as d 足 escribed below.*

FROM POINTS SOUTHEAST Take Rt. 93 North To Rt. 293 North, Exit left to Rt. 101 West (Bedford, Goffstown) to Junction of 101 and 114 (set of lights) then continue as described.*

FROM POINTS WEST Take Rt. 101 East then continue as described below.* *FROM JUNCTION OF RT. 101 AND RT. 114 At the junction of Rt. 101 and Rt. 114, continue straight on Rt. 114 North. C 足 ontinue through two sets of lights. The third set of lights is Saint Anselm Drive. Take right onto Saint Anselm Drive. Campus is a 足 pproximately one mile on right.

FROM POINTS SOUTHWEST Take Rt. 3 North. Continue to Everett Tpk. North to Rt. 101 West to Junction of 101 and 114 (set of lights) then continue as 足described.* FROM POINTS NORTH Take Rt. 93 South to Rt. 293 South (Everett Turnpike) to Rt. 101 West to Junction of 101 and 114 (set of lights) then continue as described.*

FROM MANCHESTER AIRPORT Take Brown Ave. North to Rt. 101 West to Junction of 101 and 114, (set of lights) then continue as described.* FROM BUS STATION (MANCHESTER TRANSPORTATION CENTER) Take Granite St. West to intersection of Rt. 293 South (Everett Turnpike) to Rt 101 West to Junction of 101 and 114 (set of lights) then continue as described.*

*

Manchester Bus Station


100 Saint Anselm Drive Manchester, New Hampshire 03102-1310 www.anselm.edu/summerschool


2013 Summer School