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ARCHITECTURAL FORM AND THE PUBLIC REALM by Sainabou Jack


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ARCHITECTURAL FORM AND THE PUBLIC REALM by Sainabou Jack

iii


APPROACH + CONTENTS

Approach This book begins by providing this author’s view of the environmental qualities believed to be essential in creating good urban design spaces that can be positively experienced by all users regardless of their age or ability. Through SWOT analysis, the book then provides an overview of how the implementation of these environmental qualities informs the design of the urban fabric at district, neighbourhood and block levels. This book then investigates in more detail, how the implementation of these environmental qualities informs the architectural form of a selected block and its surrounding public spaces. The block selected for this project is the administrative block of the Oxford and Cherwell Valley College located in the West End area of Oxford. iv


Architectural Form and the Public Realm

01.

Introduction This chapter looks at the environmental qualities viewed to be essential in creating good urban design spaces that can be positively experienced by all users regardless of their age or ability.

01

02.

Implementing Environmental Qualities Through SWOT analysis, this chapter briefly investigates how the implementation of the environmental qualities informs the design of the West End area of Oxford at district, neighbourhood and block levels.

07

v

03.

Architectural Form and the Public Realm

04.

Curriculum Vitae

This chapter investigates in more detail, how the implementation of the environmental qualities informs the architectural form of the administrative block and its surrounding public spaces.

15

35


01.

Introduction This chapter looks at the environmental qualities viewed to be essential in creating good urban design spaces that can be positively experienced by all users regardless of their age or ability.


INTRODUCTION: The Qualities of the Public Realm

01.

There are universal environmental qualities that are common to most people regardless of their age or ability/disability.

It is vital to incorporate these qualities in the design of the public realm in order to achieve a fully functional urban environment that is equally and positively experienced by everyone.

Based on research, it was found that there were generic environmental qualities regarded essential for the design of good urban spaces. : 1. Positive sensory experience 2. Vitality 3. Legibility 4. Energy Efficiency 5. Connectivity

These environmental qualities will be implemented into the design of the administrative block of the Oxford and Cherwell Valley College to determine how they influence the block’s architectural form and its surrounding spaces.

02

Summarising and recategorising the environmental qualities


Architectural Form and the Public Realm

ES CH OA R PP EA L B NA

SUS TA INA BL EA PP RO

TALKSCAPES OPEN SPACES

VIEWS

SU ST AI

S HE AC

GOOD LIGHTING

STAND/ SIT/PLAY

POSITIVE SENSORY EXPERIENCE

PEDESTRIAN/ CYCLIST FRIENDLY

WALKABILITY/ CYCLE ABILITY

SAFETY/ SECURITY

ACTIVE EDGES

SUSTAINABLE PUBLIC TRANSPORT

LIVELY STREETS

PUBLIC REALM

CONNECTIVITY

VITALITY ROBUSTNESS/ ADAPTABILITY

LEGIBILITY

VARIETY/ MIXED USES

HUMAN RESOURCES

LOCAL RESOURCES

WORK OF ART AND CRAFT

ENERGY EFFICIENCY

RECYCLEABLE WASTE

RENEWABLE ENERGY

LEGIBILITY RENEWABLE MATERIALS

COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT

LOCAL IDENTITY ACTIVE EDGES

PERSONALLISATION

SU S T A INA BLE A PP RO A C HE S

ES ACH PRO P EA BL A N AI ST U S

ACCESIBILITY

03


INTRODUCTION: The Site at District, Neighbourhood and Block Level

•

•

04

The following images illustrate the location of the site at district, neighbourhood and block levels which are defined as follows: -- District: The West End area of Oxford (1000m x 1000m or 100ha) --

Neighbourhood: South Oxpens which includes the Oxford and Cherwell Valley College, Oxpens Field and the ice rink (500m x 500m or 25 ha)

--

Block: The administrative block of the Oxford and Cherwell Valley College (100m x 100m or 1 ha).

The administrative block was selected for study because it is the only block on the College site that is surrounding by different street types (i.e Oxpens Road to the south and a pedestrian route to its west side), and it has a relationship with the ice rink on the opposite side of the street.

Oxford

01.

Site location

02.

West End masterplan; district level

03.

South Oxpens masterplan; neighbourhood level

04.

Administrative block masterplan; block level


Architectural Form and the Public Realm

05


02.

Implementing Environmental Qualities Through SWOT analysis, this chapter briefly investigates how the implementation of the environmental qualities informs the design of the West End area of Oxford at district, neighbourhood and block levels.


IMPLEMENTING ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITIES: District Level Carrying out SWOT analysis and proposing design actions to achieve urban design qualities

a

c c

a

02.

08

c

b

b

01.

c

Strengths a. Legibility –– The Oxford Castle and surrounding landmarks contribute to Oxford’s identity, cultural heritage, social life and economy. b. Positive Sensory Experience –– Castle Mill Stream, Wareham Stream and River Thames are significant contributors to the natural beauty of Oxford.

Weaknesses 03. a. Legibility –– Castle Mill Stream and River Thames are not celebrated as important water features. b. Positive Sensory Experience –– Oxpens Field and the ice rink feel isolated and unsafe. c. Vitality –– The Westgate shopping centre and railway station are not inviting enough, and their size and lack of active edges affect people’s comfort level. –– The Oxford and Cherwell Valley College does not meet the needs of its users in terms of sustainability, quality, and user experience. d. Connectivity –– Frideswide Square creates a bottleneck for traffic, it feels unsafe for pedestrians. –– Oxpens Road is not used to its full potential.

b d

c

d

c

a

c

a

d

c

c

c

b

Opportunities a. Legibility –– The water features could be more apparent within the cityscape. b. Positive Sensory Experience –– Oxpens Field and the ice rink could be transformed into a more vibrant area. c. Vitality –– The Westgate shopping centre and railway station could incorporate mixed uses to improve the vibrancy of the area. –– The Oxford and Cherwell Valley College could be redesigned to make it more sustainable, user friendly, permeable, and accommodate more student housing 04. d. Connectivity –– Oxpens Road could be the main traffic and public transport route, thereby alleviating the traffic created by the bottleneck at Frideswide Square. –– The road and transport network should be more pedestrian-friendly.

Threats a. Positive Sensory Experience –– Frideswide Square can be dangerous to cross the road as a pedestrian. This intersection could cause car accidents. b. Energy Efficiency –– Castle Mill Stream and River Thames have the potential to flood


Architectural Form and the Public Realm

to Park Town Worcester College

Pubic Space Make it open to the public and incorporate an exposition pavilion.

Railway Station Make it more welcoming to visitors. Reorganise routes for vehicles and public transport. Railway Station

to City Centre

Said Business School

Nuffield College

to Botley

Car Park Turn into a new business centre with shops, offices and underground parking.

Westgate Shopping Centre Extend it to have more active edges.

Oxford Castle

Business Park Create a 5* hotel with conference rooms to meet needs of Said Business School. Create more housing here.

Oxford & Cherwell Valley College

Ice Rink

Oxpens Field Integrate with existing green space, make it more inviting to the public.

to New Hinksey

Flood Solution Design a reservoir for flood prevention and integrate the ice rink within this new feature to create a new landmark in the area. 05.

Design actions derived from SWOT analysis

Mixed Use Area Incorporate shops, offices and apartments. Commercial Residential Vegetation Regenerate Pedestrian Dominant Main Routes Mixed Use

06.

Proposed masterplan for the West End of Oxford

09


IMPLEMENTING ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITIES: Neighbourhood Level Carrying out SWOT analysis and proposing design actions to achieve urban design qualities

b

c

d

b

b

d

c

01.

10

d a

02.

Strengths a. Legibility –– The presence of Castle Mill Stream and Thames River contribute to the natural beauty of the site. b. Positive Sensory Experience –– The central courtyard provides space for sitting and gathering. c. Vitality –– The College is proposed to have active edges along the surrounding streets to promote vitality in the area. d. Connectivity –– The site is well connected with Oxpens Road running across its centre. –– The College is permeable and wellconnected to its immediate surroundings.

a

c e

a

a

b a

03. Weaknesses a. Legibility –– The stream and river are not celebrated enough in the design. –– There is little interaction between the College buildings and Castle Mill stream. –– There is no apparent relationship between the College, the ice rink and Oxpens Field. b. Positive Sensory Experience –– Oxpens Road may cause noise pollution as it is proposed to be one of the main routes in the scheme. This can be a problem for the students studying at the College. c. Vitality –– Although the ice rink has viable use, the building itself has inactive edges which can have a negative impact on the vitality of the area. d. Connectivity –– The connecting route from the College to the Westgate area in the east is not strong enough as it is presently interrupted by one of the college buildings. e. Energy Efficiency –– The flood mitigation strategy could be improved to integrate with the surroundings.

b a

Opportunities a. Legibility –– Create more views and better interaction between the College and the stream. –– The College could connect to the Westgate area and become a shortcut to the city centre from Oxpens Field. –– There should be a better relationship between the College, the ice rink and Oxpens Field in terms of architectural language, routes, and visual connection. –– Castle Mill Stream and Thames River could be made more prominent features. b. Positive Sensory Experience –– Oxpens Road could be redesigned to consider traffic noise and take into account pedestrian safety. 04. –– The central courtyard could be developed further to accommodate sitting, gathering and views to the water. c. Vitality –– The ice rink and Oxpens Field could be redesigned to meet modern needs and attract more people to the area. –– The College could have more active edges by incorporating mixed functions. d. Energy Efficiency –– Improve flood mitigation strategy

Threats a. Positive Sensory Experience –– The busy Oxpens Road could become a threat to pedestrians and students of the College in terms of safety and noise pollution. b. Energy Efficiency –– Although the potential flooding of Castle Mill Stream and Thames River are accounted for by the water reservoir, if this flood mitigation scheme fails, the entire site is prone to flooding.


Architectural Form and the Public Realm

Stay/Sit/Talk Create open spaces for sitting and gathering.

Blocks Create building blocks that are located on key intersection points on the site for social and economic vitality. Flood Solution Create a water feature for its sensory enhancement qualities and flood control ability.

Pedestrian and Cyclist Routes Create a direct link between the College and Oxpens Field for pedestrians and cyclists.

05.

Design actions derived from SWOT analysis

Slow Down Traffic Reduce traffic speed in front of the College and ice rink. Enhance pedestrian and cyclist experience in this area.

06.

Proposed masterplan for South Oxpens neighbourhood

11


IMPLEMENTING ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITIES: Block Level Carrying out SWOT analysis and proposing design actions to achieve urban design qualities

d

d

b

b a c

a

a d

b

b d

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02. Strengths a. Legibility –– Façade treatment contributes to legibility of the area. b. Positive Sensory Experience –– The central courtyard provides space for sitting and gathering. –– Good use of natural materials as they contribute to sensory richness. –– Relationship between building and water enriches sensory experience within the building. c. Connectivity –– The site is well connected with Oxpens Road running across its centre. –– The block provides a connecting link from Oxpens Road to the area across the river. d. Energy Efficiency –– Limited parking reduces CO2 emissions.

a d

03.

01.

c

c

Weaknesses a. Legibility –– The corners do not relate enough to the surrounding routes so as to improve the legibility of corner entrances. b. Positive Sensory Experience –– Oxpens Road may cause noise pollution as it is proposed to be one of the main routes in the scheme. This can be a problem for the students studying at the College. c. Vitality –– The façade facing Oxpens Road should be more active during the day and at night. d. Connectivity –– There is not a clear service route running through the block. –– The cycle path currently runs between the vehicular path and the parking zone. This might be dangerous for cyclists.

Opportunities a. Legibility –– The corner entrances could be more prominent. The corners should also provide space for gathering and spill-out. b. Positive Sensory Experience –– Oxpens Road should be modified to consider the noise generated from the traffic and take into account the safecrossing of pedestrians. –– The central courtyard space could be developed further to accommodate sitting and gathering. c. Vitality –– Create active edges with mixed functions to improve safety and vitality. –– Create student housing to increase eyes on the street and the vitality of the area. 04. d. Connectivity –– A service route running through the block should be provided. –– Move cycle path between the footpath and parking zone for cyclist safety.

Threats a. Positive Sensory Experience –– The busy Oxpens Road could become a threat to pedestrians and students of the College in terms of safety and noise pollution.


Architectural Form and the Public Realm

Active Edges The ground floors should be made up of residential and commercial units to provide street surveillance during the day and night.

Stay/Sit/Talk Create open spaces for sitting and gathering.

Corners Corner entrances should be made more prominent and provide space for gathering and spill-out.

Pedestrian Crossing Modify this part of Oxpens Road to consider traffic noise and pedestrian safety.

Permeability Provide a connecting route for servicing. This route should be closable when not in use for security and privacy to residents. Mixed Use Include various functions such as cafeteria, offices and residential units.

Cyclist Safety Move cycle path between the footpath and the parking zone for cyclist safety.

06. 05.

Design actions derived from SWOT analysis

Proposed masterplan for the administrative block of the Oxford and Cherwell Valley College

13


03.

Architectural Form and the Public Realm This chapter investigates in more detail, how the implementation of the environmental qualities informs the architectural form of the administrative block and its surrounding public spaces.


ARCHITECTURAL FORM AND THE PUBLIC REALM: Block Level

12

9 9

8

9 9 7 9

1 2

5

3 4

3 13

16

4

6

01.

Ground floor plan

02.

First floor plan


Architectural Form and the Public Realm

9 9

12

10 10

9

10 10

9

10 10

9

10 10

11 10

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13.

10 10 10 10

10 11 10 10 10 10 10

Student Lounge (day and night) Cafeteria (day); Bar/Club (night) Service kitchen Storage Reception (administrative) Meeting room Offices Staff kitchen/lounge Shared housing for students/nonstudents Ensuite room Shared kitchen ensuite rooms Quiet space Ice rink with arcade and restaurant

17


ARCHITECTURAL FORM AND THE PUBLIC REALM: Block Level Relationship typologies

b

c

a

18

01.

Dividing the administrative block into different typologies

02.

Typology A

03.

Typology B

04.

Typology C

05.

Overview of the administrative block


Architectural Form and the Public Realm

a

•

b

c

To assess the ways in which the environmental qualities affect the architectural form and the public realm at block level, the administrative block will be divided into three typologies: -- Typology A: this typology will look at the relationship between the administrative building frontage and Oxpens Road, as well as the relationship between the building frontage and that of the ice rink on the opposite side of the street. --

Typology B: this typology will look at the relationship between the outside space in front of the residential units, the public path that runs in front of the residential units, and the water feature which serves as a retention pond to prevent flooding. This typology also includes the seating area by the edge of the water on the north-east corner of the block.

--

Typology C: this typology will look at the relationship between the residential units and the internal courtyard. 19


ARCHITECTURAL FORM AND THE PUBLIC REALM: Typology A

01.

Street elevation showing how administrative block relates to its surroundings

LEGIBILITY

20

CONNECTIVITY

VITALITY

The administrative block relates to the rest of its surroundings by incorporating the same architectural language and façade treatment as the surrounding College buildings, thereby contributing to the legibility of the site.

In front of the administrative block runs Oxpens road, making the site highly connected.

The incorporation of student housing and a cafeteria which converts into a student bar/club at night adds to the vitality of the area.


Architectural Form and the Public Realm

The need to slow down traffic in front of the administrative building brought on the idea to design the building façade in such a way as to indicate to drivers to reduce their speed as they approach the College area.

The building façade makes use of vertical timber beams whose placement and spacing give the effect of speed reduction.

The placement and spacing language of the timber beams continues on to the pavement where the timber beams become rumble strips to further slow down traffic.

The reduction of traffic speed through façade and pavement treatment will make the street safer for pedestrians and cyclists. This will enhance the pedestrian and cyclist sensory experience, as well as the vitality of the area.

02.

Street elevation showing how the façade of the administrative block is used as speed reduction measure

LEGIBILITY

CONNECTIVITY

POSITIVE SENSORY EXPERIENCE

VITALITY

21


ARCHITECTURAL FORM AND THE PUBLIC REALM: Typology A

01.

Street elevation showing how administrative block relates to its surroundings

LEGIBILITY

22

POSITIVE SENSORY EXPERIENCE

ENERGY EFFICIENCY

Street trees will contribute to the legibility and the sensory experience of the area. --

Crabapple trees will mark the cafeteria’s entrance and that of the ice rink to create a visual connection between the two entrances. These trees were selected for their vibrant colours, interesting seasonal changes, and fruit bearing capabilities. This tree will enhance the user’s sensory experience

as it will appeal to different senses at different times of the year. --

Maple trees will be planted on the rest of the street. Because they have the ability to tolerate pollution, maple trees will be suitable for the busy Oxpens road.


Architectural Form and the Public Realm

The timber strips, concrete and grass pavers create a visual link between the administrative block and the ice rink.

The use of the same pedestrian pavement language across the street makes the pavement appear continuous, thus making it feel safe and comfortable for pedestrians.

02.

LEGIBILITY

Section and plan showing uses and pavement treatment

CONNECTIVITY

POSITIVE SENSORY EXPERIENCE

VITALITY

23


ARCHITECTURAL FORM AND THE PUBLIC REALM: Typology A

01.

Night view showing how the cafeteria is transformed to a student bar/nightclub at night

POSITIVE SENSORY EXPERIENCE

24

VITALITY

The cafeteria on the ground floor of the administrative block will be converted to a student bar/club at night to make the street vibrant 24 hours a day.

The street lighting is useful in contributing to sensory experience as it creates an interesting ambience at night.


Architectural Form and the Public Realm

To change the perception of graffiti by using it in a positive way (e.g. on Cowley Road shop fronts) and thus improve the vitality of the site, a graffiti wall will mark the side entrance to the student lounge and cafeteria.

As part of encouraging community participation on the development of the site, the mural will be painted by local graffiti artists.

The graffiti wall will further enable the block to contribute to the legibility and local identity of the area.

02.

The graffiti wall adds to the local identity of the area

03.

Local graffiti artists will be used to paint the wall in the administrative block

LEGIBILITY

25


ARCHITECTURAL FORM AND THE PUBLIC REALM: Typology B

• CONNECTIVITY

26

POSITIVE SENSORY EXPERIENCE

VITALITY

While other areas in the block have designated student flats, the residential units along this public route can accommodate students as well as other members of the public.


Architectural Form and the Public Realm

01.

View of the residential units

02.

Axonometric of residential unit

03.

Section through residential unit

04.

Elevation of residential unit

05.

Potential users of the residential units

06.

From top to bottom: second floor plan; first floor plan; ground floor plan

The residential units are flexible enough to adapt to change, user needs and wants.

While each residential unit can be used as shared housing for students, the ground floor can be converted into a 2 bedroom flat, while the top two floors become a 4 bedroom maisonettes.

The ground floor flats could accommodate the elderly or wheelchair users as stairs are not required for access.

The maisonettes (which can be further divided into two smaller flats) can be used by mature students with families or other members of the public with families.

4 bedroom maisonettes

2 bedroom flat

27


ARCHITECTURAL FORM AND THE PUBLIC REALM: Typology B

28

01.

Day

02.

Paving materials

03.

Night


Architectural Form and the Public Realm

The public space in front of the residential units will serve as a shortcut from Oxpens Road to the bridge connecting to other parts of the site.

This space will be made up of different paving materials - timber decking, pebble gravel, slate chippings, concrete and grass pavers, and grass.

The various textures, sounds, colours from the paving materials as well as the water, plants and trees will have a significant impact on enhancing the sensory experience of users.

Street lighting will enable people to use this area even at night, thus contributing to the vitality of the space

CONNECTIVITY

POSITIVE SENSORY EXPERIENCE

VITALITY

29


ARCHITECTURAL FORM AND THE PUBLIC REALM: Typology B

30

01.

Section through the bench

02.

Winter

03.

Summer


Architectural Form and the Public Realm

On the north-west part of the block is a quieter sitting area that people can use for reflecting.

The furniture in this area has a strong relationship with the river as it overhangs over the water, thus creating a dialogue between the administrative block and the water.

The dialogue between the administrative block and the water will have a unique effect on the sensory experience of the user at different times of the year.

POSITIVE SENSORY EXPERIENCE

VITALITY

31


ARCHITECTURAL FORM AND THE PUBLIC REALM: Typology C

01.

Residents can grow fruits and vegetables in the courtyard

POSITIVE SENSORY EXPERIENCE

32

VITALITY

ENERGY EFFICIENCY

The courtyard could be used as a space to grow fruits and vegetables by the residents.

The mixture of various fruits and vegetables in the courtyard will bring an interest mix of colours, textures and tastes which will ultimately attract wildlife and affect the sensory richness of the space.

The presence of trees will help absorb CO2 emissions from the traffic on Oxpens Road.


Architectural Form and the Public Realm

•

A variety of plants and trees will attract wildlife which will further contribute to the sensory experience of the space.

•

The metal frame around the residential units will be used as a support system for climber plants such as: -- Wisteria Sinensis: its purple flowers bloom in the summer and give off a sweet fragrance. --

Vitis Vinifera (grape): this can be planted for its fruit bearing ability.

--

Honeysuckle: as these mature they change from pink to gold. Its foliage is semi-evergreen meaning it will stay relatively green throughout the year. This plant gives off a sweet scent.

02.

The steel frame of the residential units can support climber plants. The courtyard can also be used for bicycle parking.

POSITIVE SENSORY EXPERIENCE

VITALITY

ENERGY EFFICIENCY

33


04.

Curriculum Vitae


CURRICULUM VITAE

PERSONAL SUMMARY w: sainaboujack.wix.com/sainaboujack t: 07500888525 e: sainaboujack@gmail.com a: Flat 106, Building 50, Argyll Road, London, SE18 6PJ

I have a Masters in Urban Design from Oxford Brookes University for which I was awarded a Distinction. I also have a Part 2 Postgraduate Diploma in Architecture from Oxford Brookes University (Merit) as well as a Part 1 Master of Arts with Honours in Architectural Design (2:1) from the University of Edinburgh. I worked as an Architectural Assistant at MasterPlan Architects and Engineers in The Gambia, where I was part of a multi-disciplinary team that was responsible for a range of projects in the residential and commercial sectors. I consider myself a quick learner and a team player, with strong skills in communication, problem solving and time management. As a result, I am very adaptable to different situations and environments. I am very hardworking and I always devote the time and effort required to perform to a very high standard. WORK EXPERIENCE 2009

36

Part 1 Architectural Assistant MasterPlan Architects and Engineers, The Gambia • Produced design proposals and revised scheme designs • Helped modify technical drawings and helped produce mechanical and electrical drawings • Created 3D models for various projects • Attended weekly site meetings for update on the construction progress of various projects • Created project presentation sheets for client meetings

EDUCATION 2012 - 2013 Master of Arts in Urban Design (Distinction) Oxford Brookes University Dissertation: The Future of British Town Centres – in what ways can present-day British town centres be reinvented to make them suitable and adaptable to the demands of the future? (Distinction) 2010 - 2013

Diploma in Architecture (Merit) Oxford Brookes University

2006 - 2010

Master of Arts with Honours in Architectural Design (2:1) University of Edinburgh Dissertation: Le Palais Ideal – an interpretation of Ferdinand Cheval’s outsider art environment

2004 - 2006

International Baccalaureate 38 Points (out of 45) Harare International School

VOLUNTARY EXPERIENCE 2006 Sales Assistant Daniel Pearl Music and Arts Festival, Zimbabwe • Sold tickets for the festival and distributed the charity festival’s programme 2006

Muralist Circle Cement Nursery School, Zimbabwe • Painted murals on classroom walls and donated clothes to pupils


Sainabou Jack

SKILLS Information Technology AutoCAD, SketchUp, V-Ray, Photoshop, InDesign, Illustrator, Premiere Pro, Space Syntax, Microsoft Office Artistic Model making, Hand drawing (various media), Painting (various media), Sculpting (stone) Languages Fluent in English, Wolof (Spoken in Gambia and Senegal); Basic French AWARDS AND PUBLICATIONS 2013 Urban Design Thesis Hall of Fame Urban Design dissertation entitled The Future of British Town Centres was voted into the Urban Design Thesis Hall of Fame at Oxford Brookes University 2013

West Waddy Urban Design Prize Nominated by Oxford Brookes University for the project: Architectural Form and the Public Realm

2012 + 2013

Publication of Architectural and Urban Design work Oxford School of Architecture Yearbook, Oxford Brookes University

2005

Student of the Month Awarded by Harare International School, Zimbabwe

2001 + 2002 + 2003 + 2004

Certificate of Distinction; Certificate of Merit; Certificate of Excellence Excellent Performance in Academic Session. Awarded by Nigerian Turkish International School, Nigeria

2002 Certificate of Success Overall Excellent Performance in a General Examination. Awarded by Surat Educational Limited, Nigeria Achieved several awards in track and field, football and volleyball. HOBBIES AND PERSONAL PROJECTS I helped develop an iOS and Android app called Hair Journal by designing the user interface, and providing input on the app’s features and overall direction. I enjoy drawing and painting portraits of friends and family, as well as making invitation cards and gift boxes for family occasions. I have lived in and travelled to over 20 countries in Africa, Europe, the Middle East and Asia. Meeting new people and learning about their cultures has been a rich and exhilarating experience. REFERENCES Available upon request.

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NOTES


Architectural Form and the Public Realm

Architectural Form and the Public Realm  
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