Applications of Sagittar MN Radios

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MN-Series Radio Applications - Photographic Introduction

Photographs of the Sagittar MN Series Radios “MIMO 802.11n Radios” The photographs and graphics below are intended to provide an introduction to the MN Series Radios and a background on applications and uses e.g. sending data from IP Cameras over radio links.

Notes on the above photographs: 1. Top Left: Shows a bracket for the MN radios (pole diameter <50mm) 2. Bottom Left: There is a removable panel at the bottom of the MN Radio. You remove the panel to access the radio’s connectors. 3. Top Right: It is possible to feed power through the MN Radio, directly to an IP Camera. 4. Bottom Right: If you are going to connect to an external MIMO antenna, make sure to use Reverse-SMA connectors.

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MN-Series Radio Applications - Photographic Introduction The diagram below shows how the “client” radios connect directly to IP Cameras. You can use an external MIMO Parabolic antenna to increase distance of a radio link and reduce the chances of interference (use of higher-gain, larger-sized antennas makes sure there is higher received power which helps when interference is a concern. Also, higher-gain, larger-sized antennas have a narrower beamwidth, which helps reduce a radio’s susceptibility to interference). In the diagram below, on the right, you can see how the “Base Station” radio can also be connected to an external Sector antenna (examples of MIMO Sector antenna beamwidths are 90Degrees and 65 Degrees). In the example below, power to the IP Camera is fed from a +15VDC supply, through a PoE (Power-overEthernet) injector and the Sagittar MN-Series Radio.

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MN-Series Radio Applications - Photographic Introduction The diagram below shows how the “client” radios connect to IP Cameras. In the diagram, on the right, you can see how the “Base Station” radio in optionally connected to an external Sector antenna (examples of MIMO Sector antennas beamwidths are 90Degrees and 65 Degrees). In the example below, power to the IP Camera is fed from a +12V battery through a PoE injector to the Sagittar MN-Series Radio. In the diagram below, power supply to the IP Camera is from a battery.

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MN-Series Radio Applications - Photographic Introduction “AP” to “Client” Mode The diagram below shows how the “client” radios connect to a “Base Station”, which is an MN Radio working in “AP Mode” (Access Point Mode). The frequency is set in the “Base Station” radio that is configured to work in AP Mode. When the frequency of the AP is changed by the user, the Client Radios will all automatically “follow” the frequency of the AP. The radio’s “half power” beamwidth is 35 degrees for azimuth (i.e. horizontal) and 15 degrees for elevation (i.e. vertical).

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MN-Series Radio Applications - Photographic Introduction “Bridge” Connection Mode The diagram below shows how the “client” radios connect to a “Base Station” using Bridging Mode. The frequency is set in the Clients AND in the “Base Station Radio”. You establish radio link connections by entering the MAC address of the “remote radio” within the “local radio” (and you enter the MAC address of the “local radio” within the “remote radio”). To change frequencies of all connected radios, you must change the frequency settings in ALL bridged Radios.

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