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COUNCIL OF INDIAN ORGANIZATIONS IN GREATER PHILADELPHIA Proudly Presents The 17th

On August 15, 2009 The Great Plaza, Penn's Landing, Philadelphia

www.indiacouncil.org

JAI HIND GOD BLESS AMERICA


Festival Of India Committees - 2009 Advisory Board Vani Kumar, Mahendra Logani, Ramesh Gupta, Patri Prasad, Narasimha Shenoy India Pavilion Santosh Hodawadekar Partha Debnath

Cultural Events Vasanthi Rajamoorthy Sunil Nair

Souvenir Sri Sagaram Krishna Agarwal

Vendors Relations Steve Vibhute

Publicity Akanksha Kalra

Event Relations Shruti Singhal


NamasteWhat an honor it is to be part of this program celebrating our homeland's independence. Many people before us put so much on the line to make sure we have our freedom here and in India, and it makes me proud to be an Indian-American. As a young man, I was raised to believe no dream was too impossible if you have faith and stay true to yourself. I'm blessed to live that dream on a daily basis at ESPN. Gandhiji's words "be the change you want to see in this world" ring true more than six decades later as we reflect and celebrate this day of independence. Sincerely, Kevin Negandhi, ESPN SportsCenter Anchor & Monica Negandhi


President’s Message

Welcome to the Festival of India. It is the 17th year we celebrate this event at this facility. Every year, this event is enjoyed by more that 6000 attendees. It provides a platform to bring together our diversified community and to provide cultural visibility to the main stream, our children and our grand children. As we celebrate India’s independence, we remember those who gave their lives to India’s freedom. We are forever grateful for their sacrifice. Free India enabled us to migrate to this country in pursuit of better life. First of wave of Indian Americans migration to US took place during 70’s and 80’s. In addition to skilled workforce, we brought a time tested rich culture and a family value to this adopted nation of ours. Maintaining such culture is essential to our survival as a community and that of our children and grand children. Until recently, the political relation between India and US was less than friendly. During this period, India relied on India American Community which was active in political participation to bridge this gap. Now the political and business relationship between India and US are much friendlier, our community is no longer relied upon to carry on to such relationship gap. Hence, our community has relaxed in its effort to maintain relationship with the political system. It took our community many years to build up the political relationship and it is essential that we build on it. Our community prosperity depends on it. Finally, our community in this area is growing. Our religious needs are met by the temples, churches and the mosques. However, as the first generation ages and our population increases, our community needs a center to provide social, cultural and educational services. We are now ready to have a community center of our own. We will be initiating such a project soon and we will be looking for your support. Enjoy the festivity, good program and delicious Indian Cuisines Narasimha B. Shenoy President, CIO


Chairman’s Message

It gives me a great pleasure to welcome all of you to the celebration of sixty second anniversary of India’s Independence day. It is a day to celebrate our achievements in every field of human endeavor. From economics to science, from agriculture to medicine, from information technology to space technology, India is progressing. I strongly believe that 21st century belongs to India. Being home to more than 1 billion people with a median age of under 25 years, India has a tremendous potential for future growth. With real per capita income growing in excess of 7 percent with an increased willingness to compete with the rest of the world, the country is emerging as a major player in the global economy. In a recent book entitled “India Express, the Future of New Super Power” by Daniel Lak, the author states that India could become “Asia’s America” in the near future. This is a possibility that may not be realized for many years but the raw materials are all there. The many challenges and difficulties are well known: poverty, inequity, corruption etc. but at least India knows where the pitfalls are and understands they must be overcome. The media is very strong and report on both the issues and on those who seek to resolve them. Indians use their freedom of speech robustly and often. Noble Laureate Amartya Sen states that public debate at every level of Indian society is a powerful force for stability and constructive change. Even the poorest and most powerless of the poor, Sen believes, have a voice and views on how their elite is governing and behaving. Literacy is increasing at a rapid pace in India. It has grown by 20 percent in the past few decades, which means more media, more awareness, more pressure for accountability and good government. But let us not dwell upon the problems today. We will. tackle them tomorrow. Today is a day of celebration of our achievements. Enjoy the cultural program, good food, good music and above all meeting your family and friends. I would like to take this opportunity to thank all the members of Council of Indian organizations in Greater Philadelphia (CIO), the Executive committee, Board of Directors, Board of Trustees and all the volunteers for their efforts to put this program together. I commend CIO for over 25 years of community service and your continued support to us. Best wishes, Mahendra K. Logani, Ph.D. Chairman, CIO


Executive Committee President Narasimha Shenoy shenoynick@aol.com General Secretary UshaRani Sampath Negandhi Samsar11@aol.com Treasurer Krishna K. Agarwal kk_agarwal@yahoo.com VP Community Affairs Shruti Singhal ssinghal2005@hotmail.com VP Communications/ Webmaster Sri Sagaram sagaram@verizon.net VP Financial Affairs Steve Vibhute svibhute@gmail.com


Executive Committee Executive Vice President Akanksha Kalra akanksha@kalra.us Joint Secretary Sunil Nair nairsc_08@yahoo.com Joint Treasurer Dr. Santosh Hoawadekar shodawadekar@hotmail.com VP Cultural Affairs Vasanthi Rajamoorthi Rajamov@pt.fdah.com VP Endowment Funds Mr. Amit Banerjee amit0613@hotmail.com VP Youth Affairs Manish Ingle mingle@gonebula.com


Member Organizations Art Of Living –Philadelphia Neeraj Bagga neeraj@artoflivingpa.org http://www.artoflivingpa.org Asian Indian Professionals Inc (AIP) Rajendra Patel rajendra.patel11@verizon.net Drexel University Indian Student Group Gnanam Hazarika Gh35@Drexel.Edu

Indo American Development Center Maya Kamath Info@Icdcpa.org http://www.icdcpa.org/ India Heritage Society of Del Valley Bhim Chopra bhimchopra@hotmail.com Jai- USA Mrs.Hansa Patel Hansa_Patel_us@yahoo.com

Gujarathi Samaj of Delaware Valley Ramesh R. Desai rameshdesai@comcast.net

Kerala Art & Literary Association of America Korah Abraham kabraham@rnplus.net

Heritage of India Foundation Inc Murali Kartha mkartha@juno.com

Konkani Sabha Ganapathi Kamath rajabhai@aol.com

India Civic Society Dr.Asha Gupta rcg82@hotmail.com

Malayalee Association of Greater Philadelphia MAP Mr. Rajan Nair rajantnair@yahoo.com

India Cultural & Religious Center Dr.Mahendra Logani mklogani@hotmail.com Indo-American Club Mr. Bawa Jaggi bawa@phillyfeet.com

Nair Service Society of Pennsylvania, Inc NSSOPA Ramachandra Nair rnair01@verizon.net http://www.nssofpa.org/ North South Foundation Srinivas Emani Reddy srini@keystonenet.com


Member Organizations PAMPA Mr. V.V. Cherian http://www.pampaphila.org Philadelphia Marathi Mandal Shrikant Chaudhary president@phillymm.org http://www.phillymm.org PRAGATI -Bengali Association of Greater Philadelphia Mr. Partha Debanath partha@pragati.org http://www.pragati.org SAMARPAN Dr. Usha Desai b_k_Desai@sunoil.com Sangeet Society Vijay Chhajlani Info@Sangeetonline.Org http://www.Sangeetonline.Org SEWAA -Service & Education for Women against Abuse Dr.Ujwala Dixit ujwaladixit@gmail.com, sewaapa@gmail.com http://www.sewaa.net Sruti -Indian Music & Dance Society Dr. S. Vidyasanker president@sruti.org http://www.sruti.org

Tamil Association of Greater Delaware Valley Mr. Sundara Kavidass skavidass@yahoo.com http://www.tagdv.org Tamilnadu FoundationPhiladelphia Somalai Somasundaram Som48346@yahoo.com Telugu Association of Greater Delaware Valley Saroja Sagaram president@tagdv.com http://www.tagdv.com Triveni -Kannada Association Vivek Belagodu president@triveniusa.org http://www.triveniusa.org UP Association of Greater Philadelphia Mahendra Misra mahendramisra@hotmail.com http://www.upagp.com Villanova University Indian Student Group C Nataraj C.Nataraj@Villanova.Edu Wharton -India Club Balaji Nagabhushan Sbalaji@Wharton.Upenn.Edu


Gandhi's Relevance to Non Resident Indians By Partha Debnath, Chairman, Gandhi Committee, Council of Indian Organizations. Nearly a month ago, on July 14, The Economic Times reported from London that a series of letters and postcards signed and autographed by Mahatma Gandhi were bought in an auction by two leading NRIs, who will present the precious documents to the government of India. The above news may turn out to be one of many such news in the media, that may not get attention of the readers any more than a quick glance item in the breakfast table. However, if you think about the news, it would be apparent that Gandhi has significant relevance and influence in the minds of NRIs, even in current days. Gandhi memorabilia (letters and postcards) are perceived as more important things for national treasure than as personal prized possession (like celebrity memorabilia). The decision to send those items to the government of India indicates that those NRI's perspective was to revere Gandhi's personal communications and share with others, than treating those letters and postcards as rare items of antiquity meant for personal possession. This brings a bigger question of how NRI's of today perceive Gandhi, in general. There may not be a single answer to such question. In fact, answers could be any or all of the following: 1. Gandhi is the "Father of Nation" in India and we respect Gandhi as a leader. 2. Gandhi's views and actions are controversial. He had some utopian ideas. He could not stop "division of India" which still haunts us and the rivalry between the neighbor nations are still alive, even after more than half a century. 3. Gandhi's "traditional" and "not so modernized" views on India made India's progress slower. 4. Gandhi's philosophy and actions are still of relevance in our lives. Continued...


Gandhi's Relevance to Non Resident Indians Continued... 5. Gandhi is a "prime mover" of "Non Violence", "Swaraj - Freedom, Liberty and Self Rule", "Satyagraha - truth force", "Human rights", in Indian context. Gandhi is an international personality - a philosopher and a social reformer who set the path for "Non Violence" to achieve peace and harmony among nations and for the whole human civilization. Whatever the answer is, in the context of NRIs, Gandhi is still relevant and for the most part, he is a leader to be proud of, who connects us with our root, the country where we are originally from. NRIs do and should care about Gandhi, because, more than ever before, International crisis around "terrorism", "religious violence", "mighty aggression", "unjust war", "fierce poverty and ignorance", "diminishing respects", "lack of individual responsibilities", "greed and arrogance" are no longer a bunch of distant phenomena. These troubles are already knocking at our doors. NRIs, like other ethnic groups, have already started experiencing the fall outs of such irrational madness and onslaughts on civil lives and on humanity, in a more bare and direct way! Most NRIs in this country, in one way or other, have also experienced or are experiencing the downfall of economic recession which resulted into job losses, reduction in business revenues, mortgage and housing problems, rising health care costs, overall diminution of the community services and well being. I am not suggesting in any way that any of the above issues can be resolved amicably with Gandhian path. Nor do I claim that there is any single way to address the current day complex issues. Instead, all these issues should be put in perspective and should be addressed in specific terms with deeper understanding of the domain that we ought to be dealing with. However, I would be more inclined to suggest that, if we study Gandhi's views and comprehend his basic philosophy behind "swaraj", "seva", "satyagraha", "ahimsa", "dharm" and if we could bring Gandhi’s and his predecessor's approach to humanity and the pursuit of peace, harmony and happiness, we could be better prepared to address above issues and can contain the problems within reasonable aberration. Continued...


Gandhi's Relevance to Non Resident Indians Continued... With a bit of insights, we could relate that most of the troubles and problems have basic roots in the way people look after narrow self interests, the way people take or do not take responsibilities, the way people pursue to achieve comforts in the name of happiness, the way people hate other people of different opinions, race, religion or skin colors, the way one group of people tries to take control over the others in social, political, religious or economic governance. On one side, many of us carry the above pitfalls in our personal behavior and mind sets, no matter which social level we belong to. On the other side, we blame others for any or all the issues that we are perturbed with or do not agree with. We are concerned about rights in a democratic society. Many times, we forget to take "individual responsibilities" along with the pursuit of achieving those rights. It is true that many of the root causes of conflicts could possibly be uprooted by establishments of true "human rights" in the form of "true democracy". However, those solutions would be temporary if we just focus on right social orders. Such moves should also be combined with "individual responsibilities" as more of an inner struggle, combined with a sense of "civil morality" which should be an integral part of "Human Rights and Civil Liberties movement". Studying Gandhi's works and actions and reviewing Gandhian philosophy, in modern context, could help us to prepare for a better community, capable of handling modern day complex issues. So, Gandhi has and continued to have strong relevance in our NRI community, both in an ethnic community context, as well as in the mainstream social context.


Peace and Harmony Definitions from a personal dictionary Inner Peace: To be calm, contented, loving, kind. Outer Peace: To be compassionate, understanding, tolerant. To see your fellow as a part of the larger you, an expression of the divine. To see the world as the garden where tenderness can blossom and grow. Harmony: The pleasant expression of more than one note. Not discordant. Not harsh or irritating. Actually enhancing an experience by augmenting its companion. By addition or multiplication; for unexpected and beautiful expressions previously unanticipated occur when other notes are present. Harmony must have more than one expression; it is beauty created through togetherness. Through the lens of another person's vision, seeing patterns and colors we would never see otherwise. Being willing, even eager, to look through that scope. For what is pastel comes into sharper focus when contrasted with vibrant color, the beauty of each distinctly evident. Can what is male or female be expressed at all without its counterpoint? We live in a world of Ying and Yang, the proportion constantly changing but never varying in its quality of difference. Cultivate the inner and outer peace and the harmony is inevitable. Allow it to express through your smile or in a visual encounter with another person. Look up and out. See the differences and smile at them. You may find a smile in return. So much peace and harmony all around. Express it and embrace it. Submitted by: Mrs. Johnnie Wiedmann of Fort Washington, PA, who has been practicing meditation with Self-Realization Fellowship, founded by Paramahansa Yogananda, for over 30 years.


New Naturalization Test Naturalization is the process by which a foreign national can become a United States citizen. On October 1, 2008, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (“USCIS”, formerly known as the “INS”) began administering a new naturalization test. One of the requirements for naturalization is that the applicant must demonstrate an understanding of U.S. history and government and a basic ability to read write and speak English. The new naturalization test is designed to ensure that all applicants have a uniform, consistent testing experience, and that the civics test can effectively assess an applicant’s understanding of U.S. government and history. The new naturalization test will apply to all applicants who file their Form N-400, Application for Naturalization on or after October 1, 2008. The new test has a revised English reading and writing section and vocabulary list as well as a list of 100 new history and civics questions which are available on-line at www.uscis.gov/newtest. Exemptions from English and Civics Requirements: Under the new naturalization test, some applicants can still be eligible for a waiver from the English requirements based on their age and the number of years spent in the U.S. as a permanent resident. These applicants must still take the civics test.

You do not take the Lived as permanent You still take the English test if you resident in the are United States for Age 50 or older

20 years

Civics test in your language

Age 55 or older

15 years

Civics test in your language

Age 65 or older

20 years

Simplified civics test in your language


If applicants qualify for a waiver of the English proficiency requirement, they must bring an interpreter to their naturalization interview. Applicants with a physical or developmental disability or a mental impairment so severe that it prevents acquiring or demonstrating the required knowledge of English and civics, may be eligible for an exception to these requirements. To request this exception, an applicant must file a

Form N-648, Medical Certification for Disability Exceptions. For additional information, please contact your local USCIS office or www.uscis.gov Submitted by Akanksha Kalra, Esquire of Blue Bell, PA akanksha@kalra.us or aak@elliottgreenleaf.com


KHATRI AND COMPANY Certified Public Accountants 6406 Castor Avenue, Suite # 200 Philadelphia 19149 (215) 288-9200, Fax (215) 288-9201 www.ekhatri.com For all your needs of accounting and taxation services • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Accounting Services Attest Services Bookkeeping/Write-Up Cash Flow and Budgeting Financial Forecast and Projections Financial Statements Forensic Accounting Reviews and Compilations Tax Services Tax Planning Tax Preparation IRS and State/Local Representation International Taxation Payroll Services Financial Planning Retirement Planning

Vikram Khatri, CPA


Ancient Indian Scientists (Compiled by Ramesh Gupta, M.D.) BHASKARACHARYA II (1114-1183 AD) - Genius in Algebra, Arithmetic and Geometry and force of gravity. In his treatise he writes on planetary positions, eclipse, cosmology, mathematical techniques and anatomical equipments. He was first to discover gravity 500 years before Sir Isaac Newton in Surya Siddhant. NAGARJUNA (100 AD) - Wizard of Chemical Science and metallurgy and chemistry. He discovered the alchemy of transmitting base metals into gold in Rasratnakar book. ARYABHATT (476 AD) - Master Astronomer and mathematician. He formulated the process of calculating the motion of planets and times of eclipses. He was the first to proclaim that the earth is round, it rotates on its axis, orbits the sun and is suspended in space-1000 years before Copernicus published the heliocentric theory. He is also acknowledged for calculating p (pi) to four decimal places and sine table in trigonometry in Aryabhatiyam book. ACHARYA KANAD (60 BC) - Founder of Atomic theory nearly 2500 years before John Dalton. He described the dimension and motion of atoms and their chemical reactions with each other in Vaisheshik Darshan book. ACHARYA BHARADWAJ (*)) BC) - Power of Aviation Technology, Space Science and Flying Machines. He was an ordent apostle of Ayurveda and Mechanical Sciences, in Yantra Sarvasva book. ACHARYA CHARAK )600 BC) - Father of Medicine, encyclopedia of Ayurveda Medicine. He described about human anatomy, embryology, pharmacology, blood circulation and diseases. In his book he described the medicine qualities of 100,000 herbal plants in Charak Samhita book. ACHARYA SUSHRUT (600 BC) - Father of Plastic Surgery and Science of Anesthesia. He used 125 types of Surgical instruments and 300 types of operations in Sushrat Samhita book. ACHARYA PATANJALI (200 BC) - Father of Yoga. He described the control of Prana (breath) as the means to control the body, mind and soul. He described 84 Yogic postures in his book VARAHAMIHIR (499-587 AD) - Eminent Astrologer and Astronomer. He notes that the moon and planets are lustrous not because of their own light but due to sun light. In Bruhad Samhita book he revealed about geography, science, botany and animal sciences. ACHARYA KAPIL (3000 BC) - Father of Cosmology. He described the Sankhya school of thoughts. He threw light on the nature and principles of ultimate soul and primal matter and creation, transformation of energy and importance of Cosmos place as regard Atma and subtle elements.


Best Wishes to

Council of Indian Organizations In Greater Philadelphia

for Festival of India 2009 From

Telugu Association of Greater Delaware Valley Saroja Sagaram (President) & Executive Committee


BEST COMPLEMENTS FOR 26TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION OF

COUNCIL OF INDIAN ORGANIZATIONS IN GREATER PHILADELPHIA

KONKANI SABHA

Serving Konkani Community in Tri State area

www.konkanisabha.org


Indian Civic Society HELPING HANDS TO PROVIDE ASSISTANCE TO INDIVIDUAL OR FAMILY MEMBERS DURING ILLNESS OR ANY OTHER UNFORTUNATE CIRCUMSTANCES. • • • • •

VISITING FAMILY OR PATIENTS IN HOSPITALS OR HOME SUPPORTING BY COMMUNICATING WITH SICK PEOPLE OR FAMILY MEMBERS MAKING ARRANGMENTS FOR MEALS IF NEEDED, MAKING ARRANGMENTS FOR TANSPORTATION PROVIDING COMPANIONSHIP BY ALL DIFFERNT MEANS TO PROVIDE SOCIAL LIFE

WE ARE LOOKING FOR COMMUNITY VOLUNTEERS IN DIFFERNT LOCATIONS IN THE TRISTATE AREA ACCORDING TO TOWNSHIP OR COUNTY ZONE DISTRIBUTION. VOLUNTERS WILL BE CONTACTED BY A DESINGNATED COORDINATOR TO ASSIST IN THEIR AREA WHEN CALLED UPON NEW JERSEY COORDINATORS: BURLINGTON COUNTY: GLOUSTER COUNTY: VIRENDRA GUPTA (856) 424-9313 CAMDEN COUNTY: H.S ASWATHANARAYANA (609) 268-7414 MERCER COUNTY: MANJU MEHRA (meramehra @aol.com) PHILADELPHIA AREA: CHESTER COUNTY: MONTGOMERY COUNTY: HANSA PATEL ( 610-539-2425 ) PHILADELPHIA CITY: RITA SETH (215-540-4502 ) DELAWARE COUNTY: SHYAMALI GODBOLE (610-892-7760 ) MORRISVILLE: HEMA RAMAMURTHY (215-295-1980 ) PLEASE COTACT ME IF YOU ARE INTERSTED IN THIS COMMUNITY PROJECT

W (215) 823-4688

THANK YOU RAMESH GUPTA MD H (856) 234-1703 email: rcg82@hotmail.com


Best wishes to CIO on the occasion of Festival of India 2009 Celebrations

Sarla, Mukund Patel & Family With Best Compliments From India Cultural and Religious Center Dr. Mahendra Logani 3261 Farragut Court, Bensalem, Pa 19020

Phone: 215-752-9830, Email: mklogani@hotmail.com

DIABETES AWARENESS INTERNATIONAL CHARITABLE ORGANIZATION (DAICO) MISSION To provide diabetes awareness and education to the underprivileged at local levels by conducting diabetic camps in villages of India and establish diabetic care centers locally to provide lifetime care. Please send your donation to:

DAICO, 383 N. Kings Hwy, Suite B-1, Cherry Hill, NJ 08034 Tel: (856) 779-7633 YOUR DONATION WILL BE USED TO HELP POOR PEOPLE OF India. DAICO is a 501(c)(3) registered organization. www.daico.org

Contact: UshaRani Negandhi: Diabetic Educator (samsar11@aol.com)


Gujarati Samaj of Delaware Valley Presents

RATRI BEFORE NAVRATRI RAAS GARBA DANCE PROGRAM at

Montgomery County Community College 340 DeKalb Pike, Blue Bell, PA 19422 From 7 PM to 12 Midnight

Live Group - Sur Madhur (Member: $3 and Non-Members: $5) For more information call: Ramesh Desai: (215) 368-4989

Manish Modi: (267) 664-2582

Nikhil Desai: (610) 710-9356

Priti Shah: (215) 704-6466


ASIAN INDIAN PROFESSIONALS, Inc Dr. Sunder Mansukhani, Founder 64 Regan Lane, Voorhees, NJ 08043 856-751-6342 AIP is an elite organization of Indian Americans dedicated to having a good time while doing some good, like granting supplemental undergraduate college scholarships to deserving Indian American students in Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware. We have given away over $280,000 since inception.

We extend greetings to Indian Americans On the Occasion of

Independence Day celebrations August 15, 2009

Please call if you wish to apply for a college scholarship. We regularly organize professional education, Bollywood Entertainment, vacations, cruises, health fairs etc. New members are welcome. Please call Dr. Sunder Mansukhani or email smansuk@comcast.net

Kavita Gupta

Ambarish Patel

Vice President

President



Council of Indian Organizations Souvenir 2009