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Making Real Connections

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Service & Well Being * Every Separation is a LInk * Learning to Serve * Student Quotes


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Let’s Begin to feel and enjoy th through the natural character Weather. Weather Talk. Conver of normal while providing a sen particular group or style. In th that exist in this world for posi of each individual are expresse emancipating the relations tha Emotions, Stories, Feelings, E etc. etc. etc.


the seriousness of connection ristics that make us all similar: ersations about the perception ense of belonging to a his manner we see the people sitive reasons. Characteristics sed firmly inside while still hat allow them to connect with Experiences, Tastes, Beliefs,


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From the Editor Making Real Connections is based on the pleasure in life to meet new people. The intention is to better understand different cultures from the world by taking advantage of the diversity that there is to embrace, respec and enjoy. By doing so, we are benefiting ourselves because we can find similarities that people share and find confidence to converse about any given subject. The identity for this theme is the asterisk which gramatically is used as a point of reference to connect messages together. Additionally, the symbol provokes a sense of positivity and uplifting generosity, making it possible to carry a gracious style throughout this edition. Emotions, Stories, Feelings, Experiences, Tastes, Beliefs are color coded in the beginning spread of this magazine. In this publication there are messages that pertain to the color of each word. They represent the diversity that was first mentioned. This diverse system is a lifestyle that can be followed as individuals and contributors to this world. The messages are intended to give the reader the opportunity to make the connection between the colored word and its message.The goal ultimately is to motivate you to go out there and explore the connections that can be made based on the suggestions that have been provided. And beyond. Kind Regards,

Hector Said Guerra CD IV Alumn Milwaukee Institute of Art & Design


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Contents * Serve & Commit How to Sound

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feature

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dept: People

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Every Separation 30 is a Link feature

Quotes From Students Connections Warm Fuzzy Sounds

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dept: study

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feature


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lk and The action of moving and expanding our experience in the world is symbolic from the beginning of mankind. The resources that we have available in addition to the connections that have been made are a result of human desire to understand the nature of seeking enhancement and comfort based on our lifestyle of choice. Gladly, there are many beautiful settings for this to occur. -Said Guerra


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by Isabel Kent

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Life is not simply lived for one’s self. One is always aiming for something, propelled by one’s own inertia, but is also subject to force exerted from the outside. From another perspective, one may ask, are these two apparently disparate forces actually one and the same? In this sense, one’s entire life is comprised of service. One may do something to achieve one’s own ends, but it could also be of help to others. Or, helping others may in the end lead to a greater sense of well being in one’s self. Put more simply, service involves helping people, or acting to benefit something other than only one’s self. This is crucial to life because we are not autonomous beings, but rather are connected to everything around us. If our surroundings are in an ill state, it affects us, and the cycle continues. More specifically, there are those who truly cannot support themselves, and so service to them is crucial to life. Karmawhat goes around comes around. Also, having emotional, engaging relationships with others is crucial to human happiness. The description I have given of service does not differ significantly from those I’ve come across elsewhere, including those of the individuals I’ve interviewed. Each stated that essentially, service is another word for helping, or that its result is the betterment of something else. If interpreted in more conventional terms, however, the word’s use has a more specific connotation. One who volunteers time and effort, that is, without pay/reciprocation, at an organization, is a familiar example. According to this definition, and even so, just barely making it in, the only service in which I have participated has involved playing my violin at fairs, festivals, and organizations. People listened to the music I produced and most likely derived


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pleasure from it, which I think is enough. But at the end of the day, these events did not deal with what are considered society’s most pressing, lifeor-death issues. Turning it around, service I have received from others, on a broad scale, could include areas such as medical aid. This, however, is a service-based job, and therefore the providers of service are receiving pay. By some standards, this fact would exclude such situations from falling under the category of service. But I would say that if it is done well, and if the individual providing the aid cares about what he or she is doing, it should still be considered. It might also be said that holding open a door for someone is a sort of service. But on the other hand, what is the difference between this and being a “good Samaritan? It really depends upon how the term is being used, but ultimately I think it is safe to say that when it comes down to it, any act that is meant to be of help can be considered a service.

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connection

The service I have given, then, can only really be described as such within the latter classification of the term. I have held doors open for people, among other small acts of kindness. I also have played music for people, which is equally as satisfying, but perhaps in a different way. One circumstance I remember as being particularly meaningful was when I performed with a pianist at Joyce Parker Studio Productions in Bay View my sophomore year of high school. I was nervous, but after practicing a few times I fell into the mode of just playing the music. The theater was very small and old, and the crowd was almost entirely comprised of the elderly. When everything was silent in the dark beyond the stage, I began my performance of Nocturne by Aram Katchaturian. The listeners were pleased. Afterward, little old couples came up to me and told me how lovely they thought it was. And I can honestly say it made me feel good too. I connected with others via music, and bridged the gap between generations. I would like to think that I felt what they felt. I interviewed two other on their thoughts about service. The first was my mother, Christabel Kent, and as always, she had some very wise things to say. She defined service as a deed that involves helping, that is a means toward betterment, and that has an end result that


“ It can

potentially make one more appreciative of what one already possesses, and amplify empathy. �


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“Altruism in

particular has been shown to establish closer relationships and a greater sense of community.

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brings us

is positive. To her, it is important because it is a means to learn “how the other half lives.” It can potentially make one more appreciative of what one already possesses, and amplify empathy. But she also states that these are lessons one really should know without having to be involved in conventional “volunteering/service.” They are values that should be taught from childhood onward, and moreover, are essentially common sense. My mother does not proclaim to have served others through volunteer service, but her job is service-based and she helps others through small courtesies daily. She works as a medical technician, which involves testing patient samples in order to determine a diagnosis. Outside of work, a recent instance occurred during which she drove two little boys and their father from their stalled truck on the Hoan Bridge to a gas station. It really made her happy, in the truest sense of the word, not because these people had to go through with such an unpleasant circumstance, but that she was able to help others in a time of trouble. She saw that they were struggling and it made her feel good to relieve them of that, and it also gave her a personal boost to know that she had done something good. In terms of how she has been helped, on the other hand, she was unable to produce any other example than when she was pregnant and hospitalized and was brought some “awful chicken casserole” by a coworker. But despite some less than pleasing episodes, my mother does believe that service can encourage understanding, appreciation, and empathy. It is reciprocal – you give, an others give to you. And in the end, it just makes you feel better. Following this, I thought it would be interesting to see the viewpoint of someone of a different generation. I ended up have a discussion with my fifteen-yearold brother, Tristan Kent, who proved to be a good candidate, as he provided the outlook of an individual in the midst of growing and learning in today’s society. There were definitely differences between his responses and my mother’s, but there was also


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still and underlying sameness. Tristan defined service as, “the act or event of doing something to help somebody else.” Immediately a commonality can be seen. According to both interviewees, service is essentially an act of helping. The next response, however, is quite a bit different, but also very interesting. When asked how or why service may be important, Tristan replied that theoretically, it is not important at all. His argument was that each human could potentially be self-supporting. He even referenced medieval society, during which most people were quite isolated and did not usually rely on others to aid them in survival.

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all closer

Tristan acknowledged that in the contemporary world this just doesn’t happen. Humans are arguably more connected, over larger expanses of time and space, than they ever have been. Nonetheless, looked at from a broad perspective, what he is saying does make some sense. A human could live out his or her life in such a way that did not require much interjection by others in terms of aid. What this does not mean, however, is living one’s life entirely alone. Beyond the fact that there truly are some who are in such a poor state that they cannot survive without significant aid, living all alone may not be possible at all because we are inherently social. It is arguable that humans need some form of interaction to survive. But obviously Tristan has posited an extreme scenario, and there is no need to get into the philosophical underpinnings of this issue at the moment. It will suffice enough to say that need of humans for other humans has significant implications for the role of “service,” or helping others, in our lives. After this heavy conversation, I asked Tristan to give some examples of when he had served others. Among his many responses were that he rinsed the orange juice residue from his cups so that his parents would have scrub slightly less when doing the dishes, and that he went to school everyday so that others could enjoy his presence.


Besides these, however, he also mentioned his position as a bassist in both his school orchestra and jazz band, participating in various non-profit concerts, at the school and at various other venues. When asked when others have served him, Tristan was a little more tentative. After some umms and uhhs, he replied, “a teacher has taught me.”Whether meant to be sarcastic or not, I thought this was a good answer. Teaching can definitely be classified as service because it involves giving to others in a way that is to benefit their lives. Teachers, including individuals such as parents, friends, and any who somehow catalyze another to learn, have an incredibly important role. They are responsible for passing on knowledge. Where would we be without that? In the end, Tristan’s thoughts on the impact of service on health and wellbeing were nearly identical to his mother’s. Whether or not this is simply a result of her teaching I do not know, but I am inclined to believe that it is a combination of things. Tristan most likely learned values that his mother passed on to him, but, especially at this rebellious stage in his life, these were also probably synthesized with beliefs he had derived from his own experience outside of the home. Both mother and son agreed that “service,” as defined as helping others or acting to benefit something outside of one’s self, also provides a reciprocating boost to the giver. I think it all comes down to empathy, and I also think we really all know this. Current research suggests that this impulse is innately human. W ithin our brains are structures called mirror neurons, for example, which are believed to be correlated with our ability to immediately understand what another is experiencing (Society for Neuroscience). Brains scans have shown

that some of the same areas of the brain light up when one is experiencing an emotion as when one is viewing the facial expression of another who is feeling that same emotion (Society for Neuroscience). The fact that we possess such abilities at all insinuates that empathy is somehow essential for human survival, and in fact, it has been found that human connection is a fundamental necessity. We feel better just being around other people and we require closer, caring relationships for our own well being (This Emotional Life). Altruism connects and forms communities. Giving to others involves positive emotions like generosity, compassion, and gratitude, all of which actually increase happiness (This Emotional Life). Even so, we do not need science to tell us this. We can just look around us, and within ourselves. Each human is distinct, but is also dependent upon the whole. If what surrounds us is in a poor state, we will be too. We truly know that being of help to something beyond ourselves is inherently good, because we also feel it.


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It is essential to be aware that not all connections may go along very smoothly. After all, we are still human, but we should understand that we don’t have to react to a negative remark. Instead, we must be proactive and find the outlet that will bring all parties to harmony. A common denominator is usually the best way to change a conversation. Sneezing also helps. -Said Guerra


ange The pic


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People

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Service & Commitment by Ben Rothschild Photography by: David Szimanski Milwaukee Institute of Art & Design


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“Defined as unselfish loyal and benevolent concern for the good of another.” Benno Rothschild graduated with honors in 2008 from the Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design with a Bachelor’s of Fine Arts in sculpture. He created his first public work in 2006 in collaboration with the children at Milwaukee’s La Causa Crisis Nursery. The large-scale painted steel sculpture entitled “Gertie Gets Her Ducks in a Row” was designed to connect a story from the past to the difficult times of today. The work is now on permanent display along the Milwaukee River Walk. Rothschild’s work has been published in Creative Quarterly and his art has been displayed nationally. In August of 2008 his steel sculpture entitled, “Big Wheel Flyer” was featured at the Craven Arts Council and Gallery’s 2008 Annual Sculpture Show in North Carolina and his sculpture entitled “M42149” was displayed and awarded honors at the Visual Arts Society of Texas’ 41st Annual visual Arts Exhibition. While galleries have honored his work across the country, Rothschild would much rather create works of art for individual enjoyment. He has made it his routine to create works of art both for, and with, those that inspire him or need inspiration. Defined as “unselfish loyal and benevolent concern for the good of another,” Rothschild sees more value in “love” than material gain. Rothschild has made it his goal to teach young artists how to make good paint and love their canvas. After traveling to Uganda in 2009 to volunteer his skills in fine art and facilitate a series of art workshops with the children and youth of Amagezi Germaanyi, a center for art empowerment in Kampala, Rotshcild was inspired to become active in his local community and now volunteers as an art teacher working with atrisk youth in the Milwaukee area.


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Quotes from StudentS by MIAD Students

I myself am very grateful for the service of others. Services cover a wide range of actions and exchanges, and it is important to make connections between society while providing any kind of help. I can’t ask anything from anyone else. I need to ask myself what I can do for the community, and push myself to make a difference. In order to make a change. I need to be the one the initiates it, and be the one motivated to make a difference. If I had to ask something from the world and communities around me, it would just be their existence and their presence while we communicate.


We are in the midst of forever thinking. A simplicity of time based on value for beauty around us and in us. Architecture Significance has come to impress the marks that are finally adjusting. Like peanut butter jelly and reason or dispute. The way we shine conmemorates the adequate understanding of the now. The past is still here however, and is embraced according to the different types of respect among us. In this respect we rely on richness from visual references as a part to identify our cultures and our environments.


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43% singing

How to Sound

sing

Student’s Choice of Sound Making at the Milwaukee Institute of Art & Design


57% whistling by singing

Sounds alert us and making sounds give us pleasure. Through it music can be made and other distinctive things can be heard. Therefore, this connector between all humans is well appreciated and taken into consideration through the lives of many and especially important in Movies.


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e pice The joy of eating is sharing the food that is available. The food that is available can be enjoyed by understanding the right ingredients in order to live a life of wholesome integrity The Spice House in the Old World History Thirt Street can help you realize the value of taste and style in order to benefit the most from something that we all as humans share. Food for thought. -Said Guerra


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Every Separation is a Link by Isabel Kent with Megan Watling as Illustrator

Step back and look at the world. It’s such a strange thing, and incredible and beautiful, but rolling across that great sphere is also turmoil. Much of existence, perceived through the eyes of a human, is sorrow and violence, manifesting itself in multitudes of particular guises - war, poverty, famine, prejudice, crime, etc. But we’re stuck here. So, for the sake of being here, of living, how do we make it better? How do we go about diminishing these problems? Where can we possibly start?


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Underlying most of them, when the complications and differences are for the moment, stripped away, is something simple. For whatever reason, amidst the accumulated confusion of contemporary human life, we fall into the denial or hatred of another human being. We know that humans are at once imperfect and magnificent. What is difficult is accepting the imperfect as inevitable, and forgiving it in ourselves so that we can forgive it in others. There is so much sameness, if we decide to become aware of it. Our genetic code, which means our basic anatomical structure, which means our physiological functions, are fundamentally identical. We have the capacity to empathize with one another, and we need to use this. What I am saying is obviously nothing new. But the fact that it has survived thus far in the course of human civilization only serves to testify to its solidarity. It is simple, but I think it has profound implications. In all the world’s major religions, the basic tenet, the “Golden Rule,” is the same. We should “Do unto others what we would have done unto us.” Although this is drawn from religion and may seem idealistic, it’s tenets are at base, human, and extend to the nature of our experience in everyday life. For example, how can we expect others to have respect for our own views if we do not respect theirs? And how can we expect to get anything out of a conversation if we don’t try to understand what the other person is trying to get across? A sense of empathy, as current research in neuroscience and psychology is finding, really does permeate our lives. Without having to will a conscious decision, we register the body language and facial expressions of those around us. We are able to base this in our own experience and

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realize the analogous intentions behind the behavior of others. So what happens when empathy ceases to function? On an individual scale, this can be a major component of closedmindedness, arguments, and physical fights. Cases in point are bullying, whether at school or over the internet, domestic violence, and gang violence. Among larger groups this is exhibited in similar ways, largely as prejudice against, and mistreatment and/or suppression of, another people. Extreme cases are genocide and war. Can’t these be seen as large-scale manifestations of the inability to take another’s perspective? I don’t mean to oversimplify these grand issues. There are certainly various other complications that come into play. Many of these complications, however, could be explained as themselves arising partially as a consequence of lack of understanding between people. Circumstances like these coalesce and build upon each other, eventually forming one mass conflict, which then leads to further atrocities. A clash occurs when we see an individual or group as other than ourselves, that we disagree with so fervently that it appears foreign enough to be designated as wrong or even evil. To protect ourselves we often feel the need to do something to suppress that other. If these notions push further into action, physical harm is done. The thoughts themselves however, are already silently germinating this view of the world. In turn, this obviously impacts the deeds one carries out. If one continues this way unawares, the effects will only multiply. But the human brain is malleable (Boroditsky 6). Biases can be turned around if they are brought to one’s attention. The problem is that maybe reminders are not


prevalent in our everyday lives. We may see images of war on the news, but this is perhaps not specific enough. We still watch through our own tinted lenses, maybe as a proponent of one or the other of the conflicting sides. What should be emphasized is the nature of the core disagreement, how and why it exists, perhaps that it should not exist, and what the resolution may be.

The thought of taking on the vantage of the poor does not cross their mind, at least not with any great urgency. And frankly, it would just be too much effort. But if something were to make them, imagine the impact it could have. If the wealthy were made to live like the poor, or to just experience a small part of such a life, perhaps they would realize how awful it can be. To know that they personally would not want to be in a position of poverty may be enough for them to conclude that since there are other humans that are in that place, they need to be helped. The prior example becomes an issue of human rights. Throughout the world, the poor lack many basic entitlements of life because they are bound by their circumstances. In extreme conditions, there is lack of adequate shelter and nourishment to even stay alive. When the pressure of mortality is so present, anything beyond the necessities of life must seem frivolous. Furthermore, although it varies depending on the specific location, opportunities in jobs, education, and all areas of life, are in scarce supply. Law and justice may be seen as concepts created for the purpose of treating all equally in discernment of right or wrong action, in protecting individuals from mistreatment, and overall, to keep human society as a whole in order and running smoothly. But they are also founded on an emotional groundwork. Humans are innately social, require contact with others for health and well-being, and have built society based on the ability to operate in a network. For this to

“ It can

potentially make one more appreciative of what one already possesses, and amplify empathy.

“

We also need to be made more aware of our own slant and the perspective we are missing in our repertoire. Once we can see all involved outlooks more holistically, we notice their inherent sameness, and the ensuing ridiculousness of antagonism. To illustrate a concrete example of a social issue involving the inability to take on another perspective, consider the rift between the wealthiest and poorest classes in the United States. My estimation is that much of the very wealthy are so adapted to their way of living that they are not aware of the vast struggles of the impoverished. They must know that the poor do in fact exist, but they cannot put themselves in that situation, because they have never been there and do not relate to it experientially, and they also probably feel no reason to make attempts to do so. They are so comfortable where they are. Whatever charities may be goading them to donate are just an annoyance.


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function properly, cooperation between people is essential. And in order for this to occur, we need to at least have respect for the views of others. This is not to say that it will be perfect. Dilemmas will inevitably arise. The paradox is that once we acknowledge human imperfection, the dilemmas are much less common. Throughout this entire process, empathy aids us. In 2009, President Obama propounded the qualifications he deemed necessary for successors to the Supreme Court. He included everything one might expect: extensive legal experience, a spotless ethical record, and dedication to the rule of law (Garrett 1). However, Obama also added empathy. He stated, I will seek someone who understands that justice isn’t about some abstract legal theory or footnote in a casebook. It is also about how our laws affect the daily realities of people’s lives, whether they can make a living and care for their families, whether they feel safe in their homes and welcome in their own nation. I view that quality of empathy, of understanding and identifying with people’s hopes and struggles, as an essential ingredient for arriving at just decisions and outcomes. (Garrett 1). When a predicament comes to the fore, empathy helps us determine a just solution. Yes, we do have to rely on written

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law as a solid standard, but we also must be considerate of the circumstances under which the individuals involved acted. Maybe someone acted wrongly, did something that is illegal, but maybe it was because they were facing such plight, that for them at that time, it was the best decision. We need to be understanding of this. A person who may endanger others cannot be dismissed, but they also cannot be punished for being human. In all cases, beyond categorization of wronged and wrong-doer, and because all of us are really both, we need to be able to see an individual’s suffering and act out of compassion in an effort to correct it. This in itself serves to connect. In it is a realization that we are all human and that we all share the same life. The nature of how we view and interact with others has directed culture, politics, economics, and human society as a whole, which also extends to our impact on the environment. All of these things provide us with a striking image of how we participate in and create our world. This web of interrelationships has biological foundations, into which current studies surrounding the nature of the human nervous system have brought new insights. A region toward the front of the brain called the medial prefrontal cortex, or MPFC, activates when we are pondering our own feelings, but also when we are thinking about or observing those same feelings in another (Boroditsky 5). More specifically, a class of cells called mirror neurons, which are located in various areas of the brain, have been found to direct our ability to read not only another person’s actions, but also the intentions and emotions behind them. In an interview with the New York Times, Dr. Giacomo Rizzolatti, a neuroscientist at the University of Parma credited with some of the first research of these structures in the 1990’s, was quoted in saying, “We are exquisitely social creatures. Our survival depends on understanding the actions, intentions, and emotions of others. Mirror neurons allow us to grasp the minds of others not through conceptual reasoning but through direct simulation” (Blakeslee 1). Here is very real evidence of just how connected we are. In a sense we can simultaneously experience the thoughts and actions of another. This also


“ The paradox is that once we acknowledge human imperfection, the dilemmas are much less common.

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poses the intimate connectivity of thought, action, and language. These cells fire when one performs an action, sees another carrying out that action, hears it happening, says the word for that action, or hears that word (Blakeslee 1). Mirror neurons can be seen as the meeting place of these different avenues, which all allow for understanding between people, and are essentially linked as a means of communication whose framework is emotional. It is also important to note that social emotions like shame, pride, embarrassment, and so on, are centered in a uniquely human mirror neuron system in a brain region called the insula. In a study conducted by Dr. Christian Keysers at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands, it was found that when people watched a hand go to caress someone and then saw another hand push it away, this region registered the pain of rejection. Moreover, he noted that humiliation appeared to be “mapped in the brain by the same mechanisms that encode real physical pain” (Blakeslee 3). This just goes to show us that when someone is suffering from emotional trauma, they are also really ailing from physical distress. When mirror neurons malfunction, an emotional level of communication ceases to occur. It is now thought that this is a major cause of Autism and Aspberger’s disease. Autistic individuals are often cited as sort of living in their own world, or being highly antisocial. It could be that the neural basis of social abilities is lacking, and they therefore are significantly unable to relate to other people.


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e The This community on wheels can help you relate to someone by mentality, physics or stop. Whether by waiting for the bus, walking towards the bus or meeting someone getting off the bus. It is a charm that all people share. Great stories to be had, or thoughts based on observation as well as someone greeting you or waiting for you to get on the bus. -Said Guerra


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We’re mellowing down. Transf that begin to bind. So we are and are excited to remember nature and the environmental feelings and perceptions as if conmemorating more than one imagine how a pure vision can lifestyle. Because we benefit f realization and bonding of one other’s energy to remain positi for everything that we want to >>>>>> intention enlights the


ferring signals of strength fully aware of these facts the necessary adjustments of pleasures that bring us true we were together all at once e purpose. And we begin to n be implemented into our from this. Through the diverse e another we feed off each ive and have a full charge o accomplish as long as the Self and those around us.


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it een

Visiting Green areas allows us to relax and reconnect with Nature. It gives us understanding of our place in this world and what we can all do to carefuly preserve the resources that have been provided for our existence. Green offers a pleasurable aesthetic all around as we submerge with the grace of a natural environment and its positive effect of prosperity and health in all of us. -Said Guerra


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Warm Fuzzy Feelings

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by Stephanie Rasmussen “For to be idle is to become a stranger unto the seasons…. I say to you that when you work you fulfill a part of earth’s furthest dream, assigned to you when the dream was born, and in keeping yourself with labour you are in truth loving life, and to love life’s labour is to be intimate with life’s innermost secret” - Kahlil Gibran There’s something about a book that keeps falling into my lap more than once at moments in my life where I felt hopeless. The Prophet by Kahlil Gibran was first given to me by my mentor and then a few years later it was required for the emotional growth program at my boarding school. In both experiences my wellbeing benefited from receiving the services of others and providing service to others. Gibran says “work is love made visible” and I say service is love made visible (28). Through service we are living out our values, making a difference in the community, and restoring humanity. Service is an action of an individual or group benefiting another individual, group, community, population and/or environment. It is a positive action towards the greater good and wellbeing of recipient(s). Service brings forth the idea of social justice and equality among people. Service can bring strangers within the same community together. Service is a reflection of values that can provide assets to the community. People from different backgrounds are brought together, laying their differences aside, and working towards a greater good for all. Service is a way to be active within the community and restore humanity. Differences in defining service are reflected in my interviews. Poplawski’s definition of service was limited to personal gain. Rasmussen’s definition was limited to an exchange of services. I believe that services are generally one sided, and benefits should be concentrated on the individual in need. Post reflection of previous


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It is perfectly acceptable for the provider to benefit from service as much as the recipient, especially if benefits include “warm fuzzy feelings.�


Volunteering service is a way to meet the well being of an individual in need of assistance, while receiving emotional fulfillment in return.” statement, it is perfectly acceptable for the provider to benefit from service as much as the recipient, especially if benefits include “warm fuzzy feelings.” More specifically, the focus should be on the recipient, the one in need. In MBM, Kidder states “the goal was to improve the lives of others, not oneself” (244). Newer generations are more individually focused and less about community. My brother views service as an outlet for organizations to gain assets without monetary means. I interviewed my brother, DJ Rasmussen, and my boyfriend, JB Poplawski, on their interpretation and experiences of/in service. My brother DJ Rasmussen defines service as “work done by a person or group that benefits another person or group, usually in exchange for monetary gain or for another service. Services can also be provided voluntarily.” My boyfriend JB Poplawski believes that by servicing others you are using your gifts, talents, and strengths to benefit other people. Poplawski says that “service helps other people in need to help other people accomplish goals.” Rasmussen believes that service is important because it provides an outlet for organizations and individuals to obtain a certain amount of utility without the burden of an associated financial cost which normally occurs with a service exchange. Volunteering service is a way to meet the well being of an individual in need of assistance, while receiving emotional fulfillment in return. Service is important to Poplawski, “I benefit from serving other people because it gives me good self esteem and makes me feel good. It’s not that I do

benefit from service now but someday down the line I may benefit from someone’s service.” My brother has served other recently by helping friends and relatives move, helping parents with chores and yard work, and volunteering at conferences related to his work in atmospheric science. Poplawski served the community of Hazelhurst as a volunteer fire fighter. He assisted in putting out a house fire from 1am to 4am and searching for the victim. “I’ve helped put fires out but I’ve never been in an accident or had my house burn down but if some day I have that happen I will benefit from service that way.” Poplawski recently served on jury duty and donated blood. Participated in a fundraiser (polar bear jumps) for angel on my shoulder that helps family members who are coping with other family members suffering from cancer. Food drives while on student council. Mentoring junior level coworkers on careers and donating money to Salvation Army & ASPCA. Both interviewees had difficulty in listing specific examples in which they benefited from others services. Rasmussen benefited from service from family and friends when he moved between different apartments. Poplawski benefits from those who serve in the military, “They give their lives to serve the country.” He received a scholarship for Technical College that was through the community. What correlation do they see between their services (or services they have benefited from) and health and well being? Rasmussen sees a “good connection between my altruistic experiences and my emotional well being. If it was not for this, I believe there


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I learned how to have healthy relationships and rebuild trust with my parents and brothers.” would be fewer people taking part in service. It seems like a ‘win-win’ situation that I feel somewhere in the depths of economics, can be proven to be true.” Poplawski uses specific examples, by donating blood and directly helping someone you don’t even know and it’s something people don’t do. As a volunteer fire fighter, Poplawski helps the community by serving people in accidents. The military dedicate their lives in protection our nation creating accessibility to an abundance of resources that determine our level of well being. Poplawski’s donations to Salvation Army provides food and clothing to people in need. Service experiences I have participated in include working at/with YMCA, Milwaukee Girl Scout Council, Milwaukee River Work Group, and donating goods to Salvation Army. For several Christmas holidays, I collected toys and donated them to Salvation Army. The summer following high school graduation I volunteered to help at an after school teen girl youth group at the local YMCA. At my high schools campus, I proposed, created, and taught and after school arts program for students and supported the infusion of the arts into school curriculum. During my senior year in high school, I went with a group of students to help disperse food at a local pantry and prepare Christmas dinner. Two summers ago I assisted with the removal of invasive plant species along the Milwaukee River at Riverside Park. Although I received compensation for my work at Camp Silverbrook, I consider my work

as service. A summer camp located in West Bend for Milwaukee County Girl Scouts is where I spent all my days and energy teaching urban youth about nature and art. One of the greatest moments was taking inner city girls (through outreach program) on a nature hike and showing them things that they have never seen before. As the Art and Nature Specialist, I organizing and administering teamwork building activities for girl scouts and boy/cub scouts. I’ve donated money and material goods to Salvation Army and donated food to The Hunger Task Force. I will continue to provide service through my placement at Artists Working in Education (A.W.E.). It’s difficult to recall all the occasions or situations in which I may have benefited from others’ services, even more so if it came from an indirect source. For example, the military continuously protects and serves our nation so I and other citizens may live our lives with a limited amount of fear and an abundance of resources. In addition, I began to question situations that I considered to not meet qualifications of service.Thus my definition of what service is expanded. Several years ago, my dad was grilling on the deck when grill suddenly burst into flames and traveled up the side of the house. The local Voluntary Fire Department put out the fire that saved the home I grew up in. Artist Sasha Kinens mentored me for several years, teaching me discipline in art technique, art history, and life


choices. Kinens taught me the importance of having a mentor, teaching, and giving back to others. She also never gave up on me despite my downward spiral as a teenager and during the times when I wasn’t comfortable going to my parents, I knew that she would be there to talk to. Another artist, Luella Doss, was an acquaintance of my mother and worked as a set designer for a television studio. She brought me to the studio a couple times, showing me her work and the editing room, and let me help prepare for a fashion show. Working with other artists growing up helped me develop the passion for art that I have today so that I may give back to others.I briefly mentioned my rebellious teen years. When I was seventeen, I was sent to a boarding school in the mountains of California. CEDU (see what you do and do something about it) was what the counselors called an emotional growth boarding school for youth that make bad choices. The counselors dedicated their time and life in helping us down the right path. Cindy Sherman wasn’t a normal counselor but a specialist in substance abuse, sexual abuse, physical health, mental health, and codependency who dedicated her life to the kids at CEDU. The people that worked there opened my eyes and gave me faith to make the right choices. I learned how to have healthy relationships and rebuild trust with my parents and brothers. I joined AA and have been drug free ever since, going on 11 years. The people at the school literally saved my life. A little less than

year ago, I checked into Rogers Memorial Hospital in Oconomowoc. It’s still difficult to talk about what was all going on within me that led me to being committed. At the time I was in an abusive relationship, misdiagnosed by my doctor and put on the wrong medication, depressed from isolation, and feeling suicidal.I wasn’t even taking my medication at that point because I slept so much I didn’t know when the day ended and another day began. I was suffering from depression and bipolar disorder. The doctors, volunteers, and workers at the hospital dedicated themselves to the wellbeing of the patients. The service they provided gave me hope and helped bring me back to a state where I wanted to live my life. They adjusted my medication and clarified that I had bipolar disorder.Through inpatient therapy I was able to leave the hospital the day before my spring semester at MIAD began. I almost didn’t go back but I did. There is definitely a connection to service and wellness. I’ve struggled more than once in life with my psychological disorders and without the help I received from others’ services I wouldn’t be here today. Servicing others in the community reminds me of my own self worth and I hope that I can bring some sort of hope to others as I have received. My brother said it best, “volunteering service is a way to meet the well being of an individual in need of assistance, while receiving emotional fulfillment in return.”


Liste to 48

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ten to

So you can enjoy who you are and learn how to connect with others by contributing with the purpose that you have been given based on the characteristics that we possess.


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Making Real Connections

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GO


Enjoy the Ride

Copyrighted by all of the people that helped with this project. Thank you.

MIAD Bridgery  

CD IV Project 1

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