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SAH LXIV

Society of Architectural Historians

New Orleans, Lousiana 64th

Annual Meeting

April 13 – 17

2011


SAH is the leading international not-for-profit membership organization that promotes the study, interpretation and preservation of the built environment worldwide. Benefits of membership in SAH include the following: Subscription to quarterly JSAH and JSAH Online Access to complete JSAH Archives 1941 to the present Subscription to quarterly SAH News and SAH News Online Access to SAH Listserv and Career Center Share and download images through SAHARA Opportunities for research and other SAH Fellowships Priority registration for SAH Study Days and Seminars Programs help fulfill AIA/CES Discounted registration for SAH Annual Meeting Complimentary tour of SAH Headquarters Charnley-Persky House Bookshop discounts at Charnley-Persky House Discounts on newly released books in the Buildings of the United States series Join the premier Architectural History organization today Visit www.sah.org. Since 1940 SAH has been serving the architectural community academics, architects and all interested individuals


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Welcome from the General Chair

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Welcome to New Orleans

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Historic Preservation Seminar

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Annual Meeting Program Schedule

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Tours



Contents

appendix

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Index of Speakers and Session Chairs

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Hotel and Transportation Information

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New Orleans Sites of Interest

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Society of Architectural Historians

please bring this program with you to new orleans

tweeting from the annual meeting? add this hashtag to your tweets to join the conversation: #sah2011

64th Annual Meeting New Orleans, Lousiana April 13 – 17 2011


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Letter from the General Chair

Returning to New Orleans for the first time since 1974, the Society of Architectural Historians will encounter a city much transformed by Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. For many of us, it will be our first opportunity to see for ourselves the extent of the damage, the pace of the recovery, and the remarkable efforts of the resilient people of New Orleans to rebuild the physical and social fabric of their vibrant communities. We are privileged to visit the city at this moment, when there is so much attention being paid to the built environment and its meaning in real, human terms. This year’s Historic Preservation Seminar—“PostDisaster Preservation: Best- and Worst-Case Scenarios,” facilitated by Eugene D. Cizek, Ph.D., F.A.I.A., Director of Preservation Studies, Tulane University—promises to be informative, thought-provoking, and undoubtedly moving as well. If the city has changed since the SAH last visited, so has our Society. While the Society sponsored a scant nine sessions at the Annual Meeting in 1974, this year there are an unprecedented thirty sessions on the program, including one devoted to five-minute talks by graduate students in the “lightning round” format that proved so successful last year in Chicago. Equally noteworthy is the range of topics and methodologies represented in the program. In addition to the many rich and wonderful sessions focused on the architecture of a particular time and place, there are a number of thematic sessions that are global in their reach and in some cases span the centuries as well. No matter what your subspecialty, you will find plenty to engage your intellectual curiosity during the Annual Meeting. Please be sure to share this program with colleagues and friends who may not be aware of the richness of the Society’s offerings. Given the city’s ongoing recovery efforts, New Orleans is also an ideal venue for considering some of the larger implications of architectural history as a field. Why is architectural history important and to whom? Is the field having the impact we would like to see? If not, what do we want to do about it? To fuel our collective thinking about these issues, we head to Audubon Aquarium of the Americas on Thursday evening for the third

New Orleans cityscape at night


One note about a change in SAH routine: in order to give participants more time to attend midday roundtables and walking tours, information about SAH activities (in the past covered in noontime sessions) will be available throughout the meeting in the book exhibition area. Please stop by at your convenience to learn more about upcoming study tours, test-drive SAHARA, or talk informally with the editor of the Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians. Finally, I extend my heartfelt thanks to the many people who have worked so hard to make this meeting a success, especially the local committee, which has been ably chaired by Robert González. Thanks also to Pauline Saliga, the Society’s resourceful and creative executive director, and to the SAH staff members who demonstrate their unwavering commitment to the Society on a daily basis: Kathy Sturm, Bob Drum, Anne Bird, Beth Eifrig, and Kara Elliott-Ortega. We are all fortunate to have such an active and engaged board of directors, with Dianne Harris at its helm. I am grateful to all the session chairs and speakers listed in this program for their expansive views of the field, scholarly acumen, and willingness to donate their time to crafting papers and sessions that promise to prompt a vibrant scholarly conversation about the history of the built environment. Thanks especially to all of you who are joining us in New Orleans. I look forward to seeing you there. Abigail A. Van Slyck General Chair, 64th Annual Meeting First Vice President Society of Architectural Historians

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In addition to this important event, two other offerings in particular speak to the Society’s continuing commitment to bringing a high standard of architectural history to a broad audience. One will take place on Saturday afternoon, when one of the tour options involves a community project at the Priestley Charter School of Architecture and Construction. There we will meet with the faculty and students, some of whom will conduct a tour of the school and the surrounding neighborhood. Instead of paying a tour fee, SAH participants will each donate a book to the school’s first library. Later, that evening, SAH invites you to a progressive-style fund-raiser at private homes and gardens in the Garden District. Proceeds from this event will support the Society’s ongoing educational initiatives. Please lend your support to this effort while enjoying true New Orleans hospitality.



in a series of four annual plenary talks. This year, our speaker will be Craig Wilkins, an architect and theorist whose work (notably his 2007 book, The Aesthetics of Equity: Notes on Race, Space, Architecture, and Music) should prompt us to think about the relationship between architectural history and the architectural profession in new ways. As has been our practice in recent years, we also will take time on Thursday evening to congratulate fellowship recipients, to acknowledge especially active longtime members by making them Fellows of the Society, and, most important, to honor winners of the Society’s coveted book awards for scholarship.


Photo: Carl Purcell

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French Quarter balcony

Welcome to New Orleans

Since the early nineteenth century, the city of New Orleans has maintained global recognition, first as one of the nation’s principal port cities, and later as it claimed a colorful spotlight in the world of tourism and leisure. Touted as a gateway to the Americas, even when its port was no longer the leading import-export vehicle, the city gained notoriety for its easy access to the good life—or, some might say, the Seven Deadly Sins—right in the heart of the nation’s Deep South. This infamous destination brings visitors face to face with a distinct French Creole culture, traces of Caribbean life, and an unforgettable array of Mardi Gras festivities. Today, New Orleans is evolving into a symbol of a city able to rebuild itself and overcome human error and natural disaster. Many attribute this to its rich history and an infrastructure deeply rooted in its unique culture and fine-grained architecture. Even as New Orleans prepared for the five-year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, and Louisiana’s most vulnerable outposts face permanent destruction of an ecological scale, this heroic ability to resurrect gracefully was not forgotten. In only a few years, the city that once seemed frozen in historical time—with the Vieux Carré (French Quarter) and precious vernacular architecture providing storybook imagery of the city—has emerged as a living laboratory. The city has fully rebounded. And yes, you can eat the seafood! This new city of architectural experimentation and innovation is at once rethinking its vernacular underpinnings and grappling to save its surviving modern structures. Come see this transformation in action and reflect on it while experiencing the confluences of the old and new. This year’s Annual Meeting presents an opportunity to view the various architectural settings that have established the city’s cultural milieu, from the Vieux Carré to the Garden District’s upscale lifestyle, to neighborhoods beyond, and to the artful kitsch of the parade traditions. Annual Meeting participants will be able to sit in on ongoing conversations as New Orleanians assess their changing landscape. Our meeting will be of interest to architects, art historians, landscape architects, urban designers, and professionals in the historic preservation fields. This year’s Historic Preservation Seminar, titled “Post-Disaster Preservation: The Best- and Worst-Case Scenarios,” will bring together


A new community outreach activity offered this year will bring participants to another example of domestic architecture in the historic neighborhood of Gentilly, which is well off the typical tourist path. In an unprecedented partnership, SAH will play a significant role in assisting Priestley Charter School of Architecture and Construction, established post-Katrina, to move into its new home in this neighborhood. In addition to SAH’s agreement to offer the school’s faculty access to SAHARA, Annual Meeting attendees will have the opportunity to donate to a book drive to help build up the high school’s new library. Annual Meeting participants who register for this program and bring at least one book in hand, or who have mailed books to Priestley ahead of time, will be invited to a special lunch and a neighborhood walking tour prepared by the students in anticipation of SAH’s visit. Space is limited for this program; the number of books is not. In addition to tours of other historical sites of note—including Charles Moore’s postmodern icon the Piazza d’Italia, the boutique hotels and restaurants in the French Quarter, and an H. H. Richardson treasure— participants will also experience the city’s abundant landscapes. We will explore the Pitot House (a Creole colonial plantation home on Bayou St. John), the Longue Vue House and Gardens, and the botanical and sculpture gardens of City Park. Plantation house tours will offer firsthand accounts by specialists in the preservation efforts that have saved these structures. A city of spectacle depends on the element of surprise, so not all planned activities can be disclosed with this short appetizer. We promise an unforgettable presentation with all the local trappings, delicious food, and romping music. To you and yours, a warm welcome to the city of New Orleans!

Robert Alexander González, Ph.D., R.A. 2010–2011 Cejas Scholar Florida International University, School of Architecture Local Chair, SAH 64th Annual Meeting, New Orleans

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While urban rebuilding has permeated nearly every inch of New Orleans, we will also offer special tours of the city’s most concentrated efforts in the Lower Ninth Ward. Founded by actor Brad Pitt, the Make it Right Foundation has completed nearly fifty homes that stand as case studies in sustainable and affordable housing. These test cases offer proof of the city’s ongoing battle with humidity, mold, and, most important, water. The innovative architecture underway in these once devastated neighborhoods is a testament to the extent to which the city is rooted in domestic architecture and neighborhood vitality—each new structure is a meditation on the shotgun, the camelback, the double-wide, and other local housing types. The opportunity to see these built experiments, and visit their original counterparts amid the Garden District and St. Charles Avenue mansions, will shed new light on the city’s historic romance with the home and neighborhood.



specialists from the city’s government offices, FEMA, and the National Trust for Historic Preservation, to assess the effect Hurricane Katrina has had on preservation policies and practices. These conversations will segue into tours presenting modernism’s struggle to survive in New Orleans, including a look at midcentury buildings that face demolition. We will reflect on the hard work that is being undertaken by the regional chapters of DOCOMOMO US.


HISTORIC PRESERVATION SEMINAR

This seminar brings together specialists from the New Orleans Historic District Landmarks Commission, the Southeastern Architectural Archives at Tulane University, and the National Trust for Historic Preservation, to assess the effect Hurricane Katrina has had on preservation policies and best practices. Panel presentations will examine the ways in which post-Katrina rebuilding efforts were at times sensitive to preservation concerns, but in many cases, did not consider the preservation goals of the city. Panelists include: Walter Gallas, Director, Northeast Field Office, National Trust for Historic Preservation, Philadelphia Walter Gallas is the former director of the New Orleans Field Office of the National Trust for Historic Preservation (NTHP). Established after Hurricane Katrina, the New Orleans office was an unprecedented response by the National Trust to the devastation in the Gulf Coast. Previously the deputy director of the New Orleans Historic District Landmarks Commission and longtime resident of New Orleans, Gallas has been with the National Trust for six years. He holds a master’s degree in Urban and Regional Planning from the University of New Orleans. The Northeast Field Office of the NTHP in Philadelphia serves Pennsylvania, Delaware, and New Jersey. Keli Rylance, Ph.D., Head, Southeastern Architectural Archive and the School of Architecture Library, Tulane University As Head of the Southeastern Architectural Archive, Keli Rylance served as a key point person who was consulted by developers, homeowners, lawyers, and architects during the post-Katrina rebuilding effort. After moving to New Orleans in 2008, she joined DOCOMOMO US’s local

Photo: Ann Purcell

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Post-Disaster Preservation: The Best- and Worst-Case Scenarios Eugene Cizek, Ph.D., F.A.I.A., Director of Preservation Studies, Tulane University, Facilitator

City Park


chapter, and has been an active participant in National Historic Preservation Act Section 106 proceedings. She is currently a member of the DOCOMOMO US Board of Directors. She holds a Ph.D. in Art History from The Pennsylvania State University and an M.A. in Library and Information Studies from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

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Historic Preservation Seminar Wednesday, April 13 9:00 a.m.–1:30 p.m.

ROOM: COST:

Fulton— New Orleans Marriott at the Convention Center $60 SAH Member $75 Non-Member $50 Student AIA/CES: 4.5 LU Pre-registration is required. This program is open to the public. Annual Meeting registration is not required for participation in this program.

9:00 a.m. Check-in and coffee 9:20–11:45 a.m. Introduction and panel presentations 11:45 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Discussion, moderated by Eugene Cizek, Ph.D., F.A.I.A., Director of Preservation Studies, Tulane University 12:30–1:30 p.m. Lunch and discussion 1:30 p.m. Conclusion

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Following a year working at a preservation architecture firm in New York, Eleanor Burke returned to her home, New Orleans, taking a position as assistant to the Archivist of the New Orleans Notarial Archives Research Center. In that position, she became intimately familiar with the complex process for researching properties in New Orleans. In 2001, she joined the staff of the New Orleans Historic District Landmarks Commission as a plan reviewer for the uptown historic districts. She soon became the staff architectural historian. In 2008, she was appointed Deputy Director. Eleanor Burke is also a founding member of DOCOMOMO US/NOLA, a regional chapter of the international organization dedicated to the documentation and conservation of the modern movement. Recently, her work has focused on the monumental task of rewriting the agency’s design guidelines and identification and designation of significant modern structures. She obtained a master’s degree in Historic Preservation from Columbia University School of Architecture, Preservation and Planning.



Eleanor Shelby Burke, Deputy Director, New Orleans and Central Business District Historic District Landmarks Commission


New in the Society of Architectural Historians’ series



BUIL DINGS OF THE UNITED STATES

Buildings of Pennsylvania

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Philadelphia and Eastern Pennsylvania George E. Thomas with Patricia Likos Ricci, Richard J. Webster, Lawrence M. Newman, Robert Janosov, and Bruce Thomas This latest volume in the Society of Architectural Historians’ Buildings of the United States series follows the Pennsylvania migration narrative in broad swathes: Philadelphia and its surrounding counties of the original Quaker settlement zone, the Piedmont and the German agricultural zone, the Scots-Irish frontier beyond the Blue Mountain, the coal country with its trade connections to New York City and its East European coal miners, and the Northern Tier claimed and settled by New Englanders. 369 b&w illustrations, 55 maps $75.00 cloth

Forthcoming in Spring 2011

Buildings of Hawaii Don J. Hibbard Buildings of Hawaii presents the architecture of the six major islands in the Hawaii chain. The first in-depth examination of the architecture of the islands, the book covers buildings from the early nineteenth century through the first decade of the new millennium. Not only are masterworks of such mainland architects as Bertram Goodhue, Julia Morgan, Ralph Adams Cram, SOM, Edward Killingsworth, and I. M. Pei considered, but vernacular single-wall building traditions of the plantation period abound. Approx. 250 b&w illustrations, 24 maps $65.00 cloth

UNIV ERSITY O F VIRGINIA PRESS 800-831-3406 www.upress.virginia.edu


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Annual Meeting program schedule

Unless otherwise noted, all paper sessions and events will take place at the New Orleans Marriott at the Convention Center. Please check the venue and room number/name to ensure you are at the correct location on the correct date and time. All events that qualify for AIA/CES Learning Units (LU) have been assigned a session number. Allowable learning units are indicated for attendance at various events, i.e., the Historic Preservation Seminar, Introductory Address, Plenary Talk, and tours; each paper session (not individual paper) attended in its entirety qualifies for 2 AIA/CES Learning Units (LU). Please refer to the AIA/CES statement on page 56 for information on how to report your attendance and receive learning units. Be sure to include your AIA Membership Number on the Registration Form. WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13

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Annual Meeting Registration/Information Desk 8:00 a.m.–7:00 p.m. Blaine Kern Ballroom Foyer Registration is required for access to paper sessions, events, exhibits, midday meetings, and tours. Registration badges are required for admission to all meeting activities. If attending the Historic Preservation Seminar ONLY, it is not necessary to register for the Annual Meeting. Historic Preservation Seminar 9:00 a.m.–1:30 p.m. Fulton Pre-registration is required. Annual Meeting registration is not required for participation in this program. Open to the public. Seating is limited. Please see page 6 for details.

Wednesday Tours Please see SAH 2011 Tours, beginning on page 36, for details.

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Exhibits Open 3:00–7:00 p.m. Ballroom A&B

Wednesday Evening

Opening Reception 6:30–7:30 p.m. ROOM: Ballroom A&B and Foyer The 64th Annual Meeting of the Society of Architectural Historians officially opens with this evening’s welcome


COST:

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IA Introductory Address 8:15–8:45 p.m. ROOM: Ballroom C–F This lecture is open to all members of SAH. COST: Included in registration fee AIA/CES: 1LU

New Orleans: Water Works Karen Kingsley, Professor Emerita, Tulane University

Cradled in a curve of the Mississippi River, bound to the north by Lake Pontchartrain, and close by the Gulf of Mexico, New Orleans is shaped by water. Water was the reason New Orleans was founded and flourished, and it continues to define the city’s place and its architecture.

Photo: Carl Purcell

Karen Kingsley has taught architectural history at Tulane University, is the author of Buildings of Louisiana, and currently is Editor-in-Chief of the Buildings of the United States (BUS) series.

St. Charles Avenue streetcar

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Annual Business Meeting and Election of Officers 7:45–8:15 p.m. Ballroom C–F Following the Opening Reception, the Annual Business Meeting will include the election of Officers and new members of the Board, as well as reports from the President and Treasurer, and a review of latest innovations available to SAH members.

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gathering. This is the first opportunity to network with old friends and meet new SAH members over light refreshments. Registration required. Included in registration fee. Cash bar.


THURSDAY, APRIL 14

Speaker Ready Room 7:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m. Fleur de Lis (available on a first-come, first-served basis)

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Thursday Speakers’ Breakfast 7:30–8:30 a.m. Atrium Session chairs and speakers presenting on Thursday are invited to meet for a complimentary Continental breakfast and conversation regarding the day’s paper sessions. Included in registration fee New Attendee Orientation 8:00–8:45 a.m. Tchoupitoulas Join us for an overview and orientation to the SAH Annual Meeting. Meet with seasoned attendees to make your experience fulfilling and productive. Registration required. Included in registration fee

Annual Meeting Registration/Information Desk 8:00 am–5:00 p.m. Blaine Kern Ballroom Foyer

Exhibits Open 8:00–9:00 a.m. 11:30 a.m. –2:00 p.m. 4:00–5:00 p.m. Blaine Kern Ballroom A&B The Exhibit Area will be open throughout the day. Be sure to visit! You will have the opportunity to meet with the exhibitors in general or one on one. Some will have books to sell, some will be able to answer your questions regarding what is being published, and some will have editors to confer with on your works in progress. Check the schedule posted at the Exhibit Area. Exhibitors are listed on page 55 of this brochure.

Thursday Tours Please see SAH 2011 Tours, beginning on page 36, for details.

Thursday Morning Paper Sessions 9:00–11:30 a.m.

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Architectural Practice in Nineteenth-Century New Orleans James O’Gorman, Wellesley College, and Gary Van Zante, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Co-Chairs River Bend 1

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9:00 a.m. Introduction 9:10 a.m. Reading the Sketchbook of JNB de Pouilly: Imagining Antebellum New Orleans, Kate Holliday, University of Texas, Arlington 13

9:40 a.m National and Local Vernaculars and Ethnic Identity in New Orleans, Kenneth Hafertepe, Baylor University 10:10 a.m. Sex on the Street: How Storyville Transformed Basin Street through Sex, Architecture, and Legislation, Kelly Bressler [Savannah College of Art and Design]

11:10 a.m. Discussion/Q&A 11:30 a.m Closure of Session PS2

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Building in Conflict John Archer, University of Minnesota, Chair River Bend 2

9:00 a.m. Introduction 9:10 a.m. Ugly Thoughts: Brutalism and the Artifice of Experience, Timothy Hyde, Harvard University 9:35 a.m. The Occupation of Site 30: Contesting New York’s Upper West Side, Jennifer Hock, Middlebury College 10:00 a.m. Forensic Architecture in Human Rights Advocacy, Andrew Herscher, University of Michigan 10:25 a.m. “The Grand Ensemble”: Housing Spaces of Exception, Sherry McKay, University of British Columbia 10:50 a.m. Architecture and Public Assassination in The Parallax View, Merrill Schleier, University of the Pacific 11:15 a.m. Discussion/Q&A 11:30 a.m. Closure of Session PS3 Museums Framing Monuments: Practices for Premodern Heritage Laura Hollengreen, Georgia Institute of Technology, Chair ROOM: Ballroom C 9:00 a.m. Introduction 9:10 a.m. Presentation & Conservation: Sensitive Site Museums of Ireland, Kristin M. Barry, [The Pennsylvania State University] 9:35 a.m. Oslo’s Norsk Folkemuseum: Resonant Nationalism, Vernacular Wonder, Micheline Nilsen, Indiana University, South Bend 10:00 a.m. Many Structures, One Mission: A Vieux Carré Museum Campus, John H. Lawrence, New Orleans, LA 10:25 a.m. A Colonial Empire for a Museum: The French Museum of Immigration, Aurore Chery, [Université Lyon]

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10:40 a.m. Thomas Sully, Architect for New Orleans of the New South, John C. Ferguson, Austin, TX


10:50 a.m. Between Antiquity and Modernity: The New Acropolis Museum, Nikolas Drosos [City University of New York] 11:15 a.m. Discussion/Q&A

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11:30 a.m. Closure of Session PS4

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Streetscapes of the Bourgeois City Jeffrey A. Cohen, Bryn Mawr College, Chair Ballroom D

9:10 a.m. Architecture, Urbanism, and Capitalism in Moscow at the Turn of the Twentieth Century, Elena V. Kashina, University of York, UK 9:35 a.m. Reshaping Barcelona: Politics, Urbanism, and a Bourgeois Architecture, Manel Guàrdia Bassols, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, and Josep-Maria Garcia-Fuentes, [Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya] 10:00 a.m. “So Tender a Concealment”: Manchester’s Enchantment, Mark Crinson, University of Manchester 10:25 a.m. Consuming Architecture; Luxury and Industry in EighteenthCentury Amsterdam, Freek Schmidt, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam 10:50 a.m. Medieval Urban Form as Bourgeois Theater in Cordes, Catherine Barrett, University of Oklahoma 11:15 a.m. Discussion/Q&A 11:30 a.m. Closure of Session PS5 Open Session: Explorations of the Domestic Victoria M. Young, University of St. Thomas, Chair ROOM: Ballroom E 9:00 a.m. Introduction 9:05 a.m. Redefining Eclecticism: Decorating French Interiors, 1870– 1914, Anca I. Lasc, [University of Southern California] 9:25 a.m. Discussion

Photo: Harry Costner

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9:00 a.m. Introduction

Riverfront skyline


9:35 a.m. A New Japanism: Frank Lloyd Wright’s Charnley House Interiors, Ellen E. Roberts, Art Institute of Chicago 9:55 a.m. Discussion 10:05 a.m. Tasting Fascism: Food, Politics, and Gender in the Bourgeois Kitchen, Ruth W. Lo, [Brown University] 15

10:25 a.m. Discussion 10:35 a.m. A New Campus for Coeds: Housing Women in Post-WWII America, Rachel Iannacone, University of Nicosia, Cyprus 11:05 a.m. Bi-Levels, Split-Levels, and Split-Foyers in RanchObsessed America, James A. Jacobs, Washington DC 11:25 a.m. Discussion/Q&A 11:30 a.m. Closure of Session PS6 ROOM:

“Middle Eastern” Architecture in Context Nezar AlSayyad, University of California, Berkeley, and Mrinalini Rajagopalan, Yale University, Co-Chairs Ballroom F

9:00 a.m. Introduction 9:10 a.m. Islamic Military Architecture in Syria During the Crusades, Benjamin Michaudel, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 9:30 a.m. Baghdad Modern in Context, Mona Damluji, [University of California, Berkeley] 9:50 a.m. Dam Nation: Herman Sörgel’s Atlantropa and Geopolitical Imagination, Peter Christensen, [Harvard University] 10:10 a.m. Turkish “Guest Workers” and Alvaro Siza’s Housing in IBA-Berlin, Esra Akcan, University of Illinois, Chicago 10:30 a.m. Exporting Architectural Knowledge: Israel to Iran 19501979, Neta Feniger, [Technion, Israel], and Rachel Kallus, Technion, Israel 10:50 a.m. Discussion/Q&A 11:30 a.m. Closure of Session

Thursday Midday You will be able to enjoy lunch at any of the restaurants located in the hotel or a short walking distance from the hotel. There is a Food Court called Riverwalk located across the street between the Convention Center and the Audubon Aquarium of the Americas. Please refer to the information in your 64th Annual Meeting packet.

please bring this tweeting from the program with you to annual meeting? add this new orleans hashtag to your tweets to join the conversation: #sah2011

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10:55 a.m. Discussion


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BUS (Buildings of the United States) New Research for BUS: Print and Online 12:00–1:30 p.m. Delta Queen Karen Kingsley, Editor-in-Chief, BUS Join BUS authors, editors, and the University of Virginia Press for updates and discussion of new volumes and BUS online. All are welcome. Bring your lunch, beverage, and your questions. CASVA Reception (Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts) Invitation Only/Alumni Reunion 12:00–1:30 p.m. Wolfe’s Den Therese O’Malley, Host EAHN (European Architectural History Network) 12:00–1:30 p.m. Tchoupitoulas Beyond the Guidelines: What Matters Most in the Grant Application Process 12:00–1:30 p.m. Mississippi Queen Deborah Hurtt, National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH); Alexis Sornin, Canadian Centre for Architecture (CCA); Stephanie Whitlock, Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts A discussion with funding institutions to address the place of architectural history in each organization’s funding mission and explain what makes their grant-making programs distinct. Representatives will cover key topics such as, what makes a successful grant proposal; how to gauge the fit between your work and a funder’s interest; what is the role of a grants officer and how you may communicate with the officer about your project; and how the review process works.

SAH Chapter Delegates Brown-Bag Lunch 12:00–1:30 p.m. Natchez Delegates from SAH regional chapters are invited to gather for discussion of their programs and relationship to the national organization. Light refreshments will be served.

Thursday Afternoon Paper Sessions 2:00–4:30 p.m.

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PS7

Reconsidering the Late Modernist Urban Landscape Jennifer Mack, [Harvard University], and Mariana Mogilevich, [Harvard University], Co-Chairs ROOM: River Bend 1 2:00 p.m. Introduction


2:10 p.m. The Ground as Figure: The Landscape of 1970s French Housing, Dorothée Imbert, Washington University, St. Louis

3:00 p.m. Sergels Torg: Design, Form, and Meaning of a Late Modernist Public Space, Thorbjörn Andersson, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences

3:50 p.m. “La Fonction Espace Vert”: Concepts of Modern Public Space in French Postwar Housing Estates, Tom Avermaete, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands 4:15 p.m. Discussion/Q&A 4:30 p.m. Closure of Session PS8

ROOM:

Renaissance Rome Revisited: Barons, Buildings, and the Papacy Kristin Triff, Trinity College, Chair River Bend 2

2:00 p.m. Introduction 2:10 p.m. Barons, Fortresses, and Urban Development, Carla Keyvanian, Auburn University 2:40 p.m. Place, Power, and Patrimony in the Colonna Palaces of Rome and Palestrina, Brian A. Curran, The Pennsylvania State University 3:10 p.m. Old Strategies, New Family: The Patronage of Cardinal Federico Cesi, Katherine M. Bentz, Saint Anselm College 3:40 p.m. Architecture as Diplomacy: The Facade of the Palazzo Colonna in Rome, John Pinto, Princeton University 4:10 p.m. Discussion/Q&A 4:30 p.m. Closure of Session PS9

ROOM:

Capital Flows: Architecture, Geography, and Cultural Economy Paula Lupkin, Washington University, St. Louis, Chair Ballroom C

2:00 p.m. Introduction 2:10 p.m. Global Networks and the Architecture of Port Cities, Carola Hein, Bryn Mawr College 2:30 p.m. Carbon Copies: Architects, Lawyers, Stockbrokers, and the Production of Pennsylvania Coal Landscapes, Deryk Holdsworth, The Pennsylvania State University 2:50 p.m. Mills and Mansions: Northern California’s Landscapes of Lumber, James Buckley, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

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3:25 p.m. Space-Travel: The Freeway, Marc Treib, University of California, Berkeley

17

2:35 p.m. Reconfiguring Brasilia’s Modernist Landscape: The Openness of the Esplanade of Ministries, Luciana Saboia, University of Brasilia


3:10 p.m. Sassoon and the Shanghai Skyscraper, H. Parker James, Brandeis University 3:30 p.m. Capital Flows and Premium Pressures, Sara Stevens, [Princeton University] 18

3:50 p.m. Discussion/Q&A 4:30 p.m. Closure of Session

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PS10

ROOM:

Gender, Sexuality, and Architecture: New Directions Wanda Bubriski, New York, NY, and Victoria Rosner, Columbia University, Co-Chairs Ballroom D

2:00 p.m. Introduction 2:15 p.m. Research-Creation and Spatial Analysis as Feminist Methods, Cynthia I. Hammond, Concordia University, Canada 2:35 p.m. The Legacies of Architect Pravina Mehta for Feminism and Indian Modernity, Mary N. Woods, Cornell University 2:55 p.m. Feminist Scholarship and Disciplinary Discourse: A Case Study, Elizabeth Birmingham, North Dakota State University 3:15 p.m. Women in the First Histories of Modern Architecture, Mary McLeod, Columbia University 3:35 p.m. Feminism’s Recent Architectural History: From Archive to Anthology, Karen Burns, Monash University, Australia 4:00 p.m. Discussion/Q&A 4:30 p.m. Closure of Session PS11 Open Session: Colonial and Postcolonial Passages Preeti Chopra, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Chair ROOM: Ballroom E 2:00 p.m. Introduction 2:10 p.m. Churches: The Transformation from Europe to Northern China, ca. 1900, Wei Luo, [Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium] 2:35 p.m. German Prefab: Between Colonialism, Modernism, and Religion, Itohan I. Osayimwese, Ithaca College 3:00 p.m. In Search of the Sacred and Antique in Colonial India, Madhuri Desai, The Pennsylvania State University 3:25 p.m. Changing Directions at the Observatories of Sawai Jai Singh II, Susan Johnson-Roehr, [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign] 3:50 p.m. Pioneering Modern Architectural Education in 1960s Ahmedabad, Daniel Scott Williamson, New York University 4:15p.m. Discussion/Q&A 4:30 p.m. Closure of Session


PS12

ROOM:

Space, Form, and Function in Medieval Architecture Matthew Woodworth, [Duke University], Chair Ballroom F

2:00 p.m. Introduction 19

2:10 p.m. The Saint-Michel Upper Chapel in Semur-en-Brionnais, Gil Fishhof, Tel Aviv University 2:35 p.m. Shape and Function at the Monastery of Roudnice on the Elbe, Alice Klima, [Brown University]

3:25 p.m. “A Well-Built Church for Holding Services”: The Patronage of Einhard, Annika Rulkens, [University of Amsterdam] 3:50 p.m. Wykeham’s Chantry and the Design of Winchester Cathedral Nave, Veronika Decker, [University of Vienna] 4:15 p.m. Discussion/Q&A 4:30 p.m. Closure of Session

Thursday Evening

SAH Awards Reception 6:30–7:30 p.m Audubon Aquarium of the Americas Maximum number of attendees: 250 $50 (includes passed hors d’oeuvres). Cash bar.

COST:

SAH Awards Ceremony 7:45–8:30 p.m. Audubon Aquarium of the Americas Registration required. Included in registration fee

PT1

Plenary Talk 8:30–9:00 p.m. Audubon Aquarium of the Americas The History of Yesterday Craig L. Wilkins, Ph.D., AIA, University of Michigan

COST:

If increased historic preservation, restoration, and reconstruction reflect a kind of maturation of America, they also highlight the controversy over what is considered preserved, by whom, and to what ends. What is lost when we remove traces of history from the shared landscape, public memory, and common language to attract the transitory interests of capital or appease the concretized and well-guarded boundaries of disciplinary knowledge? In the scenario marked by both cultural tourism and cultural pluralism, what is to be made of architecture outside the “beautiful sell”? In this particular moment when the capitalist project of rugged individualism has cried for once unimaginable socialist support, who makes the decisions about what history is palatable for future generations to remember,

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3:00 p.m. Architecture for the Observant Eye: Vision and Design at San Marco, Florence, Theresa Flanigan, The College of Saint Rose


Craig L. Wilkins, Ph.D., AIA, is the Director of the Detroit Community Design Center at the University of Michigan. An award-winning architect, urbanist, educator, and author, his design and research mines the nexus of the social, cultural, and political conditions that inform the study and practice of architecture, particularly as they relate to marginalized communities and forgotten narratives. COST:

Registration required. Included in registration fee

Loyola University

FRIDAY, APRIL 15

Speaker Ready Room 7:00 a.m. –5:00 p.m. Fleur de Lis (available on a first-come, first-served basis)

Photo: Richard Nowitz

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especially when history is an increasingly marketable commodity? What is one to make of history’s duty to what could arguably be described as the “unmarketable”?

ROOM:

COST:

Friday Speakers’ Breakfast 7:30–8:30 a.m. Atrium Session chairs and speakers presenting on Friday are invited to meet for a complimentary Continental breakfast and final conversation regarding the paper session scheduled for this day. Included in registration fee

Annual Meeting Registration/Information Desk 8:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m. Blaine Kern Ballroom Foyer

Exhibits Open 8:00–9:00 a.m. 11:30 a.m. –2:00 p.m. 4:00–5:00 p.m. Blaine Kern Ballroom A&B

ROOM:


Friday Morning Paper Sessions 9:00–11:30 a.m.

ROOM:

LR13 Graduate Student Lightning Rounds 5-minute papers presented by Graduate Student Members of SAH Katherine Carroll, [Boston University], Jennifer L. Gray, [Columbia University], Michael Waters, [New York University], Co-Chairs River Bend 1

9:00 a.m. Introduction 9:05 a.m. Building Out of Crisis

“A Mighty Fortress is Our God”: The Fortified Bastide Churches of Southwest France, M. Jordan Love, [Columbia University]

“Atomic” Building: Architecture, Industry, and War, Deanna Sheward, [New York University]

Camp Cities: Investigative Approaches, Anooradha Iyer Siddiqi, [New York University]

Outside>In>Inside>In, Edith Fikes, [Cornell University]

Discussion/Q&A

9:40 a.m. Identity Politics

Making the Ethnic Enclave: Modernity and Resistance in Late Nineteenth-Century Detroit, Michael P. McCulloch, [University of Michigan]

Designing Progress: Race, Gender, and Modernism in Early Twentieth-Century America, Jacqueline Taylor, [University of Virginia]

Feminism in Architecture: The Women’s School of Planning and Architecture, Andrea J. Merrett, [Columbia University]

Discussion/Q&A

10:10 a.m. Transnational Discourse

The Transatlantic Dissemination of Gothic Revival Church Architecture from Anglican England to Episcopalians in the United States, Kate M. Kocyba, [University of Missouri]

American Exports: H.P. Berlage, Modernism, and Transatlantic Influences, Mary E. Phillippe, [University of Virginia]

Soviet Embassy (1928–1929): Czech Architecture Performing Soviet Identity in the Landscape of Tokyo Modernism of the 1920s, Helena Cˇ apková, [University of the Arts, London]

Discussion/Q&A

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Friday Tours Please see SAH 2011 Tours, beginning on page 36, for details.

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10:40 a.m. From Tectonics to Metaphysics An Audience of the Scientific Age: Rossum’s Universal Robots and the Production of an “Economic Conscience,” James D. Graham, [Columbia University]

The Evolving Joints: Konrad Wachsmann and the Metaphysical Abstraction of Building Assembly, Zheng Tan, [University of California, Los Angeles]

Gothic on the Move: Using Dynamic Physical Simulation to Explore the “Evolution” of the Stone Skeleton, Rory O’Neill, [Columbia University]

Discussion/Q&A

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11:10 a.m. Overall Discussion/Q&A 11:30 a.m. Closure of the Graduate Student Lightning Rounds PS14 ROOM:

Beyond Liang Sicheng: Restructuring Chinese Architectural History Wei-Cheng Lin, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and Delin Lai, University of Louisville, Co-Chairs River Bend 2

9:00 a.m. Introduction ¯ and the Birth of Chinese Architectural History, 9:10 a.m. Ito¯Chuta Shuishan Yu, Oakland University 9:35 a.m. Literati Tradition and the Acceptance of Architectural Study in China, Min-Ying Wang, Jersey City, NJ 10:00 a.m. Before Liang Sicheng: Yue Jiazao’s Chinese Architectural History, Cole Roskam, University of Hong Kong 10:25 a.m. Ernst Boerschmann and Chinese Architecture, Eduard Koegel, Berlin Institute of Technology 10:50 a.m. Misconstruction of the Chinese Bracket Set by Ernst Boerschmann, Alexandra Harrer, [University of Pennsylvania] 11:15 a.m. Discussion/Q&A 11:30 a.m. Closure of Session PS15 Materials, Matter, Materiality, and Architecture Margaretta M. Lovell, University of California, Berkeley, Chair ROOM: Ballroom C 9:00 a.m. Introduction 9:10 a.m. Glass: A Window into the Northern Architectural Renaissance, Morgan Ng, [Harvard University] 9:35 a.m. Edison’s “Single-Pour System”: Inventing Seamless Architecture, Matt Burgermaster, New Jersey Institute of Technology 10:00 a.m. The Stuff We’re Made Of: Pittsburgh’s Iconic Corporate Architecture, Stuart W. Leslie, Johns Hopkins University


10:25 a.m. “Modern Masonry Without Masons”: Eero Saarinen’s Yale Colleges, Réjean Legault, Université du Québec, Montreal 10:50 a.m. “Les Rapports Émouvants”? Brutalist Materiality and Its Detractors, Barnabas Calder, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow 23

11:15 a.m. Discussion/Q&A 11:30 a.m. Closure of Session Architecture in Mind Sarah Williams Goldhagen, Newton, MA, Chair Ballroom D

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PS16 ROOM:

9:00 a.m. Introduction 9:10 a.m. How the Mind Meets Architecture: What Photography Reveals, Hugh Campbell, University College, Dublin 9:35 a.m. Body, Space and Mind: The “Eshkol-Wachman Movement Notation” (EWMN) Systemization of Human Motion, Alona Nitzan-Shiftan, Technion, Israel, and Ifat Finkelman, [Technion, Israel] 10:00 a.m. August Schmarsow, Mental Image, and Physical Experience of Space, Martino Stierli, Universität Basel and ETH, Zurich 10:25 a.m. Mental Maps and Social Divides: Cybernetics, Sociology and Urban Design, Anthony Raynsford, San Jose State University 10:50 a.m. The Loss of Empathy in Architectural History, Cammy Brothers, University of Virginia 11:15 a.m. Discussion/Q&A

Photo: Richard Nowitz

11:30 a.m. Closure of Session

Riverfront skyline


PS17 ROOM:

Architecture and Race in the Southern City Robin Williams, Savannah College of Art and Design, Chair Ballroom E

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24

9:00 a.m. Introduction 9:10 am

Keeping a Slave in His Place: Racial Regulation and Segregation in the Savannah Squares, Nathaniel Walker, [Brown University]

9:40 a.m. Paradoxical Sites of Resistance and Freedom—Black Space in New Orleans, Jill E. Bambury, [University of Cambridge] 10:10 a.m. Divided Histories: Race, Modernism, and Architectural Identity at Virginia Union University, Bryan Clark Green, Richmond, VA 10:40 a.m. Systems of Displacement: The Construction of the Interstate System in Atlanta, Georgia, and its Lasting Impacts on the City’s Racial Landscape, Joan H. Gillard, Norcross, GA 11:10 a.m. Discussion/Q&A 11:30 a.m. Closure of Session PS18 ROOM:

The Architecture of Spectacle: Antiquity through Early Modernity John R. Senseney, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Chair Ballroom F

9:00 a.m. Introduction 9:10 a.m. Triumph Over Nature: The Roman Monumental Fountain at Miletus, Suna Güven, Middle East Technical University, Ankara 9:35 a.m. The Marble Parade: Constructing Spectacle in Ancient Rome, Brian H. Sahotsky, [University of California, Los Angeles] 10:00 a.m. Francesco Pisani’s Triumphal Architecture, Johanna D. Heinrichs, [Princeton University] 10:25 a.m. The City Gate as Scaenae Frons: Two Case Studies, David Gobel, Savannah College of Art and Design 10:50 a.m. The Architect as Dramatist: Gilles-Marie Oppenord and the Theater, Jean-François Bédard, Syracuse University 11:15 a.m. Discussion/Q&A 11:30 a.m. Closure of Session

Friday Midday You will be able to enjoy lunch at any of the restaurants located in the hotel or a short walking distance from the hotel. There is a Food Court called Riverwalk located across the street between the Convention Center and the Audubon Aquarium of the Americas. Please refer to the information in your 64th Annual Meeting packet.


ROOM:

NEH Summer Program Opportunities 12:00–1:00 p.m. River Bend 1 Deborah Hurtt, Senior Program Officer

ROOM:

Graduate Student Roundtable Teaching Architectural History: Pedagogy and Technology 12:00–1:30 p.m. Delta Queen Erin Sassin, [Brown University], Moderator

This roundtable will discuss issues related to teaching architectural history and share various approaches to using technology.

ROOM:

Landscape History Chapter 12:00–1:30 p.m. Natchez Thaisa Way, Facilitator

SAH Landscape History Chapter will hold a general meeting at which all SAH members are welcome.

Roundtable Discussion Urban Palimpsest Group 12:00–1:30 p.m. Creole Queen Areli Marina, Moderator

ROOM:

ROOM:

DOCOMOMO US 12:00–1:30 p.m. Francine Stock, President, DOCOMOMO US/LA, and Keli Rylance, Board Member, DOCOMOMO US, and Head, Southeastern Architectural Archive and the School of Architecture Library, Tulane University, Facilitators Julia

A discussion about the fate of New Orleans modernism in the wake of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita (2005). The conversation will include an assessment of the National Preservation Act’s Section 106 Process as it has been applied to midcentury modernism. All registered members are invited to discuss the dual challenges of disaster recovery and preservation.

Friday Afternoon Paper Sessions 2:00–4:30p.m.

PS19

Reading the Architecture of the Underprivileged Classes Nnamdi Elleh, University of Cincinnati, Chair River Bend 1

ROOM:

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25

Discussion of the agency’s longstanding and highly prized summer grant opportunities: Summer Seminars and Institutes, and Landmarks for American History and Culture Workshops. How can you direct a program, serve on a review panel, or attend one as an NEH Summer Scholar? Deborah Hurtt will be available for individual consultations. Email dhurtt@neh.gov for an appointment or details.


2:00 p.m. Introduction

26

2:10 p.m. House of Blues: The Shotgun and Scarcity Culture in the Mississippi Delta, Edward M. Orlowski, Lawrence Technological University 2:35 p.m. Cultural Facilities in the Opaque Spaces of Brazilian Cities, Lilian Fessler Vaz, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro

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3:00 p.m. Transit Spaces: South Africa’s Urban Future Imagined from Within a Township Shack, Matthew Barac, London South Bank University, UK 3:25 p.m. The Austrian Settlement and Allotment Garden Association, Sophie Hochhäusl, [Cornell University] 3:50 p.m. A Tiny Whole World, Vasudha Gokhale, University of Pune, India 4:15 p.m. Discussion/Q&A 4:30 p.m. Closure of Session PS20 The Cultural Aesthetics of the Well-Tended Garden Micheline Nilsen, Indiana University, South Bend, Chair ROOM: River Bend 2 2:00 p.m. Introduction 2:15 p.m. Cultivating the Enlightened Child: Gardens and Gardening in German Pedagogy, Diana Ramirez-Jasso, [Harvard University] 2:45 p.m. Beyond Scarlett’s Radish: The Culture of Southern Garden Manuals, James Schissel, [University of Illinois, UrbanaChampaign] 3:15 p.m. The Garden in the Machine: Urban Agriculture, Landscape, and Culture in Detroit, Joseph S. Cialdella, [University of Michigan] 3:45 p.m. From Need and For Protest: Motivations for Urban Gardening, Rod Northcutt, Miami University 4:15 p.m. Discussion/Q&A 4:30 p.m. Closure of Session PS21 Walls That Talk: Contextualizing Inscriptions in Architecture Amy Papalexandrou, University of Texas at Austin, Chair ROOM: Ballroom C 2:00 p.m. Introduction 2:10 p.m. Reading Architecture in Late Gothic France, Abby L. McGehee, Oregon College of Art and Craft 2:35 p.m. Inscriptions, Reused Architecture and the Example of Modern Art, Jon M. Frey, Michigan State University 3:00 p.m. Writing in the Wall: An Architect’s Signature at Mykonos, Patricia A. Butz, Savannah College of Art and Design


3:25 p.m. Cairo to Canton and Back: Tradition in the Islamic Vernacular, Ann Shafer, American University, Cairo 3:50 p.m. When Lettering Entered Urbanism: Townscape’s Textual Obsession, Mira Engler, Iowa State University 4:15 p.m. Discussion/Q&A

2:05 p.m. The 1960 Tokyo World Design Conference: Planting Seeds for the New Japanese City, Ken Tadashi Oshima, University of Washington, Seattle 2:30 p.m. Superflat Tokyo: The 100-feet Rule and Japan’s Skyscraper Complex, Seng Kuan, Washington University, St. Louis 2:55 p.m. Expo ’70: A Model City of an Information Society, Hyunjung Cho, [University of Southern California] 3:20 p.m. Kyoto Station as Cultural Gateway and Egress, Alice Y. Tseng, Boston University 3:45 p.m. Discussion/Q&A 4:30 p.m. Closure of Session PS23 ROOM:

Architecture and Gastronomy Samantha Martin-McAuliffe, University College, Dublin, Chair Ballroom E

2:00 p.m. Introduction 2:10 p.m. Cuisine and Architecture, Ken Albala, University of the Pacific, and Lisa Cooperman, Stockton, CA 2:35 p.m. Pastry and the Picturesque, Vittoria Di Palma, Columbia University 3:00 p.m. Terroir and Architecture, Nicola Camerlenghi, University of Oregon 3:25 p.m. “And in the Soup Kitchen Food Shall Be Cooked Twice Every Day”: Gustatory Aspects of Ottoman Mosque Complexes, Nina Ergin, Koç University, Istanbul 3:50 p.m. Making Space from Molecular Gastronomy and Artisan Agriculture, Jamie Horwitz, Iowa State University 4:15 p.m. Discussion/Q&A 4:30 p.m. Closure of Session

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2:00 p.m. Introduction

27

4:30 p.m. Closure of Session PS22 The Japanese City in an Age of Affluence, 1950s–1990s Jonathan M. Reynolds, Barnard College and Columbia University, Chair ROOM: Ballroom D


Visit our booth

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The sTrucTure of lighT Richard Kelly and the Illumination of Modern Architecture Edited by Dietrich Neumann Published in association with the Yale School of Architecture 130 b/w + 104 color illus.

keviN roche

Architecture as Environment Eeva-Liisa Pelkonen Published in association with the Yale School of Architecture 107 b/w + 226 color illus.

BuildiNg iN Time

From Giotto to Alberti and Modern Oblivion Marvin Trachtenberg 250 b/w + 60 color illus.

The emperor’s privaTe paradise Treasures from the Forbidden City Nancy Berliner

With Mark C. Elliott, Liu Chang, Yuan Hongqi, and Henry Tzu Ng

The waTers of rome

Aqueducts, Fountains, and the Birth of the Baroque City Katherine Wentworth Rinne 135 b/w + 32 color illus.

archiTecTure iN uNiform Designing and Building for the Second World War Jean-Louis Cohen

Distributed for Editions Hazan, Paris 300 color illus.

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Six Masters of Modernism Nicholas Fox Weber 87 b/w + 25 color illus.

whY archiTecTure maTTers Paul Goldberger 54 b/w illus.

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Shaping the Future Edited by Eeva-Liisa Pelkonen and Donald Albrecht

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Winner of the 2008 Philip Johnson Award

The surreal house

Published in association with the Finnish Cultural Institute in New York, the National Building Museum, Washington, D.C., and the Museum of Finnish Architecture 321 b/w + 125 color illus.

Edited by Jane Alison Published in association with the Barbican Art Gallery 300 color illus.

coNsTrucTiNg The iNeffaBle

The archiTecTure of alexaNdria aNd egYpT 300 B.c.–a.d. 700

Contemporary Sacred Architecture Edited by Karla Britton

Judith McKenzie

Distributed for the Yale School of Architecture 100 color + 200 b/w illus.

The Yale University Press Pelican History of Art Series 350 b/w + 274 color illus.

Winner of the 2010 James R. Wiseman Book Award

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Published in association with the Yale Center for British Art and the Canadian Centre for Architecture 360 color illus.

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Notes from the Archive Anthony Vidler

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The Birth of the Garden Suburb Mireille Galinou puBlished for The paul melloN ceNTre for sTudies iN BriTish arT

The eighTeeNTh-ceNTurY church iN BriTaiN

A Conservation Plan Peter Inskip and Stephen Gee

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The sYNagogues of BriTaiN aNd irelaNd

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PS 24 Open Session: Urban Forms, Urban Visions Robert Wojtowicz, Old Dominion University, Chair ROOM: Ballroom F

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2:00 p.m. Introduction 2:10 p.m. Bad Taste and Postmodern Architecture: The Case of Piazza d’Italia, Patricia Morton, University of California, Riverside

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2:35 p.m. Construction Site Accidents and the Modernization of Paris, Jacob Paskins, [University College, London] 3:00 p.m. The Survival of the Street Wall in Postwar American Architecture, Kathleen James-Chakraborty, University College, Dublin 3:25 p.m. Cities at the Water’s Edge in the Kingdom of Two Sicilies, Tamara Morgenstern, Los Angeles, CA 3:50 p.m. “The Figure of the City”: Scamozzi’s Architecture as Urbanism, Ann Marie Borys, University of Washington, Seattle 4:15 p.m. Discussion/Q&A 4:30 p.m. Closure of Session University of Michigan Doctoral Studies Reception 5:00–7:00 p.m. Wolfe’s in the Warehouse restaurant, located at the New Orleans Marriott at the Convention Center Annual Meeting attendees, alumni, and friends—come join us! F1

Louis Sullivan: The Struggle for American Architecture, Film Screening 5:00–7:00 p.m. ROOM: River Bend 1 COST: Included in registration fee AIA/CES: 2 LU The first feature-length documentary (2010) about the revolutionary and brilliant Chicago architect Louis Sullivan (1856–1924). Known by historians as the “father of the skyscraper” and creator of the iconic phrase “form follows function,” Sullivan was at the height of his profession in 1890. Then a series of setbacks plunged him into destitute obscurity from which he never fully recovered. Yet his persistent belief in the power of his ideas resulted in some of America’s most beautiful buildings ever created, and inspired Sullivan’s protégé, Frank Lloyd Wright, to fulfill his own dream of a truly American style of architecture. Q&A will follow the 97-minute screening. COST:

Graduate Student Reception 8:00–9:00 p.m. Ogden Museum Registration required. Graduate students attending the Annual Meeting are invited for light refreshments and conversation. Compliments of SAH.


COST:

Saturday Speakers’ Breakfast 7:30–8:30 a.m. Atrium Session chairs and speakers presenting on Saturday are invited to meet for a complimentary Continental breakfast and final conversation regarding the paper session scheduled for this day. Included in registration fee

Annual Meeting Registration/Information Desk 8:00 a.m.–2:00 p.m. Blaine Kern Ballroom Foyer

Exhibits Open 8:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m. Blaine Kern Ballroom A&B

ROOM:

Saturday Tours Please see SAH 2011 Tours, beginning on page 36, for details.

SATURDAY MORNING PAPER SESSIONS 9:00–11:30 a.m.

PS25

Revisiting La Transition: Romanesque and Gothic in the Twelfth Century Sarah Thompson, Rochester Institute of Technology, Chair River Bend 1

ROOM:

9:00 a.m. Introduction 9:10 a.m. Crazy Little Thing Called Gothic: Rethinking the Development of a Style, Vibeke Olson, University of North Carolina, Wilmington 9:35 a.m. Twelfth-Century Flying Buttresses: Rethinking the Romanesque/Gothic Paradigm, Maile S. Hutterer, [New York University] 10:00 a.m. The Hierurgy of Stone in Twelfth-Century Artisanship, Jason Crow, [McGill University] 10:25 a.m. Monikers in Stone: Provençal Masons and Cistercian Mythologies, Christine M. Bolli, [University of California, Santa Barbara]

please bring this tweeting from the program with you to annual meeting? add this new orleans hashtag to your tweets to join the conversation: #sah2011

satu rday | pro gram sche dule |

SATURDAY, APRIL 16

31


10:50 a.m. Adding to the Complexity: Mathematical Choices in TwelfthCentury Building Design, Stefaan Van Liefferinge, University of Georgia 11:15 a.m. Discussion/Q&A 32

11:30 a.m. Closure of Session PS26

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ROOM:

Locating Architecture Within the Law Timothy Hyde, Harvard University, Chair River Bend 2

9:00 a.m. Introduction 9:10 a.m. Representing Contracts: The Emergence of Contemporary Working Drawings, Alexander Ortenberg, California State Polytechnic University 9:35 a.m. The Eiffel Tower and the Architecture of Modern Aerospace Law, Enrique Ramirez, [Princeton University] 10:00 a.m. Modernist Principles vs. Federal Codes in New York Public Housing, Gaia Caramellino, Politecnico di Torino, Italy 10:25 a.m. Dwelling on the Margins, Helen Gyger, [Columbia University] 10:50 a.m. Ethics in the 1970s: From Neutral Expert to Market Competitor, Jay Wickersham, Harvard University 11:15 a.m. Discussion/Q&A 11:30 a.m. Closure of Session PS27

Driving History: Cars In/As Architecture Simon Sadler, University of California, Davis, and Gabrielle Esperdy, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Co-Chairs

ROOM:

Ballroom C

9:00 a.m. Introduction 9:10 a.m. Turning Circle: Le Corbusier and the Parisian Parking Garage, Ernie Mellegers, The Hague, The Netherlands 9:35 a.m. Modernist Parking Space, David Salomon, University of Pennsylvania 10:00 a.m. Truckitects, Vanners, and the Counterculture, Caroline Maniaque, Ecole Nationale SupÊrieure d’Architecture, Paris 10:25 a.m. Vehicles of Ocular Desire, Jon Yoder, Syracuse University 10:50 a.m. VSBA XL: Scale of the Highway in Three Projects by Venturi, Scott Brown, Richard W. Hayes, CUNY and Wolfson College, Cambridge 11:15 a.m. Discussion/Q&A 11:30 a.m. Closure of Session PS28 Open Session: Rethinking and Rediscovery Ann C. Huppert, University of Washington, Seattle, Chair ROOM: Ballroom D 9:00 a.m. Introduction


9:10 a.m. Modern Architecture and Prehistory: Retracing the Eternal Present, Spyros Papapetros, Princeton University 9:35 a.m. Between the Rubrics: Modern Architecture in the Catholic Church, Robert Proctor, Glasgow School of Art 33

10:00 a.m. The Architectural Landscape of Mastic Production and Trade in Chios, Nikolas Bakirtzis, The Cyprus Institute 10:25 a.m. Pictures at an Exhibition: Imaging German Architecture in America, Jasmine Benyamin, Texas A&M University

11:15 a.m. Discussion/Q&A 11:30 a.m. Closure of Session PS29 ROOM:

Historiographies of the Baroque, 1880s–1945 Evonne Levy, University of Toronto, Chair Ballroom E

9:00 a.m. Introduction 9:07 a.m. Engaging the Past. Albert Ilg’s “Die Zukunft des Barockstils,” Francesca Torello, Carnegie Mellon University 9:32 a.m. The Baroque of Mass Media, Zeynep Çelik Alexander, University of Toronto 9:57 a.m. The Architecture of Attention: Art History Rediscovers the Baroque, Albert Narath, University of Oregon 10:22 a.m. Against Formalism. The Historiography of the Baroque in Germany 1918–1933, Ute Engel, University of Mainz, Germany 10:47 a.m. Democratizing the Baroque, ca. 1945, Andrew Leach, Griffith University, Australia 11:07 a.m. Discussion/Q&A 11:30 a.m. Closure of Session PS30 ROOM:

Architecture in the Andes from Its Origins to Today Jean-Pierre Protzen, University of California, Berkeley, Chair Ballroom F

9:00 a.m. Introduction 9:10 a.m. Landscape Architecture in the Colombian Andes, Juan Alejandro Saldarriaga Sierra, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Medellín 9:35 a.m. Transitional Spaces: The Pre-Columbian Spatial Tradition of Cloth Production and Use in the Andean Highlands, Jessica Goldsmith, [Valdosta State University] 10:00 a.m. Windows for the Sun of God: Church Design and Solar Worship in the Southern Andes, Jaime Lara, Notre Dame University

satu rday | pro gram sche dule |

10:50 a.m. Libri delle Case. Images in the Archives in Renaissance Rome, David Friedman, Massachusetts Institute of Technology


10:25 a.m. Form and Meaning of the Coricancha, Golden Pantheon of the Incas, Humberto Rodriguez-Camilloni, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University 10:50 a.m. Discussion/Q&A

SAH Community Project 12:00–4:00 p.m.

Join SAH for a community project at the Priestley Charter School of Architecture and Construction. The students and faculty will give a presentation on the focus of this high school program, which after many years of discussion was implemented post-Katrina, as well as a tour of the neighborhood. Lunch is donated by the New Orleans Marriott at the Convention Center. Transportation will be provided. Space is limited. Registration required. Admission to this event is the donation of a relevant book to the school’s first library. We hope to help fill the 2,000 spaces on the library’s shelves. Join us for this special day. AIA/CES: 3 LU

Photo: Richard Nowitz

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11:30 a.m. Closure of Session

Ursuline Convent

SATURDAY EVENING

SAH Benefit 6:30–9:00 p.m. Join SAH to celebrate as a Society. An evening of celebration and support of SAH in the New Orleans Garden District. View four of the premier homes and gardens that make this area so famous. See SAH website (www.sah.org) for further information. Space is limited. Registration required. COST: $125 per person Hors d’oeuvres, wine/beer/soft drinks

SUNDAY, APRIL 17

Sunday Tours Please see SAH 2011 Tours, beginning on page 36, for details.


Constantinopolis/Istanbul

Cultural Encounter, Imperial Vision, and the Construction of the Ottoman Capital Çiğdem Kafescioğlu Buildings, Landscapes, and Societies Series

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The Culture of Architecture in Enlightenment Rome

|

346 pages | 8 color/154 b&w illustrations/3 maps | $100.00 cloth

Heather Hyde Minor 312 pages | 36 color/112 b&w illustrations/6 maps | $95.00 cloth Buildings, Landscapes, and Societies Series

The Life of Gian Lorenzo Bernini

A Translation and Critical Edition, with Introduction and Commentary, by Franco Mormando Domenico Bernini 464 pages | $99.95 cloth

Modern Ruins

Portraits of Place in the Mid-Atlantic Region Shaun O’Boyle Introduction by Geoff Manaugh 120 pages | 30 color/76 b&w illustrations | $42.95 cloth A Keystone Book®

Forthcoming

Humanism and the Urban World

Leon Battista Alberti and the Renaissance City Caspar Pearson 232 pages | $74.95 cloth | September 2011

penn state press See these books on display at the Penn State Press booth www.psupress.org | 1-800-326-9180


SAH 2011 TOURS Unless otherwise noted: All guided tours will depart from the Atrium area on the 2nd floor of the New Orleans Marriott at the Convention Center. Volunteers with signs will guide you to your tour. All tours are a combination of bus and walking. Times noted for each tour indicate the time the tour departs the hotel and the time participants arrive back at the hotel at the conclusion of the tour. Sunday tours indicate if there is a stop at the airport (in which case the end time will be the stop at the airport). Please note that by necessity the times of some tours and some paper sessions will overlap; please make your choices accordingly.

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Self-Guided Walking Tours Register for these self-guided tours, which may be taken on any date, and receive a listing of the buildings and their addresses along with a map in your Annual Meeting packet. TR1

Canal Street Self-Guided Walking Tour

Canal Street is the primary mercantile artery through the city of New Orleans. In the 1920s it was touted as the Broadway of New Orleans, home to jazz venues and theaters. By the 1960s, its expanse was home to many of the city’s architectural offices. Julius Dreyfous, August Perez Jr., Sol Rosenthal, Solis Seiferth, and Curtis & Davis all maintained offices here. The street is now in flux. A number of important buildings have been razed, some are being reconditioned, and yet others are threatened by demolition. COST: $10 AIA/CES: 1.5 LU TR2 French Quarter Self-Guided Walking Tour Explore New Orleans’ original city, the famed Vieux Carré founded by Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne de Bienville in 1718. See how Louisiana’s architecture evolved from its roots in France, Spain, Africa, and the West Indies into the unique Creole style. See the oldest surviving building in the Mississippi Valley; the Ursuline Convent; the Spanish colonial De La Torre House, and the beginning of “Creole” in Madame John’s Legacy. Identify a building by type, style, and components: balconies, galleries, and ironwork, wrought and cast. Experience Jackson Square, the Cabildo, Cathedral of St. Louis, King of France, the Presbytère, and the Mississippi River. See Benjamin Henry Latrobe’s last masterpiece, the Louisiana State Bank. For “lagniappe,” take in the homes of celebrities Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie, Nicolas Cage, Delta Burke, and Francis Ford Coppola, in addition to movie-filming sites. COST: $10 AIA/CES: 1.5 LU


TR3

Central Business District (CBD) Self-Guided Walking Tour

Take a self-guided tour of the historic structures in the Central Business District (CBD), based on the highly acclaimed volume Buildings of Louisiana (BUS). Tour notes will be provided to all who register for the tour. The cell phone app can be found on this page, below. COST: Compliments of SAH and BUS AIA/CES: 1.5 LU TR 4

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13 Lower Ninth Ward Recovery Tour Cesar Rodriguez, Make it Right Foundation, Tour Leader

1:00 p.m.–4:00 pm Maximum number of participants: 30 COST: $45 AIA/CES: 3 LU

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In 2005, Hurricane Katrina destroyed more than 4,000 homes in New Orleans’ Lower Ninth Ward. Two years later, when actor Brad Pitt toured the city, the neighborhood was still deserted and devastated. Pitt promised the families he met there that he would help “make it right.” He founded the nonprofit Make It Right Foundation to build 150 affordable, green, storm-resistant homes for families living in the Lower Ninth Ward at the time of the storm. This tour will focus on the innovative work proposed by local architects and by high-profile architects such as GRAFT, Adjaye Associates, Shigeru Ban, and Morphosis Architects Inc., among others. Make it Right has completed nearly 50 homes and brought close to 200 people back to the city of New Orleans.


TR5 5.5 Years Later: Historic Neighborhoods in Post-Katrina New Orleans Stephen Fowlkes, MLIS, MPS, New Orleans, Tour Leader

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New Orleans has more than twenty neighborhoods listed on the National Register of Historic Places, all of which suffered damage and building loss during Hurricane Katrina. This tour will take participants across the city to see how some of the most famous and some of the lesser-known historic neighborhoods in New Orleans have recovered from Hurricane Katrina and its subsequent flooding. Participants will travel off the beaten path for a close-up view of how many of the city’s historic and cultural treasures look after five and a half years of recovery and rebuilding efforts.

1:30–4:30 p.m. Maximum number of participants: 28 COST: $40 AIA/CES: 3 LU

THURSDAY, APRIL 14

TR6 U.S. Customhouse John Klingman, AIA, Tulane University School of Architecture, Tour Leader A fast-paced walk-through of the U. S. Customhouse in New Orleans. When work began in 1848, this building was exceeded in size only by the Capitol in Washington. However, the construction of the building stretched until 1881 through a succession of architects, construction supervisors, political changes, and technical innovations. Each of these entailed struggles that left marks upon the physical fabric of the structure. The Central Business Room, known as the Marble Hall, is acknowledged to be one of the finest Greek Revival spaces in the United States. It has recently been restored although it is not open to the public. Beginning in 1914, a series of renovations, some sympathetic, some not, have altered the building. The tour leader participated with a New Orleans architectural firm in a series of renovation/restoration projects beginning in 1986 and was a principal author of the Historic Building Preservation Plan as well. The building is currently unoccupied while the latest renovation is being completed. Hard hats will be provided.

12:00–1:30 p.m. Walking tour Maximum number of participants: 40 COST: $20 AIA/CES: 1.5 LU

TR7

Jazz in the American Sector John W. “Jack” Stewart, New Orleans, Louisiana, Tour Leader

Local musician, historian, restoration contractor, and city planner, Jack Stewart will lead a New Orleans music-themed walking tour through the city’s American Sector. This includes the Lafayette Square District, New Orleans’ second-oldest residential neighborhood, and the Canal Street Historic District, with its array of music publishing and


theater sites. The tour will also include Werlein’s Music Store and the Saenger Theatre. Visit the sites where New Orleans jazz history was made and learn about its musical precursors. 12:00–2:30 p.m Walking tour Maximum number of participants: 28 COST: $20 AIA/CES: 2.5 LU

TR8

Lower Ninth Ward Recovery Tour For description, see Wednesday, April 13 (TR 4)

1:00–4:00 p.m. Maximum number of participants: 30 COST: $45 AIA/CES: 3 LU

FRIDAY, APRIL 15

TR9

The Garden District “Americans” and Lafayette Cemetery Lloyd Sensat, SENSATion Tours, Tour Leader

Photo: Ann Purcell

Uptown home

tours |

Explore the “American” sector of New Orleans, the extraordinary Garden District established by entrepreneur Samuel Jarvis Peters in 1832. Learn why the Garden District is so different from the Creole French Quarter. Identify the various New Orleans architectural types and styles, including Greek Revival, Italianate, Gothic Revival, raised villas, carriage houses, slave quarters, and shotguns. We will see architectural masterpieces by Henry Howard, James Gallier, Sr., Lewis Reynolds, Samuel Jamison, and Thomas Wharton, as well as the fanciful Swiss chalet villa of the late Richard Koch, the father of preservation architecture in Louisiana. This tour will also include a glimpse of the home of Michel Musson, the uncle of the famous French artist Edgar Degas. Hear the story and see the death site of Jefferson Davis, the only president of the Confederacy. Marvel

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at the magnificent live oaks, magnolias, and southern gardens. The tour guide will also point out the homes of celebrities Anne Rice, Trent Reznor, John Goodman, Nicolas Cage, Archie Manning, and Sandra Bullock, in addition to numerous movie-filming sites. 12:00–2:30 p.m. Maximum number of participants: 28 COST: $40 AIA/CES: 2.5 LU

Cities of the Dead

SATURDAY, APRIL 16

TR10

Tulane University Campus Mihnea Dobre, Office of the University Architect, Tulane University; and Gary Van Zante, Curator of Architecture and Design, MIT Museum, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Tour Leaders

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Photo: Linda Reinke

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Located across from the John Charles Olmsted-inspired Audubon Park, Tulane University has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places since 1978. It is the only private university in the country that has its origins as a public institution. Founded in 1834 as the Medical College of Louisiana, the school transformed under the patronage of Paul Tulane (1801–87), for whom it was renamed in 1884. Seven years later, the university acquired land along St. Charles Avenue, and the first Romanesque Revival structure was commissioned shortly thereafter. Tour participants will also visit the Lavin-Bernick Center for University Life (1959, 2007), designed by Curtis & Davis and redesigned by Vincent James, and winner of the AIA/COTE Top Ten Green Projects for 2008.

1:00–3:00 p.m. Maximum number of participants: 28 COST: $40 AIA/CES: 2 LU


TR11 Modernism in New Orleans Francine Stock, President, DOCOMOMO US/LA; and Keli Rylance, Ph.D., Head, Southeastern Architectural Archive and the School of Architecture Library, Tulane University, and Board Member, DOCOMOMO US, Tour Leaders

1:00–4:00 p.m. Maximum number of participants: 25 COST: $40 AIA/CES: 3 LU

TR12

Selected Historic Landscapes of New Orleans, Old and New Lake Douglas, Ph.D., ASLA, Louisiana State University, Robert Reich School of Landscape Architecture, Tour

Leaders This tour will begin with Longue Vue, which includes the Edgar Stern estate and its garden, designed by Ellen Biddle Shipman (one of her few projects in the South) and Louisiana artist/naturalist Caroline Dormon. Participants will see later alterations from the 1950s and the post-Katrina restoration by Patricia O’Donnell, FASLA. The tour will continue to City Park, which was developed in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries in the Beaux Arts tradition. This segment of the tour will include the Art Deco Botanical Garden, the New Orleans Museum of Art’s Sydney and Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden, and Big Lake. The third historic landscape on this tour is the Pitot House, which is an early nineteenth-century house on historic Bayou St. John. This site presents an example of the marriage between late eighteenthcentury architecture and landscape. The Louisiana Landmarks Society, which promotes historic preservation through education and advocacy initiatives and operation of the Pitot House, will host a complimentary wine and cheese reception at the end of the tour.

1:00–4:00 pm Maximum number of participants: 30 COST: $45 (includes entrance fee) AIA/CES: 3 LU

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In the mid-twentieth century, New Orleans was home to a cadre of innovative architects who sought to employ modernist solutions to address regional conditions. The hot and humid climate, unstable substrates, and high-density land-use patterns provided significant obstacles to be overcome, as did the populace’s preference for its traditional buildings. Architects such as Claude E. Hooton, Curtis & Davis, Albert C. Ledner, and Charles Colbert garnered national attention from a city known for its unwavering support of nineteenth-century architectural forms. Sponsored by DOCOMOMO US/LA, this tour will highlight the city’s modernist arteries, neighborhoods and structures. Beginning along Canal Street, home to many of the modernist firms, the tour will follow this mercantile artery into Mid-City, where it will loop around into historic Tremé to stop at the Phillis Wheatley Elementary School (Charles R. Colbert, 1955), a World Monuments Fund watch site. From there, the tour will stop at several residences along Bayou St. John and in the Lakeshore neighborhood, culminating at the home of native architect Albert C. Ledner, where tour participants can enjoy some light refreshments.


1:30–4:30 pm Maximum number of participants: 30 COST: $40 AIA/CES: 3 LU

TR14

French Quarter Creole New Orleans Lloyd Sensat, SENSATional Tours, Tour Leader

Explore New Orleans’ original city, the famed Vieux Carré founded by Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne de Bienville in 1718. Learn how Louisiana’s architecture evolved from its roots in France, Spain, Africa, and the West Indies into the unique Creole style. See the oldest surviving building in the Mississippi Valley; the Ursuline Convent; the Spanish colonial De La Torre House, and the beginning of “Creole” in Madame John’s Legacy. Experience Jackson Square, the Cabildo, Cathedral of St. Louis, King of France, the Presbytère, and the Mississippi River, and hear the story of the Battle of New Orleans and the flamboyant Baroness de Pontalba. See Benjamin Henry Latrobe’s last masterpiece, the Louisiana State Bank. Revisit the art and literary renaissance of the 1920s: Sherwood Anderson, William Faulkner, William Spratling, Ernest Hemingway, and Tennessee Williams. Hear the heroic stories of the pioneer preservationists: William Ratcliff Irby, Lyle Saxon, and Elizabeth Werlein; and learn about the formation of the Vieux Carré Commission. For “lagniappe,” the tour will include the homes of celebrities Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie, Nicolas Cage, Delta Burke, and Francis Ford Coppola, as well as movie-filming sites.

2:00–4:00 p.m. Maximum number of participants: 28 COST: $40 AIA/CES: 2 LU

Cornstalk Hotel

Photo: Richard Nowitz

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TR13 5.5 Years Later: Historic Neighborhoods in PostKatrina New Orleans For description, see Wednesday, April 13 (TR 5)


SUNDAY, APRIL 17

TR15

River Road Plantations Eugene Cizek, Ph.D., F.A.I.A., Director of Preservation Studies, Tulane University; and Mark Thomas, Professor of Preservation, Tulane University, Tour Leaders

TR16

French Quarter Creole New Orleans For description, see Saturday, April 16 (TR 14)

9:00–11:00 a.m. Maximum number of participants: 28 COST: $40 AIA/CES: 2 LU

Photo: Richard Nowitz

9:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m Maximum number of participants: 43 COST: $80 (includes lunch and entrance fees) AIA/CES: 8 LU

Oak Alley Plantation

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In the decade prior to the Civil War, the Mississippi River served as a super-highway for the planters of southern Louisiana, providing transport for goods, services, and visitors. The Great Mississippi River Road followed the river just beyond the levee boundaries, and plantation houses faced the river. The big houses were only a small part of what was a small community, often of several hundred people, free and enslaved. The tour begins with Destrehan, a Creole-style house that had “garçonnières” added to each side in 1805 and was remodeled in the Greek Revival Style in 1840. It still maintains its huge double-pitched Creole roof. Eugene Cizek served as the restoration architect from 1978 to the present. The tour will then cross the river to Oak Alley and visit the antebellum Southern mansion, which has appeared in numerous movies. Participants will have lunch at Oak Alley Plantation’s restaurant, which serves traditional Cajun and Creole dishes. The tour will end with a visit to the grounds of Laura, a Creole Plantation, for which Cizek also served as restoration architect. This plantation consists of several houses, outbuildings, and slave cabins.


TR17 Tulane University Campus For tour description, see Saturday, April 16 (TR 10)

9:00–11:00 a.m. Maximum number of participants: 28 COST: $40 AIA/CES: 2 LU

TR18 Lower Ninth Ward Recovery Tour For similar description, see Wednesday, April 13 (TR 4) This tour does not include interior visits. 1:00 pm–4:00 p.m. Maximum number of participants: 30 COST: $40 AIA/CES: 3 LU

Photo: Carl Purcell

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Lee Circle

please bring this tweeting from the program with you to annual meeting? add this new orleans hashtag to your tweets to join the conversation: #sah2011


APPENDIX

Index of Speakers and Session Chairs

45 spe akers and sessi on chairs |

Akcan, Esra, University of Illinois, Chicago (Thurs. a.m., PS6) Albala, Ken, University of the Pacific (Fri. p.m., PS23) AlSayyad, Nezar, University of California, Berkeley (Thurs. a.m., PS6), Session Co-Chair Archer, John, University of Minnesota (Thurs. a.m., PS2), Session Chair Andersson, Thorbjörn, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (Thurs. p.m., PS7) Avermaete, Tom, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands (Thurs. p.m., PS7) Bakirtzis, Nikolas, The Cyprus Institute (Sat. a.m., PS28) Bambury, Jill E., [University of Cambridge] (Fri. a.m., PS17) Barac, Matthew, London South Bank University, UK (Fri. p.m., PS19) Barrett, Catherine, University of Oklahoma (Thurs. a.m., PS4) Barry, Kristin M., [The Pennsylvania State University] (Thurs. a.m., PS3) Bédard, Jean-François, Syracuse University (Fri. a.m., PS18) Bentz, Katherine M., Saint Anselm College (Thurs. p.m., PS8) Benyamin, Jasmine, Texas A&M University (Sat. a.m., PS28) Birmingham, Elizabeth, North Dakota State University (Thurs. p.m., PS10) Bolli, Christine M., [University of California, Santa Barbara] (Sat. a.m., PS25) Borys, Ann Marie, University of Washington, Seattle (Fri. p.m., PS24) Bressler, Kelly, [Savannah College of Art and Design], (Thurs. a.m., PS1) Brothers, Cammy, University of Virginia (Fri. a.m., PS16) Bubriski, Wanda, New York, NY (Thurs. p.m., PS10), Session Co-Chair Buckley, James, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Thurs. p.m., PS9) Burgermaster, Matt, New Jersey Institute of Technology (Fri. a.m., PS15) Burns, Karen, Monash University, Australia (Thurs. p.m., PS10) Butz, Patricia A., Savannah College of Art and Design (Fri. p.m., PS21) Calder, Barnabas University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (Fri. a.m., PS15) Camerlenghi, Nicola, University of Oregon (Fri. p.m., PS23) Campbell, Hugh, University College, Dublin (Fri a.m., PS16) Caramellino, Gaia, Politecnico di Torino, Italy (Sat. a.m., PS26) Çelik Alexander, Zeynep, University of Toronto (Sat. a.m., PS29) Chery, Aurore, [Université Lyon] (Thurs. a.m., PS3) Cho, Hyunjung, [University of Southern California] (Fri. p.m., PS22) Chopra, Preeti, University of Wisconsin, Madison (Thurs. p.m., PS11), Session Chair Christensen, Peter, [Harvard University] (Thurs. a.m., PS6) Cialdella, Joseph S., [University of Michigan] (Fri. p.m., PS20) Cohen, Jeffrey A., Bryn Mawr College (Thurs. a.m., PS4), Session Chair Cooperman, Lisa, Stockton, CA (Fri. p.m., PS23) Crinson, Mark, University of Manchester (Thurs. a.m., PS4)


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Crow, Jason, [McGill University] (Sat. a.m., PS25) Curran, Brian A., The Pennsylvania State University (Thurs. p.m., PS8) Damluji, Mona, [University of California, Berkeley] (Thurs. a.m., PS6) Decker, Veronika, [University of Vienna] (Thurs. p.m., PS12) Desai, Madhuri, The Pennsylvania State University (Thurs. p.m., PS11) Di Palma, Vittoria, Columbia University (Fri. p.m., PS23) Drosos, Nikolas, [City University of New York] (Thurs. a.m., PS3) Elleh, Nnamdi, University of Cincinnati (Fri. p.m., PS19), Session Chair Engel, Ute, University of Mainz, Germany (Sat. a.m., PS29) Engler, Mira, Iowa State University (Fri. p.m., PS21) Ergin, Nina, Koç University, Istanbul (Fri. p.m., PS23) Esperdy, Gabrielle, New Jersey Institute of Technology (Sat. a.m., PS27), Session Co-Chair Feniger, Neta, [Technion, Israel] (Thurs. a.m., PS6) Ferguson, John C., Austin, TX (Thurs. a.m., PS1) Finkelman, Ifat, [Technion, Israel] (Fri. a.m., PS16) Fishhof, Gil, Tel Aviv University (Thurs. p.m., PS12) Flanigan, Theresa, The College of Saint Rose (Thurs. p.m., PS12) Frey, Jon M., Michigan State University (Fri. p.m., PS21) Friedman, David, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Sat. a.m., PS28) Garcia-Fuentes, Josep-Maria, [Universitat Politècnica dé Catalunya], Spain (Thurs. a.m., PS4) Gillard, Joan H., Norcross, GA (Fri. a.m., PS17) Gobel, David, Savannah College of Art and Design (Fri. a.m., PS18) Gokhale, Vasudha, University of Pune, India (Fri. p.m., PS19) Goldhagen, Sarah Williams, Newton MA (Fri. a.m., PS16), Session Chair Goldsmith, Jessica, [Valdosta State University] (Sat. a.m., PS30) Green, Bryan Clark, Richmond, VA (Fri. a.m., PS17) Guàrdia Bassols, Manel, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (Thurs. a.m., PS4) Güven, Suna, Middle East Technical University, Ankara (Fri. a.m., PS18) Gyger, Helen, [Columbia University] (Sat. a.m., PS26) Hafertepe, Kenneth, Baylor University (Thurs. a.m., PS1) Hammond, Cynthia I. Concordia University, Canada (Thurs. p.m., PS10) Harrer, Alexandra [University of Pennsylvania] (Fri. a.m., PS14) Hayes, Richard W., CUNY and Wolfson College, Cambridge (Sat. a.m., PS27) Hein, Carola, Bryn Mawr College (Thurs. p.m., PS9) Heinrichs, Johanna D., [Princeton University] (Fri. a.m., PS18) Herscher, Andrew, University of Michigan (Thurs. a.m., PS2) Hochhaüsl, Sophie, [Cornell University] (Fri. p.m., PS19) Hock, Jennifer, Middlebury College (Thurs. a.m., PS2) Holdsworth, Deryck, The Pennsylvania State University (Thurs. p.m., PS9) Holliday, Kate, University of Texas, Arlington (Thurs. a.m., PS1) Hollengreen, Laura, Georgia Institute of Technology (Thurs. a.m., PS3), Session Chair


47 spe akers and sessi on chairs |

Horwitz, Jamie, Iowa State University (Fri. p.m., PS23) Huppert, Ann C., University of Washington, Seattle (Sat. a.m., PS28), Session Chair Hutterer, Maile S., [New York University] (Sat. a.m., PS25) Hyde, Timothy, Harvard University (Thurs. a.m., PS2); (Sat. a.m., PS26), Session Chair Iannacone, Rachel, University of Nicosia, Cyprus (Thurs. a.m., PS5) Imbert, Dorothée, Washington University, St. Louis (Thurs. p.m., PS7) Jacobs, James A., Washington DC (Thurs. a.m., PS5) James, H. Parker, Brandeis University (Thurs. p.m., PS9) James-Chakraborty, Kathleen, University College, Dublin (Fri. p.m., PS24) Johnson-Roehr, Susan, [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign] (Thurs. p.m., PS11) Kallus, Rachel, Technion, Israel (Thurs. a.m., PS6) Kashina, Elena V., University of York, UK (Thurs. a.m., PS4) Keyvanian, Carla, Auburn University (Thurs. p.m., PS8) Klima, Alice, [Brown University] (Thurs. p.m., PS12) Koegel, Eduard, Berlin Institute of Technology (Fri. a.m., PS14) Kuan, Seng, Washington University, St. Louis (Fri. p.m., PS22) Lai, Delin, University of Louisville (Fri. a.m., PS14), Session Co-Chair Lara, Jaime, Notre Dame University (Sat. a.m., PS30) Lasc, Anca I., [University of Southern California] (Thurs. a.m., PS5) Lawrence, John H., New Orleans, LA (Thurs. a.m., PS3) Leach, Andrew, Griffith University, Australia (Sat. a.m., PS29) Legault, Réjean, Université du Québec, Montreal (Fri. a.m., PS15) Leslie, Stuart W., Johns Hopkins University (Fri a.m., PS15) Levy, Evonne, University of Toronto (Sat. a.m., PS29), Session Chair Lin, Wei-Cheng, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (Fri. a.m., PS14), Session Co-Chair Lo, Ruth W., [Brown University] (Thurs. a.m., PS5) Luo, Wei, [Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium] (Thurs. p.m., PS11) Lovell, Margaretta M., University of California, Berkeley (Fri. a.m., PS15), Session Chair Lupkin, Paula, Washington University, St. Louis (Thurs. p.m., PS9), Session Chair Mack, Jennifer, [Harvard University] (Thurs. p.m., PS7), Session Co-Chair Maniaque, Caroline, Ecole Nationale Supérieure d’Architecture, Paris (Sat. a.m., PS27) Martin-McAuliffe, Samantha, University College, Dublin (Fri. p.m., PS23), Session Chair McGehee, Abby L., Oregon College of Art and Craft (Fri. p.m., PS21) McKay, Sherry, University of British Columbia (Thurs. a.m., PS2) McLeod, Mary, Columbia University (Thurs p.m. PS10) Mellegers, Ernie, The Hague, The Netherlands (Sat. a.m., PS27) Michaudel, Benjamin, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Thurs. a.m. PS6) Mogilevich, Mariana [Harvard University] (Thurs. p.m., PS7), Session Co-Chair Morgenstern, Tamara, Los Angeles, CA (Fri. p.m., PS24) Morton, Patricia, University of California, Riverside (Fri. p.m., PS24)


48 | sp e ak ers and se ssion chairs

Narath, Albert, University of Oregon (Sat. a.m. PS29) Ng, Morgan, [Harvard University] (Fri. a.m., PS15) Nilsen, Micheline, Indiana University, South Bend (Thurs. a.m., PS3); (Fri. p.m., PS20), Session Chair Nitzan-Shiftan, Alona, Technion, Israel (Fri. a.m., PS16) Northcutt, Rod, Miami University (Fri. p.m., PS20) O’Gorman, James, Wellesley College (Thurs. a.m., PS1), Session Co-Chair Olson, Vibeke, University of North Carolina, Wilmington (Sat. a.m., PS25) Orlowski, Edward M., Lawrence Technological University (Fri. p.m., PS19) Ortenberg, Alexander, California State Polytechnic University (Sat. p.m., PS26) Osayimwese, Itohan, Ithaca College (Thurs. p.m., PS11) Oshima, Ken Tadashi, University of Washington, Seattle (Fri. p.m., PS22) Papalexandrou, Amy, University of Texas at Austin (Fri. p.m., PS21), Session Chair Papapetros, Spyros, Princeton University (Sat. a.m., PS28) Paskins, Jacob, [University College, London] (Fri. p.m., PS24) Pinto John, Princeton University (Thurs. p.m., PS8) Proctor, Robert, Glasgow School of Art (Sat. a.m., PS28) Protzen, Jean-Pierre, University of California, Berkeley (Sat. a.m., PS30), Session Chair Rajagopalan, Mrinalini, Yale University (Thurs. a.m., PS6), Session Co-Chair Ramirez, Enrique, [Princeton University] (Sat. a.m., PS26) Ramirez-Jasso, Diana, [Harvard University] (Fri. p.m., PS20) Raynsford, Anthony, San Jose State University (Fri. a.m., PS16) Reynolds, Jonathan M., Barnard College and Columbia University (Fri. p.m., PS22), Session Chair Roberts, Ellen E., Art Institute of Chicago (Thurs. a.m., PS5) Rodriguez-Camilloni, Humberto, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Sat. a.m., PS30) Roskam, Cole, University of Hong Kong (Fri. a.m., PS14) Rosner, Victoria, Columbia University (Thurs. p.m., PS10), Session Co-Chair Rulkens, Annika, [University of Amsterdam] (Thurs. p.m., PS12) Saboia, Luciana, University of Brasilia (Thurs. p.m., PS7) Sadler, Simon, University of California, Davis (Sat. a.m., PS27), Session Co-Chair Sahotsky, Brian H., [University of California, Los Angeles] (Fri. a.m., PS18) Saldarriaga Sierra, Juan Alejandro, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Medellín (Sat. a.m., PS30) Salomon, David, University of Pennsylvania (Sat. a.m., PS27) Schissel, James [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign] (Fri. p.m., PS20) Schleier, Merrill, University of the Pacific (Thurs. a.m., PS2) Schmidt, Freek, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam (Thurs. a.m., PS4) Senseney, John, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (Fri. a.m., PS18), Session Chair


Shafer, Ann, American University, Cairo (Fri. p.m., PS21) Stevens, Sara, [Princeton University] (Thurs. p.m., PS9) Stierli, Martino, Universit채t Basel and ETH, Zurich (Fri. a.m., PS16) Thompson, Sarah, Rochester Institute of Technology (Sat. a.m., PS25), Session Chair Torello, Francesca, Carnegie Mellon University (Sat. a.m., PS29) Treib, Marc, University of California, Berkeley (Thurs. p.m., PS7) Triff, Kristin, Trinity College (Thurs. p.m., PS7), Session Chair Tseng, Alice Y., Boston University (Fri. p.m., PS22) Van Liefferinge, Stefaan, University of Georgia (Sat. a.m., PS25) Van Zante, Gary, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Thurs a.m., PS1), Session Co-Chair Vaz, Lilian Fessler, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (Fri. p.m., PS19) Walker, Nathaniel, [Brown University] (Fri. a.m., PS17) Wang, Min-Ying, Jersey City, NJ (Fri. a.m., PS14) Wickersham, Jay, Harvard University (Sat. a.m., PS26) Williams, Robin, Savannah College of Art and Design (Fri. a.m., PS17), Session Chair Williamson, Daniel Scott, [New York University], (Thurs. p.m. PS11) Wojtowicz, Robert, Old Dominion University (Fri. p.m., PS24), Session Chair Woods, Mary N., Cornell University (Thurs. p.m., PS10) Woodworth, Matthew, [Duke University] (Thurs. p.m., PS12), Session Chair Yoder, Jon, Syracuse University (Sat. a.m., PS27) Young, Victoria M., University of St. Thomas (Thurs. a.m., PS5), Session Chair Yu, Shuishan, Oakland University (Fri. a.m., PS14)

49 spe akers and sessi on chairs |


HOTEL INFORMATION Headquarters Hotel New Orleans Marriott at the Convention Center 859 Convention Center Blvd. New Orleans, LA 70130 504.613.2888 800.305.6342 504.613.2890 (fax) www.sah.org, for a direct link to the hotel website and link to book your reservation online for the 2011 Annual Meeting. The SAH room rate is $180, single or double occupancy, plus applicable taxes. This rate includes a $5.00 assessment fee to offset the Annual Meeting costs. SAH has negotiated this special rate with the New Orleans Marriott at the Convention Center, based on a quota of rooms filled by SAH Annual Meeting attendees. Please do not use alternate booking sources (Expedia, etc.) to reserve your hotel accommodations, as your room will not be counted toward the required SAH quota. If the quota is not met, SAH will be liable for attrition fees. This could result in higher fees for future meetings.

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Please make your reservations as early as possible, but no later than February 15, 2011. Due to the popularity of this meeting, SAH will not guarantee that your preferred room type will be available. SAH has anticipated a large number of participants and has secured enough rooms for the meeting. Reservations will be accepted based on availability at the time of booking. If the total number of allotted rooms sells out before February 15, 2011, SAH will post a list of alternate hotels in the area on the SAH website. In order to support the meeting overall, SAH asks that you stay at the meeting hotel. Be sure to list any roommates. SAH will compare the hotel’s rooming lists with the SAH registration list. If SAH does not see the attendee’s name on the rooming list, SAH will research and determine if the attendee has paid the correct registration fee. There is an additional $100 registration fee for all attendees not staying at the meeting hotel or living outside a 75-mile radius of the meeting city. Staying at the headquarters hotels helps offset the expenses related to the Annual Meeting.

Check-in time: 3:00 p.m. Check-out time: 12:00 p.m.

please bring this tweeting from the program with you to annual meeting? add this new orleans hashtag to your tweets to join the conversation: #sah2011


Transportation information

Airport Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport (MSY) 504.464.0831

Driving directions from airport to hotel:

The headquarters hotel is 14 miles SE of the airport. Take I-10 East to Downtown, exit at Poydras St. Follow Poydras St. Go straight for 1 mile. Turn right onto Convention Center Boulevard. Hotel is on the right.

This hotel does not provide shuttle service.

Alternate transportation from airport to hotel

Airport Shuttle 504.522-3500 $20 (one way); reservation required

SAH is able to offer a discount using Airport Shuttle with the advance purchase of a roundtrip ticket, a $3.00 savings. Visit the SAH website for a link to make your reservations.

Bus: $2.50 (one way) Taxi: $33.00 (estimated fare, one way)

Other transportation Bus New Orleans Gray Line (bus station is 1 mile W of the headquarters hotel) www.graylineneworleans.com

Hotel Parking On-site parking: $10 hourly; $31 daily Valet parking: $31 daily Off-site parking: $5 hourly; $20 daily; 0–6 hours, $12; 6–12 hours, $16

transp ortation |

Car Rental (nearby) Hertz 901 Convention Center Blvd. New Orleans, LA 70130 504.568.1645 www.hertz.com/rentacar/reservation

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Train Amtrak (New Orleans Amtrak station is 1 mile from the headquarters hotel)


New Orleans Sites of Interest Museums, Gardens, and Attractions Contemporary Arts Center 900 Camp St. 504.528.3805 cacno.org

Louisiana State Museum 751 Chartres St. 800.568.6968 http://lsm.crt.state.la.us/

New Orleans Botanical Garden Victory Ave., City Park 504.483.9386 neworleanscityepark.com/garden

National World War II Museum 945 Magazine St. 800.273.4463 nationalww2museum.org

Audubon Aquarium of the Americas 1 Canal St. 504.581.4629 auduboninstitute.org

New Orleans Museum of Art 1 Collins C. Diboll Circle, City Park 504.658.4100 noma.org

Audubon Insectarium 423 Canal St. 504.581.4629 auduboninstitute.org The Historic New Orleans Collection 533 Royal St. 504.523.4662 hnoc.org

Ogden Museum of Southern Art/ University of New Orleans 925 Camp St. 504.539.9600 ogdenmuseum.org Southern Food & Beverage Museum 1 Poydras St.—Riverwalk 504.569.0405 southernfood.org

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House of Broel 2220 St. Charles Ave. 800.827.4325 houseofbroel.com

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Independent Sellers of Antiquarian Books, Prints, and Drawings and Historical Artifacts Arcadian Books & Art Prints 714 Orleans Ave. 504.523.4138 Beckham’s Book Shop 228 Decatur St. 504.522.9875 Crescent City Books 230 Chartres St. 504.524.4997 crescentcitybooks.com

Faulkner House Books 624 Pirate’s Alley 504.524.2940 faulknerhouse.net The Sword and Pen 528 Royal St. 504.523.7741 swordandpenorleans.com Vintage 429 429 Royal St. 866.846.8429 vintage429.com


SOCIETY OF ARCHITECTURAL HISTORIANS

Officers Dianne Harris, President Abigail A. Van Slyck, 1st Vice President Ken Breisch, 2nd Vice President Gail G. Fenske, Secretary Henry H. Kuehn, Treasurer Jan Grayson, Assistant Treasurer Pauline A. Saliga, Executive Director

Directors Daniel Abramson 2013 Nezar AlSayyad 2012 Suzanne Blier 2012 Wanda Bubriski 2013 Jesús Escobar 2012 Sarah Williams Goldhagen 2013 Dorothy Metzger Habel 2011 Richard W. Hayes 2013 Zeynep Kezer 2011 Alona Nitzan-Shiftan 2013 Ken Tadashi Oshima 2011 Robert Rubin 2012 Despina Stratigakos 2011 Michael Waters 2011 Wim de Wit 2012

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BUS Editor-in-Chief, Karen Kingsley BUS Associate Editors, Samuel D. Albert and Gabrielle Esperdy BUS Assistant Editors, Brian C. Clancy, Jeffrey Klee, and Julie Nicoletta Budget and Audit Committee Chair, Richard Hayes Chapter Liaison, M. Bridget Maley Investment Committee Chair, Nezar AlSayyad JSAH Editor, David Brownlee JSAH Editor Designate, Swati Chattopadhyay Founding Editor JSAH Online, Hilary Ballon JSAH Managing Editor, Mary Christian JSAH Book Review Editor, North and South America, Keith Eggener JSAH Book Review Editor, Europe, Africa, Asia to 1750, Jesús Escobar JSAH Book Review Editor, Europe, Africa, Asia from 1750, John Maciuika JSAH Exhibition Review Editor, David G. DeLong JSAH Multimedia Review Editor, Kazys Varnelis Newsletter Editor, Pauline A. Saliga SAH Communities Editor, Pauline A. Saliga Book List Editor, Barbara Opar Nominating Committee Chair, Abigail Van Slyck Preservation Officer, David Fixler Study Tour Committee Chair, Ken Breisch


2011 Book Awards and Committee Members Antoinette Forrester Downing Award Robert Melnick, Chair Mary Beth Betts Jorge Ortero-Pailos JSAH Founders’ Award Sarah Williams Goldhagen, Chair Gabrielle Esperdy Volker Welter Alice Davis Hitchcock Award Jonathan M. Reynolds, Chair Paula Lupkin Gwendolyn Wright Philip Johnson Award Wim de Wit, Chair Jonathan Massey Erik Neil Spiro Kostof Award Swati Chattapadhyay, Chair Greg Hise Max Page Elisabeth Blair MacDougall Award Heather Hyde-Minor, Chair John Beardsley Medina Lasansky

Support for SAH Annual Meeting Fellowships/Travel Awards

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The availability of travel awards for graduate students and international speakers helps to ensure participation in the SAH Annual Meeting by a broad spectrum of outstanding scholars. These awards are made possible by the generous support of SAH members. Much-needed contributions to the funds listed below may be made on the registration form in the space provided. Donations given at this time will be used to support travel to the Annual Meeting. Thank you for your contribution.

Rosann S. Berry Annual Meeting Fellowship Fund

The Rosann S. Berry Annual Meeting Fellowship is awarded each year to enable an SAH student member engaged in advanced graduate study to attend the SAH Annual Meeting. The award consists of a reimbursable stipend of up to $1,000 to be used to offset costs of travel, meeting registration, lodging, and meals directly related to the meeting. Awarded for the first time in 1984, the fellowship is named in honor of Rosann S. Berry, who served as the Executive Secretary of the SAH from 1955 to 1980.


Spiro Kostof Annual Meeting Fellowship Fund

The Spiro Kostof Annual Meeting Fellowship is awarded each year to enable an SAH student member engaged in advanced graduate study to attend the SAH Annual Meeting. The award consists of a reimbursable stipend of up to $1,000 to be used to offset costs of travel, meeting registration, lodging, and meals directly related to the meeting. Awarded for the first time in 1999, the fellowship is named in honor of distinguished scholar Spiro Kostof.

George R. Collins Memorial Fund

A stipend from the George R. Collins Memorial Fund is awarded each year to support the travel of international speakers attending the SAH Annual Meeting. The award consists of a reimbursable stipend of up to $1,000 to be used to offset costs of travel, meeting registration, lodging, and meals directly related to the meeting. The stipend is restricted to foreign scholars who present papers on post–eighteenth-century topics. The SAH established the George R. Collins Memorial Fund in 1993 as a result of the generosity of Christiane Crasemann Collins and the family of the late George R. Collins.

SAH Annual Meeting Fellowship Fund

Several stipends from the SAH Annual Meeting Fellowship Fund are awarded each year to support the travel of senior scholars, graduate students, and independent scholars as well as international and domestic speakers attending the SAH Annual Meeting. Each award consists of a reimbursable stipend of up to $1000 to be used to offset costs of travel, meeting registration, lodging, and meals directly related to the meeting.

Advertisers

Penn State Press, page 35 SAHARA, outside back cover SAH Membership Services, inside front cover University of Minnesota Press, page 9 University of Virginia Press, page 8 Yale University Press, pages 28–29

sah |

ARTstor JSAH McFarland & Company Penn State Press Rizzoli International Publications SAH Study Tours Scholar’s Choice University of Pittsburg Press John Wiley & Sons Yale University Press

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Exhibitors


SAH Staff Pauline A. Saliga, Executive Director Anne Hill Bird, Director of Membership F. Robert Drum, Comptroller and Director of Operations Beth Eifrig, Assistant Director of Membership and Programs Kara Elliott-Ortega, Media and Communications Kathryn Sturm, Director of Programs, SAH Brochure Ken Carls, Design Stephanie Salomon, Editor Photos Courtesy New Orleans Convention and Visitors Bureau 64th Annual Meeting Committee Abigail A. Van Slyck, General Chair Robert A. González, Local Chair Eugene D. Cizek, Historic Preservation Seminar Ann Masson, Volunteer Coordinator Pauline A. Saliga, Executive Director

The Donald I. Perry Fund of SAH is has provided partial underwriting for the audiovisual expenses at the 64th Annual Meeting. Meeting Partners

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We thank the following individuals, organizations, and companies that have provided support through volunteering time and talent or complimentary/reduced rates: The Architect’s Newspaper Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library, Columbia University New Orleans Marriott at the Convention Center A full listing of our generous partners and sponsors can be found on the SAH website and on the signage at the Annual Meeting.

The Society of Architectural Historians is registered with the American Institute of Architects’ Continuing Education system to provide credit for participation in various events at the Annual Meeting, i.e., the Historic Preservation Seminar, Introductory Address, Plenary Talk, paper sessions, and tours. To receive credit, please provide your AIA Member number in the space provided on the registration form. A customized participation form will be included in your registration packet to be returned, signed, at the conclusion of the Annual Meeting to the SAH Registration/Information Desk.


MEETING AT A GLANCE 8:00 a.m.–7:00 p.m. 9:00 a.m.–1:30 p.m. 1:00–4:30 p.m. 3:00–7:00 p.m. 6:30–7:30 p.m. 7:45–8:15 p.m. 8:15–8:45 p.m.

Wednesday, April 13 Registration/Information Desk Open Historic Preservation Seminar Tours Exhibits Open Opening Reception SAH Business Meeting Introductory Address

7:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m. 7:30–8:30 a.m. 8:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m. 8:00–8:45 a.m. 8:00–9:00 a.m. 9:00–11:30 a.m. 11:30 a.m.–2:00 p.m. Midday 12:00–4:00 p.m. 2:00–4:30 p.m. 4:00–5:00 p.m. 6:30–7:30 p.m. 7:45–8:30 p.m. 8:30–9:00 p.m.

Thursday, April 14 Speaker Ready Room (available first-come first-served) Speakers’ Breakfast (Thursday speakers and session chairs only) Registration/Information Desk Open New Attendee Orientation Exhibits Open Paper Sessions, PS1–6 Exhibits Open BUS, CASVA, EAHN, Grant Funders Panel Tours (See p. 36) Paper Sessions, PS7–12 Exhibits Open Awards Reception Awards Ceremony Plenary Talk

7:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m. 7:30–8:30 a.m. 8:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m. 8:00–9:00 a.m. 9:00–11:30 a.m. 11:30 a.m.–2:00 p.m. Midday 12:00–2:30 p.m. 2:00–4:30 p.m. 4:00–5:00 p.m. 5:00–7:00 p.m.

Friday, April 15 Speaker Ready Room (available first-come first-served) Speakers’ Breakfast (Friday speakers and session chairs only) Registration/Information Desk Open Exhibits Open Paper Sessions, PS14–18 Exhibits Open NEH Summer Program Opportunities, Graduate Student Roundtable, Landscape History Chapter, Urban Palimpsest Roundtable, DOCOMOMO US Tours (See p. 36) Paper Sessions, PS19–24 Exhibits Open Louis Sullivan Documentary Film Screening

7:30–8:30 a.m. 8:00 a.m.–2:00 p.m. 8:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m. 9:00–11:30 a.m. 12:00–4:00 p.m. 1:00–4:30 p.m. 6:30–9:00 p.m. 9:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

Saturday, April 16 Speakers’ Breakfast (Saturday speakers and session chairs only) Registration/Information Desk Open Exhibits Open Paper Sessions, PS 25–30 SAH Community Project Tours (See p. 36) SAH Benefit Sunday, April 17 Tours (See p. 36)


MARK YOUR CALENDARS! 65th Annual Meeting April 18–22, 2012 | Detroit, Michigan Society of Architectural Historians 1365 North Astor Street | Chicago, Illinois 60610-2144

SAHARA is an online photo archive developed by SAH for those who have a passion for architecture and landscape and urban design. Users of SAHARA can both contribute their own digital photographs and download the photos of others from the online archive. The highly authoritative image archive has global coverage and serves the needs of those who practice, teach, research and write about architecture, landscape architecture, urban planning, engineering. SAHARA is a benefit of membership in SAH. To learn more about SAHARA visit www.saharaonline.org Initial development of SAHARA has been funded by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

SAH 2011 Annual Meeting Program  

Annual Meeting Program Society of Architectural Historians New Orleans, Louisiana 64th Annual Meeting April 13-17, 2011

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