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EXPERIENCE THE SAG HARBOR

“I would like to have the people impressed with their obligations as guardians of children, to see to it that their training and education be such that, in the future of this little hamlet, as in the past, its good women and noble men may enrich the world.” - Margaret Olivia Slovum Sage, 1908

www.sagharborschools.org

PIERSON HIGH SCHOOL

Course Selection Guide 2018-2019

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PIERSON HIGH SCHOOL Sag Harbor Union Free School District Mission Statement The Sag Harbor School District in partnership with all members of the community is committed to equity in education; its mission is to provide students with a safe, child-centered environment which fosters personal, academic, and creative excellence. This will empower students to become responsible and respectful members of a global society. As lifelong learners, students will be prepared to move successfully to the next stage of their lives.

Table of Contents Mission Statement …….…..……….2 Contact Information ……………….2 Principal’s Message …………………3 Pupil Personnel Services and Guidance ……………….…………..….4 Scheduling Process …………………5 Graduation Requirements ……….6 Exam Requirements ………………..7 International Baccalaureate .……8 Advanced Placement and Excelsior Program …….………….10 Clubs and Extracurricular Activities ………………………………11 Course Offerings ……………..……12 Art …………………………….12 English ………………………15 English as a Second Language ………………..…17 Family Sciences ………….18 Freshman Studies ……….18 Languages Other Than English ………………………19 Mathematics ………………21 Music ……………………..…24 Occupational Education ………………….26 Physical Education ……..27 Science ………………..……29 Social Studies …….………33 Technology ………..………36 Faculty List ………………..…………37

Sag Harbor Union Free School District Administration Mrs. Katy Graves ~ Superintendent of Schools Dr. Carleen Meers ~ Director of Pupil Personnel Services Mr. Scott Fisher ~ Director of Technology Mr. Eric Bramoff ~ Director of Athletics, Health, Wellness, Personnel, and Supervisor of Physical Education Dr. Phil Kenter ~ School Business Administrator Mr. Jeff Nichols ~ Principal, Pierson Middle~High School Mr. Michael Guinan ~ Assistant Principal, High School Ms. Brittany Carriero ~ Assistant Principal, Middle School

Board of Education Ms. January Kerr ~ President Ms. Diana Kolhoff ~ Vice President Mr. Alex Kriegsman Ms. Susan Lamontagne Ms. Susan Schaefer Ms. Jordana Sobey Ms. Chris Tice

Pierson Middle ~ High School 200 Jermain Avenue Sag Harbor, New York 11963 (631) 725-5302

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Principal’s Message Dear Student: The years that students spend at Pierson Middle-High School can be challenging and rewarding. The faculty and staff provide a comprehensive education to prepare students for the next phase in their lives. Education is a lifelong process. This course selection booklet has been produced to better prepare both students and parents for the educational decisions they have to make. Please take the time to carefully read the course descriptions as you construct your schedule. Ask your parents, teachers, counselors and administrators for advice. Try to choose courses that will not only satisfy your graduation requirements, but also open up future possibilities for you once you leave Pierson. We are here to help if you have any questions. We wish you great academic success as you plan for the future. Yours truly, Jeff Nichols Principal

Michael Guinan Assistant Principal

Brittany Carriero Assistant Principal

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Office of Pupil Personnel Services and Special Education The Office of Pupil Personnel Services provides a full range of services from part-time to full-time special education to all students ages 3-21 who have been identified and evaluated in accordance with the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). In addition, the district offers a high school Life Skills class and a middle school self-contained classroom for students with emotional disabilities. The procedures and policies of the Sag Harbor School District are designed to ensure the right to a “free and appropriate public education, in the least restrictive environment” for all children found to have a disability. The Office of Pupil Personnel Services strives to promote students’ academic, physical, and social/ emotional growth in a safe environment that allows students to reach their maximum potential in all areas of their development. This is accomplished by providing specially designed instruction based on the individual needs of students identified as disabled by the district’s Committee on Special Education (CSE) or Committee on Preschool Special Education (CPSE). The classroom instruction is supplemented by other professionals, including special education instructors, reading teachers, speech therapists, occupational therapists, physical therapists, registered nurses, psychologists, social workers, and guidance counselors.

Pierson High School Guidance and Counseling Center The Pierson Guidance and Counseling Office is here to assist students and families. Having a relationship with your guidance counselor is strongly encouraged so please do not hesitate to visit often. We hope that our webpage can provide connections to important information and useful resources to help students and families through all phases of high school. As the new school year approaches, the Pierson Guidance Office would like to welcome all new and returning students. We encourage all students to utilize our facilities as we are prepared to assist you in a variety of ways. Some of the services offered by our department include: personal counseling, academic guidance, career exploration, college planning, and calculation of averages and credits. Support of students and parents throughout the middle and high school years is our priority. Our office can be reached by calling 725-5302 ext 711.

NON~DISCRIMINATORY NOTICE The Sag Harbor Union Free School District, in compliance with Federal and State statutes and regulations, does not unlawfully discriminate on the basis of sex, race, color, creed, disability, marital status, veteran status, national origin or age. Compliance insures that discrimination does not occur in any policies or practices of admission, program or activity, placement or employment.

Adam Mingione ~ Guidance Counselor Margaret Motto ~ College and Career Counselor

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The Scheduling Process Please be advised that every attempt will be made to meet student program requests. However, all students must realize that not all courses contained herein may be offered each school year, as various budgetary, enrollment, and personnel factors may prevent some courses from being offered. Requested alternate courses will be used when courses are not oered or when scheduling conflicts occur. Please review the following steps for scheduling: Step 1

After considering the courses they have completed and those they are currently taking, students will meet with a guidance counselor to submit their initial course requests for the following school year.

Step 2

A follow-up meeting with the student’s parent(s) will then be scheduled to further refine and eventually finalize the course requests.

Step 3

Students will receive their schedule on or around the last day of classes of the current school year. Counselors will be available to fix any errors or make any necessary changes, but please be advised that a student’s final schedule may not exactly match their list of course requests due to issues involving class size, availability, and conflicts with other desired courses.

It should be noted that the diploma and program requirements listed on the next several pages are minimum requirements. Students are encouraged to take the most academically rigorous program possible in order to develop their personal talents to the fullest.

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Graduation Requirements Students must meet the basic requirements for graduation and may earn a New York State Regents Diploma or a Regents Diploma with Advanced Designation. Additionally, all Pierson students must complete a total of 10 hours of community service during their high school tenure and log them with the school community service coordinator in order to be eligible to graduate.

Course Requirements REQUIRED SUBJECTS

ADVANCED REGENTS DIPLOMA

REGENTS DIPLOMA

English

4 Credits

4 Credits

Social Studies

4 Credits

4 Credits

Mathematics

3 Credits

3 Credits

Science

3 Credits

3 Credits

LOTE

3 Credits

1 Credit

Health

1/2 Credit

1/2 Credit

Art/Music

1 Credit

1 Credit

Physical Education

2 Credits

2 Credits

Electives

1 1/2 Credits

3 1/2 Credits

Total

22 Credits

22 Credits

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The table below illustrates the traditional Regents exam pathway to graduation, including a passing mark of 65 on all exams. However, alternative pathways are also available to students with certain unique needs and circumstances. For more information, please consult your counselor.

REGENTS EXAMS

ADVANCED REGENTS DIPLOMA

REGENTS DIPLOMA

English Language Arts Regents

Algebra

Geometry

Algebra 11

Global History & Geography Regents

U.S. History & Government Regents

Science Regents

✓ 2 Sciences

✓ 1 Science

LOTE Local Assessment/Checkpoint B *

* Students may substitute 5 units of credit earned in Art, Music, or Occupational Education.

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International Baccalaureate Diploma Program The International Baccalaureate Diploma Program is a challenging two-year curriculum, primarily aimed at students ages 16 to 19. The program leads to a diploma that is widely recognized by the world’s leading universities. Students learn more than a collection of facts. The Diploma Program prepares students for higher learning and encourages them to: ● ask challenging questions ● learn how to learn ● develop a strong sense of their own identity and culture ● develop the ability to communicate with and understand people from other countries and cultures

Above: The first graduating class of Pierson IB Diploma Program students (2014) Students study six subjects selected from the subject groups. Normally three subjects are studied at higher levels and the remaining three subjects are studied at standard levels. All three parts of the core - Extended Essay, Theory of Knowledge, and Creativity, Action, Service - are compulsory and are central to the philosophy of the Diploma Program. Extended Essay: The extended essay has a prescribed limit of 4,000 words. It offers the opportunity to investigate a topic of individual interest, and acquaints students with the independent research and writing skills expected at university. Theory of Knowledge (TOK): The interdisciplinary TOK course is designed to provide coherence by exploring the nature of knowledge across disciplines, encouraging an appreciation of other cultural perspectives. Creativity, Action, Service (CAS): Participation in the school’s CAS program encourages students to be involved in artistic pursuits, sports, and community service work, thus fostering students’ awareness and appreciation of life outside the academic arena. 8


Choosing International Baccalaureate Diploma Program Subjects The demands of the IB DP cannot be underestimated. Higher level courses take students deeply into disciplines, while the overall range of activities guarantees a personal preparation that is valuable for adult life and the demands of university study. The choice of subjects usually requires much advice and guidance. Questions to bear in mind include: ● The difficult academic demands of the subjects at Higher Level ● The relevance of courses for the student’s possible career ● Timetable limitations (not all combinations are possible)

IB Diploma Program Subject Guide Group

Available Courses

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Language A (Literature)

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Language B: French; Spanish

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History of the Americas

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Biology; Chemistry; Computer Science; Environmental Systems and Societies; Physics

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Mathematics; Math Studies

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Music; Visual Art

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Advanced Placement Courses and Excelsior Program Pierson High School offers a variety of Advanced Placement (AP) courses. These are college level courses and require a significant commitment in terms of work and time. Any student enrolled in an AP course must take the corresponding assessments when they are given. In addition, students must also take all of the required New York State Regents Examinations. It is recommended that students have an 85 or higher average in the preceding course along with a teacher recommendation. Although it is encouraged that families strongly consider the recommendation of the faculty and administration, all students have the opportunity to enroll in advanced courses. All AP classes carry an additional weight on a student’s grade point average. Pierson High School offers a dual enrollment program, the Excelsior Program, through Suffolk County Community College. Students who choose to enroll in the program can earn college credits for courses taken at Pierson. Credits are offered at the reduced rate of $50 per credit and are to be paid for by the student. The Pierson courses included in the Excelsior program are:

PIERSON HIGH SCHOOL COURSE NAME

SUFFOLK COMMUNITY COLLEGE COURSE NAME

CREDITS AWARDED

AP World History

Western Civilization I

3 Credits

CPR/First Aid

Safety, First Aid, and CPR

3 Credits

Spanish IV

Intermediate Spanish I

3 Credits

AP Calculus

Calculus with Analytic Geometry I

4 Credits

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Pierson High School Clubs and Extracurricular Activities Pierson High School offers students the opportunity to participate in numerous clubs and extracurricular activities throughout the school year. Participation in clubs and activities enhances and supplements the teaching and learning that takes place inside of the classroom on a daily basis. The National Center for Education Statistics (1995) finds that clubs and extracurricular activities offer opportunities for students to learn the values of teamwork, individual and group responsibility, physical strength, endurance, competition, diversity, and a sense of culture and community. Extracurricular activities provide a channel for reinforcing the lessons learned in the classroom, offering students the opportunity to apply academic skills in a real-world context, and are thus considered part of a well-rounded education. Below is a partial list of clubs and activities offered at Pierson High School. Community Service CPR Club Gay Straight Alliance High School Musical High School Play HUGS Math League Model United Nations National Honor Society Newspaper Open Art Studio Quiz Bowl Robotics Student Council Yearbook

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Art Department All students must complete one credit of art or music to be eligible for graduation. Any student wishing to take any of the art department courses must begin with Studio Art or Design and Draw. After completing one of those classes, the student may take any combination of art electives. Please note that not all courses listed here are offered every school year. Studio Art Grades 9 ~ 12

1 Credit Full Year

Studio Art is a foundation level high school study in art. This course introduces students to the discovery process that is art. It is a hands-on studio experience that mirrors authentic artistic practice. The course provides a foundation in drawing, painting and three-dimensional designs. Art history is examined from a pragmatic and practical perspective as a resource in art making. Assessment is based on an individualized developmental model, which measures students’ engagement, effective use of artistic process and achievement based on their artwork.
 Studio Art 2 Grades 10 ~ 12

1 Credit Full Year

This course concentrates on the process, materials and techniques common to creating effective art. Beginning where studio art leaves off, the students have the room for personal growth and development in their own creative process. The focus remains on drawing, painting and three-dimensional design. An on-going collective sketchbook/ journal is a mandatory aspect of each course. An integral part of the advanced art program is the inclusion of special projects. In the past, these have included the design and production of the Pierson literary and art ma gazine Singularity, landscape and architectural design/development, scenic

design, documentar y videos, site-specific artwork and special printmaking workshops.
 Pre-requisite: Successful completion of Studio Art/Design and Draw Printmaking Grades 10 ~ 12

1 Credit Full Year

This art course is directed toward an intensive e x p e r i e n ce i n a v a r i e t y o f p r i n t m a k i n g techniques, including block printing, Polaroid transfer, monoprints and solar prints.
 Pre-requisite: Successful completion of Studio Art and Studio Art 2 Advanced Printmaking Grades 11 ~ 12

1 Credit Full Year

This course provides a second year of Printmaking. 
 Pre -requisite: Successful completion of Printmaking

Below: A Printmaking class

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Design and Draw for Production 1 Credit Grade 9 Full Year

Photography Grades 10 ~ 12

This course can be applied to the art/music requirement for graduation. Students explore the design and drawing process of a complete set of plans for a residential structure. They learn about zoning laws and health and building department requirements to obtain a building permit for their house. Students make the following drawings throughout the year: plot, landscape, floor, elevations, electrical & plumbing, kitchen details and HVAC plans.

This course, which is an introduction to digital photography, includes learning the functions of the camera and the basics of photography, aperture and depth of field, and shutter speed. Students will also be introduced to p h o to g r a p h y h i s to r y a n d t h e w o r k o f exemplar y photographers, the use of technology, including the applications Photoshop and InDesign, the aesthetics, design, and composition associated with photography, and experience in archiving work.
 Pre-requisite: Successful completion of Studio Art

Portfolio/Visual Arts Studies 1 Credit Grades 10 ~ 12 2 Full Years

Portfolio/ Visual Art Studies is a high school level multi-age class that uses drawing as a catalyst for the understanding of artistic process. Students will be asked to transfer their understanding of process to a variety of mediums, including painting, photography, printmaking and sculpture. Advanced students developing a portfolio for college admission will also be assisted in this effort by focusing on the requirements of specific art schools and editing and digitizing their artwork. Pre-requisite: Successful completion of Studio Art and Studio Art 2 


Advanced Photography/ 2D Design Grades 10 ~ 12

1 Credit Full Year

1 Credit Full Year

Advanced Photography/2D Design is a rigorous course of study integrating the study of digital photography with two-dimensional design. The course will emphasize both an aesthetic and thematic approach to photography and will incorporate an intensive study of design principles with their application to digital media, particularly Photoshop and In Design. Students will be required to produce a photography portfolio. The final project for the course will be the design and production of a photo essay (in book form) by each student, incorporating both disciplines. The course, which requires a significant commitment of time by students outside of class time, is essential for students wishing to continue their education in the fields of photography, photo journalism, 2D design and digital media.
 Pre-requisite: Successful completion of Digital Photography Left: Art students attending a field trip at the Jackson Pollock house and museum

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IB Visual Arts Grades 11 ~ 12

1 or 2 Credits Full Year 1 or 2 Year Course Option

Pre-requisite: Successful completion of Studio Art and one Art Elective

The IB Visual Arts course encourages students to challenge their own creative and cultural expectations and boundaries. It is a thoughtprovoking course in which students develop analytical skills in problem solving and divergent thinking, while working towards technical proficiency and confidence as artm a ke r s . In a d d i t i o n to e x p l o r i n g a n d comparing visual arts from different perspectives and in dierent contexts, students are expected to engage in, experiment with and critically reflect upon a wide range of contemporary practices and media. The course is designed for students who want to go on to study visual arts in higher education, as well as for those who are seeking lifelong enrichment through visual arts. Both the SL and HL courses encourage students to actively explore the visual arts within and across a variety of local, regional, national, international and intercultural contexts. Through inquir y, investigation, reflection and creative application, visual arts students develop an appreciation for the expressive and aesthetic diversity in the world around them, becoming critically informed makers and consumers of visual culture. For the internal and external assessments, students must then exhibit their studio work and investigation workbooks and discuss their development during a recorded interview. 
 Above:

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English Department All students are required to take four credits of high school English and pass the Regents exam in order to meet graduation requirements. The department also offers IB Literature, which replaces English 11 and 12. Please note that not all courses listed here are offered every school year. English 9 Grade 9 


1 Credit Full Year

English 10 Honors Grade 1o 


The academic skills emphasized in English 9 help students prepare for their next three years of English. Student work focuses on writing skills such as language usage, organization, grammar and punctuation. Students spend much of their time reading and analyzing literature, with an emphasis on the effect of literary elements and techniques on the works being studied. Students are provided with opportunities to cooperatively learn and partake in project work.

English 10 Grade 10

This course is recommended for students who excelled in English 9, and is recommended for students advancing into IB. The course will prepare students for the higher level analysis, speaking and writing necessary to succeed in IB English 11 and 12. These students already exhibit a higher level of sophistication both in their writing style than the average English student. Therefore, many of the fundamental writing skills taught in the regular English 10 course will be omitted. In addition, it is assumed these students are avid readers and are eager to be challenged.

1 Credit Full Year

The academic skills emphasized in this course assist students in their preparation for the NYS English Regents Exam in eleventh grade. Following the guidelines presented in the NYS Standards, primary emphasis is placed on continued development of writing skills in the structure of the paragraph, the literature essay, and the anal ysis and interpretation of literature. All grammar and rules of usage are reviewed at the beginning of the year, and are reinforced as a grade component in the essays. Vocabulary is reviewed weekly to prepare for the SAT Exam.

1 Credit Full Year

English 11 Grade 11

1 Credit Full Year

This course enhances and elevates the skills necessary to develop all of the essential language proficiencies as set forth by the New York State Standards of English. Students study both classic and contemporary American literature on a complex level, responding in both discussion and written work. Emphasis is placed on well–organized and articulate essays. Supplemental work includes weekly vocabulary tests and a review of basic grammar. Students are required to take the New York State English Regents Exam in January or June.

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English 12 Grade 12 


1 Credit Full Year

The focus of this course is to prepare the graduating seniors for the different writing and literary challenges they will face in college. Student essays include college level citations, literary criticism and theme/genre studies. Major literar y works by such authors as Steinbeck, Hosseini, Shakespeare, and Foer are read. IB Language A/ English Literature Grades 11 ~ 12 


Film Study Grades 10 ~ 12

1/2 Credit Full Year/Every Other Day

This course will offer an overview of the history of the film industry and genre analysis. Students will develop criteria for evaluating and critiquing a variety of films. This is a writing course. Students will be encouraged to strengthen their persuasive writing skills as they interpret and analyze the methods and devices used by filmmakers to tell a story.

1 Credit Per Year 2 Full Years

Language A is designed for students who excelled in the traditional English class and are highly motivated readers, writers and speakers. This is a Higher Level course for students wishing to earn an IB Certificate for English. This two-year course will encompass a rich learning environment with a blend of world literature. Students are inter nal l y and externally assessed through oral presentation and written commentaries.

Below: Student winners of the annual Stony Brook University Young Artists and Writers Project

Creative Writing 1/2 Credit Grades 1o ~ 12 Full Year/Every Other Day The creative writing workshop is designed for students who enjoy English and writing. Students are encouraged to develop their creative writing talents in all genres of literature, including fiction, the short story, non-fiction, memoirs, poetry and drama. Each participant is required to submit works-inprogress. The focus of this course is to avail the student to peer editing, one-on-one conferencing with an instructor and the development of comprehensive writing skills.

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English as a New Language Department The English as a New Language (ENL) and English Language Learner (ELL) department provides a meaningful language acquisition experience for all program participants. 1 Credit ENL English Full Year Grades 9 ~ 12 ~ Required Course English Language Learners with little or no background in English develop basic English vocabulary, start to interact socially in English through role playing, and learn basic grammatical structures in order to be able to function in our school environment and our society in general. At the intermediate level, students refine their pronunciation, expand their active and receptive vocabulary, learn more advanced structures in English, work to improve their listening comprehension and spelling, and learn a variety of idiomatic expressions for social interaction. At the advanced level, students work on vocabulary development, including using multiple forms of words for different parts of speech, practice using more advanced structures in English, and refine their pronunciation. They work on structuring and editing their writing in order to meet New York State standards in English for their grade level. 


Predictions, literary response, and personal expression are encouraged through class discussions, journal writing, and creative writing. As students grow in English proficiency, they are expected to communicate more complex ideas orally and in writing. Students are expected to make critical analyses and evaluations of their reading material at all levels. In order to graduate, they must meet New York State standards in reading and writing. 0 Credits Full Year The content area instructional component for beginners shal l pro vide grade and a ge appropriate instruction in the required content area subjects in the native language and English, in a systematic and structured way, and shall be designed to develop the cognitive skills of English Language Learners.

ENL Resource

1 Credit ENL Reading Full Year Grades 9 ~ 12 ~ Required Course Like all students taking English Language Arts, ESL students gradually learn to read, write, l i s te n a n d s p e a k f o r i n f o r m a t i o n a n d understanding in their second language. In our literature-based ESL reading program, the reading selections gradually increase in difficulty as students’ skills increase. 


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Family Sciences Department Home Economics Grades 10 ~ 12

1 Credit Full Year

This course addresses proper ways to handle food in the kitchen, as well as safety, nutrition and preparation. Students gain valuable skills and knowledge through the use of cooking utensils while learning and applying various methods and techniques used in the preparation of food. Students are introduced to a variety of food products as they prepare traditional, non-traditional and cultural foods. An emphasis is placed on total product utilization and time management. As a final project, students create a cookbook consisting of recipes that were prepared throughout the year.

Freshman Studies Department 


College and Career Preparation Grade 9

1/2 Credit Full Year/Every Other Day

College and Career Prep is a required course that will provide students with direction and tools for future success. Through the application of career theory and a college prep model students will explore career options, map a plan for success, develop strategies for problem solving, and explore their personal strengths. By analyzing the world of work and their personal skill sets students will be exposed to the variety of post high school education options, including career training and college degrees and certificates. From creating a resume to analyzing job trends, this course is designed to help students understand that they have a role in creating their future. Students will use resources such as Naviance, The College Board, The Occupational Outlook Handbook, and guest speakers to help them create their own personalized plans. In collaboration with the College and Career Counselor, students will be primed for a successful career at Pierson and beyond. 18


Languages Other Than English (LOTE) Department The LOTE department oers courses in French and Spanish. Students must complete one credit of LOTE for a Regents Diploma or three credits of LOTE and pass the local assessment Checkpoint B exam for an Advanced Regents Diploma. Students completing French or Spanish in middle school must pass the Checkpoint A exam to earn one high school LOTE credit. French 111

1 Credit Full Year

Listening, speaking, reading and writing are emphasized to prepare for the Checkpoint B Exam. Vocabulary, grammar, reading, writing, auditory comprehension and oral expression continue to be emphasized. The successful completion of this course and passing of the Checkpoint B Exam fulfills the requirement for the Regents Diploma with Advanced Designation. Pre-requisite: Successful completion of French 11 Above: Students attending a field trip to Spain

Spanish 1 French 11

1 Credit Full Year

Students must have completed French 1 successfully and passed the Checkpoint A Exam in order to enroll in this course. Vocabulary, grammar, reading, writing, auditory comprehension and oral expression are emphasized. The cultural aspect of the language is cultivated and expanded. Pre-requisite: Successful completion of French 1

1 Credit Full Year

This course is a beginning level Spanish course that facilitates the implementation of the learning outcomes of first-year foreign langua ge instr uction. Students develop practical language skills and apply them in communicative situations. This course is suitable for beginning students at any level.

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Spanish 11

1 Credit Full Year

Spanish Language and Literature 1 Credit Full Year

This course builds on a successful initial second language experience by emphasizing communicative activities, both oral and written. This course is suitable for students of various abilities, helping them to develop practical language skills applicable to many everyday situations. Students practice speaking with the entire class and in small groups. Written summaries are completed after a reading to reinforce correct grammar usage. Pre-requisite: Successful completion of Spanish 1

A review of basic spoken Spanish with an eye toward discussing the cultures of Spanish speaking countries by way of advanced texts, interviews, television, newspapers, magazines, films and travel. Pre-requisite: Successful completion of Spanish 1v

Spanish 111

1 Credit Full Year

Students learn to organize their skills for the FLACS exam. They also engage in dialogues that enable them to function in a wide variety of situations that might arise when traveling in a Spanish speaking country. Completion of this course and the passing of the Checkpoint B exam are required for the Regents Diploma with Advanced Designation. Pre-requisite: Successful completion of Spanish 11 Spanish 1v

IB Language B/ Spanish or French Grades 11 ~ 12

1 Credit Per Year 2 Full Years

These courses are oered over two years (11th and 12th grades). Students develop oral and written communication skills in the target language and focus on real-world application of language skills. Topics covered include social relations, global issues, media and communication, cultural diversity, customs and traditions, health, leisure activities and science and technology. Cultural issues are examined through the lens of cultures where the target language is spoken. Students complete the IB exam in either Spanish or French in 12th grade. Pre-requisite: Successful completion of Spanish 1v or French 11

1 Credit Full Year

Spanish 1v is a continuation of the active development of the four communicative skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) within the context of the study of dierent topics of Hispanic culture. Students will watch an authentic telenovela and read excerpts from several examples of classic Spanish literature. They will complete an intense level of grammatical study and be assigned research projects and papers to write. Spanish is the language of instruction. Pre-requisite: Successful completion of Spanish 111 Above: Pierson students at Museo Reina Sofia viewing Guernica

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Mathematics Department All students must complete three credits in mathematics to meet graduation requirements. Students must pass one Regents exam to earn a Regents Diploma. Successful completion of Algebra, Geometry, and Algebra 11, plus the accompanying exams, is required to earn an Advanced Designation. Please note that not all courses listed here are offered every school year. Algebra

1 Credit Full Year

Common Core Algebra 1 will deepen and extend understanding of linear and exponential relationships by contrasting them with each other and by applying linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend, and students engage in methods for analyzing, solving, and using quadratic functions. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations. Geometry

1 Credit Full Year

The fundamental purpose of the course in Geometry is to formalize and extend students’ geometric experiences from the middle grades. Students explore more complex geometric situations and deepen their explanations of geometric relationships, moving toward formal m a t h e m a t i c a l a r g u m e n t s . Im p o r t a n t dierences exist between this Geometry course and the historical approach taken in Geometr y classes. Fo r example, transformations are emphasized early in this course. Close attention should be paid to the introductor y content for the Geometr y conceptual category found in the high school Common Core State Standards. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the

content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations. Pre-requisite: Successful Completion of Algebra Algebra 11

1 Credit Full Year

Building on their work with linear, quadratic, and exponential functions, students extend their repertoire of functions to include polynomial, rational, and radical functions. Students work closely with the expressions that define the functions and continue to expand and hone their abilities to model situations and to solve equations, including solving quadratic equations over the set of complex numbers and solving exponential equations using the properties of logarithms. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations. Pre-requisite: Successful Completion of Geometry and a passing grade on the New York State Geometry Regents Exam

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AP Statistics Grades 11 ~ 12 


1 Credit Full Year

This course introduces students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: 1) Exploring Data: Describing patterns and departures from patterns; 2) Sampling and Experimentation: Planning and conducting a study; 3) Anticipating Patterns: Exploring random phenomena using probability and simulation, and 4) Statistical Inference: Estimating population parameters and testing hypotheses. Students are required to take the AP Statistics Exam in May. Pre-requisite: Successful completion of Algebra II and Trigonometry AP Calculus AB Grades 11 ~ 12 


1 Credit Full Year

After a short, intense review of pre-calculus topics, Calculus AB introduces three new topics to students: limits, derivatives and integrals. It is a concept-based course in which students explore these topics f rom an analytical, graphical, numerical and verbal perspective. The course is challenging both in the amount of work done and in the quality of thinking required. Use of a graphing calculator and applications of principles to real-work problems are integral to the coursework. Students take the AP Calculus AB Exam in May. Pre-requisite: Successful completion of PreCalculus

AP Calculus BC Grade 12

Rule. The use of graphing calculators and reallife applications are integral to the coursework. Students take the AP Calculus BC Exam in May. Pre-requisite: Successful completion of AP Calculus AB

IB Mathematics Grades 11 ~ 12

1 Credit Full Year

This course is designed for students who already possess a good knowledge of basic mathematical concepts, and who are equipped with the skills needed to apply simple mathematical techniques correctly. The majority of these students will expect to need a sound mathematical background as they prepare for future studies in subjects such as chemistry, economics, psychology and business administration. The course focuses on introducing important mathematical concepts through the development of mathematical techniques. The intention is to introduce students to these concepts in a comprehensible and coherent way, rather than insisting on mathematical rigor. Students should, wherever possible, apply the mathematical knowledge they have acquired to solve realistic problems set in an appropriate context. Algebra, Functions and equations, Circular functions and trigonometry, Matrices, Vectors, Statistics and probability, Calculus. Pre-requisite: Successful completion of Algebra II and Trigonometry

1 Credit Full Year

AP Calculus BC is only offered to students who have successfully completed AP Calculus AB by the end of their junior year. It is a continuation of Calculus AB. Additional topics include calculus involving infinite sequences and series, parametric equations, polar equations, limits to infinity and L’Hopital’s 22


IB Math Studies Grades 11 ~ 12 


1 Credit Full Year

The course is designed for students with varied backgrounds and abilities. More specifically, it is designed to build confidence and encourage an appreciation of mathematics in students who do not anticipate a need for mathematics in their future studies. However, the course does concentrate on mathematics that can be applied to contexts related as far as possible to other subjects being studied, to common realworld occurrences and to topics that relate to every-day situations. Students taking this course need to be already equipped with fundamental skills and a rudimentar y knowledge of basic processes (this is not a beginner course). Introduction to the graphic display calculator, Number and algebra, Sets, logic and probability, Functions, Geometry and t r i g o n o m e t r y, S t a t i s t i c s , Fi n a n c i a l mathematics, Introductor y differential calculus. Pre-requisite: Successful completion of Algebra II and Trigonometry Math Investigations Grades 10 ~ 12 


1 Credit Full Year

Math Investigations reinforces basic math in the context of basic life skills. Students learn the importance of math competence in money management, career choices, consumerism, business and everyday living. Pre-requisite: Successful completion of Algebra

Consumer Math Grades 10 ~ 12 


1 Credit Full Year

This course is an introduction into the most basic concepts used in consumer and career mathematics. Each concept is illustrated through application to real life situations encountered in many occupations. Pre-requisite: Successful completion of Algebra

Personal Finance Grades 10 ~ 12

1 Credit Full Year

This course is designed to provide students with a foundation of real-world, practical career and money management skills. Students will develop skills and acquire experiences that will influence them both personally and professionally in the years to come, both before and after graduation. Units will focus on one of two areas. In Personal Finance units, students will learn how to: budget for short and long-term goals, manage savings and debt, implement a diversified investment strategy, maintain credit, apply for loans, and manage risk. In Career Exploration units, students will learn how to start their own business, get into a college that is wellaligned with their interests and aptitudes, create a resume that will stand out in the crowd, impress employers during a job interview, and identify business trends to take advantage of opportunities in the local and global economy.

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Music Department All students must complete one credit of art or music to be eligible for graduation. The Pierson Music Department includes orchestral, choral, and instrumental ensembles. Ensembles regularly perform at the Sag Harbor Holiday Light Up, high school graduation, as well as the winter and spring concerts and various school and community ceremonies and events. High School Chorus Grades 9 ~ 12 


1 Credit Full Year

High School Chorus is an elective open to all high school students. There is no audition necessary. Emphasis is on the development of good vocal technique and musical skills that enable the students to learn and perform a variety of musical selections. Students attend weekly voice lessons on a rotating basis. The chorus performs at concerts and ceremonies throughout the school year. Additional performance opportunities include the NYSSMA Solo Festival, the SCMEA AllCounty Chorus Festival, and the HMEA Festival.




High School Band Grades 9 ~ 12

1 Credit Full Year

High School Band is a class designed for musicians interested in performing advanced concert band literature on brass, woodwind, and percussion instruments. The High School Band rehearses every day for one period. Students are required to attend a weekly lesson which is scheduled during the school day on a rotating basis. During the lessons, ensemble skills such as tone production, note reading, rhythmic accuracy and proper performance technique are studied and refined. The High School Band performs throughout the school year in formal concerts, parades and other school and community engagements. Students also have the opportunity to audition for and participate in regional, county and state solo and ensemble festivals.

Above: An orchestra student per forms a solo with instrumental accompaniment




High School Orchestra Grades 9 ~ 12

1 Credit Full Year

High School Orchestra is a class designed for musicians interested in performing advanced literature on Violin, Viola, Cello, or Bass. The High School Orchestra rehearses every day for one period. The High School Orchestra performs throughout the school year in formal concerts and other school and community engagements. Students also have the opportunity to audition for and participate in regional, county and state solo and ensemble festivals.

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IB Music Grades 11 ~ 12

1 Credit Full Year




This course is designed for music students with varied backgrounds in music performance, either solo and/or group performers. The aim of the IB music program is to give students the opportunity to explore and enjoy the diversity of music throughout the world by enabling them to creatively develop their knowledge, abilities and understanding through performance and composition. Students will be expected to demonstrate their understanding of music by performing solo and in a group, by using appropriate musical language and terminology in analyzing musical works from many cultures and time periods, and by exploring their own composition writing.

Above: Senior chorus students at the annual Pops Concert

Above: Band students rehearse for an upcoming concert Left: Chorus students perform in concert

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Occupational Education Department Students interested in pursuing an occupational training program may enroll in one of the following courses which are offered at the Eastern Long Island Academy of Applied Technology centers in Riverhead and Bellport. These programs are offered to eleventh and twelfth grade students. Students attend Pierson High School for a half-day and the Academy site for the other half-day. There are a possible 4 credits that can be earned toward graduation for each year of attendance. Most of the following study areas are two-year programs. Students who complete an Academy program are entitled to a lifetime job placement service, which is made available to provide continued help in reaching career goals. Please note that programs are offered only if registration warrants and students meet Academy enrollment criteria. Below is a list of programs offered:

Animal Science Art, Design, and Visual Communications Audio Production Auto Body Repair and Car Customizing Automotive Technology Aviation/Professional Pilot Training Barbering Carpentry/Residential Construction and Home Improvement Certified Personal Trainer Clinical Medical Assisting Computer Technology and Repair Cosmetology Culinary Arts/Restaurant Operations Management Dental Chairside Assisting Early Childhood Education

Electrical Trade and Alternative Energy Engineering Fashion Merchandising and Design Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Law Enforcement Marine/Motorsports Technology Nurse Assisting Pharmacy Technician Plumbing and Heating Practical Nursing Professional Photography and Digital Imaging Television, Video, and Digital Film Production Welding and Metal Fabrication

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Physical Education Department Physical Education 1/2 Credit Grades 9 ~ 12 Full Year/Every Other Day 


The Physical Education Department curriculum is designed to promote physical activity, attain and maintain physical fitness throughout a student’s lifetime, demonstrate a d e g r e e o f c o m p e te n c y i n a v a r i e t y o f movement skills and physical activities, teach safety practices, and develop an understanding that physical activities provide the opportunity for self expression, enjoyment and a link to good communication with fellow human beings. Physical Education exposes students to the positive feelings that result from regular participation in physical activity This course also develops an understanding of the role activities play in the pursuit of health and wellbeing and provides opportunities for students to demonstrate leadership, accountability and responsibility.

Wellness for Contemporary 1/2 Credit Living Grades 9 ~ 12 Full Year/Every Other Day This course will offer students a variety of individualized fitness opportunities, health mana gement resources, and nutrition concepts. The fitness and health management opportunities will emphasize wellness as a positive approach to health through preventative measures. The course is designed to develop awareness, self responsibility, strategies and techniques of managing one’s health. Wellness for Contemporary Living will explore such topics as caring for the physical self, using the mind constructively, channeling stress energies positively, expressing emotions effectively, becoming creatively involved with o t h e r s , a n d s t a y i n g i n to u c h w i t h t h e environment. The course will also give students an understanding of the connection between fitness and food intake. It will focus on current nutritional concepts and controversies related to human health and nutritional requirements. The material provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to maintain and adopt healthy nutritional behaviors, as well as the ability to determine their own dietary needs now and in the future.

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High School Health 1/2 Credit Grade 9 Full Year/Every Other Day 


The goal of this course is for students to become more aware of how they define health. This skills-based course begins with a focus on the factors which influence physical, mental and emotional health, stress reduction and personality. The health course focuses on injury prevention, first aid, and training in the American Heart Association Basic Life Support CPR course. The disease unit compares communicable and noncommunicable diseases and teaches prevention for a number of life-threatening diseases such as HIV, sexually-transmitted infections, cancer, Lyme disease and heart disease. Students evaluate the importance of communications skills in maintaining healthy relationships. The nutrition unit uses the American Cancer Society curriculum and analyzes the relationship of diseases to dietary intake and the importance of exercise. The course explores ways to avoid alcohol, tobacco and drug abuse. Finally, students examine their fragile environment and how some of the choices they make affect their surroundings.

Fitness for Life Grades 10 ~ 12

1/2 Credit Full Year/Every Other Day

CPR and First Aid 1/2 Credit Grades 10 ~ 12 Full Year/Every Other Day This course provides comprehensive training to students in advanced CPR and first aid through the American Heart Association. Students will be certified to instruct these skills to others at the conclusion of this course. Introduction to Coaching 1/2 Credit Grades 10 ~ 12 Full Year/Every Other Day This course provides an opportunity for students to learn the basic principles and practices of coaching. Students will develop their own coaching philosophy, as well as cover the basic issues and ideas such as communication with their athletes, motivation, coaching styles, teaching skills, and risk management.

This course will focus on the topics that have the greatest influence on an individual’s health and well-being. Topics will include healthy nutrition, exercise and fitness, stress management, relationships and communication skills.

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Science Department All students must complete three credits in science in order to meet graduation requirements. Students must pass one Regents exam to earn a Regents Diploma. Successful completion of an additional exam in a different Regents course is required to earn an Advanced Designation. Please note that not all courses listed here are offered every school year. Living Environment Grades 8 ~ 9 


1 Credit Honors Marine Biology Full Year Grades 11 ~ 12 


This course is designed to follow the New York State Regents curriculum for Biology: The Living Environment. There are six major themes covered: matter and energy – organization; maintaining a dynamic equilibrium; reproduction, growth and development; genetics and molecular biology; evolution; and the interaction and interdependence of organisms. The course consists of both lab and lecture portions, requiring students to complete 1200 minutes of lab experience with successful completion of lab reports. Students take the New York State Living Environment Regents in June.

Marine Biology Grades 10 ~ 12

1 Credit Full Year

Marine Science is an in-depth study of the living, chemical, geological and physical components of the ocean. Students will examine environmental challenges facing the oceans today and research how various features of the oceans are impacted by these challenges. Infused in each lesson, will be issues concerning the ocean as a natural resource and proper mana gement and conservation. Important laws and career paths will also be discussed. Independent research and project development will be crucial in this course.

1 Credit Full Year

Marine Biology is an in-depth study of the living, chemical, geological and physical components of the ocean. Students will examine environmental challenges facing the oceans today and research how various features of the oceans are impacted by these challenges. Infused in each lesson, will be issues concerning the ocean as a natural resource and proper mana gement and conservation. Important laws and career paths will also be discussed. Attendance is critical for course success.

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AP Computer Science Grades 10 ~ 12 


1 Credit Full Year

AP Computer Science emphasizes objectoriented programming methodology with an emphasis on problem solving and algorithm development and is meant to be the equivalent of a first-semester course in computer science. It also includes the study of data structures and abstraction. The course covers the following topics: object-oriented program design, program implementation, program analysis, standard data structures, standard algorithms, and computing in context. Pre-requisite: Successful completion of Algebra and Geometry

IB Computer Science Grades 11 ~ 12

1 Credit Full Year

This course requires an understanding of the fundamental concepts of computational thinking a s wel l a s knowledge of how computers and other digital devices operate. The course, underpinned by conceptual thinking, draws on a wide spectr um of k n o w l e d g e a n d e n a b l e s a n d e m p o we r s innovation, exploration, and the acquisition of further knowledge. Students study how computer science interacts with and influences cultures, society and how individuals and societies behave, and the ethical issues involved. During the course students will develop computational solutions which will involve the ability to identify a problem or unanswered question, design and test a proposed solution, liaise with clients to evaluate the success of the proposed solution, and make recommendations for future developments. Pre-requisite: Successful completion of AP Computer Science

Earth Science/ The Physical Setting Grades 9 ~ 12 


1 Credit Full Year

This is an introductory course taught through lecture with significant amounts of time devoted to hands-on laboratory exercises. Topics include mea surement, motions, geologic change, earth history, astronomy, energy and the rock cycle. Students are required to complete all laborator y assignments to be eligible to take the Earth Science Regents Exam in June. This is the only Regents class which has a lab practical held during the last week of regular class. Pre-requisite: Successful completion of Living Environment Honors Earth Science/ The Physical Setting Grades 9 ~ 12 


1 Credit Full Year

This class will place additional time on project work. This is the only Regents class which has a lab practical held during the last week of regular class. This introductory course follows the curriculum outlined by the New York State Learning Standards and Core Curriculum. Significant amounts of enrichments materials will be given to the Honors class. The class is taught through lecture and significant amounts of time are devoted to hands-on laboratory exercises. Topics include measurement, motions, geologic change, earth histor y, astronomy, energy budget, and the rock cycle. Students are expected to take notes, complete a ssigned readings, par ticipate in cla ss discussions, perform laboratory activities, write papers, give short class presentations and complete homework assignments. Students are required to complete all laborator y assignments in order to be eligible to take the Regents Exam. Pre-requisite: Recommendation by teacher, and a 95 overall in Living Environment

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Chemistry Grades 9 ~ 12

1 Credit Full Year

This course introduces students to the principles of chemistry. Topics include matter and energy, atomic structure, bonding, acids and bases, electrochemistry, and organic and nuclear chemistry. Students must successfully complete 30 required laboratory assignments to be eligible to sit for the New York State Chemistry Regents Exam in June. Pre-requisite: Successful completion of Living Methods of Research/ 1 Credit Environment and Algebra Chemistry Research Grades 10 ~ 12 Full Year AP Chemistry 1 Credit Students will work on an independent research Grades 10 ~ 12 Full Year p r o j e c t . Ad v a n c e d O r g a n i c C h e m i s t r y T h i s c o l l e g e - l e v e l c o u r s e p r e s e n t s a techniques are stressed in this section of comprehensive study of matter, the kinetic Methods of Research. Students are required to theory of gas, chemical equilibria, chemical organize their data in order to present their kinetics and basic thermodynamics. Laboratory research results in several forums, including local work is given special emphasis. The course and national Science competitions. focuses on chemical calculations and the Pre-requisite: Recommendation by teacher mathematical formulation of those principles involved. This course places a strong emphasis Physics 1 Credit on math and is recommended for students Grades 10 ~ 12 Full Year pursuing careers in science, medicine and engineering. Students are required to take the This course presents the principles of physics, with an empha sis on intensive study of AP Chemistry Exam in May. Pre-requisite: Placement criteria for Advanced fundamentals such as the conservation of energy and momentum, the conservation of charge, Placement courses vectors and scalars, electricity and magnetism, IB Chemistry 1 Credit waves, sound and light. This is a rigorous subject Grades 11 ~ 12 2 Full Years a n d e m p l o y s a l g e b r a , g e o m e t r y, a n d trigonometry. Students should be able to solve Students explore the concepts, theories, models an algebraic equation symbolically, including and techniques that underpin each subject area quadratic equations. Labs are designed to help and, through these, develop their understanding develop logical thinking and to help students see of the scientific method. A compulsory project the connection of theory to the concrete. e n c o u r a g e s s t u d e n t s t o a p p r e c i a t e t h e Students must successfully complete 30 required environmental, social and ethical implication of laboratory assignments to be eligible to sit for science. This exercise is collaborative and the New York State Physics Regents Exam in interdisciplinary and provides an opportunity June. for students to explore scientific solutions to Pre-requisite: Successful completion of two global questions. Regents science courses and Algebra II and Tr i g o n o m e t r y Re g e n t s . Pr e - c a l c u l u s i s recommended. 


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IB Physics~Year One Grades 11 ~ 12

1 Credit Full Year

Astronomy Grades 10 ~ 12

The curriculum of the first year of this course parallels the Physics Regents course. Labs will be evaluated according to the IB assessment standards and students in the course will be required to complete the Group 4 project. The final exam in the course will be the Physics Regents exam. The second year will cover the main principles of physics in depth and will stress problem solving, as well as laboratory skills. It is designed to meet the needs of those students wishing to further their study of physics. This course requires a variety of IB assessments. Pre-requisite: Algebra, Geometry, and Algebra 11/Trigonometry (may be taken concurrently)

1/2 Credit Full Year/Every Other Day

This is an introductor y sur vey course in astronomy based on Kaufmann and Comin’s Discovering the Universe. Each quarter begins by exploring the history of astronomy, the nature of light, life cycle of stars, and other basic topics. Students then choose an area that they would like to explore. The course utilizes a wealth of websites presenting current astronomical research. The culminating activity each quarter is a 15-minute presentation to the class.

Forensic Science Grades 10 ~ 12

1/2 Credit Full Year/Every Other Day

This course will explore the history of forensic science, methods of investigating a crime scene, types of evidence, and analysis of fingerprints, hair, fibers, drugs, glass, soil, and blood. In addition, students will study agencies that offer forensic services, typical forensic labs, careers in forensic science, the DNA molecule, and genetics. There will be an array of assessments, including simulated crime scenes, mock trials, debates, papers, and projects. IB Environmental Systems and Societies Grades 11 ~ 12

2 Credits Full Year

Environmental Systems and Societies (ESS) is a course that promotes an understanding of environmental processes at a variety of scales, from local to global. ESS will provide students a holistic perspective on environmental issues from economic, historical, cultural, sociopolitical, and scientific viewpoints. ESS is the only IB course that offers two IB credits upon successful completion of the class. ESS meets the requirements for both a level 3 (individuals and societies) and a level 4 (the experimental sciences) course in the IB Diploma Program Hexagon.

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Social Studies Department All students are required to take four credits of high school social studies and pass Regents exams in Global Studies and U.S. History in order to meet graduation requirements. Please note that not all courses listed here are offered every school year. Global Studies 1 Grade 9

1 Credit AP World History 1 Credit Full Year May be substituted for Full Year Global Studies 1 is the first half of a two-year Global Studies 11 study of our world. The class uses a thematic This course allows students to develop a better approach to examine the history, economic understanding of the evolution of global systems, political structures, cultures, religions, exchange and interaction of the various societies and geography of the ancient and early modern found in recent history. The course is taught at world. Students gain a general understanding of an introductory college level and is based on the the historical narrative of World History since last 1,000 years of world history. Study includes the dawn of man until the enlightenment. international trends and their development in S i g n i f i c a n t d e v e l o p m e n t s s u c h a s t h e regional studies and in a comparative fashion i n t r o d u c t i o n o f d e m o c r a c y, s u s t a i n e d with other civilizations. Periodization is the agriculture, expanding markets, imperialism and basic organizing framework of the course and the emergence of religious systems are evaluated several major themes include change over time, from a global perspective. Viewing history as a geography as a tool to shape history, and contact range of culture-specific answers to universal among societies. Students are expected to read questions and needs enables students to analytically, write persuasively, and utilize a appreciate the diverse paths that led to the tremendous amount of factual knowledge that culminates with the students taking both the present. New York State Global Studies Regents Exam Global Studies 11 1 Credit and the AP World History Exam. Grade 10 Full Year Pre-requisite: Placement criteria for Advanced This course uses a multidisciplinary approach to Placement courses 


enga ge students in learning about major historical events throughout the world that have had a significant impact on our society. The content begins with the Enlightenment and continues through to the Modern Era. This is accomplished by focusing on change, political systems, revolutions and diversity. There is a special focus on the development of global i n te r d e p e n d e n c e i n t h e m o d e r n w o r l d . Comparisons between modern and traditional cultures show how the values of different cultures are expressed. All students must take the New York State Global Studies Regents Exam.

Above: Pierson Quiz Bowl students face off against Sag Harbor residents at BookHampton

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U.S. History and Government Grade 11

1 Credit Full Year

Economics 1/2 Credit Grade 12 One Semester This course is a chronological survey of United States history from the formation of the country Students participate in a variety of activities and through modern times. There is an emphasis on projects designed to develop an understanding the United States as a developing industrial and of major economic concepts and systems, the post-industrial nation. This is accomplished principles of economic decision making, and the through a variety of activities and projects interdependence of economies throughout the geared to prepare the students for the Regents world. Some of the major topics are scarcity, exam while allowing them to explore and productivity, opportunity cost, supply and understand the history of the United States in demand, inflation, profit, interdependence, greater detail. The U.S. Constitution is examined capital, competition and the market. There is a in depth with reference to how it has affected significant focus on the development and the development of our country to date. All application of the skills needed to make students take the New York State Regents Exam informed and well-reasoned economic decisions in United States History and Government in in daily life. June. Participation in Government 1/2 Credit IB History of the Americas One Semester 1 Credit Grade 12 Per Year This course emphasizes the interaction between Grades 11 ~ 12 2 Full Years citizens and government at all levels: local, state 


The focus of this course centers on select periods of American, Canadian, and Latin American history. Students will explore and reflect about historical topics through a variety of methods, including classroom discussion and instruction, research, and independent reading and writing. Learners will be expected to spend time examining their own culture and history so they are then better able to understand and appreciate global history and culture.

and federal. Through the use of a variety of intellectual skills and activities, students develop an understanding of the necessity for establishing governments, the governmental system of the United States and other nations, the United States Constitution, the basic civic values of American constitutional democracy, and the roles, rights, and responsibilities of citizenship including avenues of participation.

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AP American Government and 1/2 Credit Politics May be substituted for Participation in Government One Semester

Through successful completion of the coursework, students will be prepared to continue criminal justice studies in the college setting. This college-level course is designed to give Pre-requisite: Successful completion of Global students an introduction to the American Studies I and II political system. Students will have extensive reading assignments, challenging research projects and class activities designed to allow students to explore our governing system with a focus on constitutional underpinnings, political IB Theory of Knowledge 1 Credit beliefs and behaviors, political parties, interest IB DP Candidate groups, mass media, institutions, Congress, presidency, bureaucracy, courts, public policy, The overarching goal of Theory of Knowledge is civil rights and civil liberties. The student will be not to give students answers. Instead, it seeks to required to take the AP American Government provide students with the means to ask the and Politics Exam given in May. questions themselves. While a student may gain Pre-requisite: Placement criteria for Advanced significant insight from a more traditional Placement courses. approach, it can ultimately leave them inflexible and averse to change. Theory of Knowledge will Introduction to Psychology 1/2 Credit challenge students to strip away preexisting Grades 10 ~ 12 One Semester modes of thinking and replace them with a more The course is designed to introduce major topics innovative and independent approach. As a in the field of psychology. Topics of study required course for all IB Diploma candidates, include approaches to psychology, mental students will take this course for two semesters disorders, personality, development, brain/body over their 11th and 12th grade years. The course relationship to behavior, consciousness, stress also requires students to take internal and and research and statistics. The course will external IB exams. 


provide a survey of the psychology discipline so that students may become familiar with psychological topics prior to entering college. The course runs for one semester with students enrolling in Introduction to Criminal Justice Studies for the second semester. Pre-requisite: Successful completion of Global Studies I and II Introduction to Criminal Justice 1/2 Credit Grades 10 ~ 12 One Semester 


The course runs during the second semester, following completion of Introduction to Psychology. The course provides an overview of the criminal justice system in the United States. Topics covered are crime in America, policy, adjudication (the court system), and corrections. 35


Technology Department Design and Draw for Production 1 Credit Production and 1 Credit Manufacturing Systems Grade 9 Full Year Full Year Grades 10~ 12 This course can be applied to the art/music requirement for graduation. Students explore This course provides instruction in the systems the design and drawing process of a complete set of manufacturing and construction technology: of plans for a residential structure. They learn their resources, processes, products; and quality about zoning laws and health and building assurance. Impacts on society, the economy, and department requirements to obtain a building the environment are also covered. Instruction in permit for their house. Students make the the manufacturing aspects of production is following drawings throughout the year: plot, organized around five topics that correlate very landscape, floor, elevations, electrical & closel y to the universal systems model: manufacturing inputs, resources, processes, plumbing, kitchen details and HVAC plans. outputs, and control. Students are taught in a traditional shop setting where intensive “handson� involvement is required. In order for this class to meet the 1 credit math requirement, it has been adapted to include increased emphasis on underlying math principles appropriate to t h i s te c h n o l o g y a r e a , l e s s e m p h a s i s o n construction skills, increased focus on geometry, material science and environmental impacts, more emphasis on transferable skill development, and experiences that build on the students’ previous knowledge in math.

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Faculty & Sta Joe Amato Maria Archer Frank Atkinson-Barnes Kevin Barron Joe Bartolotto Jen Bianchi Eileen Caulfield Margaret Comber Yanina Cuesta Sue Denis Amanda DiNapoli Susan Duff Christine Farrell Terri Federico Caitlin Fredericks William Fujita Sarah Glass Amy Gleason Rocio Gutierrez Donna Harden Erinn Hennessey Keith Holden Nancy Huneken Melissa Isaacson

Christian Johns Shannon Judge Sean Kelly Jim Kinnier Jason LaBatti Christina Little Nell Lowell Chase Mallia Elizabeth Marchisella Toby Marienfeld Marge Masters Brittany McCabe Donnelly McGovern Edward Moloney Kira McLaughlin Adam Mingione Margaret Motto Suzanne Nicoletti William Raney Elizabeth Rasor Denise Read Lindsay Reilly Austin Remson

Juliette Rendon Kevin Roode Kayla Schoenwaelder Clint Schulman Gary Schulman Richard Schumacher Robert Schumacher Kelly Shaffer Jim Sloane Peter Solow Jillian Stellato Calvin Stewart Kathleen Sullivan Ewa Szychowska Rich Terry Justine Trainor John Tortorella Sharon Truland Emily Tyson Laura Westhoff Dan White Ruth White-Dunne

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Profile for Sag Harbor Schools

2018-2019 Pierson High School Course Selection Guide  

2018-2019 Pierson High School Course Selection Guide Pierson High School Sag Harbor, New York

2018-2019 Pierson High School Course Selection Guide  

2018-2019 Pierson High School Course Selection Guide Pierson High School Sag Harbor, New York

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