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THE LOST FOREST Restoring the Ecological State of Angke Kapuk Mangrove Forest, North Jakarta, Indonesia


The above picture shows the condition of of coastal line along the Angke Kapuk Mangrove Forest that has been degraded by abrasion.

The coastal abrasion processes due to the current has caused the coastline along North Jakarta coast retreating further to the south. As a result, the 100 meter width and 1.780 meter length coastal area along the Angke Kapuk Mangrove Forest “has disappeared’ in recent years.


The Lost Forest is a documentation photography on the initiative movement of community who joins ‘Sahabat Bakau’ in restoring the environmental conditions of the lost mangrove forests. Ecological restoration movement of Angke Kapuk Forest aims at reviving the mangrove ecosystems and its wildlife, providing access to acknowledge and educate the public about the mangroves and its habitats. This movement also opens up opportunities in the utilization of mangrove forests for the benefit of communities in the vicinity. Who is ‘Sahabat Bakau’? ‘Sahabat Bakau’ is a movement to attract public attention as well as public concern on the ecosystem and environmental conditions about its function and preservation, are threatened particularly for the mangrove forest ecosystem. As an informal community of environmentalists, ‘Sahabat Bakau’ seeks partnership and collaborate with various other environmentalist communities, in an effort to restore the mangrove ecosystem in the north of Jakarta which has been degraded by nature. To regain the mangrove ecosystem, several groups of stakeholders who are members of ‘Sahabat Bakau’ have raised an initiative to implement Ecological Restoration Program of Angke Kapuk Forest. The movement is also expected to encourage community initiative and participation in joint efforts to undertake the restoration of mangrove forests and preserve its function.


01

R E V I VA L O F A L O N G L O S T F O R E S T Mangrove live on the edge at the intersection between land and sea.There are some 70 species from two dozen families mostly live within 30 degrees of the Equator, but a few hardy types have adapted to temperate climates.


02

P n e u m a t o p h o r e ( B R E AT H I N G T U B E S ) Mangroves grow well on land that has open water system to the sea where the change of sea water can occur every day for the mangrove roots to get “new� water every day.


03

MANGROVE FORESTS ALONG THE COAST Mangrove forests are one of of the most productive and biological ecosystems on earth. Wherever they live, they are very brilliant adapter. Mangroves are also the basis for fish breeding, a food source for water birds, monkeys, crabs, bats to the honey bee.


04

STILT ROOTS OF Rhizophora sp. Stilt roots keep the plants upright on wetland, provide them with air at high tide and in fact in some species, desalinate of sea water.


05

LONE SEEDLING OF Avicennia sp. Avicennia sp. requires sea water and fresh water as a nutrition source, as well as river water that is full of mineral for sediment and swamp as its place to grow.


06

STEMS OF Rhizophora mucronata Rhizophora mucronata flourish in brackish water. They can grow to 25 feet. The roots help stabilizing the tree and create a home for other plants and nests for the occupants of the mangrove ecosystem including fish, birds and crocodiles.


07

P R O PA G U L E S O F R h i z o p h o r a m u c r o n a t a Propagule will be mature in its parent tree before it fall and float to shallow water and start a new colony.


08

GOLDEN LIGHT SHINING ON MANGROVE FORESTS The afternoon sunlight accompanies the silence of mangrove forests.


09

AERIAL ROOTS Aerial roots are home to swarms of mosquitoes, crabs, shrimp and fish.


10

C R A B - E AT I N G M O N K E Y A long-tailed macaque is enjoying his freedom, this species is commonly known as the crab-eating macaque because they are often seen foraging beaches for crabs.


11

M a c a c a f a s c i c u l a r i s ( L O N G - TA I L E D M A C A Q U E ) Macaca fascicularis is a very social animal that lives in groups of 5–60 or more animals. Group size often depends on the level of predation and availability of food.


12

GOLDEN ORB SPIDER & LITTLE BABY This large tropical spider is mainly found in Asia. A ferocious looking arachnid whose torso is the size of a human male thumb. Supposedly mildly venomous and non lethal to humans. Its male counter part is a hundred times smaller. The web it spins is reputedly the strongest in the world and each web is capable of lasting a year. Average size of its web spans about 4 feet wide.


13

J U V E N I L E F I S H H A B I TAT Mangroves can act as nurseries to juvenile fish offering protection from predators and a ready supply of food.


14

Ucaa sp. (MUD CRAB) Ucaa sp. is an keystone species in mangrove ecosystems. There are about 61 species of shrimp and crabs that live in mangrove habitat of Indonesia and almost all species are edible and have high economic value.


15

NEW LIFE Snail eggs signify the recovery of food chain habitat in the restoration region of mangrove forests. The unique mangrove ecosystem with a different root system than other plants and inhabited by various animals, is a valuable asset as a field of research and tourism.


16

T R O P I C A L L E AT H E R L E A F This slug hatches from eggs some species has several adaptations for living in dry conditions. They search for food nearly at night, and stay buried in the soil during the day. Larger specimens are active during the day sometimes. This slug can grow up from 0.5 cm to approximately 4 cm in length in 7 months.


17

LUGWORM Lugworms feed on decayed organic matter and ingest sand along with the food particles. At low tide their coiled casts (masses of excrement) may often be seen piled above their burrows. Their burrows may extend as deep as 60 cm (2 feet). The animals are hermaphroditic; i.e., functional reproductive organs of both sexes occur in the same individual. The eggs of one individual, however, are fertilized by the sperm of another.


18

S U N B AT H I N G Sunning can dislodge feather parasites because the excess heat will encourage insects to move to other places in a bird’s plumage. It is essential to get rid of these parasites – the tiny insects that infect feathers can cause problems for a bird’s flight, insulation and appearance, all of which can impact its survival.


19

PA C I F I C R E E F H E R O N Also known as the Pacific Reef Egret or Eastern Reef Egret, they are found in many areas of Asia. This charcoal-grey bird lay clutches of eggs year round in colonies in the jungle, between palms and mangroves.


20

FLYING HOME The birds return to their homes after a day of fishing on the coast.


21

B R E A K FA S T T I M E A thriving mangrove planting area is home to brackish water fish and a strategic location for the water bird to find food.


2 4 26

N AT U R E S TA B I L I Z E R Through stabilization of their surroundings, mangroves create a community for other plants and animals providing nesting and hunting habitat for a diverse array of organisms, including fish, birds, and crocodiles.


23

E g r e t t a s p . ( WAT E R B I R D ) Egretta sp. feeds in shallow water or drier habitats, feeding mainly on fish, frogs, small mammals, and occasionally small reptiles and insects, spearing them with its long, sharp bill most of the time by standing still and allowing the prey to come within its striking distance of its bill which it uses as a spear.


24

HEALTHY ECOSYSTEM Mangrove planting areas that now increasingly flourish provide the fields of food for the water bird, reef heron, and other types of sea birds.


25

SEA DEFENSE Stone embankments (sea defense) built 1.780 meters along the coast serve as protection for the young mangroves from the sea waves.


26

T H E C O A S TA L L I T T E R Litter originating from Jakarta and its surrounding areas are drifted in the flow of sea waves and fulfilling the coast of mangrove forests.


27

PRESERVING THE MANGROVE FORESTS Litter cleaning is done regularly. This activity is essential for sustaining the growth of mangrove seedlings around the restoration area.


28

HAND IN HAND CLEANING UP THE LITTER Women of the Kamal fishing village contribute in cleaning up the coast of mangrove forests from litter.


29

A C L E A N C O A S TA L E N V I R O N M E N T Potrait of one of the Kamal fishing village people who has contributed in the cleaning and greening of the coastal area and mangrove forests.


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INDEX 01

R E V I VA L O F A L O N G L O S T F O R E S T

18

S U N B AT H I N G

02

P n e u m a t o p h o r e ( B R E AT H I N G T U B E S )

19

PA C I F I C R E E F H E R O N

03

MANGROVE FORESTS ALONG THE COAST

20

FLYING HOME

04

STILT ROOTS OF Rhizophora sp.

21

B R E A K FA S T T I M E

05

LONE SEEDLING OF Avicennia sp.

22

N AT U R E S TA B I L I Z E R

06

STEM OF Rhizophora mucronata

23

E g r e t t a s p . ( WAT E R B I R D )

07

P R O PA G U L E S O F R h i z o p h o r a m u c r o n a t a

24

HEALTHY ECOSYSTEM

08

GOLDEN LIGHT SHINING ON MANGROVE FORESTS

25

SEA DEFENSE

09

AERIAL ROOTS

26

T H E C O A S TA L L I T T E R

10

C R A B - E AT I N G M O N K E Y

27

PRESERVING THE MANGROVE FORESTS

11

M a c a c a f a s c i c u l a r i s ( L O N G - TA I L E D M A C A Q U E )

28

HAND IN HAND CLEANING UP THE LITTER

12

GOLDEN ORB SPIDER & LITTLE BABY

29

A C L E A N C O A S TA L E N V I R O N M E N T

13

J U V E N I L E F I S H H A B I TAT

14

Ucaa sp. (MUD CRAB)

15

NEW LIFE

16

T R O P I C A L L E AT H E R L E A F

17

LUGWORM

The Lost Forest Volume #1, June 2012 Copyright © 2012. Kapuk Naga Indah. All Rights Reserved. www.sahabatbakau.com


The Lost Forest  

The Lost Forest is a documentation photography on the initiative movement of community who joins 'Sahabat Bakau' in restoring the environmen...

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