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SAGAMOK ANISHNAWBEK NEWS January 2014 Published Monthly by Sagamok Anishnawbek

Young Warriors Youth Council Page: 3

Tobacco Research Pages:4-5

(December 31st) Families pack the Multi-Education Centre for the annual Sagamok New Years Powwow. This annual pow wow has become a yearly tradition attended by people of all walks of life and distances. Some driving from as far as the United States to attend.

Biinjiying

BAASHKAAKODIN GIIZIS Fitness Centre Schedule Page: 3 Community Justice Program Pages 6 Lands Department Page 10 Joint Health and Safety Committee Page 11 Fire Department Pages 15

Shki Waase-Aaban Binoojiihn Gamik Page: 11

Biidabaan Kinoomaagegamik Pages: 12-14


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SAGAMOK ANISHNAWBEK NEWS Sagamok Anishnawbek News is a product of the Community Development and Nation Building Project. A Communications Core Group formed to respond requesting timely and up to date information of our Administration of Government. The Sagamok Anishnawbek News first published in June 2004. It will continue monthly information sharing related to Sagamok Anishnawbek Administration of Government.

PUBLISHING CRITERIA The Sagamok Anishnawbek News is a monthly publication of the Sagamok Anishnawbek First Nation. Views expressed are not necessarily the opinion or political position of the First Nation. No portion of this paper may be reproduced without the written permission of the Sagamok Anishnawbek News Editorial Board. All contributors will be provided a reply regarding the receiving of their submission. As administrator and editor we reserve the right to edit, condense, print, reject or delay publication of submissions. Publication of submissions is based upon priority of interest. All contributors must include contact information with their submission. Submissions which include pictures must include information regarding the content of the photo. The Sagamok News is offering cash honoraria for article submissions from Community members. All articles must be 250 words in length and relevant to Sagamok history and culture. All articles must be typed or formatted using MS Word and sent to the email address Newsletter@Sagamok.ca or dropped off at the Sagamok Newsletter mailbox in the Band office. The monthly deadline for submissions is the 3rd Friday of each month. A maximum of $100 honoraria per month will be shared amongst membership contributors. Letters to the editor and all other employee submissions are not applicable to the Community Member news article Initiative. Newspaper Working Group:

Michelle Toulouse

Janet Owl Allen Toulouse Wayne Peltier Laura McMeekin-Clarke Rebecca Toulouse Ezra Owl Amanda Hardisty Mitzi Toulouse Lorna Sinobert Veronica Nashkawa Production: Sagamok Anishnawbek News Administration:

Allen Toulouse

ADVERTISING & NEW DEADLINES Deadline for the February 2014 issue Submission Deadline: January 17th, 2013 Scheduled Printing: January 31th, 2013 SUBMISSION INQUIRIES

Telephone

(705) 865-2421

Toll Free

1-800-567-2896

Email newsletter@sagamok.ca Donations Payable to: Sagamok Anishnawbek News P.O. Box 610, Massey, Ontario , P0P 1P0

I would like to send a Big Happy Birthday Wish to my son ZanderLee Toulouse who turns 10 years old on January 7th, 2014. Love you! -Mommy

DUTY TO REPORT

Kids shouldn’t have to live with abuse. Reporting suspected child abuse and neglect is everyone’s responsibility. To learn more about child abuse and neglect, how to recognize it and what happens when you call a children’s aid society, visit www. useyourvoice.ca. Use your voice. Report your suspicions of child abuse and neglect to your local Children’s Aid Society at 705-5663113.


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Children’s Wellness

Young Warriors Youth Council

Ethan Eshkakogan Annual Toy Drive

Youth Cultural Night January 2014

Every year the Children’s Wellness Program offers the “Ethan Eshkakogan Memorial Toy Drive”, to assist families that are in genuine need. We held an evening program on Wednesday, December 18th, 2013 at the New Community Hall that consisted of only parents, who had the opportunity to have a catered dinner, pick their children’s gifts and personally wrap them We had 62 parents that participated and 117 children each received a gift. I have so much pride in this program and also so much admiration that every year Mr. & Mrs. Robert Eshkakogan come on out and support the program by assisting with the process! I had staff that was committed in giving a helping hand with this program. I would like to send a “Chi-Meegwetch” to Cora Toulouse, Conrad Toulouse and Dwayne Toulouse for helping out and making this program a success! It felt good to watch our parents take home nicely wrapped gifts for their children!

The Young Warriors will be delivering Youth Cultural Night that will be facilitated by Isaac Murdoch. Youth Cultural Night topic of learning will be Moccasin Making & Beading. This will be a program that will take two sessions starting January 2014 – February 2014. This program will be offered for youth ages 12 years & up and will be accepting 12 youth that are interested in learning the process. Participants will be required to register and sign in to participate. Posters will be distributed within Sagamok and along with students as soon as all have been finalized. Please look for postings within community for dates and location!

Family Wellness Program The Children’s Wellness Department is working in collaboration with various departments with developing a five week Family Wellness Program. We would like to target all family members and assist with health and wellness. We will be offering this program once a week for two hours per week. We will be accepting seven families that want to participate with learning about overall family wellness. Please look for postings within the community for dates and locations. Pick up your own copy of this schedule from the Fitness Center or in the lobby of the Community Wellness Department SUNDAY

Young Warriors Guitar Lessons The Young Warriors Youth Council is currently in the process of developing evening programs for our youth who are interested in learning to play the guitar. We will be offering two youth groups for ages 12yrs – 15yrs and 16yrs & up. We will be offering guitar sessions twice per week and will be having 10 seats for both groups. We are in the process of securing interested guitar teachers along with securing dates for our programming, please look for postings within community.

January 2014 Fitness Center Schedule MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

1

THURSDAY

2

HAPPY NEW YEAR closed

5 Kyla/Jessica 5-9pm

12 Kyla/Jessica 5-9pm

19 Kyla/Jessica 5-9pm

26 Kyla/Jessica 5-9pm

FRIDAY

3 Nathan 10-3pm

SATURDAY

4 Nathan 10-3pm

6

7

8

9

10

Nathan/Tyler- 10-3pm Mitch/Justice 7-9pm

Nathan/Tyler 10-3pm Mitch/Justice- 5-9pm

Nathan– 10-3pm Mitch/Justice 5-9pm

Nathan/Tyler- 10-3pm Mitch/Justice 5-9pm

Nathan/Tyler 10-3pm Kyla/Jessica 5-9pm

13

14

15

16

17

Nathan/Tyler- 10-3pm Julian 5-7pm Mitch/Justice 7-9pm

Nathan/Tyler 10-3pm Mitch/Justice- 5-9pm

Nathan– 10-3pm Mitch/Justice 5-9pm

Nathan/Tyler- 10-3pm Mitch/Justice 5-9pm

Nathan/Tyler 10-3pm Kyla/Jessica 5-9pm

20

21

22

23

24

Nathan/Tyler- 10-3pm Julian 5-7pm Mitch/Justice 7-9pm

Nathan/Tyler 10-3pm Mitch/Justice- 5-9pm

Nathan– 10-3pm Mitch/Justice 5-9pm

Nathan/Tyler- 10-3pm Mitch/Justice 5-9pm

Nathan/Tyler 10-3pm Kyla/Jessica 5-9pm

27

28

29

30

31

Nathan/Tyler- 10-3pm Julian 5-7pm Mitch/Justice 7-9pm

Nathan/Tyler 10-3pm Mitch/Justice- 5-9pm

Nathan– 10-3pm Mitch/Justice 5-9pm

Nathan/Tyler- 10-3pm Mitch/Justice 5-9pm

Nathan/Tyler 10-3pm Kyla/Jessica 5-9pm

Kyla/Jessica 5-9pm

11 Victoria/Julian 1-3pm Kyla/Jessica 5-9pm

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Victoria/Julian 1-3pm Kyla/Jessica 5-9pm

25 Victoria/Julian 1-3pm Kyla/Jessica 5-9pm

 The Hours of Operation for the Fitness Center are subject to change. Please be sure to check for any revisions to the schedule on the main schedule in the front window of the Fitness Center, OR, Please call the Fitness Center (705-865-1967) to inquire about any schedule changes or last minute closures.  If you would like to have the Fitness Center Schedule e-mailed to you please send a simple request to physicalwellnessworker@sagamok.ca


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EXPLORING HOW FIRST NATIONS TRADITIONAL USE OF TOBACCO CAN BE UTILIZED AS A STRATEGY IN PREVENTION AND INTERVENTION FOR TOBACCO MISUSE AMONGST FIRST NATIONS YOUTH

SAGAMOK ANISHNAWBEK FIRST NATION RESEARCH TEAM

COMMUNITY RESEARCH TEAM

Co-Principal Investigators ▸ Sheila Cote-Meek, BScN, MBA, PhD ▸ Sonia Isaac-Mann, BSc, MSc Co-Applicants ▸ Nicole Eskkakogan, BA, MA ▸ Peter Selby, MBBS, CCFP, FCFP, MHSc, DipABAM ▸ Tina Martin, Community Research Partner ▸ Eileen Smith, MSW, RSW, Community Research Partner ▸ Tyler White, Community Research Partner ▸ Edie Karacsonyi, BSW, Community Research Partner ▸ Fern Assinewe, Research Project Coordinator

For more information, please contact: Audra Owl 705-863-0002 or 705-865-2171 fnowl@hotmail.com

Eileen Smith, MSW, RSW Community Research Partner

Delores Trudeau Elder Representative

Cheyenne Abitong Youth Representative

Audra Owl Community-Based Research Assistant

Canadian Cancer Society Research Institute Canadian Institutes of Health Research Instituts de recherche en santé du Canada


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EXPLORING HOW FIRST NATIONS TRADITIONAL USE OF TOBACCO CAN BE UTILIZED AS A STRATEGY IN PREVENTION AND INTERVENTION FOR TOBACCO MISUSE AMONGST FIRST NATIONS YOUTH

SAGAMOK ANISHNAWBEK FIRST NATION SAGAMOK ANISHNAWBEK FINDINGS ▸ 75% of Youth report that it is fairly easy or very easy to get tobacco. ▸ 73% of youth who smoke said that they got their last cigarette from a friend, a store or gas station. ▸ 86% of Youth indicate that their parents/guardians smoke. ▸ 85% of Youth respondents who are current smokers indicate that their parents/guardians smoke. ▸ 44% of Youth report that their grandparents smoke. ▸ 37% of youth who are current smokers report that their grandparents smoke. ▸

▸ When asked how successful programs and services were, 11 of the 20 interview participants indicated that they were “Not Successful.” ▸ 3 out of 4 Elders indicated that they were not aware of programs and services offered in the community. ▸ 5 out of 6 focus group participants indicated that they were not aware of any programs and services and if there were, the programs and services were not very well advertised.

▸ 50% of youth survey participants know how to use traditional tobacco. ▸ 65% of youth interviewees indicated that they knew how tobacco was originally or traditionally used in their community. ▸ 60% of youth interviewees indicated that they did not know how the tobacco was obtained. ▸ Two Elders indicated that tobacco was not always used, that local/ plants herbs were used because tobacco was not a local plant.

▸ 65% of youth interviewees ▸ 90% of youth interviewees recommended education and indicated that they did not know role modelling to health workers, if there was more than one kind teachers, and other service 31% of Youth who are current of traditional tobacco. providers as possible strategies for smokers indicate that they have tobacco prevention/intervention. ▸ All four Elders indicated that the smoked while pregnant. teachings about the traditional ▸ 3 of 4 Elders recommended 65% of Youth who are current use of tobacco were limited continued promotion/discussion smokers report that they have within the community. regarding tobacco misuse. smoked around pregnant women. ▸ The majority of youth 70% of youth survey participants ▸ Focus group participants interviewees indicated that there recommended: reported that they had not been would be interest in restoring the ▹ Communication with involved in any tobacco-related traditional use of tobacco. community; programs, services, or activities. ▸ All four Elders indicated that ▹ Support groups; 50% of youth interview teaching the ceremonies was a ▹ More traditional activities; and, participants could not describe key factor in addressing the issue ▹ Having traditional tobacco any programs or services for of youth tobacco usage. available for use. tobacco prevention/intervention. ▸ 85% of youth survey participants know what traditional tobacco is.

For more information, please contact: Audra Owl 705-863-0002 or 705-865-2171 fnowl@hotmail.com

SAGAMOK ANISHNAWBEK ACTION PLAN IN RESPONSE TO THESE FINDINGS ▸ Reduce the number of underage youth accessing commercial tobacco from gas bars, stores or friends. ▸ Educate and produce awareness within younger age groups (0-11) as a way to reduce the number of children/youth who are exposed to images of smoking as an accepted activity so that they do not pick up the behaviour of smoking. ▸ Increase in the awareness and participation of tobacco prevention/intervention programs, services, and activities. ▸ Increase use of local plants/herbs as an alternative to commercial tobacco. ▸ Use the correct language and teachings.

Canadian Cancer Society Research Institute Canadian Institutes of Health Research Instituts de recherche en santé du Canada


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Community Justice Program MIWDOODAA MINO MAADIZIWIN DIVERSION PROGRAM VISION

Eligibility

Length of Program

A safe and secure community with a traditional jus- • Youth ages 12-17, Adults 18+ •  The length of the program is tice system based on the sacred teachings and holisdetermined by two factors. • Member or resident of Sagamok tic community values.

MISSION

The Community Justice Program will support offenders, families and victims to restore balance and harmony in relationships as they work towards healing; assist offenders in reintegration into the community; instill pride in their Anishnawbek identity, create community awareness of justice issues through education; and work together with other programs and services to improve the quality of life for all community members

Anishnawbek who normally • Case by case basis and the time resides in Sagamok given to the client to complete conditions as outlined • Individual has agreed and conin the Healing and Wellness sented to voluntary participaPlan tion in the diversion program • Address causes of the offending behaviour •  Individual has consulted with legal counsel • The needs of the victims will be adequately addressed

Justice Committee

• The safety and harmony of the community will be enhanced Guided by the sacred teachings through the use of a commuof the Seven Grandfathers, the nity based approach Justice Committee consists of Sagamok Anishnawbek com• Community ownership and remunity members who promote sponsibility decision by consensus, equality, •  Reduced charge or withdrawal balance and unity. of charge

Aboriginal Legal Aid Advice Lawyer (A.L.A.A.L)

Legal Advice Clinics

Wills&Estates, Criminal Law, Family Law and all Civil Matters

SAGAMOK ANISHNAWBEK COMMUNITY JUSTICE PROGRAM JUSTICE COMMITTEE MEETING SCHEDULE FISCAL YEAR – 2013 -2014 (Revised 12th December 2013) DATE

TIME

Wednesday, Jan. 15th 1-3 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 19th 1-3 p.m. Wednesday, Mar. 19th 1-3 p.m. Lawyer: Susan M. Hare To book an appointment please contact the Community Justice Program at 705-865-2171 ext 249

Aboriginal Lawyers Serving Aboriginal People LOCATION

TO BE DISCUSSED

January 20, 2014

10 - 3 p.m.

CWD – SMALL RESOURCE ROOM

Workplan & Budget Review & Approval for 14-15

January 28, 2014

1 – 4 pm

CWD – SMALL RESOURCE ROOM

Regularly Meeting

Scheduled

Justice

February 25, 2014

10 - 3 p.m.

CWD – SMALL RESOURCE ROOM

Regularly Meeting

Scheduled

Justice

March 20, 2014

5 - 7 p.m.

March 25, 2014

1- 4 pm

Enji Wii ji Gaabwitaadaying Agaamik (New Community Hall) CWD – SMALL RESOURCE ROOM

Annual Honoring Ceremony Preparation Evaluations

for

year-end/


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25 Annual Biidaaban Classic Invitational Hockey Tournament Tuesday, February 18th – four games Wednesday, Feb. 19th - eight games Wed. “Biidaaban Tyke Stars Exhibition Game” At the Massey and District Arena First Eight Invited Teams Entry Fee $200.00

* Trophies and Medallions * All Star Trophies * Mr. and Mrs. Clause pose for a photo at Sagamok’s Annual Elder’s Christmas Dinner. (Photo Credit: Rebecca C. Toulouse)

Please contact Becky Toulouse, Tournament Coordinator Phone 705-865-2421ext 250; Fax 705-865-3411 Or by Email: toulouse_becky@sagamok.ca Deadline for entry Jan. 31, 2014 If Interested in Refereeing or score keeping, please contact tournament coordinator

Information For Community Regarding Sagamok Anishnawbek First Response Team The purpose of the First Response Team is to provide emergency patient care at the scene of an accident or illness until such time that an ambulance is available to arrive at the scene.

NOTICE Sagamok Anishnawbek Membership Protest As a result of the General Band Membership Meeting held on December 19, 2013, One (1) Band Membership applicant was accepted for membership with Sagamok Anishnawbek. All applicants have completed their five (5) years probationary period as stated in the Membership Laws of Sagamok Anishnawbek.

The applicant who received the majority votes are as follows: • Eunice Bouchard Should a member of Sagamok Anishnawbek wish to protest the results of the General Band Membership Meeting, a notice in writing should be delivered to the Membership Authority containing the grounds thereof within 180 days (July 18, 2014) limitation period, unless the person who is bringing forth a protest, can show that there was no way for them to have known about the decisions within that time period. Protest Forms are available at the Membership Office. Sagamok Anishnawbek P.O. Box 610 Massey, ON P0P 1P0 (705) 865-2421/ Fax: (705) 865-3307 Attn: Mitzi Toulouse

The intent of these teams is to have local access to a trained group of local volunteers that may be available to respond to a local ambulance related emergency and administer first aid. There are times when there are not enough volunteers to provide the First Response service and as such will notify the Central Ambulance Communication Centre (CACC) that the First Response Team is not in service. An Emergency First Response Team is not an ambulance service and must be dispatched by an ambulance communications Centre (CACC). The CACC prioritizes the urgency of requests, determines the appropriate destination hospital to meet patient needs and provides callers with pre-arrival first aid instructions. The centers deploy, coordinate and direct the movement of all ambulances and emergency response vehicles within geographic catchment areas to ensure an integrated healthcare system. The Emergency First Response Team will be activated only by the CACC. Should someone contact a team member directly for assistance, the team member will contact the CACC and request an ambulance prior to responding on the call. The First Response Vehicle is to be used as a First Response Vehicle and as such is NOT TO BE USED TO TRANSPORT PATIENT(S). Circumstances may deem the need for the First Response vehicle to be used as a mobile shelter. Mobile shelter will be considered as a temporary shelter at the scene, when the need for shelter from the elements is required i.e. weather, insects, bystanders, patient safety, etc. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact Audra Owl at (705) 865-2421 ext. 211.


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Tanner Southwind brings in the New Year in alongside traditional dancer Tim McGregor.

Happy Birthday

Craig and Velma Toulouse (Photo Credit: Rebecca C. Toulouse)

Happy Birthday to Parker B. Abitong From your mom, Sara Abitong Happy Birthday to Byron Owl- January 12th and Brandy Owl January 18th from Family and Friends and your little brudder.

December 2013

PUBLIC NOTICE Armstrong Lake Dam Replacement The Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR), Sudbury District, is inviting public comment on an application received from Vale Canada Limited (Vale) seeking approval to replace the Armstrong Lake Dam. The current rock and timber structure with stop log management, built in 1964, is proposed to be replaced with a new overflow concrete dam. The Armstrong Lake Dam, owned and operated by Vale under MNR License of Occupation #1517, is located in Totten Township at coordinate 46.5349N and 81.5947W.

Vale, with Hatch Engineering, has completed a hydro-technical assessment and developed several dam replacement options. The proposed option – a concrete overflow weir structure – was selected based on a review of potential environmental impacts and overall feasibility.

Our family cannot thank everyone enough for all you have done for us during our difficult time. The names are too many to list but you know who you are. Whether the support came from a hug, providing food, monetary donations, spiritual guidance, cultural teachings or just being there, we are grateful for all you have done. Our Sagamok family truly came together to help us celebrate and remember our beloved Courtney Keysis and gave her the sendoff she deserved. She will be truly missed by all who knew her. Miigwetch, From the Keysis/Richards Family

Vale is proposing to complete the Armstrong Lake Dam replacement work during 2015. The proposal is being evaluated in accordance with a Category B project under the Class Environmental Assessment for MNR Resource Stewardship and Facility Development Projects. A Notice of Completion will be provided to parties who have provided input or requested further notice. Where concerns can be resolved, MNR can proceed to implement the project without issuing a Notice of Completion.


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Sagamok Minor Soccer League Summer 2014 Session (Get Active, Meet friends, Learn New Skills)

Tentative Timeline for the program February 2014: Recruitment for Volunteer Coaches Recruitment for Soccer Referees

March 2014: Player Registration

April 2014: Coaching clinic Referee Clinic

May 2014 - July 2014 10 week program, players play twice per week Season Start date dependent on weather Elder’s Eagle Lodge Staff would like to thanks all the community members who attended this year’s function.

Contact: Laura McMeekin-Clarke - Community Wellness Department - Physical Wellness Worker 705-865-2171 physicalwellnessworker@sagamok.ca or on Facebook (Laura McMeekin-Clarke)


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Lands Department Tammy’s Tips!

A New Year – Make GREEN Resolutions!

• Eat a local diet. Grow your own food and support local farmers, natural food stores, and food co-ops. You’ll save money, eat quality foods, create local jobs, and increase farmlands. You’ll also reduce transportation costs from shipping food. • Use recycled and rechargeable batteries. Disposable batteries contain toxic chemicals, and manufacturing them takes about 50 times as much energy as the batteries produce. • Replace old appliances when needed with energy-efficient models. • Use cold water in your washing machine when possible. As much as 90 percent of the energy used to wash clothes goes to heating water.

By: Tammy Tremblay B.Sc., Lands and Environment Administrative Assistant January has arrived, have you made your New Years’ resolution? The three most popular resolutions that I hear year after year are to better themselves by quitting smoking, start exercising and making better food choices (dieting). This year, why not make a resolution that is geared to helping our beloved Mother Earth. “Green tips” are simple tips that you can use to green your home, clothing, transportation and more. With all the tips that are out there, it can seem a little overwhelming. I recommend picking one or two to get started and add more as time goes on. Here are some tips to get your green resolutions underway:

• Tread lightly on the Earth. Identify a way you can reduce waste or pollution in your life (recycle more, conserve more energy). • Encourage your friends and family to watch less television. Play games together, organize a club, host neighborhood dinners, or take long walks instead. • Practice Clothing Consciousness. Look for alternative fabrics made from recycled content, such as fleece which is made from plastic bottles. Buy used clothing, not only is it less expensive, but it also saves raw materials and energy. Avoid dry cleaners; they use chemicals that can be dangerous to your health and the environment. Hand-wash clothes at home, or turn to wet cleaners. • Make your own cleaners and laundry. To avoid toxic chemicals, consider making your own cleaners. Household items like baking soda, lemon juice, vinegar, and club soda, can be combined to clean everything from carpets to toilet bowls. • Use old clothing and sheets for dusting and cleaning rags, as an alternative for paper towels. • Install a clothesline in your backyard or basement, and let your clothes dry naturally. • Use houseplants to purify the air. Some houseplants— such as Boston ferns, English ivy, rubber plants, and peace lilies—can help clean your indoor air by absorbing toxic chemicals. • Avoid excessively packaged foods. Buy bulk foods or products packaged in recyclable materials or reusable containers. • Pack garbage-less lunches in reusable containers instead of plastic and paper. • Compost! Instead of throwing your apple cores, egg shells, and other organic waste into a landfill, compost them. If you don’t have a yard, consider using an indoor worm bin.

• Set your refrigerator to 2.5°–4.5°C, and turn the freezer to -15°C. • If you buy a car, consider an electric or hybrid vehicle, which can create less pollution. • Drive less. Carpool, walk, bike, or use trains, buses, and other public transportation. When you do drive, combine errands for fewer trips. Leave a bike at the office. If it’s too far to bike to work, leave a bike at the office for errands during the day. • Consider using nontoxic paints and stains to minimize indoor air pollution and reduce contaminants in landfills and groundwater. • Never dispose of old paint thinner, household cleaners, oil, or pesticides by washing them down the drain or throwing them out. Donate leftovers to a friend or charity, or take your waste to a local toxic disposal center. • Check out local used furniture stores to find items that are light on your wallet and the environment, or consider new eco-friendly furniture. • Use alternative building materials that don’t come from trees, such recycled plastic lumber for rot-free decks, and cabinetry made from recycled newspapers. • Read magazines online, or share a subscription with a friend. You’ll save money as well as paper. • Remove yourself from junk mail lists, cancel unnecessary catalogs, and ask businesses and other organizations not to share your name. • Save paper in your financial transactions. Utilize direct deposit, automatic bill paying, online banking, and online portfolio management to save paper in your financial transactions. • Carry cloth bags with you to the store to avoid wasting paper (or plastic). • Set your computer printer to print on both sides of the page. There is a variety of reasons to go green, but most come back to supply and demand. We have a limited amount of resources available and more and more people using them up. If we want our future generations to enjoy the same standard of living we’ve experienced, we need to take action. Please try these tips and tricks and encourage family and friends to do the same. Miigwetch!


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Joint Health & Safety Committee

Shki Waase-Aaban Binoojiihn Gamik

Healthy Workplace By:Marla Toulouse What is a healthy workplace? Three key elements of a healthy workplace include the physical environment and compliance to health and safety regulations, supporting healthy lifestyle practices, and an organizational culture that creates a positive psychosocial work environment. These three elements of a healthy workplace influence / impact one another.  For a workplace health strategy to be effective, each avenue of influence must be addressed in an integrated, comprehensive manner.  Health and safety measures, lifestylerelated programs, and a positive culture that supports these initiatives and employees’ psychosocial needs are imperative to a healthy workplace. What the law says The Occupational Health and Safety Act, which gives the Government of Ontario broad powers to make regulations, sets out general principles and duties for the workplace parties.  The regulations set out in detail how these duties are to be carried out.  Many regulations have been made under the Act.  For example, there are four separate safety regulations that apply to industrial establishments, construction sites, mines, and health care facilities. Employers, supervisors, owners and constructors, among others, have an obligation to know and comply with the regulations that apply to their workplaces.  Contact your health and safety provider for the specifics on the regulations that cover your workplace. Having a healthy workplace can help your business / organization in the following ways; Decreased: Absenteeism and turnover Litigation Accidents, illness, levels of stress and depression

Increased: Health and safety performance Employee satisfaction Employee engagement

On December 19, 2013 the children and staff invited parents to join them in their annual Christmas and year end celebration. The children came in dressed in their best attire for this special occasion. Prior to the delicious traditional Christmas feast that was prepared by Corinna and Pris cilla, the staff prepared several activities for parent and child interaction, which included; ornament making, cookie decorating, snowman marshmallow kabobs, candy canes, and Christmas scrapbooking. The event was a great success for the children because each child had their special guest accompany them for this day in which we gathered moms, dads, caregivers, and grandparents. The staff had planned, decorated and prepared for this to be a special event to highlight the end of a great year of working together for the growth and development of so many wonderful children. We believe the children are gifts from the Creator and what better way than to treat them as special as they are, and give them the gift of inviting the jolly old Santa Claus who brought gifts of toys for each and every child who attends our daycare centre.

Insurance claims and costs

Productivity

The staff of Shki Wasse-Aaban Binoojiihn Gamik would like to thank everyone who came, our cooks, the Santas Elve’s Program and Santa Claus for making this celebration great.

Use of short- and long-term disability

Profit

We wish all our families and community a happy, healthy and

Three things are clear: Unhealthy, unsafe and stressful workplaces are costing Canadian employers billions of dollars annually. Workplace interventions can make significant improvements and save at least 20% of these costs. Comprehensive, healthy workplace interventions cost far less than they are likely to save the company, returning between $1.15 and $8 for every dollar spent on developing healthy workplaces.  Some effective interventions are virtually free.

Right photo:Grace Mantiowabi and granddaughter Santana pose for a family photo at the Elder’s Christmas Dinner


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Biidaaban Kinoomaagegamik National Bullying Awareness Week

During National Bullying Awareness Week, teachers at Biidaaban School participated in “Creating a Bully Free School & Classroom� training with Susan Buchanan. Students had the opportunity to participate in an in-class workshop the next day. Students learned what Bullying looks like and discussed strategies to help them if they are being bullied or if they see a friend being bullied. As part of this initiative, staff and students will be learning and practicing a different virtue each week, such as caring, cleanliness and compassion. We will also be teaching specific learning skills school wide that will be implemented daily in class room routines. A schedule of when the virtues and skills will be taught has been provided on the last page of this newsletter. We encourage parents to also discuss what the virtues mean and what they look like at home with their child.

National Diabetes Awareness Month

The Junior Kindergarten has been speaking about healthy eating and the risk factors that come with eating too many sweets, or unhealthy foods. November is Diabetes Awareness month and to show our support for Diabetes Research the class fundraised by selling Fruit Kabobs and Veggie Trays. This was also to promote healthy eating within our school. With all the donations from the students we were able to raise $301.55. All proceeds from this fundraising effort went to the diabetes research. We would like to say Chi-Miigwetch to all the parents for showing their support by donating items. As well, Biidaaban raised $32.50 from the ribbon sales.

Biidaaban Students Play in Blind River Volleyball Tournament

Picture: (Back Row)Coach Becky Toulouse,Deidra Abitong, Desirae Southwind, Faye Solomon, Cecile Eshkawkogan, Natalie Trudeau Southwind (Front Row) Asia Eshkakogan, Braxton Owl, Celeste Toulouse, Julie Ann Trudeau, Trinity Hardisty The Intermediate Boys and Girls volleyball teams took part in a tournament hosted by W.C. Eaket Secondary School in Blind River. Teams from the Blind River, Elliot Lake and North Shore area competed in the round robin event which was organized by senior high school students. The girls won two and lost two matches. The boys fought hard in a tie breaker to go into the semi finals. Both teams had worked hard over the past month practicing several times a day. They have certainly found a love for the game and showed dedication and sportsmanship representing Biidaaban well. Congratulations Biidaaban! Picture Below: (Back Row)Preston Eshkawkogan, Rusty Caibaiosai, Ethan Toulouse, Jackson Linklater, Coach Colin Granby (Front Row) Tyson Francis, Hunter Chiblow, Kain Kokoko,


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Biidaban Kinoomaagegamik National Aboriginal Addictions Awareness National Child Day Week

National Child Day is celebrated every year on November 20th marking the date in history when Canada adopted the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC), 1991. Canada supports the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and is committed to make certain that all children are treated with dignity and respect. Providing the opportunity for children to have a voice, be protected from harm and be provided with their basic needs and every opportunity to reach their full potential. Biidaaban students had a great time participating in the National Aboriginal Addictions Awareness Week Powwow. Prior to the powwow, we had visits from Tim and Amelia McGregor who shared traditional teachings, dances and the importance of exercise and healthy eating. We would like to say Chi-Miigwetch to the grade eight parents who helped with the dinner for the guest dancers, drummers and elders. This is one of the grade eight fundraising activities that support their year-end class trip.

This year Biidaaban celebrated National Child Day with an afternoon filled with fun activities. Later, students and parents enjoyed an evening of music and dancing. “Safety and security don’t just happen they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear.” -Nelson Mandela

“Just Move It” Challenge

Biidaaban “Just Move It” Challenge Blends with Diabetes Awareness Month and NAAAW Activities promoting “Weweni Mno Bimaadzing” - Living a Good Life Over the last four weeks Biidaaban students participated in their regularly scheduled Physical Education classes and as well, classroom teachers added additional minutes in Daily Physical Activity (DPA) opportunities for their students. Classes from Grades One to Eight participated. Congratulations go out to the Grade 5 class who tabulated 850 minutes of physical activity over the four week period. The entire school also celebrated with a community walk promoting living a Healthy Lifestyle. Earlier in November men’s traditional dancer Tim McGregor and women’s jingle dress dancer Amelia McGregor shared traditional teachings, dances and the importance of exercise and healthy eating. As part of NAAAW celebrations, students participated in a school powwow.


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Biidaaban kinoomaagegamik Confident Learners Initiative and Professional Learning Communities at Biidaaban

Intermediate Boys and Girls Volleyball Team to Participate in Blind River Tournament

“Confident Learners Initiative (CLI) is an early-years literacy program designed to develop the reading skills of young students in First Nations schools. The program leverages each young learner’s areas of confidence to progressively and measurably build strong literacy skills, which research shows will help them become confident learners beyond grade three”. Robert Laurie Biidaaban primary teachers have completed an initial training in assessment for the CLI and are enthusiastic about embarking on this initiative. The only way to improve student achievement is to change classroom practice. “The most promising strategy for sustained, substantive school improvement is developing the ability for school personnel to function as professional learning communities. The framework for teacher professional development focuses on quality instruction, engagement, context and time. With this in mind, teachers will be conducting Professional Learning Communities every Monday after school as a component of the CLI.

Baapaashkakodin Giizis

Miigwechwe Giizhgat

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Ntam Giizhgat

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Gimaa Giizhgat Staff – PLC 3:30 – 4:30

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Virtue: Courage

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Virtue: Courtesy

Niish Giizhgat

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Martin Luther King Day

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Family Literacy Day

Virtue: Generosity

New Year’s Day

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Naanoo Giizhgat

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Oodetoo Giizhgat

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Dental Screening JK –Gr.4

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Dental Screening Gr.5 - 8 New Year Sunrise Ceremony 7AM & Pancake Breakfast Biidaaban Hockey Practice 4:30 @ Massey Arena

Pizza Lunch$4

EHS @ Grade 8 11:15 AM Parents Welcome Course Option Application

Virtue: Friendliness

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Niiwoo Giizhgat

Nswi Giizhgat 1

After School Programs Begin

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Students from Grades 6, 7 and 8 have been busy attending after school practices preparing for a tournament to be held at the high school in Blind River on Friday, Dec. 13. Over the last several weeks, the boys and girls team visited St. Mary’s Massey and S. Geiger for warm-up exhibition games. The boys were successful in winning a match against St. Mary’s. The girls went to a tie breaker losing their match with both schools. St. Mary’s visited our community and enjoyed the large gym and high ceilings! The students are looking forward to participating in the upcoming tournament.

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Grade 7 & 8 Winter Survival

Grade 7 & 8 Winter Survival

Grade 8 Fundraiser – Sheppard’s Pie

Pizza Lunch $4

PD Day School Closed


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Fire Department WINTER DRIVING Be Prepared, Be Safe! Weather conditions can be unpredictable, placing extra demands on your vehicle and your driving skills. Stay alert, slow down, and stay in control. Drive according to highway and weather conditions. Maintain a safe following distance between you and the vehicle in front of you to avoid situations where you may have to brake suddenly. REMEMBER: It takes vehicles longer to stop in winter weather conditions and driving downhill. You should limit the use of cruise control on wet, snowy or icy pavement. Under these conditions, cruise control may cause your vehicle to accelerate in an unpredictable manner, possibly reducing your reaction time and ability to control your vehicle. Make sure that your vehicle is mechanically ready for winter conditions.

Maawanji’idiwag (Gathering Together) is a journey of Self-Exploration.

Based on a traditional approach rooted in the Seven Grandfather teachings the interactive 2-hour Monthly Circles will engage male participants to openly discuss and explore the values of responsibility and accountability while learning about their specific roles to self, family & community.

Monthly Men’s Circle Offered Every Third Thursday of the Month Time: 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Location: Community Wellness Department Facilitator: Isaac Murdoch Date and Topics: January 16 –

Welcoming and Grandfather Teachings

February 20 –

Exploring Lateral Violence in the Community

March 20 –

Exploring Self-Esteem and Positive Affirmation

April 17 –

The Family Circle (Circle will be Co-ed)

May 15 –

Fellowship on the Land (Fort LaCloche - Transportation Provided)

June 17 –

(Circle will be Co-ed)

For More Information Please Contact: Community Justice Program Office at 1-705-865-2171 ext. 249.

Keep your fuel tank sufficiently full – at least half a tank is recommended.

SAGAMOK ANISHNAWBEK LAND CODE DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY ASSEMBLY

Always be sure you have enough windshield washer fluid in the reservoir. Keep an extra jug in the vehicle.

March 5 2014 10 am to 3 pm

Clear snow and ice from all windows, lights, mirrors, and the roof.

“Ednakamigad Centre”

After starting the car, wait for the fog to clear from the interior of the windows. It’s a good idea to keep a winter survival kit in your vehicle. Having essential supplies can provide comfort and safety for you and your passengers should you become stranded. Be careful if you have to get out of your vehicle when on the shoulder of a busy road.

Planting the Seeds for the Next Generation

(Millennium Centre)

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To be better Land Managers based on Sagamok principles and values that will allow future generations to manage the Land Decrease and resolve land disputes Economic prosperity Preserving Sagamok tradition of common band land Learning and research from past and current information- building upon The Sagamok Story

The Anishnawbek people survived for thousands of years on this land. We cooperated with each other in using the land and its resources and we flourished. The introduction of European government and economy undermined our traditional land management strategies and, as a result, we are now fighting with each other and abusing the land. We need to take control of our land by re-creating a land management strategy that fit with our story of who we want to be. Community Story Report Card on Lands & Resources 2006

All community members are invited and encouraged to participate in this one day session to discuss and provide direction to the development of our Sagamok Anishnawbek Land Code. Lunch – Refreshments - Door Prizes

For More Information Contact: Rhea Assinewe, Lands & Resources Coordinator


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Animal Control Sagamok Anishnawbek

On Friday December 13th, 2013 our Young Warriors Youth Council had launched their first Youth Program for our youth by hosting a semi-formal event that consisted of a dinner and dance. We had 31 Youth come out to participate in our event and also came out in their best dressed and all looked FABULOUS!! Thanks to all the youth that participated and we look forward to your participation in our future events

The community of Sagamok partnered with IFAW and ARF to run the Third Annual Animal Wellness Clinic November 8, 2013, Objectives of providing wellness are; to provide veterinarian services to dogs and cats, to do health checks, vaccinations, deworming, flea treatment and to talk to the owners about concerns As a result; there have been 68 dogs checked and vaccinated This is double that was represented from previous year; however the next steps is to continue with community concerns and to register your dog and cat.

IFAWW International federation for animal Welfare

Contact Stanford Owl 705-863-2512

Proposed Residential Lot ete Cem

NOTICE Sagamok Anishnawbek

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As a result of the G’daa Kiim-non Meeting held on December 3, 2013, seven Applications for Land Use were reviewed.

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Before recommendations are made to Chief and Council, any potential land encumbrances need to be identified.

Please review the attached maps and the identified parcels of land in question.

Should a Member of Sagamok Anishnawbek, wish to protest any of the Land Applications for Land Use, a notice in writing should be delivered to the Lands & Environment Department containing the grounds thereof within 60 days, February 4, 2014. Sagamok Anishnawbek P.O. Box 610 Massey, ON P0P 1P0 (705) 865-2421/ Fax: (705) 865-3307 Attn: Tammy Tremblay

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Proposed Camp Sites

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Sagamok news january digital version