Issuu on Google+

2012 SUMMER SCHOOL www.anselm.edu/summerschool

1


SUMMER SCHOOL

2012

www.anselm.edu/summerschool


CONTENTS Classroom legend..........................................................................................3 Schedule........................................................................................................4 Tuition/Fees...................................................................................................4 General information......................................................................................5 Courses offerings...........................................................................................8 First day session.....................................................................................8 Second day session.................................................................................9 Third day session...................................................................................9 Evening session....................................................................................10 Internships...........................................................................................11 Summer Education Abroad..................................................................11 Course descriptions.....................................................................................12 Spend the Summer in Belize.........................................................................31 Study French in Paris...................................................................................32 Directions to campus...................................................................................33 Registration.................................................................................................35

CLASSROOM LEGEND ROOMS

LOCATION

ACC Room A LL1 LL2 - LL7 5 - 11 12 - 16 4G - 208G 104 - 108 2111 2205 3100 - 3105 1C - 18C 4001 - 4007 005 and 010 110 209

Poisson Hall Alumni Hall – Lower Level through Chapel Arts Lobby Alumni Hall – Lower Level Alumni Hall – Third Floor Alumni Hall – Fourth Floor Gadbois Hall Poisson Hall Goulet Science Center – Lab room Goulet Science Center – Perini Lecture Hall Goulet Science Center Comiskey Center – Adjacent to Collins & Falvey House New Hampshire Institute of Politics Joseph Hall Ground Floor Joseph Hall First Floor Joseph Hall Second Floor


SCHEDULE: First Session 5 days/week

May 21 - June 15 (4 Weeks) No classes Monday, May 28 Final Exams: Saturday, June 16

Second Session 5 days/week

June 18 - July 13 (4 Weeks) No classes Wednesday, July 4 Final Exams: Saturday, July 14

Third Session 5 days/week

July 16 - August 10 (4 Weeks) Final Exams: Saturday, August 11

Evening Session I 2 nights/week

May 21 - June 27 (6 Weeks) Monday & Wednesday No classes Monday, May 28 Final Exams: Wednesday, June 27

Evening Session II 2 nights/week

May 22 – June 28 (6 Weeks) Tuesday & Thursday Final Exams: Thursday, June 28

Evening Session III 2 nights/week

July 2 - August 8 (6 Weeks) Monday & Wednesday No classes Wednesday, July 4 Final Exams: Wednesday, August 8

TUITION: $1005.00 / 3 Credit Course $1340.00 / 4 Credit Course

$1675.00 / 5 Credit Course $450.00 / Audit

FEES: $65.00 Science Lab fee Studio Art fee to be determined by course $50.00 Registration fee Fees are non-refundable unless the course is cancelled All students, including faculty dependents and staff, are required to pay the $50.00 Registration fee. PAYMENT IS DUE IN THE BUSINESS OFFICE AT THE TIME OF REGISTRATION.

4


GENERAL INFORMATION: Academic Regulations The summer courses at Saint Anselm College are intensive academic experiences. Each class is of at least two hours duration, providing a highly concentrated continuous immersion in one subject area. The intensity of the program allows for a coverage in depth well beyond the usual. No student is allowed to take more than two courses in any one session. Students are expected to attend all classes. Instructors may take absences into account when determining a student’s academic standing and course grade. Accreditation and Memberships Saint Anselm College is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges. It holds membership in the Association of American Colleges, the American Council on Education, the National Catholic Educational Association, and the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities. For a complete list, please refer to the College Catalogue. Saint Anselm College is a co-educational institution. All courses are on the undergraduate level and have been selected to enable: 1. Undergraduate students to accelerate programs, to supplement their academic programs, and/or to make up deficiencies. 2. High school graduates or competent high school seniors to start their college programs, and/or to strengthen a particular area of academic need. 3. People to undertake studies which will further their personal and vocational goals. Who May Enroll Saint Anselm College actively seeks a diversity of students. The College admits students of any race, creed, color, national and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, creed, national and ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarships and loan programs, and athletic and other school-administered programs.

5


Transfer of Credit to Other Institutions College undergraduates who desire that credits earned be applied to their college degree programs should have their summer session course selection approved by an appropriate official of their college or university. All official transcripts must be requested in writing through the Registrar’s Office. Transcripts will be issued only when all financial accounts have been settled. The transcript fee is $5.00 per copy. Registration Students may register for courses in the Registrar’s Office on the first floor of Alumni Hall any weekday from 8:30 AM to 4:00 PM. Students may also register by mailing the registration form in the back of this catalogue (or available on the Saint Anselm College Web Page at www. anselm.edu/summerschool) with full remittance to: Summer School, Box #1732, Saint Anselm College, 100 Saint Anselm Drive, Manchester, NH 03102-1310. Registrations are not permitted after the second meeting of a class without the permission of the course instructor and the Assistant Dean of the College. Registration is not completed until tuition has been paid in full. The college reserves the right to cancel classes due to inadequate enrollment and to close registration for classes which are fully enrolled. There will be NO confirmation of registration sent to the student. Students will be contacted ONLY if classes are canceled. PAYMENT IS DUE IN THE BUSINESS OFFICE AT THE TIME OF REGISTRATION

Payments can be made by cash, personal check, Master Card and Visa. If calling, please have your credit card number available. Checks are to be made payable to Saint Anselm College. Financial Aid There are no specific grants of financial aid made for the summer program. Housing for Summer School Students Summer housing will be provided for matriculated Saint Anselm students enrolled in summer classes if they wish to live on campus. Summer residences will open on Sunday, May 20, 2012, and will close on July 14, 2012. Summer housing is available only for the first two sessions of Summer school (day and evening). On-campus housing accommodations are not available for sessions three. All College rules and regulations will remain in effect, and residents are subject to enforcement of College policy. In addition, summer residence halls are alcohol-free for all residents, regardless of age.

6


The Summer Housing Application and a $130 deposit are due in the Office of Residential Life and Education on a first come, first-served basis. The cost of summer housing will be $130 per week payable to Saint Anselm College and directed to the business office. For more information, please contact Lisa Gowern, Conference and Event Services at (603) 222-4270 or lgowern@anselm.edu. Tuition Refund Policy A student withdrawing during the summer session will be refunded tuition according to the following percentages: Within the first week 60% Within two weeks 20% Over two weeks 0% In determining the percentage of refund, the date of withdrawal will be the date the student notifies the Assistant Dean of the College in writing or by submitting the summer course withdrawal form. Absence from class does not constitute withdrawal, nor relieve the student of the responsibility for tuition charges. Grades The grades, A, A-; B+, B, B-; C+, C, C-; D+, D, D-; E, are assigned by each instructor to denote the student’s academic performance. A indicates excellent work; B indicates work of above average quality; C indicates average work normally expected of a college student; D indicates below average work, but passing. E indicates a failure. The symbols + and - indicate intermediate levels. In addition, the grades F, I, W, and WF are assigned by the Assistant Dean of the College with the advice of the Instructor. The grade F indicates excessive absences. The grade I indicates that the student’s work is Incomplete due to missing a final examination with adequate reasons. After the second week of classes, a student withdrawing from a course will receive a grade of W (Withdrawal) or WF (Withdrawal/Failing) depending upon circumstances. Incomplete work must be made up by November 2, 2012. Any other inquiries may be addressed to: Summer School Office, Box #1732, Saint Anselm College, 100 Saint Anselm Drive, Manchester, NH 03102-1310 or call at (603) 641-7400.

7


COURSE OFFERINGS FIRST DAY SESSION May 21 to June 15, Monday through Friday (No Classes May 28) COURSE# SEC COURSE TITLE INSTRUCTOR CREDIT

8:30 TO 10:30 AM

10:30 TO 12:30 PM

1:30 ROOM 3:30 PM

BI 331 A Human Anatomy and Physiology I (w/lab)

Poltak

04

X (8:30am to 12:30pm)

BI 344

A Nutrition

Lavoie

03

X

3102

BI 421

A Independent Research

Staff

by Arr.

BI 422

A Independent Research

Staff

by Arr.

CH 130

A General Chemistry I (w/lab) Parodi

04

X (8:30am to 12:00pm)

3103

CH 250

A Organic Chemistry I (w/lab) Wierda

04

X (8:30am to 12:00pm)

3105

3101

CJ 101 A Introduction to the Criminal Justice System

Hull

03

CJ 209

Hull

03

X

010

Prasad

03

X

Room A

A Criminal Law

CS 205 A Fundamentals and Issues of Using the Internet

X

010

CS 210 A ST: Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Traynor

03

CS 450

A Bioinformatics

Malita

03

X

108

EN 221

A Public Speaking

Bouchard

03

X

207

EN 251

A Shakespeare:

Bouchard

03

X

110

FAH 260 A The Cinematic Eye: A History of Film to 1945

Hoffman

03

X

LL3

FAH 262 A Contemporary Film: 1945 to the Present

Hoffman

03

FAS 220

A Painting I

Asbury

03

FR 201

A Intermediate French I

Sandstrom

03

X

LL7

HI 374

A Hollywood & US History

Moore

03

X

110

HU 201

A Humanities Seminar III

Banach

04

X (1:30 – 4) 005

MA 110

A Concepts of Math

Shea

03

X

MA 170

A Calculus I

Shea

04

X (10:30 -1:00)

PH 105

A Nature and Human Person

Latona

03

X

PH 107

A Ethics

Augros

03

X

PH 321

A Formal Logic

Staley

03

PH 467

A ST: Camus and Dostoevsky

Banach

03

X

3102

PS 121

A General Physics I

Guerra

05

X (8:30am to 12:30pm)

3104

PY 205

A Psych of Addiction

Troisi

03

X

3100

PY 307

A Abnormal Psychology

Wenzel

03

SP 201

A Intermediate Spanish I

Fouts

TH 100

A Biblical Theology

TH 255

A Religions of the West

8

X

X X

X

Room A

LL3 3C

4006 4004 LL5 LL4 3101

X

3100

03

X

LL7

McMahon

03

X

LL4

Holder

03

X

LL2


SECOND DAY SESSION June 18 to July 13, Monday through Friday (No Classes July 4) COURSE# SEC COURSE TITLE INSTRUCTOR CREDIT BI 332 A Human Anatomy and Physiology II (w/lab)

8:30 TO 10:30 AM

10:30 TO 12:30 PM

1:30 ROOM 3:30 PM

Poltak

04

X (8:30am to 12:30pm)

3101

CH 131

A General Chemistry II (w/lab) Donais

04

X (8:30am to 12:00pm)

3103

CH 251

A Organic Chemistry II (w/lab) Wierda

04

X (8:30am to 12:00pm)

3105

CJ 203 A Statistical Techniques for Criminal Justice

Hull

03

EN 103

Contarino

03

EN 104 A Freshman English II EN 325 A ST in Communication: Advanced Public Speaking

Contarino

03

X

Bouchard

03

X

207

FR 202

A Intermediate French II

Sandstrom

03

X

LL7

HI 251

A U.S. History from 1877

Masur

03

X

HI 378

A Modern China

Masur

03

X

HU 202

A Humanities Seminar IV

Banach

04

X (1:30 – 4) 005

MA 180

A Calculus II

Plyukhin

04

MA 210

A Calculus III

Plyukhin

04

PH 107

C Ethics

Latona

03

X

LL2

PH 323

A Philosophy of Education

Augros

03

X

LL6

PH 326

A Philosophy of God

Larson

03

X

LL4

PS 122

A General Physics II

Guerra

05

X (8:30am to 12:30pm)

3104

PY 206

A Health Psychology

Troisi

03

X

3102

SO 212

A Social Statistics

Burrill

03

SP 202

A Intermediate Spanish II

Delgadillo

03

TH 270

A Christian Moral Life

McMahon

03

A Freshman English I

X

4004

X

LL5

X X

LL5

LL3 3101 4006 4004

X

4002

X

LL3

X

LL4

THIRD DAY SESSION July 16 to August 10, Monday through Friday COURSE# SEC COURSE TITLE INSTRUCTOR CREDIT Traynor

10:30 TO 12:30 PM

1:30 ROOM 3:30 PM

CS 101

A Digital Literacy

EN 110

A Intro Human Communication Shepler

03

X

LL6

PH 470

A ST: Human Happiness

03

X

LL7

Latona

03

8:30 TO 10:30 AM

X

Room A

9


EVENING I SESSION May 21 to June 27, Mondays and Wednesdays 6:30-9:30 (No classes May 28) COURSE# SEC

COURSE TITLE

INSTRUCTOR

CREDIT

ROOM

BI 107

A

Elementary Biochemistry with lab** Vallari

05

3101

BI 108

A

Microbiology with lab*

Tobin

04

2205

CJ 224

A

Police and Society

Hull

03

110

FAS 230

A

Printmaking I

Asbury

03

2C

FAS 240

A

Photography I

Voelker

03

LL1

FAS 274

A

Graphic Design

Johnson

03

1C

HI 385

A

Vietnam War

Masur

03

LL6

PH 107

B

Ethics

Anderson

03

LL4

PH 469

B

ST: Islamic Philosophy

Staley

03

LL5

TH 100

B

Biblical Theology

Holder

03

3105

TH 371

A

Medical Ethics

Daly

03

LL3

*Because of lab, start time is 6:00pm, end time is 10:30pm **Starts at 5:30pm, ends at 10:30pm

EVENING II SESSION May 22 to June 28, Tuesdays and Thursdays 6:30-9:30 COURSE# SEC

COURSE TITLE

INSTRUCTOR

CREDIT

ROOM

CJ 212

A Criminal Procedure

Hull

03

EC 111

A Financial Accounting*

St. Cyr

03

110 107

FAS 110

A Drawing I

Asbury

03

10C

PH 338 A Contemporary Images of Man in Fantasy Novels

Banach

03

LL7

*This course runs for 7 weeks

EVENING III SESSION July 2 to August 8, Mondays and Wednesdays 6:30 to 9:30 (No classes July 4) COURSE# SEC

COURSE TITLE

PH 468 A ST: The Problem of Evil

10

INSTRUCTOR Anderson

CREDIT

03

ROOM LL5


INTERNSHIPS COURSE# SEC

INSTRUCTOR

CREDIT

BI 451

Biology Internship

COURSE TITLE

Lavoie

03

by Arr.

BI 452

Biology Internship

Lavoie

03

by Arr.

CJ 450

Criminal Justice Internship

Rizzo

12

by Arr.

CJ 451

Criminal Justice Internship

Rizzo

06

by Arr.

CJ 453

Criminal Justice Internship

Rizzo

06

by Arr.

EC 481

Economics and Business Internship

Robinson

03

by Arr.

EC 485

Economics and Business Internship

Robinson

06

by Arr.

PO 480

Politics Internship

J. Lucas

03

by Arr.

PO 485

Politics Internship

J. Lucas

06

by Arr.

PO 494

Campaign Internship

J. Lucas

09

by Arr.

PY 402

Psychology Internship

Brady

03

by Arr.

PY 403

Psychology Internship

Brady

03

by Arr.

SO 454

Sociology Internship

Smith

06

by Arr.

SO 455

Sociology Internships

Smith

03

by Arr.

SUMMER EDUCATION ABROAD COURSE# SEC

COURSE TITLE

INSTRUCTOR

CREDIT

Belize BI 340

A Field Studies Tropical Biology

Berry

03

by Arr. by Arr.

B I340

B Field Studies Tropical Biology

LaPlante

03

by Arr.

Paris FR

A Intensive French Language-different levels

06

by Arr.

Italy CL 280

A Archaeological Fieldwork

Rulman

03

by Arr. by Arr.

CL 280

B Archaeological Fieldwork

George

03

by Arr.

CL:281

A Study Tour

George

03

by Arr.

11


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS BIOLOGY

BI 107 ELEMENTARY BIOCHEMISTRY & LAB This course seeks to develop an understanding of and appreciation for the chemical basis of life. Fundamental principles of general, organic, and biological chemistry are covered with particular emphasis on clinical applications. Adequate preparation for this course should include a working knowledge of high school level algebra.

BI 108 MICROBIOLOGY & LAB This course focuses on the general principles underlying the life processes of microorganisms. Topics include microbial cell structure, metabolism, genetics, and growth characteristics. Emphasis is given to diseasecausing (pathogenic) microorganisms and the various systems of defense employed by the human host.

BI 331–332 HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY I AND II & LAB The structure and function of human cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems are considered. The interdependence of these systems is emphasized and related to the total field of biology. Laboratory work includes the dissection of a typical mammal and completion of classical experiments of physiology.

BI 344 NUTRITION An introduction to the science of nutrition focusing on biochemical foundations (carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals) as they apply to human health (diet, physical activity, and healthful considerations for, for example, fluid balance, and bone and blood health). Eating disorders, food safety, nutrition through the life cycle, and global/cultural considerations are also covered.

12


BI 421-422 INDEPENDENT RESEARCH IN BIOLOGY Individualized research experience in the biological sciences, under the direction of a science faculty member.

BI 451-BI452 BIOLOGY INTERNSHIP Qualified students may be offered the opportunity to develop, with the aid of the chairperson of the department, an internship experience relevant to their academic needs. Assessment will be based on a portfolio that includes the agency’s outcome assessment, the student’s objective and subjective journal, and a primary-source referenced term paper in an area allied to the internship. Contact Professor Daniel Lavoie for more information and to apply for internships before registering.

CHEMISTRY CH 130-CH131 GENERAL CHEMISTRY I AND II & LAB The principles of chemistry with emphasis on the pertinent aspects of chemical theory and behavior. The descriptive chemistry of the more common elements is investigated and correlated to their structures, reactivity and properties. The laboratory work is largely quantitative with particular emphasis on scientific observation, recording of data, and evaluation of results.

COMPUTER SCIENCE

CH 250-CH251 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I AND II & LAB A study of the structure, nomenclature, preparations, characterization methods and reactions of organic compounds. Modern theories and reaction mechanisms will be used as unifying bases. CS 101 DIGITAL LITERACY Computers and their applications are at the center of our everyday lives. In this course, we explore what it means to communicate effectively and engage in critical thinking and problem solving using computers as a creative tool. We use Word Processing, Spreadsheet, 13


Presentation, Database, and other software applications to visualize, organize, present, document, explain, and query information. Students also learn how to publish their work to web pages in order to share them with a greater audience.

CS 205 FUNDAMENTALS AND ISSUES OF USING THE INTERNET Designed for non majors who wish to deepen their understanding of the Internet, this course explores the fundamentals of Internet communication and the applications that facilitate it. Students gain a basic understanding of the technical side of the Internet while learning how to leverage it to their advantage with subjects such as online research techniques, good privacy and security practices, and an introduction to HTML and web page creation. Topics of class discussion include online ethics in an era of “free� information and safety in the face of increasing threats to information security. No prerequisite.

CS 210 INTRODUCTION TO GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS (GIS) This course serves as an introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Students will be introduced to the fundamental principal and practices of GIS. This course will focus on spatial data development and analysis of this data. Topics covered will include basic data structures, data sources, data collection, data quality, understanding maps, building a GIS, Global Navigation Satellite Systems, digital data, attribute data and tables, and basic spatial analysis.

CS 450 BIOINFORMATICS Bioinformatics is a field that combines biology, computer science, and information technologies. The goal of this introductory course is to introduce students to Bioinformatics and to give them a broad overview of the field. In addition students will learn how computation helps scientists model, predict, and control the behavior of biological processes. Students

14


will learn how to write simple to intermediate programs and scripts to access, query, and manipulate biological and text-based data to solve fundamental biological questions. Students interested in this field are invited to enroll. No prerequisite. CRIMINAL JUSTICE

CJ 101 INTRODUCTION TO THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM This course will trace the history and philosophy of criminal justice, consider constitutional limitations, study the roles of various agencies, review the process of justice, and evaluate modern criminal justice.

CJ 203 STATISTICAL TECHNIQUES FOR CRIMINAL JUSTICE This course involves the application of statistical techniques to social science data as typically illustrated in the research and writing of Criminal Justice professionals. As a course for majors, it represents an important part of the student’s methodological training with respect to the statistical analysis of data typically used by social scientists. Students are expected to carry out a number of exercises involving the statistical analysis of data and to interpret the results. The course covers widely used statistical techniques including descriptive and inferential statistics, hypothesis testing, cross tabulation, correlation, and linear regression.

CJ 209 CRIMINAL LAW This course covers the history of criminal law, its development in America, elements of crime, law of arrests, and courtroom procedures.

CJ 212 CRIMINAL PROCEDURE An examination of the law of search and seizure, including a thorough study of basic concepts in the law of search and seizure, search incident to arrest, search warrants, consent searches, emergency searches, administrative searches, procedural requirements, exclusionary evidence rule, and state statutory provisions relating to search and seizure.

15


CJ 224 POLICE AND SOCIETY An examination of the police image in a changing society, including police-citizen partnership in crime prevention. Issues in policing, including use of deadly force, stress, education, and corruption together with administrative issues, including recruitment, promotion, and management are considered.

CJ 450 CRIMINAL JUSTICE INTERNSHIP Internships with local, state and federal criminal justice agencies are available to students of all majors and class levels. The student must spend 40 hours per week with the agency and write a research paper. Twelve credits are awarded for the successful completion of the program. Contact Prof. Elaine Rizzo (641-7078 or erizzo @anselm.edu) for more information and to apply for the Internship before registering.

CJ 451 CRIMINAL JUSTICE INTERNSHIP Internships with local, state and federal criminal justice agencies are available to students of all majors and class levels. The student must spend 20 hours per week with the agency and write a research paper. Six credits are awarded for the successful completion of the program. Contact Prof. Elaine Rizzo (641-7078 or erizzo @ anselm.edu) for more information and to apply for the Internship before registering.

CJ 453 CRIMINAL JUSTICE INTERNSHIP Available only to students who have successfully completed a six credit Criminal Justice Internship. The student must spend 20 hours per week with the agency and write a research paper. Six credits are awarded for the successful completion of the program. Contact Prof. Elaine Rizzo (641-7078 or erizzo @anselm.edu) for more information and to apply for the Internship before registering.

16


ECONOMICS & BUSINESS EC 111 FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING This course presents accounting concepts leading to the preparation of a company’s financial statements. It reviews the importance of good accounting information for the capital market and for proper decision making within a company. At the end of the course, a student should be able to prepare financial statements for a small company.

EC 481 ECONOMIC INTERNSHIP Students intern with businesses, organizations and/or companies throughout the United States. Students must complete at least 120 hours at the internship site, as well as complete academic assignments to successfully meet the requirements of the course. This course is worth three credits at completion and students receive a letter grade. Contact Tanya Robinson (641-7136 or trobinson@anselm.edu) for more information and to apply for Internship before registering.

EC 485 ECONOMIC INTERNSHIP Students intern with businesses, organizations and/or companies throughout the United States. Students must complete at least 240 hours at the internship site, as well as complete academic assignments to successfully meet the requirements of the course. This course is worth six credits at completion and students receive a letter grade. Contact Tanya Robinson (641-7136 or trobinson@anselm.edu) for more information and to apply for Internship before registering.

ENGLISH

EN 103-104 FRESHMAN ENGLISH I & II A two-semester sequence designed to help students become better thinkers, readers and writers and to initiate the training they need to satisfy the demands of their college education. It focuses primarily on the writing process and the interrelated stages of that process. The second semester also introduces students to research methods. Course Descriptions continue on page 20

17


Campus Directory 1. 2. 3. 4.

Abbey Church Saint Anselm Abbey Joseph Hall Alumni Hall (Administration,

5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19.

20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28.

Print Shop / Copy Center Coffee Shop and Pub Holy Cross Hall (residence) Building L (residence) Faltin Hall (residence) Boutselis Hall (residence) Dupont Hall (residence) Paul Hall (residence) Reilly Hall (residence) Nivelle Hall (residence) Building F (residence) Curtis Hall (residence) Kelly Hall (residence) Barlow Hall (residence)

29. Goulet Science Center 30. Cushing Student Center (Academic

Admission, Business Office, Alva deMars Megan Chapel Art Center, Financial Aid, President, Registrar, North Hall-residence) Jean Building (Bookstore)

31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36.

Guerin Hall (residence) Dominic Hall (residence) Bradley House (faculty offices) Gadbois Hall (nursing and classrooms) St. Joan of Arc Hall (residence) Baroody Hall (residence) Sullivan Ice Arena Davison Hall (dining) Dana Humanities Center (Humanities Program, Koonz Theatre)

Advising, Academic Resource Center, Campus Ministry, Career and Employment Services, Meelia Center for Community Services, Multicultural Center, Health Services, Mail Center, Student Activities)

Stoutenburgh Gymnasium Carr Activities and Fitness Center New Hampshire Institute of Politics Danais Hall (residence) Primeau Hall (residence) Gerald Hall (residence)

37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50. 51. 52. 53. 54. 55.

Cohen Hall (resi Mareski Hall (re Raphael Hall (re Breck House (re Von Dy Rowe H Sullivan House Rowell House ( Brady Hall (resi Bertrand Hall (r Hilary Hall (resi Poisson Hall (In Geisel Library Comiskey Cente Falvey House (r Collins House ( Daley Maintena St. Mary Hall (r Benedictine Sist Francis House ( Izart Observato Parking

Parking

Walkways Walkways

*Saint Anselm Abbey b

18


idence) esidence) esidence) esidence) House (residence) (residence) (residence) idence) residence) idence) nformation Technology)

er (Fine Arts) residence) (residence)

ance Center

residence) ters (residence) (residence) ory (not shown on map)

buildings

Rev. 2/09

19


Course Descriptions continued from page 17

EN 110 INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN COMMUNICATION This course introduces the general areas and concentrations of the study of communication relating to everyday communication interactions. Students investigate concepts and basic theories related to a variety of communication contexts, including intrapersonal, interpersonal, group, organizational, mediated, gender and intercultural. This course is designed to be an entry level introduction to the discipline of Communication.

EN 221 PUBLIC SPEAKING This course stresses building effective speaking skills necessary for professional careers and participation in civic life. Students learn various strategies that are available for assessing and meeting the demands of speaking situations. Assignments include a series of informative, persuasive, and commemorative speeches.

EN 251 SHAKESPEARE Close reading of representative comedies, histories and tragedies.

EN 325 ST IN COMMUNICATION: ADVANCED PUBLIC SPEAKING This course offers an opportunity for students to develop their Public Speaking abilities at another level by learning persuasive techniques of argument that integrate rational, emotional and ethical appeal. Emphasis will be placed on the construction of persuasive arguments, supported by strong evidence, and the refinement of engaging public presenation techniques. Pre-requisite EN 221 or permission of instructor.

20


FINE ARTS

FAH 260: THE CINEMATIC EYE: A HISTORY OF FILM TO 1945 A study of the history of film (motion pictures) as an art form from its origins to the end of World War II. Focus will primarily be on influential European and American films, and major advancements in filmmaking techniques as well as the significance of a film for the society of its time. Different genres of film will be explored as well as the work of major individual directors.

FAH 262 CONTEMPORARY FILM: 1945 TO THE PRESENT A study of American and Foreign cinema in the post World War II era. The interaction of film and society, as well as specific genres and directors will be considered.

FAS 110 DRAWING I A beginning level course open to students with little or no visual arts experience. This course covers the methods of rendering a variety of subjects, including still-life, portrait and human figure in pencil, charcoal and ink. Fine Arts Materials Fee for this course.

FAS 220 PAINTING I The principles of color theory and composition are explored in this introduction to the materials and tools of oil painting. Students work from life to create still lifes, portraits, figure studies, and landscapes. Studio work is complemented by readings, critical writings, museum visits, and discussion of artistic works of the past and present. In addition to the studio fee, students are responsible for purchase of paints and some supplies.

21


FAS 230 PRINTMAKING: MONOTYPE, RELIEF, COLLAGRAPHY This studio course covers printmaking theory and technique through lectures, demonstrations, critiques, and individual print lab time. Students will develop imagery through an exploration of historical and contemporary art and culture and will complete a portfolio of several original images by the end of the semester. Using the state of the art Whelen XPress Intaglio Press as well as hand printing methods, students will make multiple original prints through several processes including monotype printing, relief (linoleum and wood block), and collagraphy (building image plates through collage techniques. Individual lab time is required. Students will learn to demonstrate proper studio method including the safe handling and cleaning of tools, materials, and equipment as well as studio etiquette. Studio and materials fees charged.

FAS 240 PHOTOGRAPHY I An introduction to black-and-white photography, including the history, technique, and aesthetics of photography. Students are taught to operate a 35mm camera, develop black-and-white film, and make prints. Assignments stress the different elements involved in making a successful photograph. Students are expected to have their own manually operated 35mm camera. Studio and materials fees charged.

FAS 274 GRAPHIC DESIGN I Combining studio work with classroom instruction and group critiques, students will learn fundamentals of design theory and typography. Students will gain competency in industry standard software such as Adobe InDesign, Photoshop and Illustrator and will use analytical thinking and problem solving skills to produce creative, communicative design layouts and presentations in various media. Professional opportunities in the design field will be presented. Fine Arts Materials fees for this course.

22


HISTORY

HI 251 US HISTORY FROM 1877 A survey of American economic, political and social developments from the Gilded Age to the present.

HI 374 ST: HOLLYWOOD AND U.S. HISTORY Few institutions of pop culture loom larger in the popular imagination than movies. Since the advent of film, movies have reflected social, political, and cultural change, even as they have helped to shape values and ideas in American society at large. This course examines the phenomenon of Hollywood filmmaking and encourages students to “see” movies in a different way – as historical sources, windows through which we can understand the social, political, and cultural transformations of the twentieth-century America.

HI 378 MODERN CHINA This course explores the history of China since approximately 1600, focusing on the transition from the Sino-centric world in existence when the Qing dynasty took power in 1644 to the challenges of European imperialism, republicanism and communism in the 19th and 20th centuries.

HI 385 ST: VIETNAM WAR This course focuses on American involvement in Vietnam from 1954 to 1975, though we will also discuss events before and after this period. Students should note that this is not a course in military history. We will discuss military events, but we will also take a broader view of the conflict. Topics will include the reasons for American intervention in Vietnam, the experiences of people involved in the conflict, the viability of the South Vietnamese state, the causes of America’s defeat (and North Vietnam’s victory), responses on the home front, the war in American memory, and political consequences of the war. The course will consist of lectures and discussions. Readings will include historical monographs, memoirs, primary sources, and literary materials.

23


HUMANITIES HU 201-HU 202 HUMANITIES III & IV The second year of Sophomore Humanities consists of portraits of individuals arranged chronologically from the Italian Renaissance to the 20th century. Each individual, great in his or her own right, has farreaching social, cultural, or political significance. MATH

MA 110 BASIC CONCEPTS OF MATHEMATICS A review course for students who wish to develop quantitative skills. Topics covered include: number systems, linear equations and inequalities, exponents, polynomial and rational expressions, polynomial equations, relations and functions. Not open to students with demonstrated quantitative skills

MA 170–MA 180 CALCULUS I & II A study of the differentiation and integration of algebraic and transcendental functions with applications. Topics in analytic geometry include a study of conics.

MA 210 CALCULUS III A continuation of Mathematics 170–180. Topics include infinite sequences and series, vectors and vector calculus, and multivariable calculus. Prerequisite: Mathematics 180

MODERN LANGUAGES FR 201-FR 202 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I & II The student is required to undertake a thorough review of grammar, exercises in composition, intensive readings and translations, and correlated laboratory drills. The second semester emphasizes culture and civilization.

24

SP 201-SP 202 INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I & II An integrated course for students having a basic command of Spanish. Later phases of the course include introduction to a variety of cultural and literary reading selection in Spanish.


PHILOSOPHY PH 105 PHILOSOPHY OF NATURE AND THE HUMAN PERSON This introductory course deals with the traditional topics of speculative philosophy, pertaining to Nature, the human person, and God.

PH 107 ETHICS A presentation of the principles of moral conduct and their application to specific cases, including a review of some of the major ethical theories.

PH 321 FORMAL LOGIC A critical study of reasoning, including classical syllogistic logic, truth functional logic, formal fallacies, fallacies of ordinary language, and inductive reasoning.

PH 323 PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION An examination of classical and modern theories of education, focusing on the nature and purpose of learning and teaching, with application to current policies in the United States.

PH 326 PHILOSOPHY OF GOD A study of the fundamental philosophical questions regarding the existence and nature of God, our knowledge of God, and the character of religious belief.

PH 338 CONTEMPORARY IMAGES OF MAN IN FANTASY NOVELS This course examines the Postmodern situation and the nature of the Human Person in four popular sets of Fantasy Novels. We reveal how we see the limitations contemporary life, man’s place, and the nature of good and evil, by how we alter those limitations in stories that alter the fundamental metaphysical and moral features of our world. We will consider two sets of novels influenced by World War II: Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings and C.S. Lewis’s Narnia series, and contrast them with two recent series: Harry Potter by J.K. Rowling and The Golden Compass series by Philip Pullman. The course will examine what we think of the real, its

25


metaphysics and moral structure, by how we conceive the unreal.

PH 467 ST: CAMUS AND DOSTOEVSKY A seminar that traces the influence of Dostoevsky on Camus and the central arguments and themes of their thought by examining parallel sections from their major works. We will read The Plague by Camus with “Rebellion” from The Brothers Karamazov; The Rebel by Camus with “The Grand Inquisitor”; The Fall by Camus with Notes from the Underground; The Myth of Sisyphus by Camus with Kirilov’s suicide in The Possessed; and The Stranger with selections from Crime and Punishment.

PH 468 ST: THE PROBLEM OF EVIL This course is an examination of the nature of evil as discussed in philosophical works and as displayed in literature and film. Special attention will be given to the problem that evil raises for the existence of an all-good God.

PH 469 ST: ISLAMIC PHILOSOPHY After an introduction to the basic elements of Islam, its history, and its manifestations in a variety of cultures and civilizations, the course will examine the origins of Islamic philosophy in the ninth century and its development through to the twentieth century. Special attention will be given to the interaction of philosophy with Islamic law, theology, and mysticism. Reading materials include a general survey of Islamic philosophy and representative readings from primary sources.

PH 470 ST: HUMAN HAPPINESS This course will examine the subject of human happiness from a variety of philosophical perspectives, drawn from both the Western and Eastern traditions, ancient and modern. Is happiness possible? What is it? How do we achieve it? The class will be conducted as a seminar.

26


PHYSICS

PS 121–PS 122 GENERAL PHYSICS I AND II WITH L AB An introduction of the physical phenomena and the analysis used in the study of Newton’s mechanics. Topics covered will include kinematics, dynamics, momentum and energy. A working knowledge of algebra, plane geometry, and trigonometry are required. Calculus is not required.

POLITICS

PO 480 POLITICS INTERNSHIP Students are placed in a federal or state government agency. This course is worth three credits at completion. Contact Professor Jennifer Lucas (222-4151 or jlucas@ anselm.edu) for more information and to apply for Internships before registering.

PO 485 POLITICS INTERNSHIP Students are placed in a federal or state government agency. This course is worth a total of six credits at completion. Contact Professor Jennifer Lucas (2224151 or jlucas@anselm.edu) for more information and to apply for Internships before registering.

PO 494 CAMPAIGN INTERNSHIP Students work with a national, state or local campaign for a candidate for public office. Contact Professor Jennifer Lucas (222-4151 or jlucas@anselm.edu) for more information and to apply for Internships before registering.

PSYCHOLOGY PY 205 PSYCHOLOGY OF ADDICTION AND DEPENDENCY The psychological aspects of addiction and dependency are surveyed. Substances that modify human behavior and emotions are studied as they relate to psychopathology and the functioning of the healthy individual. Psychological diagnosis and treatment of addiction and dependency are stressed.

27


PY 206 HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY The role of psychological factors in four health-related areas: the prevention and treatment of mental and physical illness; the development of mental and physical illness; the promotion and maintenance of good health behavior; and the organization and formation of healthcare policy and the health-care system. The student will be exposed to the underlying psychological theories and methods employed in this area, as well as their clinical applications.

PY 307 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY The classifications and incidence of behavioral disorders. Issues of etiology, causes of abnormality, methods of treatment and clinical diagnosis are discussed.

PY 402-PY 403 INTERNSHIP Qualified students may be offered the opportunity to work as interns in agencies which offer significant roles for psychologists, e.g., schools, clinics, rehabilitation centers, or in industry or other typical organizations which offer opportunities to integrate academic studies in the liberal arts and in psychology with the practical aspects available in the site locations. These courses are worth 3 credits each at completion. Contact Loretta Brady (641-7144 or lbrady@anselm.edu) for more information and to apply for Internship before registering.

SOCIOLOGY

SO 212 SOCIAL STATISTICS An introduction to the logic and techniques of statistical analysis as applied to human behavior, including organization and presentation of statistical data, measures of centrality and dispersion, probability, sampling, hypothesis testing, estimation, tests of association and significance, and an introduction to multivariate techniques.

28


SO 454 SOCIOLOGY INTERNSHIP Provides qualified students with supervised experience in a professional setting to enhance the academic learning received in the classroom. It may include work experience in human service, a business environment, or government agency. Participation may take such forms as a supervised case worker, research analyst, or other approved roles. This internship is worth 6 credits at completion. Contact Michael Smith (656-6003 or msmith@anselm.edu) for more information and to apply for Internship before registering.

SO 455 SOCIOLOGY INTERNSHIP Provides qualified students with supervised experience in a professional setting to enhance the academic learning received in the classroom. It may include work experience in human service, a business environment, or government agency. Participation may take such forms as a supervised case worker, research analyst, or other approved roles. This internship is worth 3 credits at completion. Contact Michael Smith (656-6003 or msmith@anselm.edu) for more information and to apply for Internship before registering.

THEOLOGY

TH 100 BIBLICAL THEOLOGY An introduction to Divine Revelation enabling students to gain an understanding of the total Bible – the Old Testament and the New Testament.

TH 255 RELIGIONS OF THE WEST A study of the major monotheistic religious traditions originating in the Ancient Near East: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The course concentrates on the history, thought, and practice of the three great Abrahamic traditions. Special attention is given to the contemporary varieties of each tradition.

29


TH 270 CHRISTIAN MORAL LIFE This course examines the Eucharistic character of Christian moral life. It studies the virtues of this life, precepts derived from Scripture and the teaching tradition of the Church, the application of these precepts to contemporary issues, and the nourishing of moral life through the Sacraments.

TH 371 MEDICAL ETHICS An investigation of the moral problems which can arise in the practice of modern medicine. A brief historical survey of medical ethics is followed by a study of the basic Christian principles of morality. Questions discussed include the concept of health and illness, the inception, preservation, and termination of human life.

30


FIELD STUDIES IN TROPICAL BIOLOGY: BELIZE Course dates: May 21-June 3, 2012 Application deadline: March 7, 2012 Estimated course fees: $3500 - $4000* (includes airfare) Prerequisite: 1 yr of college-level biology, permission to register by instructor *final cost will depend on enrollment and airfare prices. Costs will be finalized before the end of spring semester

BI340: FIELD STUDIES IN TROPICAL BIOLOGY A 3-credit course offered in the first summer session. This course introduces students to the biological complexity of the tropics through participatory field experiences in the ecologically diverse Central American country of Belize. Field trips and exercises are conducted in two of the most speciesrich ecosystems on the planet: the neotropical rainforest and barrier coral reef. Saint Anselm faculty (Dr. Eric Berry and Dr. Lori LaPlante) and local experts will lecture on a variety of topics including the natural history of tropical biota, patterns of species diversity, rainforest ecology and conservation, ethnobiology, fish diversity/behavior, coral reef ecology, and mangrove ecology.

A $100 deposit is due with your application. The deposit will be credited against your course fees. INCLUDES: • Round-trip airfare to and from Belize • Saint Anselm tuition (3 credits) • 1 day of savannah field studies at Monkey Bay Wildlife Sanctuary <http://www.monkeybaybelize. org/> • 4 days of rainforest field studies at Cockscomb Basin Wildlife Sanctuary / Jaguar Reserve <http://www. belizeaudubon.org/protected_areas/ cockscomb-basin-wildlife-sanctuary. html> • 5 days of coral reef field studies at Tobacco Caye <http://www.tcmsbelize.org/> • 1 night accommodation in or near Belize City • 4 nights dorm accommodations at Saint Anselm College • All housing, ground transfers, and most meals in Belize OTHER: • This course is open to all majors meeting the prerequisite • Participation is limited to 12 students • A $100 deposit (nonrefundable) will be due with your application • Financial aid may be available - Contact Mac Broderick <mailto:mbroderick@anselm.edu> (phone: 641-7110) For additional information visit the course website: http://www.anselm. edu/x826.xml or contact Dr. LaPlante or Dr. Berry.

31


STUDY FRENCH IN PARIS Travel Dates: Summer 1: May 29-June 30, 2012 or Summer 2: June 26July 28, 2012 No Prerequisite. Open to all levels—true beginner to superior. Apply now through March 1, 2012. Apply early to guarantee your spot. Study French at the Institut Catholique de Paris and earn six credits Work toward your language requirement or, if you’ve already completed Intermediate, earn your Minor with only two more French classes at Saint Anselm. You can study abroad and still graduate in four years. Intensive French Language Your mornings will be spent in intensive French language study with faculty at the Institut Catholique. Coursework is tailored to your level and includes 15 hours per week of in-depth study of the language ­augmented by two workshops focusing on oral or written French, phonetics, or culture and civilization.

Students will be placed into the ­appropriate level (Beginner, ­Elementary, Intermediate, Advanced, or Superior) based on a placement exam administered upon arrival.

Experiential Learning Your evenings and weekends will be spent learning outside the classroom. Housing: You will live in a rich ­environment of your choosing—­ either independently in a studio apartment, with other students in campus housing, or with a French family in their home. Paris: There are many reasons Paris is the most popular tourist ­destination in the world. One of the world's leading business and cultural centers, its influence in politics, edu-

32

cation, entertainment, media, fashion, science and the arts all contribute to its status as one of the world's major global cities. Did you know that the Ile-de-France hosts 36 of the Fortune Global 500 companies? Cultural Excursions: Included in the program are outings to iconic Parisian landmarks like the Eiffel Tower, ­museums like the Musée d’Orsay, ­cathedrals like Notre Dame, neighborhoods like Montmartre, and ­experiences like a boat tour on the Seine. Beyond Paris: You will also get to visit other regions of France, including a weekend excursion to Normandy ­(Summer 1) or Provence (Summer 2) and a day trip to the chateau of ­Chantilly (Summer 1) or Versailles (Summer 2).

What’s included: Tuition Logistical and academic support by ­Academic Programs International Saint Anselm professor on site part of the time Pre-departure orientation Transportation to and from airport On-site orientation Housing Metro pass Some meals Excursions and cultural activities Free mobile phone with discounted calling packages Medical and life insurance (Airfare is not included) For more information and application materials, contact Dr. Susanne Rossbach at srossbac@anselm.edu and visit www. anselm.edu/anselm-in-paris Direct Financial Aid inquiries to Mac ­Broderick at mbroderick@anselm.edu


DIRECTIONS TO CAMPUS FROM SEACOAST Take Rt. 101 West then continue as 足described below.* FROM POINTS WEST Take Rt. 101 East then continue as described below.* *FROM JUNCTION OF RT. 101 AND RT. 114 At the junction of Rt. 101 and Rt. 114, continue straight on Rt. 114 North. C足 ontinue through two sets of lights. The third set of lights is Saint Anselm Drive. Take right onto Saint Anselm Drive. Campus is a足 pproximately one mile on right. FROM MANCHESTER AIRPORT Take Brown Ave. North to Rt. 101 West to Junction of 101 and 114, (set of lights) then continue as described.* FROM BUS STATION (MANCHESTER TRANSPORTATION CENTER) Take Granite St. West to intersection of Rt. 293 South (Everett Turnpike) to Rt 101 West to Junction of 101 and 114 (set of lights) then continue as described.*

FROM POINTS SOUTHEAST Take Rt. 93 North To Rt. 293 North, Exit left to Rt. 101 West (Bedford, Goffstown) to Junction of 101 and 114 (set of lights) then continue as described.* FROM POINTS SOUTHWEST Take Rt. 3 North. Continue to Everett Tpk. North to Rt. 101 West to Junction of 101 and 114 (set of lights) then continue as 足described.* FROM POINTS NORTH Take Rt. 93 South to Rt. 293 South (Everett Turnpike) to Rt. 101 West to Junction of 101 and 114 (set of lights) then continue as described.*

*

Manchester Bus Station

33


34


SUMMER SCHOOL REGISTRATION 2012 Please complete this form and submit with full remittance to: Summer School Office Saint Anselm College, Box #1732 100 Saint Anselm Drive, Manchester, NH 03102 Fax: 603-656-6297 Name___________________________________________________________________________ Address__________________________________________________________________________ City____________________________________ State____________ Zip____________________ Social Security #_________________________ Student ID #______________________________ Phone__________________________________ E-Mail___________________________________ In case of emergency, please call: Name_________________________________________________ Phone____________________ Relationship to student________________________________________ Are you a Saint Anselm College student?  yes

 no

If not, what is your home institution?________________________________________________ Where did you learn about Saint Anselm College summer courses?  summer school catalog  Saint Anselm College website  newspaper  other:________________________________________________ COURSE INFORMATION Course #

Course Title

Session Credits

Charge

$ $ $ $

Registration Fee

$50.00

Lab Fee

$_________

Total Amount Due

$_________

 Check enclosed  Charge to:

 MasterCard

 Visa

Card Number__________________________________________ Expiration Date________________________ Name on Card________________________________________________________________________________ Billing Address (if different from above)__________________________________________________________ Signature____________________________________________________________________________________

FULL PAYMENT IS DUE AT TIME OF REGISTRATION Signature Date____________________________________________________________________  ______________________________________________________________________________ FOR INTERNAL USE

35


2012 Summer School