Page 1

Washington State Visitors’ guide 2014

Washington state visitors’ Guide

Best of the

63

awes festivoame ls

northwest

discover

how to get on the water explore

where to rock ’n’ roll taste

2014 www.experiencewa.com

what to drink now


Make yourself at home away from home. Firmly established as one of the Northwest’s premier destinations for the value-minded traveler, Seattle Southside has all of the comforts of home just a stone’s throw away from everything Pacific Northwest. Every adventure needs a home base. Make Seattle Southside yours!

TO GET YOUR VIP PASSPORT TO SAVINGS: 1) Cut out this exclusive voucher from Seattle Southside. 2) Bring your voucher to the Seattle Southside Visitor Center at Westfield Southcenter. 3) Receive your VIP Passport to Savings, entitling you to thousands of dollars worth of special offers & amenities from more than 50 retailers, restaurants & cafes.

(877) 885-9452 • seattlesouthside.com


THE MOST PLANES IN THE CLOUD. MORE WI-FI THAN ANY OTHER AIRLINE.

DELTA .COM/WIFI


The Belle vue ColleC Tion S E E O U R S T U N N I N G VA R I E T Y of over 200 sophisticated retail stores where you will find the best-known brands and unique gifts. Plus 25 destination dining options, numerous cafÊ-style choices and an array of dynamic entertainment & nightlife‌all connected by sky bridges. Your adventure begins with an overnight stay in luxury at The Westin Bellevue or Hyatt Regency Bellevue. The Place To Be For Inspiring Fashion, Artful Dining and Vibrant Nightlife.

B E L L E V U E S Q UA R E

B E L L E V U E P L AC E

L I N C O L N S Q UA R E

Located in Bellevue, Washington, just minutes away from Seattle. Experience more at bellevuecollection.com and plan your getaway. 425.454.8096.


Ask us where to go for a uniquely local experience. Whether you’re visiting wine country in the Tri-Cities, soaring above Seattle atop the Space Needle or enjoying Spokane’s Riverfront Park, there’s a local experience waiting. Ask us where to go for the best local food, shopping, family fun and outdoor adventure when you stay with us!

Bellevue • Kelso • Kennewick • Olympia • Pasco Port Angeles • Richland • Seattle • Spokane • Tacoma Vancouver • Walla Walla • Wenatchee • Yakima

800–Red Lion redlion.com

A1041/0114



Seattle’s Award Winning Restaurant & Bar in the HEART of Pike Place Market

Open at 7AM every day!

Lowell’s opens every day of the week for breakfast, lunch, dinner & cocktails at 7AM on all 3 floors! Overlooking Puget Sound with panoramic wall to wall windows, Lowell’s unique “hideaway” is recognized as the friendliest restaurant & bar in Seattle!

1519 Pike Place Market, Seattle 206-622-2036 • www.eatatlowells.com


Contents

2 0 14

SEATTLE’S LAKE UNION

D E PAR TME NTS

30

15

Rollicking ocean waves, roaring river rapids, and placid lakes beckon those in search of aquatic adventure. By Anne Larkin

Get lured in with our prime fishing grounds, snowy slopes, literary locales, regional sips, and Native arts. Plus, romantic spots and fun runs for all.

Fest By Northwest

Calendar

The Wild Waters of Washington

38

Eighteen great Washington music fests attract audiophiles as much for their cool tunes as their breathtaking sights. By Laura D. Redman

8

WAnderlust

On the covers

26

From rodeos to barrel tastings, pioneer celebrations to holiday lights, here’s a month-bymonth guide to 45 of Washington’s best festivals and events.

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

Mount Rainier By Justin Bailie / tandemstock.com

The Palouse By Ben Herndon / tandemstock.com

Seattle By Joel Rogers / joelrogers.com

PHOTOGRAPH BY MICHAEL HANSON

F EAT U R ES

30


the heathman hotel kirkl and and trellis restaurant. The perfect pairing.

Details. They’re what separate the ordinary from the extraordinary. In a hotel, they’re the difference between accommodations and accommodating , a stay that’s pleasant and one that’s truly memorable, a good meal and a unique culinary experience. Details. They’re why service is still an art at the Heathman Hotel Kirkland and Trellis Restaurant .

Please call us at 425-284-5900 or visit heathmankirkland.com • 220 Kirkland Avenue, Downtown Kirkland, Washington


47

117

3

2 9

77

4

7

1

10

5

8 6

REGIO NS

47 Metro Seattle [1]

99 North Central [7]

65 North Cascades [2]

109 Wine Country [8]

From tulip fields and family farms to hiking and biking on miles of trails, the North Cascades are wildly wonderful.

71 The Islands [3]

Washington’s archipelago reveals just why it’s a National Monument, with watery expanses and quaint harbor towns.

109 65

77 Peninsulas & Coast [4]

Rain forest hikes, rocky coasts, white-sand beaches, a historic Victorian village, and more await.

85 The Volcanoes [5]

Day-trip to Mount St. Helens, bag Mount Rainier, and learn the rich history of mountaineering in the state.

93 The Gorge [6] 99 10

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

The Columbia River Gorge Scenic Byway has stunning vistas, while trails traverse Vancouver for more views.

Outdoor pursuits for every season, a Bavarian hamlet, and glacier-fed Lake Chelan are all part of the fun in the North Central region. Get uncorked in Wine Country before geeking out at a former nuclear complex and diving into the indie arts.

117 Northeast [9]

Discover Spokane, the cultural capital of the inland Northwest, and explore the natural wonders of Washington’s final frontier.

125 Southeast [10]

The green and golden hills of the Palouse, North America’s deepest river gorge, and a bustling college town can all be found in the southeast corner of the state.

PHOTOGRAPHS FROM TOP: LINDSAY BORDEN, JOHNATHAN ESPER/DREAMSTIME, LEE RENTZ, COURTESY WALLAWALLA.ORG, PIERRE LECLERC/SHUTTERSTOCK, GRANT GUNDERSON/TANDEMSTOCK.COM

With a wealth of art and culture, authentic global cuisine, and dreamy waterfronts, Puget Sound is wide open for exploration.


The Official Publication of the Washington Tourism Alliance PUBLISHED BY Washington Lodging Association in partnership with the Washington Tourism Alliance and SagaCity Media, Inc. WASHINGTON LODGING ASSOCIATION EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE PRESIDENT AND CEO Jan Simon Aridj CHAIR Zahoor Ahmed, R. C. Hedreen Company, Seattle IMMEDIATE PAST CHAIR Cindy Fanning, Silver Cloud Inns & Hotels VICE CHAIR Meghan Wiley, Holiday Inn Express Hotel & Suites, Pullman TREASURER Matt Van Der Peet, Sheraton Seattle Hotel

PLANNING A TRIP can require making some tough decisions. Should you dive

into unspoiled wilds or wander through an urban jungle? Get cultured or satisfy your taste buds? To that, we say, why choose? In Washington state—where the landscape shifts from rolling wheat fields to coastal sea stacks, mossy rain forests to rushing rivers, glimmering skylines to craggy mountains—you can experience it all. Our millions of acres of forest, thousands of lakes, and 172-island archipelago are ripe for exploration—as are our major urban centers and charming small towns. So much so that you may find yourself wandering the Seattle waterfront one day and then snowshoeing the Mount Rainier foothills the next; floating past nesting bald eagles on the Skagit River, then digging for fossils in Republic. Truly, every corner of the state has something splendid to offer. Diversity also reigns in our cuisine, culture, and cityscapes. Washington boasts museums and attractions in the realms of visual art, literature, popular culture, aviation, and even nuclear power. Tiny towns offer up big personality, while scores of breweries, distilleries, wineries, and coffee roasters add to the flourishing liquid culture around the state. It is a year of anniversaries, too. In 2014, Washington celebrates 125 years of statehood, Smith Tower—once the tallest building west of the Mississippi—turns 100, and Walla Walla Valley celebrates its 30th year as a federal American Viticultural Area. It’s this stunning and spectacular variety that makes Washington such a special place. So whether you’re stopping by to cheer for the Super Bowl champion Seattle Seahawks or to marvel at one of the newest National Monuments, the San Juan Islands, it’s all but impossible to avoid an adventure. We look forward to welcoming you to the Evergreen State!

ZAHOOR AHMED Chair, Washington Lodging Association Board of Directors

12

CHERYL KILDAY Chair, Washington Tourism Alliance Board of Directors

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

ALLIED OFFICER Roy Cupler, CPA, Moss Adams LLP WASHINGTON TOURISM ALLIANCE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Louise Stanton-Masten BOARD CHAIR Cheryl Kilday, Visit Spokane VICE CHAIRS Jane Kilburn, Port of Seattle Andy Olsen, Columbia Hospitality SECRETARY Skip Thompson, The Boeing Company TREASURER John Bookwalter, Bookwalter Winery PAST PRESIDENT/CHAIR Kevin Clark, Argosy Cruises & Tillicum Village SAGACITY MEDIA, INC. PRESIDENT Nicole Vogel VICE PRESIDENT, CUSTOM MEDIA Jeff Adams ADVERTISING SALES Colleen Bagdon, Dixie Duncan SENIOR ADVERTISING COORDINATOR Danielle Williams ADVERTISING ASSISTANT Elizabeth Loori SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, EDITORIAL & OPERATIONS Bill Hutfilz SENIOR EDITOR Julie H. Case ASSOCIATE EDITOR Angela Cabotaje COPY EDITOR Margaret Seiler ART DIRECTOR Samantha Gardner CONTRIBUTING ART DIRECTOR Chuck Kerr PRODUCTION MANAGER Mary Bradford EDITORIAL INTERNS Melena Jankanish, Jessica Winterbauer EDITORIAL BOARD Jeff Adams, Jan Simon Aridj, Julie H. Case, John Cooper, Bill Hutfilz, Jane Kilburn, Marianne Scholl, Louise Stanton-Masten

Washington Lodging Association, Washington Tourism Alliance, and SagaCity Media, Inc. are not responsible for the business practices of facilities mentioned herein, nor are they responsible for changes or variances that occur after publication. Advertising inquiries should be directed to Jeff Adams at SagaCity Media at 206-454-3007; editorial inquiries to Julie H. Case at 206-454-3028; and distribution inquiries to the Washington Lodging Association at 206-306-1001 or visitorsguide@walodging.org. All rights reserved. Copyright © 2014 by the Washington Lodging Association.

PHOTOGRAPHS FROM LEFT: TUSHARKOLEY/SHUTTERSTOCK, JEFF CAVEN, 2009FOTOFRIENDS/SHUTTERSTOCK

WONDER FULL

SECRETARY Frank Welton, Hilton Seattle Airport & Conference Center and DoubleTree by Hilton Seattle Airport


2014

Cruise Seattle

Start your Alaska Cruise here!

www.portseattle.org


s k i a r e as 16

wanderlust / regional sips 17 /

lo cal go od s 18

/ l i t e r a ry s i t e s 2 0 /

n at i v e a rt 2 2

cast away A fisherman pitches a line on the salmon-laden Skagit River.

Explore the outdoors

hooked on washington

Photograph by farhad Jahanbani

cast a line into the state’s prime fishing grounds. On a brisk October day on the Chehalish River, the banks on either side are dressed in bright yellow leaves, and the water below is full of migrating coho salmon. Carl Burke, who has been fishing in Washington for longer than I’ve been alive, is spin-casting from a jet boat into the brush at the water’s edge where coho salmon like to hide. I’ve hooked dozens of logs and branches already, each time imagining the tug to be a fish, yanking my rod with a jolt of adrenaline, only to realize my catch’s definite lifelessness. Finally, something feels different—it’s clear this is no rotting log. “Hook ’em, hook ’em!” Burke shouts as a silvery dorsal fin emerges from the water. Then he reaches down with the net and grabs the gorgeous fish, lifting it into the air where it thrashes wildly. “That’s a coho for you,” Burke says. “He’ll fight you like crazy.” After that we’re on a roll, and by the end of the day our boat is heavy with salmon cargo. A week—and many salmon dinners—later I depart Anacortes (map p. 72) for the San Juan Islands with seasoned guide Derek Floyd, owner and operator of Anglers Choice Charters (anglerschoicefishing.com). At Eagle Bluff on Cypress Island, a tried-and-true fishing spot, we set our lines, weighted to sink to 100 feet where king salmon are feeding. The San Juans are the ultimate place for this kind of anticipatory wait—as the morning fog lifts, it’s beyond pleasant drifting past pines clinging to rocky islands like overgrown bonsai. By noon, the sun is out and we’re trolling back and forth along James Island. We’ve been keeping our eyes trained on the rods, and finally one

jumps up, giving the fish at its end away. A fervent reel brings a 24-inch king to the surface, its scales glinting in the sun. Floyd has caught far more fish in his lifetime than I, but we’re equally thrilled as we pull the fish aboard. The rush of snagging a fish from Washington’s waters doesn’t seem easily diminished; each catch is as heady as the last. And, there are a whole lot to be caught—the list of species is a long (and tasty) one. Westport (p. 78), on the Pacific Coast, lures with the opportunity to fish deep waters and haul in chinook and coho salmon, as well as albacore tuna, halibut, rockfish, and lingcod. All Rivers & Saltwater Charters (allriversguideservice.com) runs express tuna trips July through Halloween, halibut trips during that season in May, and steelhead and salmon excursions in the rivers inland from the coast. Close to a million pink salmon return to the Skagit River each year, while rivers farther in are known for their spirited steelhead. That’s especially true in the Heller Bar area of the Snake River, near Clarkston (p. 126), where thousands of the feisty fish pass through from August to March, and on the nearby Grande Ronde, where fly-fishing is popular. And there’s trout fishing—many fishers’ first childhood catch—in lakes across the state. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (wdfw. wa.gov/fishing) stocks many lakes, such as Williams Lake, 30 miles southwest of Spokane (p. 118), plus a handful of high alpine lakes. Come winter there’s even ice fishing for perch, walleye, and trout out on the Lind Coulee arm of Potholes Reservoir, near Moses Lake. —anne larkin www.experiencewa.com Washington State Visitors’ Guide 2014

15


wanderlust

going down Skiers and boarders ride Edelweiss Bowl at Alpental.

Explore winter

get up, get down

volcanoes, multiple mountain ranges, and tons of precipitation make for exceptional winter pursuits.

16

Central

4 Stevens Pass Two mountains, three faces, and groomers, gulches, and bowls to spare. This North Cascades resort also has night skiing and a park full of boxes and gun poles. stevenspass.com Vertical: 1,800 feet Trails: 37; 11% easy, 54% medium, 35% expert 5 Mission Ridge Being east of the Cascades makes for cool, bright winters—and dry powder and blue skies. Take a run on Bomber Bowl and glimpse a B-24 that crashed here in 1944. missionridge.com Vertical: 2,250 feet Trails: 36; 10% easy, 60% medium, 30% expert 6 Alpental & The Summit at Snoqualmie The family-friendly Summit features night skiing, 50-plus kilometers of snowshoe and Nordic trails, and tubing. Alpental, on the north side of I-90, offers more steeps and deeps, as well as 523 acres of backcountry. summitat snoqualmie.com

Vertical: 2,280 feet Trails: 108; 14% easy, 45% medium, 41% expert 7 Crystal Mountain Ascend above the tree line for steeps and deeps, and the chance to drop between trees and rocky chutes at this resort perched in the northeast corner of Mt. Rainier National Park. Don’t ski? Ride the gondola for dinner and an up-close view of the mountain. crystal mountainresort.com Vertical: 3,100 feet Trails: 57; 11% easy, 54% medium, 35% expert 8 White Pass Combine the state’s highest base elevation with the dry air of the eastern slopes and you get consistent snow, as well as some of the best tree skiing in the state. This über-family-friendly resort, southeast of Mt. Rainier National Park, also has 18,000 acres of cross-country terrain. skiwhitepass.com Vertical: 2,050 feet Trails: 47; 23% easy, 60% medium, 17% expert

Washington State Visitors’ Guide 2014 www.experiencewa.com

East

9 49 Degrees North Come home to moguls, bone-dry powder, and evergreens for everyone. Ditch the skins; the Angel Peak lift grants access to 270 acres of inbounds backcountry. ski49n.com Vertical: 1,851 feet Trails: 82; 30% easy, 40% medium, 30% expert 10 Mt. Spokane This mountain is home to some of the state’s best night skiing and the largest certified ski school in the state. Warm up at the summit with fireside hot toddies. mtspokane.com Vertical: 2,000 feet Trails: 45; 23% easy, 45% medium, 32% expert 11 Bluewood Dry powder, short lift lines, and blue skies make this ski area near the Oregon border special. Don’t miss a cat ride to Vintners Ridge for tree runs. bluewood.com Vertical: 1,125 feet Trails: 24; 27% easy, 43% medium, 30% expert

West

12 Hurricane Ridge A mile above sea level, this resort offers terrain said to change weekly, uncongested bowls, and the right to brag you’ve skied in the Olympics: Go off-piste and you’re in Olympic National Park backcountry. hurricane ridge.com Vertical: 800 feet Trails: 10 Everywhere

DIY: Grab a SnoPark permit (parks. wa.gov/206/permits), rent skis or snowshoes from outfitters such as REI (rei.com), and head to any of the 120 public Sno-Parks. Find everything from sledding hills to skate lanes to snowmobiling, as well as the occasional sled dog sighting. —julie h. case 1 3 12 6

4

7

2

9 10

5 8 11

Photograph by jeff caven

North

1 Mt. Baker The mountain that holds the world record for snowfall—95 feet fell here in 1998–1999— is huge among boarders and skiers (including Olympian Angeli VanLaanen) thanks to trees, bowls, and double blacks galore. winter.mtbaker.us Vertical: 1,500 feet Trails: 38; 23% easy, 35% medium, 42% expert 2 North Cascade Heli For untouched backcountry, head to the Methow. North Cascade Heli drops into 300,000 acres among the most glaciated peaks in the continental U.S. If one day isn’t enough, try the three-day yurt trip. heli-ski.com Vertical: varies 3 Loup Loup Ski bowl Methow Valley locals get their turn. Looking for a cheap thrill? Just $40 on Wednesday or Friday ($45 on weekends) gets you the one quad, a J-bar, a towrope, and some 300 acres of alpine terrain. skitheloup.com Vertical: 1,240 feet Trails: 10


Sip the State

W

Photographs from top: JFergusonphotos/Dreamstime.com, courtesy woodinville whiskey company

hen it comes to beverages, we’re lucky. Climate and geography coalesce for some of the nation’s best growing conditions. Here’s how we toast our fortune. Beer: Second only to Germany in hop growing,we also rank eighth in the U.S. for craft breweries per capita. Rainier Brewing and Olympia Brewing were born in Seattle and Tumwater (map p. 48) respectively in the late 1800s, and the now shuttered Yakima Brewing & Malting Co. was America’s first microbrewery after Prohibition. Today, it’s hop-driven India pale ales and imperial ales from such breweries as Tacoma’s (p. 48) Harmon Brewing (harmonbrewingco.com) and Yakima’s (p. 110) Bale Breaker Brewing Company (balebreaker.com), plus stouts and porters from the likes of Winthrop’s (p. 100) Old Schoolhouse Brewery (oldschoolhousebrewery.com), that draw raves. Spirits: Legislation in 2008 created a craft distillery license, and Washington now has more than 70 licensed distillers. Whiskey led the revival, first at the hands of Spokane’s (p. 118) Dry Fly and now with the likes of Woodinville’s (p. 48) Woodinville Whiskey Co. (woodinvillewhiskeyco.com). In Seattle, Sodo Spirits is making the country’s only shochu, a Japanese barley-based distillate, while 3 Howls Distillery (3howls.com) and Sun Liquor (sunliquor.com) were the first to produce a Seattle rum. And Gig Harbor’s (p. 78) Heritage Distilling Company (heritagedistilling.com) makes spirits and teaches guests to produce their own. Vino: The second-largest premium wine producer in the country, Washington has 750-plus wineries—across 13 American Viticultural Areas—producing nearly 12 million cases of wine annually. Growing regions range from hot and sunny Red Mountain (p. 110) to cool and elevated areas ideal for Riesling. Tasting rooms abound—from Vintner’s Village, just off I-90 in Prosser (p. 110), to Woodinville, with its 90-plus wineries. Walla Walla Valley (p. 110) is best known as wine country, and Lake Chelan (p. 100) is where lakes and grapes gloriously collide. Buzz, No Buzz: Not all here is boozy. Coffee has been big since Starbucks opened in 1971, while Burlington’s (p. 66) Sakuma Bros. (sakumamarketstand.com) has been handpicking and crafting tea for a decade. DRY Soda’s natural sodas bubble with lavender and blood orange, and ginger beer from small producers like Rachel’s Ginger Beer has taken bars—and now Pike Place Market—by storm. —Erin James

Woodinville whiskey Company

Lace ’em up

On the Run Splendid scenery, vibrant communities, and a thriving running scene make the Evergreen State a great place to get your jog on. Best of all, it’s also home to some of the country’s oldest, largest, and most distinctive running events. Tiptoe through the tulips in Burlington’s (map p. 66) Tulip Run (Apr 5). March across Victorian Port Townsend’s (p. 78) Fort Worden, savoring the sweet scents of rhododendron blossoms in the Rhody Run 12k (May 18), or venture to Spokane (p. 118) to run alongside 50,000 others in the Bloomsday 12k (May 4), the third-largest timed running race in North America. Run within the shadows of the Olympic Mountains and along the Strait of Juan de Fuca (p. 78) in the North Olympic Discovery Marathon and Half Marathon (June 1), join military battalions running through Tacoma’s (p. 48) Point Defiance Park in the Sound to Narrows 5 and 12k (June 14), or roll along the Columbia River—and back in time at historic Fort Vancouver (p. 94)— in the Vancouver USA Marathon and Half Marathon (June 15). Sprint spectator-lined downtown streets and dart along the Alaskan Way Viaduct in Seattle’s (p. 48) Seafair Torchlight 8k Run (July 26). Trace portions of Captain Clark’s historic coastal walk at Long Beach’s (p. 78) Discovery Trail Half Marathon (Sept 13), or race along the Salish Sea under majestic Mount Baker’s snowy eye in the Bellingham Bay Marathon (Sept 28; p. 66). Feast on energy bars and gels on Thanksgiving Day weekend with more than 15,000 runners and walkers during the Seattle Marathon and Half Marathon (Nov 30), a holiday tradition for more than 40 years. —Craig Romano

www.experiencewa.com Washington State Visitors’ Guide 2014

17


wanderlust

1

3

2

discoveries

4

Made Here

5

6

7 8 9

10

11

18

Washington State Visitors’ Guide 2014 www.experiencewa.com

01 | Liberty Orchards dusts its jellied Aplets and Cotlets with powdered sugar for any sweet tooth. Cashmere (map p. 100), libertyorchards.com 02 | Each of Brown & Haley’s buttery, chocolateand-almond-coated Almond Roca toffee confections comes swathed in gold foil. Tacoma (p. 48), brown-haley.com 03 | These solid beeswax Totem Candles from Grain Design are sculpted by hand and perfume the air with a sweet honey scent. Bainbridge Island (p. 78), graindesign.com 04 | Volcanic ash from the infamous 1980 eruption has been swirled into the colorful blown-glass art sold at the Mount St. Helens Forest Learning Center gift shop. Toutle (p. 86), 360-274-7750 05 | What’s the secret to Anderson Family Farm’s lotions and soap bars? Pure, natural milk from its herd of goats. Ellensburg (p. 100), andersonfamily farm1979.com 06 | Dry Fly Distillery’s award-winning Washington Bourbon 101 is crafted from locally grown corn, wheat, and barley, resulting in a subtly sweet, oaky taste. Spokane (p. 118), dryflydistilling.com

07 | Palouse Brand takes “farm to table” to a new level, labeling its Pardina lentils with the exact field in which they were grown. Palouse (p. 126), palousebrand.com 08 | San Juan Island Sea Salt harvests its finishing salt by hand before letting the sun’s evaporating power do the rest. Friday Harbor (p. 72), sanjuan islandseasalt.com 09 | Liberty Bottleworks crafts recycled-aluminum water bottles that pay homage to Washington with creative designs of Mount Rainier, Seattle’s public transit system, and the Seahawks’ 12th Man. Union Gap (p. 110), libertybottles.com 10 | Craft-roasted in small batches, award-winning Ganesha espresso from Tony’s Coffee features hints of floral and chocolate. Bellingham (p. 66), tonyscoffee.com 11 | Olympic Lavender Farm cultivates the fragrant flower on five acres of Olympic Peninsula land. Pick up a bundle of dried lavender, or choose from an array of bath products infused with the delicate scent. Sequim (p. 78), olympiclavender.com —angela cabotaje

Photograph by zech johnson

From the rolling hills of the Palouse to the coastal sea stacks of the Olympic Peninsula, there’s plenty to marvel at in Washington. Revel in our regional riches with locally made goods that showcase the best of the state.


- NEWCASTLE, WA -

Experience two championship-caliber 18-hole golf courses, co-designed by Robert E. Cupp and Fred Couples featuring awe-inspiring views of Seattle, Lake Washington and the Olympic Mountains

Perfect your game at our extensive, state-of-the-art practice facility

Dine in the Calcutta Grill and enjoy stunning sunsets from our outdoor terrace

Hold your next event in our impressive clubhouse with more than 8,000 square feet of indoor & outdoor meeting space

Conveniently located just 20 minutesfrom Seattle and Bellevue

www.NewcastleGolf.com (425) 793-5566 15500 Six Penny Lane - Newcastle, WA


snohomish

wanderlust

ome to a slew of literary locales, Washington has

served as muse for many a best-selling author. The state’s rainy reputation moved Twilight author Stephenie Meyer to set her novels in the Olympic Peninsula logging town of Forks (map p. 78), but it’s the maritime charm of Port Orchard (p. 78)—hometown of romance writer Debbie Macomber—that shines in her Cedar Cove series. Nearby, quaint Bainbridge Island (p. 78) inspired David Guterson’s fictional San Piedro Island in Snow Falling on Cedars. Looking for something a little edgier? Journey south on the Kitsap Peninsula to the site of the notorious “health” sanitarium depicted in Gregg Olsen’s true crime book Starvation Heights. If you’re hunting for Sasquatch, the ancient forests along the Columbia River are prominently featured in Molly Gloss’s Wild Life. The San Juan Islands (p. 72) are the setting for the psychological thriller Folly by Laurie R. King, author of the highly acclaimed Mary Russell series, while Skagit Valley is where La Conner (p. 66) author Tom Robbins placed his quirky masterpiece, Another Roadside Attraction. Fans of E. L. James’s Fifty Shades of Grey should check out Seattle’s (p. 48) Escala condo tower, the fictional home of bondage-loving billionaire Christian Grey. Readers of Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet can step back in time at the historic Panama Hotel in Seattle’s International District, while devotees of Maria Semple’s Where’d You Go, Bernadette? can venture to Queen Anne Hill, where the cranky title character seethed about the Emerald City’s many quirks. There’s plenty of literary action east of the Cascades, too, from Teri Hein’s Atomic Farmgirl, a memoir about growing up in the shadow of the Hanford nuclear reservation, to Amanda Coplin’s haunting novel, The Orchardist, set in the apple and apricot orchards of the Wenatchee Valley. Spokane (p. 118) is the setting for a good chunk of Jess Walter’s darkly comic Citizen Vince, and the city’s historic Davenport Hotel was once the home of early 20th-century poet Vachel Lindsay. Still up for literary landmarks? The nearby Spokane Indian Reservation is home to both Sherman Alexie and the characters of his short story collection The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven. —Diane Mapes

davenport hotel

20

Washington State Visitors’ Guide 2014 www.experiencewa.com

shop around

Antique Me In these antique-friendly towns, foraging for treasure is part of the fun. Bellingham Artwork, jewelry, pottery, and fabulous midcentury finds can be had at Penny Lane Antique Mall (pennylaneantiquemall.com). Fairhaven Antique Mall (fairhavenantiquemall. com), located in the city’s historic district, is cozy yet packs plenty of gems, including dolls, Depression glass, and holiday collectibles. (map p. 66) Cashmere When it comes to antiques, this town doesn’t fool around. With 70,000 square feet, Apple Annie’s Antique Gallery (appleannieantiques. com) offers collectibles from every era. Nearby, Cashmere Antique Mall (antiquemallatcashmere.vpweb.com) has more than 15,000 square feet of radios, birdhouses, and more. (p. 100) Centralia This quaint town, just 30 minutes south of state capital Olympia, boasts an entire “Antique Row” along Tower Avenue. Plus, Centralia Antique Mall (201 S Pearl St) is just around the corner from Tower and houses 135 dealers. (p. 86) Seattle Seattle Antiques Market (seattle antiquesmarket.com) and Antiques at Pike Place (antiquesatpikeplace.com) are both top-notch malls with plenty of fantastic and funky finds. (p. 48) Snohomish This riverfront town calls itself the “Antique Capital of the Northwest,” thanks to its more than 20 shops featuring 175-plus dealers. (p. 48) Walla Walla Shady Lawn Antiques (shadylawnantiques.com) features vintage tools, fishing gear, and cabin décor; the Antique Mall of Walla Walla (antiquemallwallawalla.com) has 5,000 square feet of vintage clothes, books, and garden collectibles. (p. 110) —Diane Mapes

Photograph left courtesy davenport hotel, right courtesy snohomish.org

H

Book It


Just 30 minutes north of Seattle,

Woodinville Wine Country is home to over 100 award-winning wineries and tasting rooms.


wanderlust sandhill crane

discoveries

Native Art

Towering cedar totems, engaging museums, and annual cultural celebrations throughout the state tell the millennia-old legacies of Washington’s storied tribes.

Hibulb Cultural Center On a 50-acre natural history preserve, this Tulalip (map p. 48) tribute features historic canoes, a re-created longhouse, and exhibits labeled in both English and the Coast Salish language Lushootseed. hibulbculturalcenter.org Lelooska Foundation & Museum Woodcarving workshops and evenings of song and ceremonial mask demos bring Northwest Coast traditions to life at this cultural center near Ariel (p. 86), southwest of Mount St. Helens, where you can tour the collection of tomahawks, cornhusk bags, and other preserved relics. lelooska.org Suquamish Museum Amid towering trees on the Kitsap Peninsula, this LEED Gold–certified museum traces the Suquamish (p. 78) history back to the last ice age. Admire baskets, carvings, and artifacts before paying respects at Chief Seattle’s gravesite a few blocks away. suquamishmuseum.org Tillicum Village In spring and summer, Argosy Cruises’ boats depart from Seattle’s (p. 48) Pier 55 for

22

Blake Island, where you can admire the totems or fill up at a salmon bake. argosycruises .com/tillicum-village Columbia Gorge Interpretive Center With picture windows peering out onto the Columbia River, this Stevenson (p. 94) museum recounts the 40million-year history of the Gorge region. Trace the first peoples’ influence, from the Cascade Chinook to the Clahclehlah village visited by Lewis and Clark. columbiagorge.org Omak Stampede Every August, this annual event stampedes into Omak (p. 100) with rodeo events and the Colville Confederated Tribes’ Indian Encampment and Pow Wow, featuring a tepee village and dancing. omakstampede.org Yakama Nation Museum and Cultural Center From traditional garb to lifesize dwellings of the Plateau People, the history of Yakama Nation’s various tribes are on display at this 12,000-squarefoot museum in Toppenish (p. 110). Guided tours are available by appointment, Monday through Friday. yakamamuseum.com

For the Birds

Lummi Nation Stommish Water Festival This celebration of Coast Salish culture includes war canoe races and a traditional salmon barbecue on the Lummi reservation near Bellingham (p. 66), June 19 through 22. stommish.com Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture Learn about the Native cultures influencing the northeast corner of the state, from the indigenous Northern Plateau Indians to 1925’s National Indian Congress, plus the Inland Northwest Narrative: Crossroads and Confluence exhibit on display for two-plus years at this Smithsonian-affiliated museum in Spokane (p. 118). northwestmuseum.org Confluence Project An unprecedented collaboration between artist Maya Lin and Pacific Northwest tribes, this seven-site art installation reinterprets the journey of Lewis and Clark. One of the recently completed installations is a Nez Perce–inspired listening circle made of sculpted earth on a Snake River island at Clarkston’s (p. 126) Chief Timothy Park. confluenceproject.org

Washington State Visitors’ Guide 2014 www.experiencewa.com

—angela cabotaje

Omak stampede

Thanks to its place on the Pacific flyway, Washington contains some of the best bird-watching in the country—and annual bird-based bashes that celebrate their arrival. Skagit Eagle Festival During winter the Skagit River hosts one of the largest concentrations of bald eagles in the continental U.S. Concrete, Rockport, and Marblemount (map p. 66) celebrate our national bird in January with a month of float trips and interpretive programs. concrete-wa.com Port Susan Snow Goose and Birding Festival In February, a blizzard of up to 100,000 snow geese blankets the Stillaguamish and Skagit River deltas near Stanwood (p. 48). Accompany naturalists by foot or shuttle to catch a gander of the geese. snowgoosefest.org Grays Harbor’s Shorebird Festival Observing tens of thousands of sandpipers and plovers is a sure thing at this April event in Hoquiam (p. 78). Between bird-watching forays, dabble at a birding marketplace and nature fair. shorebirdfestival.com Othello’s Sandhill Crane Festival More than 400,000 lesser sandhill cranes cram the channeled scablands surrounding Othello (p. 126) each spring. After crane spotting, attend a seminar, art program, or naturalist program. othellosandhillcranefestival.org Puget Sound Bird Fest In September celebrate Puget Sound’s birds in Edmonds (p. 48). Take a guided beach or marsh walk, sound cruise, photography workshop, or native plant garden tour. pugetsoundbirdfest.org Birdfest Welcome the arrival of sandhill cranes at Ridgefield (p. 94) in October with a guided hike or paddling tour along the Columba River’s snaking sloughs. Afterward migrate to a salmon bake, live bird show, or storytelling session. ridgefieldfriends.org/birdfest —Craig Romano

Photograph left by becca olmsted, right Tania Thomson/shutterstock, bottom by tim patrick photography

Lelooska Foundation & Museum

spot wildlife


greatwolf.com/grandmound | 800.640.9653 (WOLF)

Reward Your Stay Join Best Western Rewards®, our FREE rewards program, and now through December 31, 2014, you can earn 2,000 bonus points for every qualified night you stay at a Best Western hotel in Washington State for up to 4 nights! Every U.S. dollar spent at Best Western hotels will earn you points. Points can be redeemed for free room nights, partner rewards, merchandise, dining, retail and gift cards. So, stay more–earn more! Join the club today.

bestwesternWashington.com/bwr 1.800.237.8483 | Promo code: WAVG14

Visit bestwesternWashington.com/bwr for complete terms and conditions. All Best Western Rewards® program rules apply. See bestwesternrewards.com for additional program terms. For a list of most current properties, local attractions, and events visit bestwesternWashington.com. Amenities vary by location. Best Western and the Best Western marks are service marks or registered service marks of Best Western International, Inc. ©2014 Best Western International, Inc. All rights reserved. Each Best Western® branded hotel is independently owned and operated.

WashingtonVisitorsGd 2014 Ad 12-13.indd 1

12/16/13 4:12 PM


puget sound

wanderlust Get romantic

From sweethearts stealing smooches during a sunset cruise to couples canoodling on a sleigh ride through the snow, one thing’s clear: The Evergreen State knows how to do romance right. Lovebirds tiptoe to tulip fields during the annual Skagit Valley Tulip Festival in April, where the colorful blooms create a sweet-smelling backdrop. Meanwhile, nearby La Conner (map p. 66) is always a dreamy setting for whispering sweet nothings with a historic marina, gallery-lined streets, and cozy restaurants right along the Swinomish Channel. In summer, it’s hard to top the picturesque San Juan Islands, which boast secluded beaches, glimmering coves, and forested hills. Venture out for a bike ride through rolling greenery, or kayak together to a private picnic on shore. Farther south, Whidbey Island seems made for wining and dining with eateries

24

specializing in Penn Cove mussels that are pulled fresh from nearby waters. Let days blend into a delicious blur as you and your beau stroll and sip through Washington Wine Country, where wineries and tasting rooms are an ideal way to get love-drunk. In North Central Washington, near the Columbia River, soak in breathtaking views from a cliffside perch at Cave B Estate Winery in Quincy (p. 100). Hint: the 100-acre vineyard also has an intimate spa. Even more enamoring sights abound around the state: In the shadow of Mount Rainier, Paradise’s (p. 86) alpine meadows are lush with wildflowers in July and August. The sun puts on a blissful show, melting into the horizon in a vivid orange haze, as ferries coast across Puget Sound.

Washington State Visitors’ Guide 2014 www.experiencewa.com

Centuries-old trees and moss-heavy branches create ancient, awe-inspiring splendor in the Olympic Peninsula’s Hoh Rain Forest. And nestled in the Cascade foothills, Leavenworth (p. 100) gives sweethearts reason to snuggle with horse-pulled sleigh rides in winter and glimmering lights that illuminate the snowy hamlet. For those looking to tie the knot here— including same-sex couples—a marriage license is valid after a three-day waiting period and for up to 60 days. Licenses may be obtained in person (or via mail) and fulfilled at any of the state’s romantic locations. —angela cabotaje

Photograph by Edmund Lowe/getty images

State of Love


Calendar

F I N D O U T W H AT ’S H A P P E N I N G A C R O S S T H E S TAT E T H I S Y E A R

18 Elma Chamber Wine and Seafood Festival Sample seafood, coastal cuisine, and wines from more than 25 Washington wineries. Jan 18; elmachamber.org 23 Spokane International Film Festival See a variety of indie flicks, and join in post-film discussions with the moviemakers. Jan 23–Feb 1; spokanefilmfestival.org F EB R U A RY

05 Northwest Flower and Garden Show (Seattle) More than 20 display gardens, lectures from luminaries, and 100-plus seminars help green thumbs grow. Feb 5–9; gardenshow.com

26

22 Mystery Weekend (Langley) Take part in an interactive whodunit during this two-day mystery play. Feb 22–23; visitlangley.com 27 Wintergrass (Bellevue) Finger-plucking fun includes bluegrass performances, impromptu jam sessions, and more. Feb 27–Mar 2; acoustic sound.org M A RCH

07 Penn Cove MusselFest (Coupeville) Visit mussel farms and get a taste of the famous bivalves. Mar 7–9; thepenncove musselfestival.com 28 Badger Mountain Challenge (Tri-Cities) Join ultramarathoners on 15k, 50k, or 100mile endurance runs on Badger Mountain. Mar 28–29; badgermountain challenge.com 28 Sandhill Crane Festival (Othello) Crane viewing and more fill this birdwatching event. Mar 28–30; othellosandhill cranefestival.org

29 Taste Washington (Seattle) The largest single-region food and wine event in the nation. Mar 29–30; taste washington.org A PRIL

07 Get Lit! Festival (Spokane) Bookworms gather for a week of readings, poetry slams, and wordy fun. April 7–13; outreach .ewu.edu/getlit 25 Spring Barrel Tasting (Yakima Valley) Get a tasting peek at vintages in the making from 40 wineries. Apr 25–27; wineyakimavalley.org 26 Black Lake Fishing Derby (Ilwaco) A familyfriendly day of fishing on Long Beach Peninsula. Apr 26; ilwaco-wa.gov M AY

06 Duck Dodge (Seattle) Weekly sailboat races get a dose of silliness with wacky costumes and awards. Tuesdays, May 6–Nov 4; duckdodge.org

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

09 Balloon Stampede (Walla Walla) Dozens of hot-air balloons launch into the sky during the 40th anniversary of this event. May 9–11; wwvchamber.com 10 Lilac Festival (Spokane) Parades, a car show, and a marathon commemorate this 76-yearold festival. May 10–17; spokanelilacfestival.org 23 Northwest Folklife Festival (Seattle) Enjoy this free festival dedicated to ethnic, traditional, and folk expression. May 23–26; nwfolklife.org JUNE

07 Maritime Gig Festival (Gig Harbor) A grand parade, historic boat show, and live music highlight this annual celebration. June 7–8; gigharborchamber.net 19 Celebrate Walla Walla Valley Wine Sip and learn about syrah at this wine event, featuring 70-plus winemakers, lectures, and vineyard tours. June 19–21; celebratewallawalla. squarespace.com

DUCK DODGE Sailboats race Tuesday nights on Seattle’s Lake Union.

PHOTOGRAPH BY TOM DOWD/DREAMSTIME.COM, TOP BY SILHOUETTELOVER/SHUTTERSTOCK

J A N U A RY

04 Skagit Eagle Festival (Concrete) Enjoy raptor presentations, float trips, Native American music, and the chance to see majestic bald eagles. Weekends, Jan 4–26; concrete-wa.com/skagiteagle-festival-2014


SEEHISTORY. IN THE MAKING

Coming to the Pacific Northwest?

Edmonds Galleries, cafes & bistros, boutiques, day spas, fabulous festivals, spring & summer public markets, performing arts center, theaters, beaches, murals, waterfront walkways, underwater dive park, award winning marina, ferry terminal and rail station. Minutes north of Seattle. VisitEdmonds.com 1-877-775-6934 VisitEdmonds.com

Plan to Stay in Lynnwood 15 Minutes North of Seattle 10 Minutes from Boeing Tour Lodging 40% Less Than Seattle

BOEING TOUR

Legendary Shopping Parking Always Free

www.LynnwoodTourism.com Or Call 800-662-2044

800.464.1476 8415 Paine Field Blvd Mukilteo • WA Futureofflight.org

Port of EVERETT

MARINA

Everett is a convenient and affordable option! The Port of Everett Marina is located just north of Seattle on Port Gardner Bay. Its waterfront amenities and island views provide a great destination for visitors and boaters alike. Come explore what we have to offer!

www.portofeverett.com | 425.259.3164 PO Box 538 Everett, WA 98206

EXPERIENCE THE ADVENTURE OF A LIFETIME Lynnwood Tourism Washington WITHOUT State Visitors Guide Ad TAKING ONE TO GET HERE.

1/6 Page Vertical - 2.1875” x 4.75” - Full Color Just minutes 1/2014 north of Seattle. OPEN UP to Snohomish County, there’s a treasure trove of adventure waiting for you to discover.


CALENDAR

20 Summer Solstice Art Walk (Bellingham) Soak up local art and historic charm in the Fairhaven enclave. June 20; fairhaven.com 21 Cycle de Vine (Chelan) A 35-mile ride with rest stops at wineries. June 21; cycledevine.com 28 Strawberry Festival (Bellevue) Enjoy strawberry shortcake and family entertainment. June 28–29; bellevue strawberryfestival.org 28 Hoopfest (Spokane) The world’s largest three-onthree basketball event. June 28–29; spokane hoopfest.net 28 Recycled Arts Festival (Vancouver) Artists turn trash into treasure at this eco-fest. June 28–29; recycledartsfestival.com J U LY

12 Skagit Valley Highland Games (Mount Vernon) Kilts, bagpipes, and fiddles abound at this traditional Scottish athletics event. July 12–13, celticarts.org 18 Northwest Raspberry Festival (Lynden) Celebrate the nation’s largest harvest of raspberries with live music and plenty of chances to taste the berries. July 18–19; lynden.org

A UGUS T

01 Anacortes Arts Festival An art bash with 250plus artisan booths and live music galore. Aug 1–3; anacortesarts festival.com 07 Omak Stampede Rodeos, Native American and Western art, and a tepee village highlight this 80-year-old event. Aug 7–10; omak stampede.org 18 International Kite Festival (Long Beach) It’s a week dedicated to defying gravity. Don’t miss the unbelievable indoor kite flyers. Aug 18–24; kitefestival.com 22 National Lentil Festival (Pullman) Street fairs, open-air concerts, cooking demos, and the world’s largest bowl of lentil chili are part of the fun in the Palouse. Aug 22–23; lentilfest.com 22 Seattle International Beerfest Mugs runneth over with more than 200 beers from 16 different countries. Aug 22–24; seattlebeerfest.com 29 Packwood Flea Market Browse antiques and more at this mega flea market. Aug 29– Sept 1; packwoodflea market.com

29 Ellensburg Rodeo Watch ropers, riders, and steer wrestlers at one of the top rodeo arenas in the nation. Aug 29–Sept 1; ellensburgrodeo.com S EPTEMBER

05 Washington State Fair (Puyallup) More than one million fair-goers enjoy rides, food, and fair fun at the largest annual attraction in the state. Sept 5–21; thefair.com 19 Valleyfest (Spokane Valley) Marathons, bike races, and boating fill this three-day event. Sept 19–21; valleyfest.org 19 Port Townsend Film Festival Enjoy scores of documentaries, short films, and features. Sept 19–21; ptfilmfest.com 26 The Great Prosser Balloon Rally Watch pilots from around the region inflate their hot air balloons and launch into the sky. Sept 26–28; prosserballoonrally.org OCTOBER

01 Savor the San Juans A monthlong celebration of the state’s archipelago, with food, farmers markets, and harvest festivals. Oct 1–31; visitsanjuans.com/savor 03 Oktoberfest (Leavenworth) Don lederhosen and partake in German-

themed fun at this Bavarian village. Weekends, Oct 3–18; leavenworth oktoberfest.com 04 Old Apple Tree Festival (Vancouver) Celebrate the oldest living apple tree in the Northwest with activities for children, cider pressings, live music, and food. Oct 4; visitvancouverusa.com NOVEMBER

14 Taste of Tulalip Savor sips from dozens of wineries and bites from award-winning chefs. Nov 14–15; tasteof tulalip.com 28 Bellevue Magic Season Glide across the area’s largest open-air ice arena, watch holiday drum and light shows, and see dazzling lights at the botanical garden. Nov 28–Jan 11, 2015; magicseason.com DECEMBER

05 Christmas Lighting Festival (Leavenworth) Sing carols, enjoy roasted chestnuts, and meet St. Nick as holiday lights illuminate a hamlet in the hills. Weekends, Dec 5–21; leavenworth.org 31 First Night Tri-Cities (Kennewick) Live music, fireworks, and performances highlight this alcohol-free, familyfriendly New Year’s Eve celebration. Dec 31; firstnighttricities.com

OMAK STAMPEDE A tepee village highlights local Native culture.

PHOTOGRAPH BY JOE VIESTI/VIESTIPHOTO.COM

18 Sequim Lavender Festival It’s all about lavender with farm tours,

live music, and street fairs. July 18–20; lavenderfestival.com

28

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM


18th Annual

August 22, 23 & 24, 2014 Fri. Noon-7 • Sat. 10-7 • Sun. 10-5

Garlic Themed Cuisine Artisans & Craft Vendors Antique Alley Kid’s Activities Chef Demonstrations

Live Music

EXIT 81

E FREing!

Garlicious’ ChilLounge

GARLIC FEST NAL AV NATIO

EXIT 79

GARLIC BEER!

Beer Garden

E

Park

$5 General Admission Cloves & Vines $4 Seniors 65+ & Military Kids 7 & Featuring Regional Wineries under FREE

Wine Tasting

Free Parking • No Pets or Smoking

SW Washington Fairgrounds 2555 N. National Ave. Chehalis, WA

For more information, go to www.ChehalisGarlicFest.com An Advocate Agency Production

Bellevue Square Shopping Center 425.454.8497

River Park Square

808 W. Main Avenue, Spokane 509.838.7115 www.oilandvinegarusa.com


The Wild

Waters

of Was

30

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM


WESTHAVEN STATE PARK

FROM OCEAN WAVES TO GLACIAL LAKES, RAGING RIVERS TO PLACID STREAMS, THERE’S AN ADVENTURE FOR EVERYONE.

shington By ANNE LARKIN Photograph by JUSTIN MYERS

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

31


I hear hollered from behind me for what must be the hundredth time this morning. Body balanced on my surfboard, I give it all I’ve got. My arms windmill at my sides, propelling me along with the swelling wave. Then I feel it—the force of the water working with me rather than against me— and I hop to my feet and stay there, gliding, sailing, flying toward shore. The nose of my board bonks into the sand, and I leap off, buzzing with the joy of my surfing success. I’m at Westhaven State Park, just outside the fishing town of Westport on the Olympic Peninsula, surfing the jetty. I’ve been out here since sunrise, working up the courage and coordination to stand up on my surfboard, rented from Steepwater Surf Shop in town. Stuart, my boyfriend (and, today, my surf coach), rides in, too, landing at the beach beaming. We got lucky; the swell is outstanding today. Back out on my board behind the farthest break, I watch a squadron of brown pelicans playing with the surf, hugging the cresting waves, dipping their wings in the spray. I’m cozy in my neoprene, happy to just sit out here and feel the Pacific Ocean under and around me, the sun shining on my cheeks while I gaze out over the beach toward the far-off Olympics. It’s the beginning of summer, a glorious season in Washington, and I’ve got big

Water World

From within the Canadian Rocky Mountains the Columbia River rises, then descends through Washington and turns west—forming the Oregon border—until it reaches the Pacific. Hells Canyon is here, as is an entire archipelago (the San Juan Islands) and miles-long glacier-fed lakes. No matter your sport, you can do it in Washington. Here are more ways to get on the water.

32

WE SPEND A COUPLE OF BLISSFUL HOURS GLIDING BETWEEN THE ROCKY ISLANDS, WATCHING THE PINES WHIP BY. plans for the next few months. It starts with surfing, and soon I’ll be exploring as many of the state’s 157 miles of coastline, 169 rivers, and 8,000 lakes as I can, in hot pursuit of watery adventure. A few weeks later, I find myself farther north, past the peaks I could just barely see from the surfboard, bound for Friday Harbor and a day trip with San Juan Classic Day Sailing. After a scenic 90-minute drive from our home base in Seattle to the ferry terminal in Anacortes, Stuart and I

GO FLY A KITE The hot, dry wind gusts that sweep out of the desert and into the Columbia River Gorge are so extreme waves form on the river. Once renowned for its windsurfing scene, the area between Beacon Rock and Alderdale is now the epicenter of a new extreme—kiteboarding.

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

Outfitters in Bingen and White Salmon offer rental gear and lessons, but take heed: this is no surf turf for beginners. A better launchpad might be near Everett. A passenger ferry transports swimmers and kiters to Jetty Island (ci.everett. wa.us), a two-mile-long

walk on (though cars are welcome) to the Hyak, one of 22 ferries in Washington’s iconic fleet, for an hour-long journey past evergreen shores poking out of the fog. We dock next to Spring Street Landing, where we plan to meet the crew. Our vessel is Iris, a 42-foot classic cutter built in 1934, skillfully piloted by Morgan, daughter of captain-owner Art Lohrey and a longtime sailor and islander. Along with the Iris, which takes groups of up to six out on afternoon and sunset sails, San Juan Classic

COLUMBIA RIVER GORGE

PHOTOGRAPH TOP: JOSEF HANUS/SHUTTERSTOCK, BOTTOM BY KEN STRINGFELLOW

“PADDLE, PADDLE!”


PHOTOGRAPHS FROM TOP RIGHT: JOSEF HANUS/SHUTTERSTOCK, COURTESY OSPREY RAFTING, COURTESY SAN JUAN CLASSIC DAY SAILING

From left: the San Juan Islands; San Juan Classic Day Sailing; Osprey Rafting; and rafters on the Wenatchee River

Day Sailing also sets out from Roche Harbor on Dirigo II, a 72-foot schooner built in 1939 for private charters and planned multiday sails. Though our trip with Iris starts out under gray skies, the sun soon forces its way through the clouds, making Iris’s seafoam-green paint and bronze fittings gleam. We spend a couple of blissful hours gliding between the rocky islands, watching the pines whip by, imagining the sweetness of a simple life out here amongst the harbor seals. After Iris returns us to the harbor, our day ends with a ferry ride at dusk, the lights of the islands’ shores winking goodbye.

ON ANOTHER HOT SUMMER DAY, I’m heading east for a very different kind of boating. After a two-hour drive along leafy Highway 2, my friend Beth and I emerge in Leavenworth, Washington’s own little Bavaria, where Osprey Rafting has been operating for 20 years. Today we’re rafting the Wenatchee, a powerful river that runs through the Cascades for 53 miles. Osprey has a put-in just around the corner from the shop, and after a safety talk and paddling lesson, we eagerly hop into the waiting raft. Soon after entering the river, we splash through Triple Threat and Tinley Falls—two Class IV rapids—laughing and screaming

isthmus of sand jutting into Puget Sound.

gov/noca/planyour visit/boating-on-rosslake.htm). A full 19 boat-in campsites are scattered around the lake—some with docks, all requiring a backcountry pass. Or board the Lady of the Lake in Chelan and set sail across the 50.5-milelong Lake Chelan for Stehekin (stehekin.

Steep river canyon walls and narrow shoots make for one very wild WHITE-WATER THE ride, with a variety of VOLCANOES outfitters (mtadams Volcanoes are hot. Snow chamber.com). is cold. When spring comes, the local volcaTAKE A REMOTE nic peaks around Mount BOAT EXCURSION Adams send gushing Kayak between the U.S. torrents of snowmelt and Canada via North cascading through the Cascades National White Salmon River. Park’s Ross Lake (nps.

com), a tiny community, with a beloved bakery, only accessible by foot, boat, or floatplane. JET BOAT AWAY The Snake River flows through Hells Canyon— the nation’s deepest river gorge—offering up stunning, craggy river views. Kayakers and canoeists regularly

with glee. After the initial hoopla, the river calms and loops back in toward town, carrying on past the gabled chalets. While we embarked on a half-day rafting trip, there are a ton of ways to raft with Osprey: mellow family rides, longer trips down to a barbecue at their takeout in Cashmere, happy-hour trips that yo-yo those first few rapids and end with a beer token for Leavenworth’s Icicle Brewing, or tubing trips, the ultimate in floating relaxation. Rafting starts on the Wenatchee whenever the snow begins to melt—around April or May—and runs until Labor Day. Trace the Wenatchee south to where it meets the Columbia, then continue farther

paddle the river, but jet boats out of Clarkston (hellscanyonvisitor.com) offer an exciting way to see even more. Stop for a glimpse of ancient petroglyphs. DO A DAM TOUR In the North Cascades, Seattle City Light’s Diablo Lake Boat Tour (seattle.gov/light/

tours/skagit/boat. asp) offers views of plummeting waterfalls during cruises on this brilliant blue lake ringed by emerald forests and snow-capped peaks. On the east side of the state visitors can take a tour of the Grand Coulee Dam (usbr.gov/ pn/grandcoulee) and even catch a laser show.

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

33


From left: houseboats on Lake Roosevelt; a skier pilots an air chair

ONCE WE ANCHOR TO THE SHORE, WE SETTLE INTO OUR NEW DIGS—ON GO THE HOT TUB AND THE ROOFTOP GRILL. downstream to find another convergence— the Snake, mingling with the Columbia at the Tri-Cities in Washington Wine Country. It’s from here that I’m heading on a jet boat trip early one morning, setting out from the Columbia Point Public Boat Launch in Richland on a powerful sixpassenger boat. Captain Ray Hamilton of Columbia River Journeys tells me over the roar of the motor that we’re going to a wild river—the last free-flowing part of the Columbia, a section of the mighty river that Lewis and Clark never even floated upon. He and a handful of other captains take modern-day explorers out on the river May 1 through October 15, often on a larger 22-seat boat. Kids fishing from shore wave

34

at us as we skim across the flat water, the glassy green river between us perfectly reflecting the bleached-blue sky above. Once we pass the last reminders of civilization—houses, ranches, and green vineyards—Captain Ray pushes the throttle down as far as it goes and a pair of white pelicans take off a hundred yards away, their black-rimmed wings carrying them high overhead. Soon the character of the river changes, the glassy water giving way to the ripples and whorls of a faster current. A little more than 20 miles upstream from town, we arrive at the Hanford Reach National Monument, a 196,000-acre reserve established in 2000 around the nuclear reactors built here from the ’40s to the ’60s—the

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

SOON ENOUGH, summer’s almost over and I’m chasing the sun out east with my dad and two family friends at Seven Bays Marina in Davenport (35 miles from Spokane), heading out on a houseboating expedition. At Dakota Columbia Houseboat Adventures’ dock, we meet owner Lyle Parker and our boat, the mighty Eclipse. I’m a little surprised they’re letting me take this giant vessel—it’s 62 feet long and 16 feet wide, sleeps 16, and looks a lot like an RV perched on top of two huge metal pontoons—out on the lake, but after a thorough briefing sprinkled with lots of “fores” and “afts,” I’m confidently houseboating on Lake Roosevelt, the 150-mile-long lake created by the Grand Coulee Dam. We set out for Hawk Creek, just four miles south of the marina, and arrive as the light starts to fade. Once we anchor to the shore, we settle into our new digs—on go the hot tub and the rooftop grill. By the

PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY DAKOTA COLUMBIA HOUSEBOAT ADVENTURES

first in the world. Six of the nine reactors are “cocooned,” stripped down to their essential bits and encased in angular cement and gleaming stainless steel to become strangely stunning modern art pieces. The town of Hanford and all of the reactors are on the south side of the river, while the north is flanked for the most part by the White Bluffs, 900-foot-tall cliffs made of layers upon layers of compressed sand and clay speckled with swallows’ nests. The captain adds in history lessons along the way, but other than that, it’s just a glorious ride on the river—the sky and the land feel wide open as we race across the water.


From left: stand-up paddling on Lake Union; kayaking at Hanford Reach National Monument

time our burgers are finished, the tub is warm, so we soak under the stars before finding our cozy berths. In the morning we plug in the coffee maker, watch the news on the satellite TV, and scramble eggs on the gas range, reveling in the strangeness (and awesomeness) of floating-amenity abundance. After breakfast, it’s out to our kayaks to paddle up the arm of Hawk Creek, where the beaches give way to steep basalt walls and, beneath us, pretty, leafy stalks reach up through the crystalline water. A 30-minute paddle ends with an impressive waterfall tucked into a little cove—“Jurassic Park,” Dakota Columbia owner Lyle calls it. Over the course of the day, we figure out what houseboating is all about. It’s not about covering ground, seeing as the max speed is a whopping eight miles per hour; it’s about finding the perfect place to park it and play. We score a pretty spot to beach ourselves, then run up to the

36

houseboat roof to zing off the slide, splashing in the aquamarine water. Our trip is over after another day, but most folks come for at least a week—packing the boat full of people and provisions for a unique exploration of this corner of the state.

BACK IN SEATTLE on one of the last sweet, sunny days of the season, I’m gearing up for an afternoon of stand-up paddleboarding. There are a number of places in Puget Sound where I can test my balance on the water—Lake Union in Seattle and Thea Foss Waterway in Tacoma, for example—but West Seattle is where I’m headed for a SUP lesson with Heidi, a guide with Alki Kayak Tours. She helps me choose a big, wide board that should keep me steady, and we set off from the beach to a chorus of sea lions, barking from

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

the giant buoy out in the bay. Alki Kayak Tours offers guided paddles (SUP or kayak) in both directions from the shop—west toward the lighthouse or east into Elliott Bay, which is where we’re headed. The afternoon sun is still reaching over the bluff of West Seattle as we sidle up to a derelict pier, dropping to our knees to fit underneath and poke through the musseland barnacle-covered pylons. The water is shockingly clear—I can see brilliantly colored sea stars and anemones clinging to long-fallen beams and boards below. Back out in the bay, we loop behind a docked barge to investigate moored vessels. Huge, gentle waves from the ferries, water taxis, and ships roll underneath us as we head toward Harbor Island and the mouth of

the Duwamish for a peek at the heavy-duty industry afoot here. As we turn back toward the beach, giant egg-yolk jellyfish pass harmless and graceful beneath us. “Every time I come out to the water, I feel so lucky to live here,” Heidi says. Savoring the setting sun over the mountains ahead and the salt water below me—recalling my delight surfing the waves out in Westport and riding the white water in the Cascades—I couldn’t agree more.

BOOK YOUR TRIP

Alki Kayak Tours kayakalki.com, Columbia River Journeys columbiariverjourneys.com, Dakota Columbia Houseboat Adventures dakotacolumbia. com, Osprey Rafting ospreyrafting.com, San Juan Classic Day Sailing sanjuanclassicdaysailing.com, Steepwater Surf Shop steepwatersurfshop.com

PHOTOGRAPH LEFT BY MICHAEL HANSON, RIGHT BY COLUMBIA RIVERKEEPER

EVERY TIME I COME OUT TO THE WATER, I FEEL SO LUCKY TO LIVE HERE.


Romance, Culture, Entertainment, and Recreation

EXPERIENCE IT ALL

UNDER ONE ROOF With 105 beautiful hotel rooms and suites, a luxury spa, headline entertainment, 9 diverse dining options and exciting gaming, why go anywhere else?

BC, CANADA PEACE ARCH

WA, USA

N Ferndale EXIT 260 Bellingham Seattle

EXPERIENCEEVERYTHING 24/7 ACTION SilverReefCasino.com (866) 383-0777 I-5 Exit 260 • 4 Min. West • Haxton Way at Slater Road • Ferndale, WA Events subject to change without notice. Must be 21 or over to play. Management reserves all rights. ©2014 Silver Reef Casino

The Best Value on the Road Free Value Club* Instant Rewards Save 15% on Future Stays, Room Upgrade, Late Check-Out & More! Free Internet, Continental Breakfast & HBO at most of our 1,000 Inns, Hotels & Suites in North America • Edmonds • Lakewood • Seatac • Tukwila • Walla Walla Download our free App

We’ve Got You Covered ®

AmericasBestValueInn.com 888-315-2378 *Offers & discounts are subject to availability and may be cancelled at any time. Details at AmericasBestValueInn.com or visit an Americas Best Value Inn. © 2014 Vantage Hospitality Group Inc.

Experience

this waterfront jewel of the Kitsap Peninsula situated on the shores of scenic Hood Canal. portgamble.com 360-297-8074


38

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

PHOTOGRAPH BY MATTHEW THOMPSON/ COURTESY KEXP

SASQUATCH! MUSIC FESTIVAL 2013 AT THE GORGE AMPHITHEATRE IN GEORGE, WA


FEST BY NORTH WEST

Catch a set by the next Nirvana or Jimi Hendrix in a seriously jaw-dropping setting. By LAURA D. REDMAN

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

39


MANY OF US, AT ONE POINT OR ANOTHER, HAVE ASPIRED TO PARTY WITH A ROCK STAR. The circumstances vary—be it a cold beer with your favorite drummer after a particularly thrashing set or a jam session with Miles Davis, back from the dead— but the dream is the same, and seemingly unattainable for us mere mortals. We resign ourselves to following our favorite bands on Twitter. But you cross the border into Washington state, and all of a sudden musicians are real people. Dave Matthews lives and grocery-shops in a quiet Seattle neighborhood. Mike McCready, lead guitarist for Pearl Jam, makes appearances at fund-raisers and plays backup for fledgling rockers. Hip-hop star Macklemore shoots music videos at Value Village and Dick’s Drive-In—but here, he goes by Ben. Just Ben. Even before an Aberdeen boy named Kurt Cobain started playing raucous concerts at Evergreen State College, Washington’s music scene was uniquely accessible. Far from the spotlight of New York or Los Angeles, people stay humble, honor their roots, and make music that’s both authentic and inspired. The native sound has morphed over the years. Jackson Street jazz of the 1940s and ’50s gave way to Northwest garage rock, with the Kingsmen’s “Louie Louie” as the unofficial anthem. (In fact, the song is still played during the seventh-inning stretch at Seattle Mariners games.) Jimi Hendrix shredded into the early ’70s, before things got funkier (Kenny G) and punkier (Heart). The ’90s brought a little thing called grunge and riot grrrl; a new century delivered a new genre, indie rock, and its Bellinghambred ambassadors Death Cab for Cutie;

40

and today, hip-hop and indie-folk rule the region. The best part? Washington boasts so many kinds of concert venues—from natural open-air amphitheaters to historic sites—musicians want to play here. They want to explore the Columbia River Valley just as badly as the rest of us do. That’s why it’s possible to go for a run along a dusty riverside trail at the Gorge and happen upon a few gentlemen out

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

for a walk. You may strike up a conversation; they may invite you back to their bus to hang out. They might, just might, be Mumford and Sons, the world’s biggest indie-folk band. (True story.) So: How to make your own rock-star dream a reality? Begin by exploring Washington’s best music festivals, held in some of the most varied and visually stunning destinations in the state—where even the musicians come out to play.


Left: Macklemore and Ryan Lewis and Elvis Costello play at Sasquatch! Music Festival 2013. Right: Confetti falls on the crowd, and Purity Ring takes the stage at Capitol Hill Block Party 2013.

ROCKING PANORAMAS KING GORGE

PHOTOGRAPHS CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: DAVID CONGER, SUZI PRATT, DAVID LICHTERMAN / COURTESY KEXP, MORGAN SCHULER / COURTESY KEXP

Sasquatch! Music Festival May 23–25, July 4–6; the Gorge Amphitheatre, George; sasquatchfestival.com Carved into basalt cliffs high above the Columbia River in central Washington, a natural amphitheater—is the sort of venue that draws music pilgrims from around the world. The sun sets behind the stage, spreading its hazy late-day glow over the valley, the campgrounds, and desert landscape beyond. For more than a decade, Sasquatch! Music Festival has been the high point of the Gorge’s annual lineup: a Memorial Day weekend celebration featuring some of the hippest acts in indie rock, hiphop, pop, comedy, electronic, and more. Everyone from Coldplay to the Pixies has done a tour at the Gorge, and 2013’s headliners—Mumford and Sons, Sigur Rós, the Postal Service, and Macklemore and Ryan Lewis—reflected both the festival’s diversity and its commitment to Northwest artists. (Mack and Lewis and the Postal Service are homegrown.) One might say that, like its namesake,

Sasquatch has grown too big. Since its inception in 2002, the fest has gone from a single day to four, and tickets have consistently sold out within hours of release. This year festival organizers expanded the series to two separate three-day events—over Memorial Day and the Fourth of July weekends—with entirely different lineups. Outkast, Queens of the Stone Age, M.I.A., Neko Case, and the Violent Femmes are featured in May. Soundgarden, New Order, Shelby Earl, and Spoon are among those headlining July. Let it be known: everything’s bigger at the Gorge. INSIDER TIP General camping, which is included with a festival pass, can turn into a frat party. Find alternatives at tourgrantcounty.com. STREET BEATS

Capitol Hill Block Party July 25–27; Union to Pine Streets between Broadway and 12th Avenues, Seattle; capitolhillblockparty.com

We get older, but Capitol Hill Block Party stays the same age. One of Seattle’s urban music festivals consumes Pike and Pine streets—known to locals as the PikePine corridor—for a weekend every July, with twentysomethings in fluorescent tank tops (and thirtysomethings looking pleasantly bewildered) rocking out to hip-hop, rock, and electronic music. It’s an all-afternoon, late-night event packing multiple venues in the city’s oh-so-hipster neighborhood. With a wristband, it’s easy to pop inside Neumos nightclub for a dance party, stumble back into the sunshine to catch a rising Seattle band at the Vera stage, grab a cold beverage at a beer garden, and claim territory for the nighttime headliner, be it Fitz and the Tantrums, the Flaming Lips, or Girl Talk (some of past years’ main attractions). Relive the days when you, too, could rock and roll all night. Some of the biggest names play a session in Caffé Vita or Barboza, Neumos’s basement bar, capacity 200. INSIDER TIP

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

41


DOE BAY FEST

Aug 7–11; Doe Bay Resort, Olga, Orcas Island; doebayfest.com Even as Sasquatch expands to two weekends and Capitol Hill Block Party picks up more corporate beer sponsors, one Northwest festival refuses to grow bigger than its hiking boots: Doe Bay Fest. Every summer for the past six years, fans of Northwest music—be it indie rock and soul or hip-hop and Americana—have been sneaking off to Orcas Island in the San Juan Islands for a weekend stay at a 38-acre waterfront resort. Ticket holders and musicians alike pitch tents, hike, walk the beach, and strum guitars around a campfire. Yes, there is an actual stage and schedule, but impromptu concerts may also happen along a trail in the woods. Barriers between audience and artist are completely down—it’s like everyone’s on vacation. Recent documentary Welcome to Doe Bay bore the tagline “the best festival you’ve never heard of.” Not any longer. The weekend consistently sells out months in advance. But rather than add tickets or days to the festival, talent organizers Artist Home have decided to create a new fest in the same spirit. Timber! Out-

42

TIMBER! OUTDOOR MUSIC FESTIVAL

door Music Festival (July 24–26) launched last summer, drawing bands and singersongwriters from all over the country to a park in Carnation. Bikes and beards were prominent, as were outdoor activities like astronomy talks, giving the whole experience an “adult summer camp” vibe, per event organizer Kevin Sur.

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

INSIDER TIP Artist Home launched a winter music festival—Timbrrr!—in Leavenworth this January that pairs skiing, snowboarding, and live music from the likes of Hey Marseilles, Telekinesis, and Radiation City.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY JASON NEUERBURG

ISLAND VIBES

Doe Bay Fest


BUMBERSHOOT

JULY

BELLINGHAM FESTIVAL OF MUSIC Cruise ships idle in the background as chamber players entertain on two days of this 15-day virtuoso orchestra festival. Among this year’s lineup are violinist Stefan Jackiw, the Calidore String Quartet, and internationally acclaimed soprano Joanna Mongiardo. July 5–20; Western Washington University, 516 High St, Bellingham; bellinghamfestival.org

MORE MUSIC, MORE VIEWS M AY

JUAN DE FUCA FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS Named for the strait separating the state from Canada, this international music and arts festival includes a multistage, multiday concert series. Past acts include the bhangra-meetsCeltic rock of Delhi 2 Dublin and Sierra Leone’s Refugee All Stars. May 22–26; Vern Burton Memorial Community Center, 308 E Fourth St, Port Angeles; jffa.org J U N E– S E P T E M B E R

CHATEAU STE. MICHELLE SUMMER CONCERTS Start the evening inside a French-style chateau at the state’s oldest winery, pick up a bottle of Ethos Reserve cabernet sauvignon or Riesling (or both), then take your liquid picnic to the sloping lawn, where a chilled-out crowd reclines on the grass as artists—be it Allen Stone or Sarah McLachlan—play on. June–Sept; Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery, 14111 NE 145th St, Woodinville; ste-michelle.com ZOOTUNES Concerts at a zoo? Sounds exotic. It’s not like you’re elbowing camels for a seat, but the outdoor shows on the lawn at Woodland Park Zoo are a great place to bring the kids to see Huey Lewis and the News or

44

Brandi Carlile. Look, don’t touch. June–Aug; Woodland Park Zoo, 5500 Phinney Ave N, Seattle; zoo.org/zootunes OLYMPIC MUSIC FESTIVAL In the summer, the best place to hear classical music isn’t a symphony hall; it’s a century-old dairy farm barn on the Olympic Peninsula. Members of the Philadelphia String Quartet launched the chamber music series in 1984, and 30 years on wafts of Prokofiev’s Romeo and Juliet or Beethoven’s violin sonatas drift out to people seated on hay bales. Weekends, June 28–Sept 7; 7360 Center Rd, Quilcene; olympicmusicfestival.org MARYHILL WINERY CONCERTS Winery concerts are all the rage here, but Maryhill has some of the best views (the carved bluffs of the Columbia River Gorge) and concert lineups (Bob Dylan, Hall and Oates, and Willie Nelson for the nostalgia seekers out there) in the state. Plus, there’s wine. June–Sept; Maryhill Winery, 9774 Hwy 14, Goldendale; maryhillwinery.com

draws more than 10,000 people to the streets of Browne’s Addition, the home of the city’s late1800s elite. Don’t let the ’hood’s tony past fool you. Elkfest is a down-to-earth, all-ages party with top talent from Seattle to Spokane (and sometimes beyond). June 6–8; The Elk Public House, 1931 W Pacific Ave, Spokane; wedonthaveone. com/the-elk/elkfest MUSIC ON THE MOUNTAIN A concert series at 4,314 feet would be cool enough, but this one overlooks the ashy (and active) Mount St. Helens volcano, whose crater turns shades of pink and purple as the sun dips down below the horizon.

JUNE

ELKFEST Now in its 10th year, this outdoor indie-rock festival is the pride of Spokane. It

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014 WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

WINTHROP RHYTHM AND BLUES FESTIVAL It’s hard to believe anyone actually has the blues at this annual festival, nestled in the North Cascades on the banks of the Methow River. Kids play in streams, parents make camp with peace flags flying, and national artists— even Bo Diddley in the past— get down to the serious business of jamming. July 18–20; The Blues Ranch, 19190 Hwy 20, Winthrop; winthropbluesfestival.com JAZZ PORT TOWNSEND One of the nation’s oldest jazz workshops culminates with a series of live performances in a state park (Fort Worden) perched above the Strait of Juan de Fuca—and later at night in intimate venues throughout town. July 20–27; centrum.org/ programs/jazz

AUGUST

SUMMER MELTDOWN Nestled between a lazy river and glacier-capped mountains, Whitehorse Mountain Amphitheater is home to the Darrington Bluegrass Festival (July 18–20) and, more recently, Summer Meltdown, a three-day camping-andmusic festival with more than 30 bands—think everyone from Bobby Fearon to the Shook Twins. Aug 7–10; Whitehorse Mountain Amphitheater, 42501 SR 530 NE, Darrington; summermeltdownfest.com BUMBERSHOOT The granddaddy of Seattle music and arts festivals returns every Labor Day weekend to Seattle Center, with three straight days of concerts (Death Cab for Cutie, fun., and Heart headlined last summer), comedy, theater, lectures on fan fiction, art exhibits, short films, and “spectacles.” Aug 30–Sept 1; Seattle Center, 305 Harrison St, Seattle; bumbershoot.org SEP T EMBER

DECIBEL FESTIVAL Now in its 11th year, the electronic music festival draws artists from around the globe, many whose names don’t have vowels (like XXYYXX and MNDR). It also boasts big-deal DJs such as Amon Tobin and eye-popping stage shows that double as the art of illumination. Sept 24–28; various concert venues, Seattle; dbfestival.com

DAVID BYRNE AND ST. VINCENT AT CHATEAU STE. MICHELLE

PHOTOGRAPHS FROM TOP: CHRISTOPHER NELSON, KIRK STAUFFER

June 28, July 26, August 30; Johnston Ridge Observatory Amphitheater, 24000 Spirit Memorial Lake Hwy, Toutle; facebook.com/musicon themnt


-

Must See Must Do

Washington Tours & Attractions CANOPY TOURS NORTHWEST Our tour features 6 ziplines, two beautiful trails, a log bridge, and a dramatic 54-foot final rappel! Zip through the trees viewing the forest from a whole new perspective. Camano Island, 360-387-5807 canopytoursnw.com

NORTH CASCADES INSTITUTE offers programs that share the natural and cultural history of the region, including guided tours, family getaways, art retreats and backcountry adventures. 360-854-2599 ncascades.org

FREE BOAT RIDES every Sunday at THE CENTER FOR WOODEN BOATS in Seattle, where maritime history comes alive and admission is free. 10% off all row boat rentals with the code: WOODBOAT. 1010 Valley St. Seattle, 206-382-2628, cwb.org

History abounds at the NORTHWEST CARRIAGE MUSEUM. Visit one of the finest collections of 19th century carriages, buggies, wagons and historic artifacts in the country. Interactive exhibits for all ages. Group tours available. 314 Alder St, Raymond WA 360-942-4150, nwcarriagemuseum.org

EDEN VALLEY GUEST RANCH & TRAIL RIDES Relax in Cabins with great views. Wi-Fi, Catering, Trail System for Hiking, Mt Biking & Horseback Trail Rides. Play Area, Child & Pet Friendly, Car Accessible. Many Activities. 10-miles E. of Oroville. Reservations: 509-485-4002, edenvalleyranch.net

NORTHWEST RAILWAY MUSEUM Just 2 miles from Snoqualmie Falls! Historic depot and exhibits daily, 10am– 5pm. Tours of Railway History Center and train excursions weekends, April–Oct and holidays. Experience how the railroad changed everything. Snoqualmie 425-888-3030, trainmuseum.org

GLIDER-RIDES.COM. Soar like a bird in our Grob motorized glider. See Snoqualmie Falls from above. Shoot pictures from an open window. Take the controls and experience flight in all its glory. Book now for an experience of a lifetime. FAA-certified pilot. In Renton near SeaTac, 800-734-3588, glider-rides.com

The 4 million volt Tesla Coil throws 10 foot arcs of lightning and is the star attraction in the SPARK MUSEUM’S MegaZapper Electrical Show, every Saturday & Sunday at 2:30 p.m. 1312 Bay Street, Bellingham, WA, sparkmuseum.org or 360-738-3886

HYDROPLANE & RACEBOAT MUSEUM Feel the Thunder! Mention this ad and get two tickets for the price of one! For hours and directions visit: thunderboats.org Kent, 206-764-9453

TOURUSA MOTORCYCLE RENTALS AND TOURS Experience the Pacific Northwest by riding though it! Choose a street, touring or adventure motorcycle. For a weekend or a full tour, enjoy the time spent between destinations. Guided and Self-Guided tour assistance available. 888-627-3682, TourUSA.us

MOLSON SCHOOLHOUSE MUSEUM Centennial Celebration 2014. Open Daily in Summer 10am–5pm OLD MOLSON GHOST TOWN MUSEUM Full-scale historic buildings on 5-acres. Kids love it. Daylight hours April–Oct. Oroville, 509-485-3292, orovillewashington.com; molsonmuseum.org

Open all year round, the VETERANS MEMORIAL MUSEUM has over 85 display cases of artifacts from the Revolutionary War to modern day. 2014 July 12-13 is our huge Civil War Battle and July 31-Aug 3 hosting the Vietnam Traveling Wall. Come visit us on I-5 at Exit 77. Chehalis, 360-740-8875, veteransmuseum.org

MYSTIC SEA CHARTERS Come aboard the classic 100 ft. Mystic Sea for our guaranteed whale watch and wildlife cruise and enjoy a fun and relaxing day on the water. Gray whale watching—Langley, WA: March 8–May 18. Orca whale watching— Anacortes, WA: May 23–Oct 4. 800-308-9387, mysticseacharters.com

WING LUKE MUSEUM OF THE ASIAN PACIFIC AMERICAN EXPERIENCE Discover Seattle through the stories, history and art of the Asian Pacific American experience in the heart of Seattle’s Chinatown-International District. Guided neighborhood & historic hotel tours. Seattle, 206-623-5124, wingluke.org


photo: Nick Hall

Come discover what makes Seattle great.

visitseattle.org


Metro Seattle SEATTLE, TACOMA, AND PUGET SOUND

PHOTOGRAPH BY ARTAZUM AND IRIANA SHIYAN/SHUTTERSTOCK

ELLIOTT BAY

In the metro Seattle area, drift into a dreamy scene where cityscapes meet the wilds. Iconic attractions promise everything from soaring sights to flying fish. Public art and museums deliver stunning views around every corner, Washington State Ferries—the state’s top tourist attraction— ply the waters at several city edges, and eating global is the norm. Plus, outlets are a shopper’s paradise and drinking local means not only tasting regional sips, but also seeing where they’re made.

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

47


530

N

Darrington

MOUNTAIN LOOP HWY

Stanwood

1

Tulalip

Port Townsend

S

Granite Falls

Marysville LAKE STEVENS

M E TRO S E AT T L E

Everett

Snohomish

Lynnwood

1

PUGET SOUND

3

BAINBRIDGE ISLAND

Bremerton

Bothell 203 Kirkland 4 Redmond 520

Seattle

Bellevue

5

VASHON ISLAND

Lakewood Dupont

5

North Bend

Sumner

Tacoma

Shelton

6

CHESTER MORSE LAKE

Auburn

Fife

Puyallup

512

Enumclaw

410

Graham

101

Olympia

Lacey

161

510

Tumwater Grand Mound

507

Yelm

Eatonville

Mt. Rainier National Park

7

EXPLORE

brave crossers to a little bit of paradise. 5 FALL CITY Once a mill town out in farm country, Fall City is 1 EDMONDS Snohomish takes its now a scenic 2,000This historic community history seriously. Homes person burg with a mind may have roots in lumdisplay the year they to preserve its heritage. ber, but Edmonds circa were built, and the SnoThe historical society 4 CARNATION now is all about quaint, homish Historic District has already saved a Situated between the small-town charm. Its in the center of town is 130-year-old hop shed, strollable downtown on the National Register Tolt and Snoqualmie Riv- and the lodgelike Last ers, Carnation is right in Frontier Saloon proudly brims with vintage of Historic Places. the heart of U-pick berry pours beers on the spot street lamps, cafes, and 3 GOLD BAR paradise. Miller’s Merboutiques—plus a water- Little Gold Bar celewhere Fall City’s trading front featuring fishing brates its mining heyday cantile—part gift shop, post was built in 1869. 6 NORTH BEND part community event off the pier, a 27-acre with July’s Gold Dust space—brings the farm- Made famous by the underwater dive park, Days, which includes land vibe into town with TV show Twin Peaks, and the bustling ferry a parade, live music, giant sunflowers painted North Bend is a sweet terminal connecting and vendors selling across its facade. ToltEdmonds to Kingston. all things that glitter. little town at the foot 2 SNOHOMISH MacDonald Park on the of Mount Si, a popular Just outside of town is edge of town is another hiking destination. Known as the Antique Wallace Falls—actually Capital of the Northnine falls in all, with the treat. A suspension After conquering the west—specialty shops, grandest being 265 feet bridge sways to the 4,167-foot peak, drop other side of the Snoart galleries, and sweet tall and worth the fiveby Twede’s Cafe for a qualmie, transporting cafes pack downtown— mile round-trip hike. slice of cherry pie and

Small Towns

48

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

6

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

Leavenworth

Fall City Snoqualmie

18

167

Skykomish Stevens Pass

Carnation

Kent Federal Way

Gig Harbor

2

Newcastle 90 Renton

7 SeaTac

20 mi

WALLACE FALLS

Gold Bar

Issaquah

16

3

Woodinville

405

Union

Monroe

522

Edmonds

Poulsbo

GLACIER PEAK

2

Mukilteo

E

W

Arlington

5

WANDER HERE

• Alpental; Summit at Snoqualmie; Stevens Pass (p. 16) • Harmon Brewing; Rachel’s Ginger Beer; Sodo Spirits; Sun Liquor; 3 Howls Distillery (p. 17) • Sound to Narrows; Seafair Torchlight; Seattle Marathon (p. 17) • Woodinville (p. 17) • Antiques at Pike Place; Seattle Antiques Market (p. 20) • Tillicum Village (p. 22) • Port Susan Snow Goose and Birding Festival; Puget Sound Bird Fest (p. 22) • Bumbershoot; Capitol Hill Block Party (p. 38) a coffee à la Special Agent Dale Cooper. Two blocks away, the Snoqualmie Valley Historical Museum showcases the non-Hollywood history of the area. 7 VASHON A 20-minute ferry ride from West Seattle transports travelers to a place far removed from city life, where farms still surround the tiny center of commerce, bikes wait for their owners unlocked, and everyone knows everyone at the cheery summer farmers market. The island is ringed with rocky beaches and laced with curvy roads through wooded wonderlands—plenty of room for adventure. —ANNE LARKIN


OLYMPIC SCULPTURE PARK

WINGMAN BREWERS

REGIONAL TASTES

Art & Craft

ART MEETS NATURE

PHOTOGRAPH LEFT BY BENJAMIN BENSCHNEIDER, RIGHT COURTESY WINGMAN BREWERS

WASHINGTONIANS LOVE TO LIVE and play outdoors, so it’s no surprise

that our cities are studded with dazzling sculptures and alfresco art. World-renowned glass sculptor Dale Chihuly—whose pieces have been featured in 200-plus museum collections around the globe—has threaded countless masterpieces into the rugged beauty of the Pacific Northwest. In his hometown of Tacoma, find 2,364 vibrant glass forms suspended overhead, two 40-foot-tall block towers glimmering in blue, and a display case filled with 109 whimsical sculptures on the Chihuly Bridge of Glass, a 500-foot-long pedestrian overpass leading to the Museum of Glass (museumofglass.org). The maestro’s work is also juxtaposed with nature under the towering Space Needle in Seattle at Chihuly Garden and Glass (chihulygardenandglass.com). Wend down paths lined with camellias and daylilies to happen upon works like Reeds on Logs, cobalt-blue glass rods that rise like giant candles out of the ground. Elsewhere in Seattle, public art abounds. In Capitol Hill’s Volunteer Park (seattle. gov/parks), Isamu Noguchi’s circular Black Sun frames views of the distant Space Needle and Olympic Mountains. Other works become an interactive cornerstone of neighborhood culture (Fremont residents often dress up the cast aluminum figures of Richard Beyer’s Waiting for the Interurban), while downtown’s waterfront Olympic Sculpture Park (seattleartmuseum.org) features 21 permanent outdoor pieces, ranging from Alexander Calder’s abstract Eagle to Louise Bourgeois’s fountain-engulfed Father and Son. TRIP TIP About 42 pieces are on display in downtown Bellevue—includPick up a free ing a life-size bronze statue of Mahatma Gandhi outside the art map at each public library—plus additional temporary works during the bien- city’s visitor information center. nial sculpture exhibition Bellwether. In Snohomish County, around 40 murals and sculptures by regional artists are sprinkled throughout downtown Edmonds and along the Puget Sound coastline. Visitors can also admire James Madison’s 15-foot-tall Tulalip People aluminum sculpture, which pays homage to the region’s Native culture with its fish-ladder effect, in Stanwood. State capital Olympia boasts some 27 pieces of alfresco art with waterfront park Percival Landing serving as a major hub. Within less than a mile, find 17 sculptures made from cast bronze to mosaic tiles to found objects on this promenade that might as well be considered a museum without walls. —CORINNE WHITING WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

The South Sound’s “legacy of honest hard work” resonates in every sip from Wingman Brewers (wingmanbrewers.com), a 2011 start-up that’s already upgraded to a taproom across from Tacoma Dome Station. Its theme salutes the World War II service of head brewer Ken Thoburn’s grandfather, who painted designs on military fuselages. Today, Wingman’s logo, a pinup girl behind an airplane gauge, keeps alive the area’s can-do spirit. This cleverness is echoed around Washington, which ranks eighth among states in craft breweries per capita and brews up a good chunk of the nation’s $10.2-billion small-batch suds industry. Sample the region’s success in Tacoma’s first craft brewery: Harmon Brewing Co. (harmonbrewingco.com). Or head to Pint Defiance (pintdefiance.com), a new bottle shop that has 50 feet of craft beers, meads, and ciders for sale, as well as tap offerings like Test Pilot IPA from Kent’s Airways Brewing Co. (airwaysbrewing.com). Ten miles southeast, connoisseurs can savor Puyallup’s DUO (duobrewing.com) Poles Apart milk stout and Powerhouse (powerhousebrewpub.com) Amperage Amber in an electrical substation that’s one of the West’s top brewpubs. In Graham, lift a glass of Dark Marc ale to the M.T. Head Brewing Company’s (mtheadbrewingco.com) fifth year of turning out boutique barrels under the watchful gaze of Mount Rainier. But the area doesn’t just excel at artisanal beer. Vintners have opened shop in Lakewood (Stina’s Cellars, stinas cellars.com) and on Vashon Island (Palouse Winery, palousewinery.com), among others, keeping the South Sound’s spirit of innovation burning bright. —AMANDA CASTLEMAN

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

49


JANUIK

LOCAL SIPS

Pour Across the Sound The Seattle area may be best known for its coffee—think java titans like Starbucks, with its original Pike Place Market location, microroasters like Middle Fork (middleforkroasters.com), or Bainbridge Island’s Storyville (storyville.com), now also in Pike Place Market—but beverages are booming beyond the bean. Beer is big here. Standards and seasonals from pioneers such as Pike Brewing Company (pikebrewing.com) and Elysian Brewing (elysianbrewing.com) are mainstays at taphouses like Brouwer’s Cafe (brouwerscafe.blogspot.com), funeral-parlor-turned-beer-bar Pine Box (pineboxbar.com), and the dog-friendly Beveridge Place Pub (beveridgeplace pub.com). Fremont Brewing Company (fremontbrewing.com) offers an outdoor year-round beer garden, while nearby Odin Brewing (odinbrewing.wordpress. com) focuses on food and beer pairings. Outside Seattle, nanobrewery Foggy Noggin (foggynogginbrewing.com) produces English-style ales in a Bothell garage, Redmond’s Black Raven Brewing (blackravenbrewing.com) is racking up acclaim for its distinct brews and neighborhood taproom, and Woodinville’s Triplehorn Brewing (triplehornbrewing. com) recently celebrated a first anniversary. Down the hill is Redhook Brewery (redhook.com), home to multiple seasonal ale fests and summer “Moonlight Cinema” on a 55-foot inflatable screen on its lawn. What Woodinville is best known for,

50

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

however, is wine. The area is home to tasting rooms for 100 wineries, including Chateau Ste. Michelle (ste-michelle.com) and nearby wineries Novelty-Hill and Januik (noveltyhilljanuik.com), both by “master of Merlot” Mike Januik. By the landmark Hollywood Schoolhouse, wineries like Mark Ryan Winery (markryanwinery. com), J. Bookwalter (bookwalterwines. com), and Brian Carter Cellars (briancarter cellars.com) pour distinctly Washington juice. A few miles north is the warehouse district, with more than 50 wineries, including locals Baer Winery (baerwinery. com) and Sparkman Cellars (sparkman cellars.com), and eastern Washington’s Obelisco Estate (obelisco.com) and Kestrel Vintners (kestrelwines.com). Back in Seattle, Seattle Cider Company (seattlecidercompany.com)—the city’s first cidery since Prohibition—recently opened alongside brewery Two Beers (twobeers brewery.com), although Vashon Island’s Dragon’s Head Cider (dragonsheadcider. com) has been around since 2010. With the legalization of liquor production in Washington, distilleries with tasting rooms have been popping up. Seattle’s SoDo district is home to the enormous new Westland Distillery (westland distillery.com) and Glass Distillery (glass distillery.com); Interbay has craft distillers Batch 206 (batch206.com) and Sound Spirits (drinksoundspirits.com); and Fremont Mischief Distillery (fremont mischief.com) makes John Jacob rye whiskey. Woodinville’s Soft Tail Spirits (softtailspirits.com) has been revitalizing grappa since 2008, while Project V Distillery (projectvdistillery.com) distills vodka and sells frozen house-made sausages.

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY JANUIK

M E TRO S E AT T L E

1

The Convergence Zone—Edmonds to Arlington—gets a whip of wind crossing the Puget Sound from the Olympic Mountains. It’s also getting a taste of another natural force: beer. Edmonds’s American Brewing (american brewing.com) is proud owner of the Breakaway India pale ale. Mukilteo’s Diamond Knot Craft Brewing (diamond knot.com) has four locations around the Sound, and Skookum Brewery (skookumbrewing.com) recently relinquished a backwoods brewpub for a bold warehouse and taproom in Arlington. Humble Norm’s Market (10027 Lundeen Park Way) in Lake Stevens has more than 50 rotating kegs made for growler fills. Nine miles down Machias Road, Snohomish’s Trails End Taphouse (trailsendcatering.com) tenders 28 beers on draft. Everett’s champion of beer has long been waterfront microbrewery Scuttlebutt (scuttlebuttbrewing.com), but new players are making a mark. Nanobrewery Middleton Brewing (middletonbrewing. net) has a taproom full of proprietary brews as well as rotating suds from the likes of local newbie Justice Brewing (justicebrewing.com). Take one to go at Lynnwood’s Special Brews (special-brews. com), an extensive bottle shop with more than 1,000 bottles and 15 draft picks, or DIY at Gallagher’s Where-U-Brew (whereubrew.com) in Edmonds, with recipes ranging from porters and lagers to semi-sweet cider. Wine gets its due in Bothell at Wild Vine Bistro (wildvinebistro.com), where happy hours feature TRIP TIP $5 glass pours. Feeling Map a tour lucky? Tulalip Resort at washington Casino (tulalipresort wine.org or washington casino.com) offers seven beer.com. different restaurants and award-winning wine lists. Head to Snohomish distilleries Skip Rock (skiprockdistillers.com) for fruit liqueurs and Dark Moon (1830 Bickford Ave) for apple cider vodka, or to Everett’s Bluewater Organic Distilling (bluewater distilling.com) for the Halcyon gin. The next day, Velton’s Coffee (veltons coffee.com) Bonsai Blend espresso wakes up Everett, and Vinaccio Cofffee’s (vinaccio .com) Sumatran Mandehling roast gets the job done in Marysville. —ERIN JAMES


visitsam.org

WE CONNECT ART TO LIFE

Photo: Catherine Anstett

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I


SEE SEATTLE ON A WHOLE NEW LEVEL

CHIHULY BRIDGE OF GLASS AND MUSEUM OF GLASS

ENRICH YOUR PERSPECTIVE—WHETHER YOU’VE BEEN HERE FOR AN HOUR OR MORE THAN A DECADE.

OLD CAPITOL EXPLORE BUILDING

VIEW 360º HEIGHT 902´ FLOOR 73 THE HIGHEST PUBLIC OBSERVATORY ON THE WEST COAST LOCATED IN COLUMBIA CENTER, 701 FIFTH AVE | OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK* 10AM-8PM | SKYVIEWOBSERVATORY.COM *EXCLUDING HOLIDAYS AND PRIVATE EVENTS. PHOTO: MIKE REID

SEATTLE’S PREMIER L OCATION ◆ 160 beautifully appointed guestrooms and suites ◆ Complimentary Internet Access ◆ Connected to Westlake Center, Seattle Monorail

and Seattle’s Light Rail ◆ Specializing in meetings for 10 to 200 ◆ Award-Winning Restaurant Andaluca

and Oliver’s Lounge 800-426-5100 mayflowerpark.com National Trust Historic Hotels of America

52

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

Museum of Glass Along with works from glass-art pioneer and Tacoma hometown hero Dale Chihuly, expect sculpted silica from as far as the Czech Republic and Ireland. museumofglass.org Seattle Art Museum Downtown’s big kid on the block offers a consistently stellar lineup of classic and modern works, from the colorful abstracts of Miró to dramatic 17th-century European paintings. seattleartmuseum.org Bellevue Arts Museum Contemporary craft—including whimsical woodcarvings and life-size terra-cotta sculptures—populate this Eastside establishment, which highlights Pacific Northwest artists and global stars. bellevuearts.org Bigelow House Museum Though unassuming, this two-story Carpenter Gothic home in Olympia is actually one of Washington’s oldest remaining wood-frame houses. It’s on the National Register of Historic Places and features original furnishings and artifacts from its Oregon Trail–era owners. olympiahistory.org/wp Schack Art Center See and make art at this two-in-one creative hub in Everett, where galleries showcase regional talents and a hot-shop studio lets anyone—who passes orientation—try glassblowing. It also offers classes in everything from jewelry to painting. schack.org Done all these? In Seattle, check out pop culture at EMP Museum, the past at the Museum of History and Industry, Asian-American works at Wing Luke, or interactive exhibits at Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. To any itinerary in Tacoma, add the Tacoma Art Museum or classic autos at LeMay—America’s Car Museum. empmuseum.org; mohai.org; wingluke. org; gatesvc.org; tacomaartmuseum.org; lemaymuseum.org —ANGELA CABOTAJE

PHOTOGRAPH BY MAHESH THAPA

Museum Day


Refresh There’s an abundance of refreshing ways to experience Bellevue, Washington. Revive your wardrobe with a luxurious shopping experience. Invigorate your mind in our museums and art galleries. Savor some fine wine and world-class dining while exploring the city’s vibrant nightlife. Revel in the beauty of the Northwest at the area’s parks and premier golf courses.

V I S I T B E L L E V U E WA S H I N GTO N . CO M


PIKE PLACE MARKET

ATTRACTIONS

Escape the ordinary Situated in the city’s vibrant core, the Sheraton Seattle Hotel provides a gateway to the diverse sights and sounds of the Pacific Northwest. Simply step out our front doors to find gourmet food, exciting entertainment, and world-class shopping. Book at sheratonseattle.com or call 866 716 8123

©2013 Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Preferred Guest, SPG, Sheraton and their logos are the trademarks of Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc., or its affiliates.

54

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

Our famous spots go from sky-high aviation exhibits to historic streets. Space Needle Take a 41-second ride to the top of this 605-foot-tall symbol of Seattle in a window-clad elevator, then wander the open-air observation deck. Or dine on wild king salmon in the rotating restaurant, with its ever-changing view out the window. spaceneedle.com Aviation Attractions Seattle’s Museum of Flight is a must for its 150-plus aircraft, not to mention NASA’s space shuttle trainer. Find vintage planes at Olympia’s Olympic Flight Museum, Everett’s Flying Heritage Collection, and Mukilteo’s Historic Flight Collection. Or head to The Future of Flight Aviation Center & Boeing Tour in Mukilteo to see 747s, 777s, and 787s being built in the factory. museumof flight.org; olympicflightmuseum.com; flyingheritage.com; historicflight.org; futureofflight.org State Capitol Olympia’s capitol building may be the seat of state government, but it’s also the city’s most popular attraction. The 287-foot-tall structure is the tallest masonry dome in North America and houses one of the world’s largest collection of Tiffany lights. Tours are available from 10am to 3pm weekdays and 11am to 3pm weekends. des.wa.gov Pike Place Market Seattle’s famous 107-year-old public market is perched above Elliott Bay. Wander the stalls to gather a bouquet of fresh-cut dahlias, discover handmade artisan wares, leave your sticky mark on the gum wall in Post Alley, watch overall-clad fishmongers toss fish, and drop a coin in the rotund belly of 550-pound bronze piggy bank Rachel the

PHOTOGRAPH BY LINDSAY BORDEN

Iconic Sights


Unforgettable Scenic Tours Fly off the water & soar above Seattle on a 20-minute narrated seaplane adventure

Pig, who collects donations for nonprofit social services. pikeplacemarket.org Chihuly Bridge of Glass Consider it a 500-foot-long thank-you gift from renowned glass artist Dale Chihuly to his hometown, Tacoma. This art-displaymeets-walkway is packed with thousands of Chihuly’s glass masterpieces, including 2,364 pieces suspended overhead and 109 featured in an illuminated display. museumofglass.org Smith Tower The oldest skyscraper in Seattle—it turns 100 on July 4, 2014—is a neoclassical building in historic Pioneer Square. Ride to the 35th floor in an oldtimey copper-and-brass elevator, then step out to admire the ornate Chinese Room and the views from the outdoor observation deck. smithtower.com Snoqualmie Falls An appearance on Twin Peaks earned this Snoqualmie natural wonder international fame, but it’s the thunderous sight of water plunging 268 feet over rocky cliffs that draws 1.5 million visitors every year. A groomed trail leads to an observation deck below, while a viewing platform at top is wheelchair accessible. snoqualmiefalls.com Kerry Park Find picture-perfect views at this hillside park in Seattle’s Queen Anne neighborhood. Its 1.26-acre swath of grass offers a dreamy vista of the city skyline, Elliott Bay, and—on clear days—Mount Rainier. seattle.gov/parks Chambers Bay Before pro golfers and hordes of spectators descend here for the 2015 U.S. Open, test your game on the championship-caliber course in University Place. This links-style stunner features green fairways, dramatic dunes, native grasses, and unbeatable views of Puget Sound. chambersbaygolf.com

866-435-9524 • KenmoreAir.com C M Daily tour departures from Downtown Seattle’s Lake Union. Also daily flights to the San Juan Islands, Port Angeles & Victoria, BC.

your basecamp for seattle exploration escape to the luxurious renaissance seattle Hotel in downtown, just minutes from the pike place market, upscale shopping, and sports stadiums. We believe that travel is about discovery and exploration, and encourage you to find delight in the unique offerings of the seattle area. What hidden gems will you uncover along your journey?

to reserve your room, call 800-228-9290 or visit renaissanceseattle.com

renaissance seattle Hotel 515 madison street seattle, Wa 98104 t: 206.583.0300

—ANGELA CABOTAJE WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

55


SEATTLE-BREMERTON FERRY

FREE ADMISSION 10 am–5 pm, Tuesday–Saturday 440 Fifth Avenue North (East of Seattle Center) Seattle,WA 98109

56

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

gatesvc.org GatesVC

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

GET OUT

Ferried Away After nearly an hour coasting through shimmering blue water, the ferry makes a final turn, revealing Seattle’s spectacular skyline. A collection of towering highrises, industrious orange cranes, and the spinning Great Wheel make Seattle look like a fantastic toy town from afar. It’s just part of the magic of a Washington ferry. There are 10 ferry routes, all of which include glimpses of mountains, forested coastlines, and glistening water. The ride alone is worth a trip, but there’s also plenty to see once you step off the boat. Seattle–Bainbridge Island The state’s busiest route goes to the heart of Bainbridge Island. Browse the selection at Eagle Harbor Book Co. (eagleharborbooks. com), admire works from local artists in the Bainbridge Island Museum of Art (biartmuseum.org), or sample the ice cream at Mora (moraicecream.com). Seattle–Bremerton A navy town that’s worked hard to revitalize its city core, Bremerton is a picturesque spot for art and history buffs. Don’t miss the vibrant paintings inside the Amy Burnett Fine Art gallery (amyburnettgallery.com)—there’s a kitschy-cool Pyrex Museum downstairs— or a tour of the USS Turner Joy navy destroyer (ussturnerjoy.org), which played an important role in the Vietnam War. Fauntleroy–Vashon From West Seattle, the ferry cruises to rural Vashon, which is admired for its natural beauty. Check out Point Robinson Park (vashonparks. org) to explore a driftwood-strewn beach. Mukilteo–Clinton The ferry provides access to Whidbey Island, the state’s largest. Find succulent mussels and oysters from Penn Cove Shellfish (penncoveshell fish.com) on restaurant menus around town—they’re worth it for seafood that’s as fresh as it gets. —HALEY SHAPLEY

PHOTOGRAPH BY CAROL ANN BOHLMEYER

ARRIVE CURIOUS. LEAVE INSPIRED.


DISCOVERIES

Shop the Outlets Looking for some retail therapy, Washington style? Seattle Premium Outlets (premiumoutlets.com/seattle), a sprawling outdoor outlet center, lies about 40 miles north of its namesake city in Tulalip. A Quick Shuttle service runs to and from the mall, with buses leaving downtown Seattle near the Space Needle five times per day, but there’s plenty of parking for drivers, not to mention a grand neighboring casino for those hoping to win big before hitting the mall’s 125 stores. Shops range from luxury brands like Burberry and Michael Kors to casual, family-friendly mainstays like Columbia Sportswear, the Disney Store, and more. Serenely situated in the Cascade foothills town of North Bend, the North Bend Premium Outlets (premiumoutlets. com/northbend) have 50 shops, including local outfits as well as international brands. Browse the factory stores of Bellevue’s Eddie Bauer and Portlandbased Pendleton TRIP TIP Woolen Mills before Want more? Visit perusing outlet staSeattle-based ples like Coach, Nike, department store Nordstrom, Banana Republic, and outdoor outfitter more in the outdoor REI, and kitchenspace. For the kids, ware retailer Sur La Table for Toys “R” Us Express more ways to isn’t an outlet, per se, shop like a local. but it carries valueoriented playthings in a space that’s cozier than the retailer’s traditional locations. Auburn’s Outlet Collection (outlet collectionseattle.com), formerly the Supermall of the Great Northwest, is the largest indoor mall in the region. Plan ahead and give yourself the whole day to take on the center’s 130-plus stores, which span nearly a million square feet, but be aware that not every storefront is an outlet. The mall is anchored by an expansive Nordstrom Rack and includes the factory stores of J.Crew, Coach, Levi’s, and more alongside traditional stores like Sports Authority and a recently opened H&M.

WELCOME COMFORT meets WELLNESS

thehotelbellevue.com

—AMANDA ZURITA WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

57


EVERY CAR HAS A STORY

DIN TAI FUNG

EXPERIENCE YOUR AUTOBIOGRAPHY

LOCAL FLAVOR

Celebrate America’s love affair with the automobile. Open 7 days a week | 10am to 5pm lemaymuseum.org

2702 East D Street Tacoma, WA 98421 253.779.8490

From the concentration of Korean restaurants in Lynnwood and Lakewood to the Indian and Thai fare throughout the Eastside and South Sound, there’s an abundance of options for global dining: Din Tai Fung At the Bellevue and Seattle branches of the popular Taipei-based chain known for its neatly pleated soup dumplings, it’s hard to go wrong. The menu includes irresistible shu mai, sautéed greens, and hand-shaved noodles. dintaifungusa.com La Tarasca Head to this casual, familyrun restaurant for slow-cooked carnitas, mole, and adobado tacos, plus housemade tortillas and marinated vegetables. 1001 W Main St, Centralia Naan-N-Curry This spacious, informal spot in Renton for Indian and Pakistani favorites uses fresh-ground spices and bakes its namesake naan bread in the kitchen’s clay oven. naanncurry.com Noodle Boat Thai standards like pad thai take on fresh, tongue-tingling new life at this family-owned restaurant in an Issaquah strip mall. Call before you go, it closes every two to three years for family trips to Thailand. noodleboat.com Sam Oh Jung Enjoy Korean dishes in a polished setting, from spectacular buckwheat-noodle soup spiked with mustard to equally delicious hot soon du bu tofu soup. 17425 Hwy 99, Lynnwood King Noodle House Noodle soup is the star dish at this aptly named Everett spot. Have your pick of hand-pulled or knife-shaved noodles featured in bowls of piping-hot broth. kingnoodlehouse.com Miyabi A popular spot in Tukwila, this eatery specializes in hand-rolled sushi and freshly sliced sashimi. miyabisushi.com —REBEKAH DENN

58

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

PHOTOGRAPH BY ANNALISE WONG

Ethnic Eats


46%

Space Needle

Seattle Aquarium

Argosy Cruises Harbor Tour

5 famous attractions

- Good for 9 days - Skip most ticket lines

ONLY

Ages 4-12

64 44

$

$

Your choice of EMP Museum OR Woodland Park Zoo

As applicable, prices include Washington state sales tax and/or city of Seattle admissions tax.

Buy at these attractions Connect with CityPASS

(888) 330-5008 or citypass.com

Your choice of The Museum of Flight OR Pacific Science Center ATLANTA | BOSTON | CHICAGO | HOUSTON | NEW YORK CITY | PHILADELPHIA | SAN FRANCISCO | SEATTLE | SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA | TORONTO Prices and programs subject to change.

Hyatt Regency Bellevue. A perfect weekend date-away. Your urban oasis awaits right outside our doors. Enjoy the ultimate in outdoor activities, shopping, dining, and entertainment when you book your “Date Night” package at Hyatt Regency Bellevue. Starting as low as $205 per night, enjoy a welcome amenity, movie certificate good for two at Lincoln Square Cinemas, breakfast for two in bed, complimentary valet parking and a late 2 p.m. checkout. Also included in the package is a $75 dinner gift certificate valid at over 45 restaurants and lounges within The Bellevue Collection, home to 250 shops. Try something different in 2014. The next time you need a date-away call us at 800 233 1234 or visit us online at bellevue.hyatt.com and reference offer code WA425. Hyatt. You’re More Than Welcome.

HYATT REGENCY BELLEVUE ON SEATTLE’S EASTSIDE 900 Bellevue Way NE Bellevue, Washington, USA 98004-4272 HYATT name, design and related marks are trademarks of Hyatt Corporation. ©2014 Hyatt Corporation. All rights reserved.


Listings are sorted alphabetically, by region and city

BELLEVUE

Best Western Arlington 3721 172nd Street NE Arlington 98223

360-363-4321 www.bestwestern.com

HMR

Best Western PLUS Bainbridge Island Suites 350 NE High School Road Bainbridge Island 98110

206-855-9666 www.bestwestern.com/ bainbridgeislandsuites

HMR

139 179

51

425-455-9444 www.coasthotels.com

HMR

99 329

176

425-644-2500 www.seattlebellevue.embassy suites.com

HMR

99 239

240

425-454-4424 www.thehotelbellevue.com

HMR

159 309

67

57

  

         

Hyatt Regency Bellevue 900 Bellevue Way NE Bellevue 98004

425-462-1234 www.bellevue.hyatt.com

HMR

129 499

732

59

 

La Residence Suite Hotel 475 100th Avenue NE Bellevue 98004

425-455-1475 www.bellevuelodging.com

HMR

99 199

24

Silver Cloud Hotel - Bellevue Eastgate 14632 SE Eastgate Way Bellevue 98007

425-957-9100 www.silvercloud.com/ bellevueeastgate

HMR

89 199

145

74

Silver Cloud Inn - Bellevue Downtown 10621 NE 12th Street Bellevue 98004

425-637-7000 www.silvercloud.com/ bellevuedowntown

HMR

89 199

98

74

The Westin Bellevue 600 Bellevue Way NE Bellevue 98004

425-638-1000 www.westin.com/bellevuewa

HMR

159 429

337

Liberty Inn 1400 Wilmington Drive Dupont 98327

253-912-8777 www.libertyinn.com

HMR

145 190

72

 

425-776-0200 www.americasbestvalueinn.com

HMR

49 99

52

425-347-2555 www.navigatorsuites.com

HMR

99 139

102

425-339-2000 www.hieverett.com

HMR

99 146

243

425-353-8120 www.motel6.com

HMR

44 60

99

131

360-273-7718 www.greatwolf.com/grandmound

HMR

199 699

398

23

  

 

425-392-8405 www.motel6.com

HMR

56 70

103 131

 

253-854-8767 www.plazabythegreen.com

HMR

99 149

425-822-2300 www.baymontinns.com

HMR

Heathman Hotel 220 Kirkland Avenue Kirkland 98033

425-284-5800 www.heathmankirkland.com

HMR

179 269

91

Super 8 Lacey 112 College Street SE Lacey 98503

360-459-8888 www.super8.com

HMR

69 99

98

253-589-8800 www.americasbestvalueinn.com

HMR

43 75

54

Coast Bellevue Hotel 625 116th Avenue NE Bellevue 98004 Embassy Suites Seattle - Bellevue 3225 158th Avenue SE Bellevue 98008 Hotel Bellevue 11200 SE 6th Street Bellevue 98004

Americas Best Value Inn 22127 Highway 99 Edmonds 98026 EVERETT

M E TRO S E AT T L E

1

Best Western PLUS Navigator Inn & Suites 10210 Evergreen Way Everett 98204 Holiday Inn Downtown Everett 3105 Pine Street Everett 98201 Motel 6 Everett South 224 128th Street SW Everett 98204 Great Wolf Lodge 20500 Old Highway 99 SW Grand Mound 98531 Motel 6 Issaquah 1885 15th Place NW Issaquah 98027 Best Western PLUS Plaza by the Green 24415 Russell Road Kent 98032 Baymont Inn & Suites Kirkland 12223 NE 116th Street Kirkland 98034

Americas Best Value Inn 4215 Sharondale Street SW Lakewood 98499

60

eo f lo dg ing Sta (se n ek o f f d ar e y) pe d g ak u e /pe st u Nu ak ni t mb r at er es of un Se it s ea do np Me ag eti e ng /re F ir ep t re l ac at sp e Re ac s t a in r o e om ur a Co mp n t /l o un lim ge Hig e o h - s n t ar y b n - si t pe e re a Mi ed c ro k In t wa er n f a s t Ki t v e/ e t ch ac en re fr i ce g et t Ind e u er ato s s oo ni t r rp s oo Ou l tdo or Lo c a p o ol l sh ut t Tel l ev i sio e n Kid - fri en Pe dl y ts all ow Sp a/m ed as Fit sa ne ge ss se ce Sm nte r vic e ok s r e -f r AD A -f ee po rie l i c n Wa y t e r dl y vie w

HMR = Hotel/Motel/Resort B&B = Bed & Breakfast VRH = Vacation Rental Housing

Typ

ACCOMMODATIONS

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

100

58

   

  

  

   

  

  

   

  

   

   

   

 

   

37

  

   

  

 

  

  

   

  

 

       

  

 

  

  

 

    

   

  

   

  

  

 

 

    

  

  

97

  

  

  

104

  

    

  

  

  

9

37

  

  

   

  


f lo dg ing Sta (se ek o f f n d ar e y) pe d g ak u e /pe st Nu ak uni t mb r at er es of un Se it s ea do np Me ag eti e ng /re F ir ep t re l ac at sp e Re ac s t a in r o e om ur a Co n t /l mp o un l g Hi g im e n t ar e o n h-s yb s pe re a i te Mi ed c ro k In t wa er n f a s t Ki t v e/ et ch ac en re fr i ce g et t Ind e u er ato s s oo ni t r rp s o Ou tdo ol or Lo c a p o ol l sh ut t Tel l ev i sio e n Kid - fri en Pe dl y ts all ow Sp a/m ed as Fit sa ne ge ss se ce Sm nte r vic e ok s r e -f re e AD A -f po rie l ic y n Wa t e r dl y vie w

Listings are sorted alphabetically, by region and city Hampton Inn & Suites Seattle-North Lynnwood 19324 Alderwood Mall Parkway Lynnwood 98036

HMR

109 149

153

    

  

  

360-530-1234 www.hiexpress.com/marysvillewa

HMR

109 199

100

 

  

   

  

425-423-8600 www.silvercloud.com/mukilteo

HMR

129 249

70

  

  

Staybridge Suites 9600 Harbour Place Mukilteo 98275

425-493-9500 www.staymukilteo.com

HMR

119 169

134

    

   

  

Ramada Olympia 4520 Martin Way E Olympia 98516

360-459-8866 www.ramada.com

HMR

125

  

  

  

Best Western Premier Plaza Hotel & Conference Center 620 S Hill Park Drive Puyallup 98373

253-848-1500 www.bwpremierplaza.com

HMR

129 169

99

   

  

  

Fairfield Inn & Suites Puyallup 202 15th Avenue SW Puyallup 98371

253-770-3100 www.marriott.com/seapp

HMR

129 179

120

  

 

  

Holiday Inn Express Puyallup 812 S Hill Park Drive Puyallup 98373

253-848-4900 www.holidayinnexpress.com/ puyallup

HMR

129 179

96

  

  

  

425-883-4900 www.redmondinn.com

HMR

89 169

137

Silver Cloud Inn - Redmond 2122 152nd Avenue NE Redmond 98052

425-746-8200 www.silvercloud.com/redmond

HMR

89 199

144

74

Americas Best Value Airport Inn 20620 International Blvd. SeaTac 98198

800-426-5060 www.bestvalueairportinn.com

HMR

49 79

50

37

Best Western Airport Executel 20717 International Blvd. Seattle 98198

206-878-3300 www.apexecutel.com

HMR

75 149

140

Coast Gateway Hotel 18415 International Blvd. SeaTac 98188

206-248-8200 www.coasthotels.com

HMR

99 299

143

P U YA L L U P

Silver Cloud Inn - Mukilteo Waterfront 718 Front Street Mukilteo 98275

S E ATA C

Redmond Inn 17601 Redmond Way Redmond 98052

  

    

  

  

  

 

  

38

206-433-8188 www.super8.com

HMR

68 95

119

American Hotel - Hostelling International 520 S King Street Seattle 98104

206-622-5443 www.americanhotelseattle.com

HMR

29 29

286

Americas Best Value Inn & Suites Tukwila 14800 Interurban Avenue S Tukwila 98168

206-246-2323 www.americasbestvalueinn.com

HMR

45 175

80

206-340-0340 www.thearcticclubseattle.com

HMR

169 479

120

206-329-1864 www.baconmansion.com

B&B

104 259

11

206-529-3700 www.belltown-inn.com

HMR

89 199

174

Cedarbrook Lodge 18525 36th Avenue S Seattle 98188

877-515-2176 www.cedarbrooklodge.com

HMR

139 309

104

College Inn 4000 University Way NE Seattle 98105

206-633-4441 www.collegeinnseattle.com

B&B

50 100

27

Belltown Inn 2301 3rd Avenue Seattle 98121

 

57

 

  

   

  

    

  

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

  

   

  

  

  

 

  

58

   

   

 

37

  

   

Super 8 SeaTac 3100 S 192nd Street Seattle 98188

Bacon Mansion Bed & Breakfast 959 Broadway E Seattle 98102

   

  

206-277-0700 www.ramada.com

Arctic Club Seattle a DoubleTree by Hilton 700 3rd Avenue Seattle 98104

Ramada Suites SeaTac Airport 16720 International Blvd. SeaTac 98188

HMR

74

 

 

 

  

  

 

 

   

  

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

1 M E TRO S E AT T L E

425-771-1888 www.hamptonseattlenorth.com

Holiday Inn Express Hotel & Suites Marysville 8606 36th Avenue NE Marysville 98270

S E AT T L E

Typ

HMR = Hotel/Motel/Resort B&B = Bed & Breakfast VRH = Vacation Rental Housing

eo

ACCOMMODATIONS

61


S E AT T L E

M E TRO S E AT T L E

1

Listings are sorted alphabetically, by region and city DoubleTree by Hilton Seattle Airport 18740 International Blvd. Seattle 98188

206-246-8600 www.seattleairport.doubletree.com

HMR

The Edgewater Pier 67, 2411 Alaskan Way Seattle 98121

206-728-7000 www.edgewaterhotel.com

HMR

Fairmont Olympic Hotel 411 University Street Seattle 98101

206-621-1700 www.fairmont.com/seattle

850 131

    

199 899

223

  

   

HMR

199 549

450

 

206-749-7000 www.fourseasons.com/seattle

HMR

315 5500

147

  

 

206-774-1234 www.grandseattle.hyatt.com

HMR

179 399

425

 

Hilton Seattle Airport & Conference Center 17620 International Blvd. Seattle 98188

206-244-4800 www.seattleairport.hilton.com

HMR

396 131

Homewood Suites by Hilton Seattle Convention Center 1011 Pike Street Seattle 98101

206-682-8282 www.homewoodsuitesseattle.com

HMR

139 299

195

    

Hotel 1000 1000 1st Avenue Seattle 98104

206-957-1000 www.hotel1000seattle.com

HMR

199 429

120

 

        

Hotel Five 2200 5th Avenue Seattle 98121

866-866-7977 www.hotelfiveseattle.com

HMR

109 159

169

   

  

206-365-0700 www.hotelnexusseattle.com

HMR

109 159

169

    

    

  

206-695-1234 www.olive8.hyatt.com

HMR

179 399

346

206-282-7357 www.innatqueenanne.com

HMR

89 149

69

206-583-6453 www.innatvirginiamason.com

HMR

109 199

79

206-624-6820 www.lq.com

HMR

104 309

72

206-282-7407 www.marqueen.com

HMR

119 189

58

  

866-866-7977 www.themaxwellhotel.com

HMR

139 239

139

 

800-426-5100 www.mayflowerpark.com

HMR

139 299

160

a

a

a

a a

a a a

206-428-4700 www.mediterranean-inn.com

HMR

89 289

180

  

   

206-824-9902 www.motel6.com

HMR

40 50

124 131

206-728-7666 www.qualityinnseattle.com

HMR

85 599

159

206-583-0300 www.renaissanceseattle.com

HMR

149 459

553

55

 

206-621-1200 www.coasthotels.com

HMR

129 335

151

58

  

Four Seasons Hotel Seattle 99 Union Street Seattle 98101 Grand Hyatt Seattle 721 Pine Street Seattle 98101

Hotel Nexus Seattle 2140 N Northgate Way Seattle 98133 Hyatt at Olive 8 1635 8th Avenue Seattle 98101 Inn at Queen Anne 505 1st Avenue N Seattle 98109 Inn at Virginia Mason 1006 Spring Street Seattle 98104 La Quinta Inn & Suites Seattle Downtown 2224 8th Avenue Seattle 98121 MarQueen Hotel 600 Queen Anne Avenue N Seattle 98109 The Maxwell Hotel 300 Roy Street Seattle 98109 Mayflower Park Hotel 405 Olive Way Seattle 98101 Mediterranean Inn 425 Queen Anne Avenue N Seattle 98109 Motel 6 Seattle South 20651 Military Road Seattle 98198 Quality Inn & Suites Seattle Center 618 John Street Seattle 98109 Renaissance Seattle Hotel 515 Madison Street Seattle 98104 The Roosevelt, a Coast Hotel 1531 7th Avenue Seattle 98101

62

eo f lo dg ing Sta (se n ek o f f d ar e y) pe d g ak u e /pe st u Nu ak ni t mb r at er es of un Se it s ea do np Me ag eti e ng /re F ir ep t re l ac at sp e Re ac s t a in r o e om ur a Co mp n t /l o un lim ge Hig e o h - s n t ar y b n - si t pe e re a Mi ed c ro k In t wa er n f a s t Ki t v e/ e t ch ac en re fr i ce g et t Ind e u er ato s s oo ni t r rp s oo Ou l tdo or Lo c a p o ol l sh ut t Tel l ev i sio e n Kid - fri en Pe dl y ts all ow Sp a/m ed as Fit sa ne ge ss se ce Sm nte r vic e ok s r e -f r AD A -f ee po rie l i c n Wa y t e r dl y vie w

HMR = Hotel/Motel/Resort B&B = Bed & Breakfast VRH = Vacation Rental Housing

Typ

ACCOMMODATIONS

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

 

   

      

       

       

    

  

  

 

 

  

  

50

  

   

 

  

 

 

       

  

  

      

  

  

   

   

  


Sheraton Seattle Hotel 1400 6th Avenue Seattle 98101

HMR

159 300

Silver Cloud Hotel - Seattle Broadway 1100 Broadway Seattle 98122

206-325-1400 www.silvercloud.com/ seattlebroadway

HMR

139 269

179

Silver Cloud Hotel - Seattle Stadium 1046 1st Avenue S Seattle 98134

206-204-9800 www.silvercloud.com/ seattlestadium

HMR

139 299

Silver Cloud Inn - Seattle Lake Union 1150 Fairview Avenue N Seattle 98109

206-447-9500 www.silvercloud.com/ seattlelakeunion

HMR

Silver Cloud Inn - Seattle UW District 5036 25th Avenue NE Seattle 98105

206-526-5200 www.silvercloud.com/university

1236 54

74

 

211

74

 

129 269

184

74

 

  

HMR

119 229

179

74

  

866-866-7977 www.universityinnseattle.com

HMR

99 320

102

53

866-866-7977 www.watertownseattle.com

HMR

129 229

100

The Westin Seattle 1900 5th Avenue Seattle 98101

206-728-1000 www.westinseattle.com

HMR

149 499

891

Inn at Snohomish 323 Second Street Snohomish 98290

360-568-0574 www.snohomishinn.com

HMR

76 146

26

425-888-2556 www.salishlodge.com

HMR

189 399

84

  

253-299-0205 www.hiexpress.com/sumnerwa

HMR

89 189

112

253-591-9100 www.courtyardtacoma.com

HMR

149 199

162

888-820-3555 www.emeraldqueen.com

HMR

79 189

100

Motel 6 Tacoma 1811 S 76th Street Tacoma 98408

253-473-7100 www.motel6.com

HMR

44 60

119 131

Shilo Inn & Suites 7414 S Hosmer Tacoma 98408

253-475-4020 www.shiloinns.com

HMR

99 169

132 131

253-272-1300 www.silvercloud.com/tacoma

HMR

139 269

90

Ramada Limited Tukwila/SeaTac 13916 International Blvd. Tukwila 98168

206-244-8800 www.ramada.com

HMR

146

Ramada Tukwila SeaTac Airport 15901 W Valley Hwy. Tukwila 98188

425-226-1812 www.ramada.com

HMR

360-716-6000 www.tulalipresort.com

HMR

360-754-7320 www.motel6.com 425-424-3900 www.willowslodge.com

University Inn Seattle 4140 Roosevelt Way NE Seattle 98105 Watertown Hotel Seattle 4242 Roosevelt Way NE Seattle 98105

Salish Lodge & Spa 6501 Railroad Avenue SE Snoqualmie 98065 Holiday Inn Express Hotel & Suites Sumner 2500 136th Avenue Court E Sumner 98390 TA C O M A

f lo dg ing Sta (se ek o f f n d ar e y) pe d g ak u e /pe st Nu ak uni t mb r at er es of un Se it s ea do np Me ag eti e ng /re F ir ep t re l ac at sp e Re ac s t a in r o e om ur a Co n t /l mp o un l g Hi g im e n t ar e o n h-s yb s pe re a i te Mi ed c ro k In t wa er n f a s t Ki t v e/ et ch ac en re fr i ce g et t Ind e u er ato s s oo ni t r rp s o Ou tdo ol or Lo c a p o ol l sh ut t Tel l ev i sio e n Kid - fri en Pe dl y ts all ow Sp a/m ed as Fit sa ne ge ss se ce Sm nte r vic e ok s r e -f re e AD A -f po rie l ic y n Wa t e r dl y vie w

206-621-9000 www.sheraton.com/seattle

Courtyard Marriott Tacoma Downtown 1515 Commerce Street Tacoma 98402 Emerald Queen Hotel & Casino 5700 Pacific Hwy. E Fife 98424

Silver Cloud Inn - Tacoma Waterfront 2317 N Ruston Way Tacoma 98402

Tulalip Resort Casino 10200 Quil Ceda Blvd. Tulalip 98271 Motel 6 Tumwater 400 Lee Street SW Tumwater 98501 Willows Lodge 14580 NE 145th Street Woodinville 98072

  

  

   

  

  

  

  

  

 

    

  

 

    

  

131

19

       

 

  

 

       

  

 

 

    

 

74

       

 

 

  

 

    

  

  

  

  

  

   

   

  

146

   

   

  

135 355

370

  

  

   

HMR

40 50

118 131

HMR

199 679

84

 

  

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

  

  

 

    

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

1 M E TRO S E AT T L E

S E AT T L E

Listings are sorted alphabetically, by region and city

eo

HMR = Hotel/Motel/Resort B&B = Bed & Breakfast VRH = Vacation Rental Housing

Typ

ACCOMMODATIONS

63


CH BA KER BAIRY B


North Cascades

PHOTOGRAPH BY PIERRE LECLERC/SHUTTERSTOCK

BELLINGHAM, MOUNT BAKER, AND SKAGIT COUNTY

SKAGIT VALLEY TULIP FESTIVAL

Though millions of colorful tulips perfume the Skagit Valley in spring, the North Cascades region is always abloom with much more than just botanicals. Skiers and snowboarders flock to Mount

Baker’s snowy slopes, hikers and bikers trek to glorious views of peaks and pastoral meadows, and turquoise lakes beckon to all with their pristine waters. Elsewhere, farms fling open their barn doors to invite the public in, and breweries craft a new area legacy.

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

65


N

C A N A D A

Lynden

Birch Bay

N O R T H CA S CA D E S

2

S

1 Blaine

539

Maple Falls

Everson

DESOLATION PEAK

Glacier 9

Ferndale

ROSS LAKE

Deming

542

MOUNT BAKER

North Cascades National Park

Bellingham LAKE WHATCOM

BAKER LAKE

LUMMI ISLAND

2

DIABLO LAKE

Newhalem

LAKE SHANNON

9

Bow/Edison Anacortes PADILLA BAY

11

20

4

NORTH CASCADES HWY

20

Sedro-Woolley Burlington

5

r git Rive Ska

Concrete Marblemount Rockport

WANDER HERE

530

La Conner WHIDBEY ISLAND

20 NORTH CASCADES HWY

Mount Vernon

3

• Mt. Baker Ski Area (p. 16) • Sakuma Bros. (p. 17) • Bellingham Bay Marathon; Tulip Run (p. 17) • Penny Lane; Fairhaven Antique Mall (p. 20) • Lummi Nation Stommish Water Festival (p. 22) • North Cascades National Park; Ross Lake; Diablo Lake Boat Tour (p. 30) • Bellingham Festival of Music; Summer Meltdown (p. 38)

Conway

CAMANO ISLAND

Arlington

Marysville

To Seattle

EXPLORE

Small Towns

66

6

20 mi

5

SAMISH BAY

1 LYNDEN Just five miles south of the U.S.–Canada border, this decorous Dutch-influenced town is known for its churches, windmill, and many festivals. The Northwest Washington Fair (complete with farm animal exhibitions and a Demolition Derby) is held here each August. Other good bets: the Raspberry Festival, held the third weekend in July, and September’s Mount Baker Vintage Trailer Rally. 2 BOW & EDISON These two tiny hamlets tucked among the pastures and potato fields of the Skagit

E

W

Valley have become a haven for foodies. Best bets include Tweets, renowned for its farmto-table lunches; the mostly organic (and some would say orgasmic) artisan bakery Breadfarm; and organic farmstead cheese makers Samish Bay Cheese. 3 LA CONNER This painterly community has long been a haven for artists thanks to its incredible light and beautiful setting. Ten-plus art galleries, two museums, and the annual Arts Alive! festival can be found here, along with plenty of inspiring scenery and wildlife, including seals,

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

1

otters, and wintering trumpeter swans. 4 BURLINGTON Originally founded as a logging camp, this town is now known for its outlet malls, eaglewatching float trips, and annual Berry Dairy Days, which celebrate the region’s luscious agricultural gifts each June with a parade, carnival, salmon barbecue, and, yes, the World’s Largest Shortcake. 5 CONCRETE Just 22.5 miles east of Sedro-Woolley on High-

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

way 20, this tiny town is packed with surreal surprises. First, there are the looming cement silos, a haunting monument to an industrial past. Then there’s the hilltop high school, which has a road running through it—literally. And, for thrills, there’s the Concrete Ghost Walk, a combination tour–oral history–creepfest held every weekend in October. 6 NEWHALEM A historic Seattle City Light company town surrounded by natural and man-made wonders, Newhalem has long been a tourist attraction. Lakes, waterfalls, and scenic overlooks abound, but it’s Gorge, Diablo, and Ross Dams and their accompanying powerhouses that

will truly electrify (in all senses of the word). A limited number of tours to these art deco wonders are available each year through Seattle City Light. Sign up early. DON’T MISS

BELLINGHAM History and shopping come together in this harbor city’s Fairhaven district, which boasts quaint boutiques, cobblestone streets, and a slew of historic buildings and markers highlighting some of the city’s more colorful exploits (think opium dens and counterfeiters’ hideouts). Village Books, a three-story wonder just off the Village Green, is a mustsee. Ditto for nearby Chuckanut Drive. —DIANE MAPES


DIABLO LAKE

BOUNDARY BAY BREWERY

LOCAL SIPS

Craft of the Cascades

GREAT OUTDOORS

PHOTOGRAPH ABOVE GALYNA ANDRUSHKO/SHUTTERSTOCK, RIGHT SARAH POSTMA

NICKNAMED THE “AMERICAN ALPS,” the North Cascades offer a stun-

ning backdrop for outdoor enthusiasts. Here, you’ll find magnificent 9,000-foot peaks, glistening glaciers, sea-green lakes, and rolling hills eventually giving way to peaceful farmland. Breathtaking, wild, and beautiful, it’s also yours to explore. Ascend: Nearly 400 miles of trails in North Cascades National Park (nps.gov/ noca) offer everything from senior-friendly loops to grueling climbs. The popular Cascade Pass Trail features spectacular views of glaciers, peaks, streams, and wildflower-strewn meadows along its nearly four-mile stretch. More ambitious hikers may want to branch off at the lovely Sahale Arm, a strenuous two-mile ramble that rewards with breathtaking views of Doubtful Lake, the lush Stehekin River Valley, Eldorado Peak, and the occasional basking marmot. Descend: The thousand-acre Mt. Baker Ski Area (winter.mtbaker.us), located 52 miles east of Bellingham, is known for its ample snowfall (including a 95foot world record in 1998–99), its sparsely populated slopes, and its annual Legendary Banked Slalom, one of the largest snowboarding competitions in the world. Cross country more your style? Check out the hundreds of miles of trails in North Cascades National Park. Pedal: The Skagit Valley is made for biking. Those in the mood for a leisurely ride can opt for the sedate South Skagit Flats route, which winds among the area’s famous tulip fields between Mount Vernon and La Conner. Trail riding more your style? Try the 22-mile Cascade Trail TRIP TIP Map a route of that travels along the old Burlington Northern rail bed from the Skagit Valley’s Sedro-Woolley to Concrete. Farms, foothills, and riverfront farm stands for scenery abound. Routes and rental info can be found at wsdot. yourself at visit wa.gov/bike/localmaps.htm and visitskagitvalley.com/biking. skagitvalley.com. Paddle: Boating is the perfect way to explore Skagit and Whatcom Counties. Serene Lake McMurray is a lovely spot for canoeing or kayaking, as is Sixteen Lake, just east of Conway. Kayaking, canoeing, and stand-up paddleboarding are popular on Bellingham Bay, Lake Whatcom, Lake Samish, and off Lummi Island. Want more? Sign up for a sea kayak tour with an expedition company, or head to Diablo Lake to explore the turquoise, trout-laden waters. —DIANE MAPES WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

With its jagged peaks and rugged waters it’s no shock that the region between La Conner and Canada, the Salish Sea, and the Methow Valley inspires brewers. Bellingham pioneers Boundary Bay (bbaybrewery.com) and Chuckanut (chuckanutbreweryandkitchen.com) have served as launchpads for many a brewery. Kulshan Brewing Co. (kulshan brewery.com) won first place in Yakima’s Fresh Hop Ale Festival (freshhop alefestival.com) and hosts food carts in front of the brewpub. North, in Ferndale, Menace Brewing (menacebrewing.tumblr .com) created a session IPA with town tavern Maggie’s Pub (2030 Main St). East, in Deming, North Fork Brewery (northfork brewery.com) has pizza and a wedding chapel. South, in Bow, Golden Distillery (goldendistillery.com) makes two whiskeys—including a rare single-malt—and a signature apple brandy made from Everson’s Mount Baker Vineyard (mountbaker vineyards.com) apple wine. Mount Vernon’s “Beermuda Triangle” is home to gluten-free-friendly Trumpeter Public House (trumpeterpublichouse. com); Empire Ale House (empirealehouse. com), with its 19 rotating taps; and Porterhouse Pub (porterhousepub.net), with its 21 seasonal drafts and annual beerfest benefitting Mount Vernon Lincoln Theatre. East, in Rockport, Glacier Peak Winery (glacierpeakwinery.net) pours its pinot noir and other cool-climate varietals. And there are places like Burlington’s Fidalgo Bay Coffee Roasters (fidalgobay coffee.com), which provides a “sensory experience” at its roastery. —ERIN JAMES

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

67


Luxury Hotel

Spa

Restaurant

HOEHN BEND FARM

Visit beautiful Bellingham on the bay and…

The Chrysalis Inn & Spa

DISCOVERIES

www.TheChrysalisInn.com 360.756.1005

68

888.808.1005

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

804 10th St. Bellingham, WA

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

Verdant Skagit Valley is known for its winding river full of salmon and bald eagles, picturesque dairy farms, patchwork fields, and fertile farmland. More than 90 crops are grown in the valley, including berries, cucumbers, potatoes, and those famously colorful tulips. Now all of the sights, sounds, tastes, and, yes, smells of the farm can be yours, thanks to a burgeoning crop of Skagit Valley farm tourism opportunities. Hoehn Bend Farm (farmstayskagit. com) near Sedro-Woolley offers guests the chance to stay in a quaint turn-ofthe-20th-century farmhouse surrounded by pastures, barns, and a host of critters, including Polly, a rescued pig. Amble around the farm’s 30 acres, help gather eggs, feed the animals, or pick and press a bundle of fall apples into cider. Stays are also possible at Samish Bay Cheese Farmhouse (samishbaycheese.com), an organic beef, pork, and farmstead cheese maker at the base of the Chuckanut Mountains. The modernized, 100-year-old farmhouse makes a perfect base for exploring the farm’s 200 acres and points beyond. For a quick trip, check out the Skagit Valley Festival of Family Farms (Oct 4–5; festivaloffamilyfarms.com). The free, family-friendly event offers a behindthe-seeds glimpse of 14 working farms producing everything from berries and bulbs to cheese, wine, and shellfish. Farm tours, hayrides, corn mazes, petting zoos, gardening demos, and pony rides are on the docket, as are bulb-planting seminars at tulip titans RoozenGaarde (tulips.com), a pie-eating contest at Sakuma Bros. Farms (sakumamarketstand.com), and crab races and oyster-shucking demos at Taylor Shellfish (taylorshellfishfarms.com), located along Chuckanut Drive in Bow. Parking is free and shopping is plentiful, as are those cow pies. Wear boots. —DIANE MAPES

PHOTOGRAPH BY GEMINI CONNECT

Tour de Farm


f lo dg ing Sta (se ek o f f n d ar e y) pe d g ak u e /pe st Nu ak uni t mb r at er es of un Se it s ea do np Me ag eti e ng /re F ir ep t re l ac at sp e Re ac s t a in r o e om ur a Co n t /l mp o un l g Hi g im e n t ar e o n h-s yb s pe re a i te Mi ed c ro k In t wa er n f a s t Ki t v e/ et ch ac en re fr i ce g et t Ind e u er ato s s oo ni t r rp s o Ou tdo ol or Lo c a p o ol l sh ut t Tel l ev i sio e n Kid - fri en Pe dl y ts all ow Sp a/m ed as Fit sa ne ge ss se ce Sm nte r vic e ok s r e -f re e AD A -f po rie l ic y n Wa t e r dl y vie w

Baymont Inn & Suites Bellingham 125 E Kellogg Road Bellingham 98226

360-671-6200 www.baymontinns.com/hotel/ 02166

HMR

Best Western PLUS Heritage Inn 151 E McLeod Road Bellingham 98226

360-647-1912 www.bestwesternheritageinn.com

HMR

109 249

90

57

360-756-1005 www.thechrysalisinn.com

HMR

209 349

43

68

  

Fairhaven Village Inn 1200 10th Street Bellingham 98225

360-733-1311 www.fairhavenvillageinn.com

HMR

179 299

22

Holiday Inn Express 4160 Meridian Street Bellingham 98226

360-671-4800 www.hiexpress.com/bellinghamwa

HMR

120 170

101

Motel 6 Bellingham 3701 Byron Avenue Bellingham 98225

360-671-4494 www.motel6.com

HMR

50 80

130 131

Silver Reef Hotel Casino Spa 4876 Haxton Way Ferndale 98248

866-383-0777 www.silverreefcasino.com

HMR

99 349

105

SpringHill Suites by Marriott 4040 Northwest Avenue Bellingham 98226

360-714-9600 www.marriott.com

HMR

Semiahmoo Resort, Golf, Spa 9565 Semiahmoo Parkway Blaine 98230

855-917-3767 www.semiahmoo.com

HMR

139 499

212

Candlewood Suites Burlington 1866 S Burlington Blvd. Burlington 98233

360-755-3300 www.candlewoodsuites.com

HMR

89 169

Cocusa Motel 370 W Rio Vista Avenue Burlington 98233

360-757-6044 www.cocusamotel.com

HMR

Hampton Inn & Suites Burlington 1860 S Burlington Blvd. Burlington 98233

360-757-7100 www.burlingtonsuites. hamptoninn.com

BURLINGTON

The Chrysalis Inn & Spa 804 10th Street Bellingham 98225

  

122

57

  

    

  

   

 

37

     

 

   

  

 

 

    

  

  

  

 

 

   

 

   

   

  

83

  

  

  

49 99

63

    

    

HMR

99 179

102

   

 

HMR

89 199

75

  

 

  

888-724-1640 www.theskagitridge.com

HMR

79 149

41

 

  

877-275-2448 www.theskagit.com

HMR

79 169

103 132

  

 

La Conner Channel Lodge 205 N 1st Street La Conner 98257

360-466-1500 www.laconnerlodging.com

HMR

99 359

39

 

Mount Baker Lodging 7463 Mt. Baker Hwy. Maple Falls 98244

800-709-7669 www.mtbakerlodging.com

VRH

99 1219

88

 

360-428-5678 www.bestwestern.com

HMR

120

  

  

  

Days Inn 2009 Riverside Drive Mount Vernon 98273

360-424-4141 www.daysinn.com

HMR

65

   

  

Tulip Inn 2200 Freeway Drive Mount Vernon 98273

360-428-5969 www.tulipinn.net

HMR

  

  

The Skagit Ridge Hotel 18444 Bow Ridge Drive Bow 98232 Skagit Valley Casino Resort 5984 N Darrk Lane Bow 98232

Best Western PLUS Skagit Valley Inn 2300 Market Street Mount Vernon 98273

360-755-7338 www.hiexpress.com/burlingtonwa

104 179

63 109

40

 

     

  

Holiday Inn Express & Suites Burlington 900 Andis Road Burlington 98233

MOUNT VERNON

70

  

   

   

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

       

 

 

  

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

2 N O R T H CA S CA D E S

BELLINGHAM

Listings are sorted alphabetically, by region and city

Typ

HMR = Hotel/Motel/Resort B&B = Bed & Breakfast VRH = Vacation Rental Housing

eo

ACCOMMODATIONS

69


The Shortest Distance to Far Away 速

Enter to win an island getaway!

Free maps, guides, lodging and event info at

WhidbeyCamanoIslands.com


The Islands

PHOTOGRAPH BY JOELROGERS.COM

CAMANO, FIDALGO, WHIDBEY, AND THE SAN JUAN ISLANDS

SALISH SEA

The waters between Canada and Washington’s mainland are dotted with the San Juan Islands, featuring nine major land masses and a hundredplus satellite islands. The result? A wonderland for sailing, boating, whale watching,

and seaside living. Take in pods of orcas and dolphins, the relaxed vibe of artsy towns like Friday Harbor and Olga, and mesmerizing views from the stone, Medieval-style watchtower at the summit of Mount Constitution. WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

71


Bellingham

C A N A D A

N

1 MOUNT CONSTITUTION

3 TH E I S L A N D S

2 SAN JUAN ISLAND

S

ORCAS ISLAND

Deer Harbor Roche Harbor

E

W

Eastsound

Orcas BLAKELY ISLAND

SHAW ISLAND

Friday Harbor

5 mi

CYPRESS ISLAND GUEMES ISLAND

3 Lopez

Anacortes

LOPEZ ISLAND

Burlington 20

FIDALGO ISLAND

Victoria, B.C. DECEPTION PASS STATE PARK

WANDER HERE

5

20

• Anglers Choice Charters (p. 15) • San Juan Island Sea Salt (p. 18) • Penn Cove MusselFest; Anacortes Arts Festival; Savor the San Juans (p. 26) • San Juan Classic Day Sailing (p. 30) • Doe Bay Fest (p. 38)

WHIDBEY ISLAND

Oak Harbor

532

4 FORT EBEY STATE PARK

Coupeville

CAMANO ISLAND

5

Port Townsend

Greenbank

6 Everett

Langley Freeland

Clinton

Mukilteo

EXPLORE

Small Towns 1 EASTSOUND Even back at the turn of the century Orcas Island produced enough fruit to export to the mainland, and the agrofocus has stuck. Tucked inside the horseshoe of Orcas, Eastsound is the island’s hub. Its seasonal farmers market is always hopping, and it feels like every restaurant is supplied by a local’s chickens, the rhubarb patch down the road, or some sweet community farm. 2 SHAW ISLAND The littlest San Juan served by a ferry, Shaw is 7.7 square miles of

72

tranquility. It’s known for its concentration of nuns—the habitwearing ladies ran the ferry terminal until 2004—and it has only one store to ensure that this remains the perfect place for a quiet retreat. 3 LOPEZ Nicknamed “Slow-pez” for its residents’ love of a leisurely, unhurried lifestyle, Lopez Island is a patchwork of 29.5 square miles filled with lush green forest, bucolic farmland, and splendid beaches. Named for a Spanish pilot who helped map the San Juans, Lopez is

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

3 the southernmost and flattest island in the archipelago, making it a popular spot for tourists on two wheels. The perfect bike trip starts or ends (or both) with a visit to Holly B’s Bakery for a luscious marionberry scone or an almond butterhorn. 4 COUPEVILLE Tucked inside Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve, Coupeville has some outstanding examples of architec-

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

ture through the ages, from log cabin–esque blockhouses to regal Queen Anne homes. After walking through the history of Washington’s second-oldest town, taste it: Toby’s, a tavern with its own long history (it was built in the late-1800s), serves up Penn Cove mussels right on the water. 5 GREENBANK Located midway between Freeland and Coupeville on a skinny stretch of Whidbey Island, this tiny community was once the loganberry-growing capital of the U.S. The town’s fruity history is preserved in the divine loganberry pie from Whidbey Pies at Greenbank Farm. Established

more than a hundred years ago, the farm has remained central to the town. It now holds galleries and shops selling wine, cheese, and (of course) pie. 6 LANGLEY Perched on a northfacing bluff on the south end of Whidbey Island, this is a quintessential seashore destination. Cedar-shingled shops mingle with tiny wine bars and art galleries showcasing local works and wares. The Star Store, right on First Street, is an all-purpose shop with everything from rain boots to ramekins; there’s even a restaurant, Prima Bistro, on the roof. —ANNE LARKIN

To Seattle

PHOTOGRAPH BY JEAN-PIERRE CHAMBERLAND

525


FRIDAY HARBOR

WHIDBEY ISLAND VINEYARDS AND WINERY

LOCAL SIPS

Ambrosial Atolls

FRIDAY HARBOR

PHOTOGRAPH LEFT BY CHARLES KOH, RIGHT BY MARGARET HALL

AN HOUR-LONG BOAT RIDE from Anacortes is all that separates main-

land day-trippers from the shores of Friday Harbor, the gateway to San Juan Island. Step directly off the state ferry or Clipper Vacations (clippervacations.com) vessel into downtown, where the streets are lined with locally owned businesses from The Doctor’s Office Cafe (do-cafe.com) to the seafaring-themed Cask & Schooner Public House (caskandschooner.com). The main town corridor, Spring Street, is within walking distance to almost everything, including shops, restaurants, bars, and tasting rooms. Set your watch to island time, and start the day with a latte from San Juan Coffee Roasting Company (rockisland.com/~sjcoffee). Stroll with your steamer down the Cannery Landing dock to catch views of both the maritime village and the archipelago beauty. Decide on the Craquelin au Chocolat brioche pastry stuffed with candied oranges and chocolate at Cafe Demeter (80 Nichols St), then saunter down the block to the San Juan Islands Museum of Art (sjima.org) to view the sculptures, paintings, and other pieces by Native artists. Afterward, enjoy a hand-shaved turkey sandwich on hours-old bread at farm-to-table deli The Market Chef (225 A St). Once nourished, get ready to hit the boutiques: Island Studios (islandstudios.com) showcases work by local artists and craftspeople, while the cozy and quaint Serendipity Used Books (223 A St) satisfies as a bookworm fix. Prefer more active pursuits? Rent a bicycle or moped from Susie’s Mopeds (susies mopeds.com) and voyage through the acres of farmland and forest, or book a boat with San Juan Excursions (watchwhales.com) to awe at orcas. Farther afield, Roche Harbor is just a 10-mile ride away on the other side of the island. The 167-year-old sheltered harbor town is rumored to be haunted TRIP TIP Plan ahead, find and features a mysterious and massive lime ash mausoleum, an ferry routes, and eclectic sculpture park, and the spooky historic Hotel de Haro. view schedules Back in Friday Harbor, dine at the cozy and celebrated Duck at wsdot.com/ ferries/schedule. Soup Inn (ducksoupinn.com), but don’t miss sitting by the fireplace or trying the applewood-smoked oysters. Another epicurean excursion awaits at The Bluff Restaurant Bar & Terrace (fridayharborhouse.com), situated in the lobby of Friday Harbor House, offering vegetarian and gluten-free alternatives that incorporate produce from an on-site garden and multiple usages and infusions of local madrone bark. —ERIN JAMES WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

From Whidbey to Orcas Island, isolation and a bounty of seafood make the area a mecca for esoteric wines, palate-cleansing brews, crisp ciders, and herbal spirits. Whidbey Island Vineyards and Winery (whidbeyislandwinery.com) uses rare varietals like Madeleine Angevine, an unconventional French wine now sampled in the Langley tasting room. Nearby Langley, Ott & Murphy Wines (ott murphywines.com) focuses on Rhônestyles like syrah and viognier, while Whidbey Island Distillery (whidbey distillery.com) is producing liqueurs from Washington’s rare loganberries. Across the pond, on Camano Island, Diamond Knot Craft Brewing (diamondknot.com) pours its suds at a lakeside island lodge. From Anacortes, set sail for the San Juan Islands. Lopez Island Vineyards’ (lopez islandvineyards.com) tasting room, on six acres of organic vineyards, is appealing for both sights and sips. San Juan Vineyards (sanjuanvineyards.com), on San Juan Island, grows award-winning estate wines like Madeleine Angevine and Siegerrebe. An apple orchard serves as the home of San Juan Island Distillery (sanjuan islanddistillery.com), notable for gins and liqueurs, and Westcott Bay Cider (westcott baycider.com), which produces a variety of traditional ciders. In Orcas Island’s Eastsound, Island Hoppin’ Brewery (islandhoppinbrewery. com) makes small-batch ales and lagers. Stop by for the K Pod Kolsch, named for a local orca clan. —ERIN JAMES

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

73


3

GET OUT

From the air, the San Juan Islands look like a necklace of gleaming emeralds, a chain of 172 pristine islands strewn across Puget Sound. The archipelago, which earned National Monument status in 2013, is home to vital bird and marine mammal breeding grounds, ancient fishing sites, historic lighthouses, state parks, serene bays, and prime recreational land. Washington State Ferries service the four biggest islands—Lopez, Shaw, San Juan, and Orcas—but the smattering of other isles is best reached by kayak or LANGLEY private boat. From your watercraft, the marine world comes to life: purple and orange starfish carpet shallow beaches; eagles perch on weathered snags to scan the horizon; and orcas, on the prowl for salmon, breach the water’s surface. For a guided tour, book a half-day

74

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

LIME KILN POINT

excursion or multiday trip with Discovery Sea Kayaks (discoveryseakayak.com) in Friday Harbor to access the lesserknown islands and explore prime orca habitat. Paddlers may encounter other marine life along the way, including harbor seals, porpoises, and bald eagles. Those who prefer to DIY can take their time exploring—rentals are available from multiple outfitters, such as Lopez Island Sea Kayak (lopezkayaks. com), Sea Quest Expeditions (seaquest-kayak.com), and Outer Island Expeditions (outerislandx.com). Cross

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

channels between islands, meander around the shore, stop at secluded beaches, and paddle out to take in the full measure of this saltwater wonderland. Many of the islands offer beautiful, well-maintained campgrounds with abundant opportunities for exploration. Ambitious paddlers can travel the Cascadia Marine Trail, a saltwater route that extends from the state capital in Olympia to the Canadian border, and includes more than 50 campsites along the way, including a number among the San Juan Islands. —NICHOLAS O’CONNELL

PHOTOGRAPH BY PAUL GILL

TH E I S L A N D S

See Worthy


f lo dg ing Sta (se ek o f f n d ar e y) pe d g ak u e /pe st Nu ak uni t mb r at er es of un Se it s ea do np Me ag eti e ng /re F ir ep t re l ac at sp e Re ac s t a in r o e om ur a Co n t /l mp o un l g Hi g im e n t ar e o n h-s yb s pe re a i te Mi ed c ro k In t wa er n f a s t Ki t v e/ et ch ac en re fr i ce g et t Ind e u er ato s s oo ni t r rp s o Ou tdo ol or Lo c a p o ol l sh ut t Tel l ev i sio e n Kid - fri en Pe dl y ts all ow Sp a/m ed as Fit sa ne ge ss se ce Sm nte r vic e ok s r e -f re e AD A -f po rie l ic y n Wa t e r dl y vie w

Anacortes Inn 3006 Commercial Avenue Anacortes 98221

360-293-3153 www.anacortesinn.com

HMR

59 128

44

Cap Sante Inn 906 9th Street Anacortes 98221

360-293-0602 www.capsanteinn.com

HMR

69 99

34

Swinomish Casino & Lodge 12885 Casino Drive Anacortes 98221

888-288-8883 www.swinomishcasino andlodge.com

HMR

89 399

98

Camano Island Chamber of Commerce 848 N Sunrise Blvd. #4 Camano Island 98282

360-629-7136 www.camanoisland.org

ALL

49 350

360-387-2256 www.innatbarnumpoint.com

B&B

125 225

3

Bird Rock Hotel 35 First Street Friday Harbor 98250

360-378-5848 www.birdrockhotel.com

HMR

87 297

15

Earthbox Inn & Spa 410 Spring Street Friday Harbor 98250

360-378-4000 www.earthboxinn.com

HMR

157 407

72

Friday Harbor House 130 West Street Friday Harbor 98250

360-378-8455 www.fridayharborhouse.com

HMR

169 389

23

    

Friday Harbor Suites 680 Spring Street Friday Harbor 98250

800-752-5752 www.fridayharborsuites.com

HMR

149 249

60

360-378-2344 www.lakedale.com

HMR

150 400

18

 

360-378-2783 www.tuckerhouse.com

HMR

99 355

17

      

360-468-2233 www.lopezfun.com

HMR

99 189

28

360-376-2222 www.rosarioresort.com

HMR

89 499

105

  

    

       

360-376-2297 www.smuggler.com

HMR

159 329

20

 

  

 

800-376-4914 www.turtlebackinn.com

B&B

115 260

11

360-679-4567 www.bestwestern.com/plusharbor plazaandconferencecenter

HMR

89 159

80

Candlewood Suites Oak Harbor 33221 State Route 20 Oak Harbor 98277

360-279-2222 www.candlewoodsuites.com/ oakharborwa

HMR

89 159

80

Clinton Chamber of Commerce c/o Dalton Realty 9546 Hwy. 525 Clinton 98236

360-341-3929 www.discoverclintonwa.com

ALL

95 1400

70

                 

Coupeville Chamber of Commerce 905 NW Alexander Street Coupeville 98239

360-678-5434 www.coupevillechamber.com

ALL

59 1000

70

                 

360-678-6668 www.thecoupevilleinn.com

HMR

110 225

133

 

Greater Freeland Chamber of Commerce 5575 Harbor Avenue #101 Freeland 98249

360-331-1980 www.freeland-wa.org

ALL

79 2000

Greater Oak Harbor Chamber of Commerce 32630 State Route 20 Oak Harbor 98277

360-675-3735 www.oakharborchamber.com

ALL

48 495

800-997-3115 www.guesthouselogcottages.com

B&B

125 350

360-221-6765 www.visitlangley.com

ALL

80 575

70

                 

www.whidbeycamanoislands.com

ALL

48 2000

70

                 

F R I D AY H A R B O R

Inn at Barnum Point 464 S Barnum Road Camano Island 98282

Lakedale Resort 4313 Roche Harbor Road Friday Harbor 98250 Tucker House 275 C Street Friday Harbor 98250

ORCAS ISLAND

Lopez Islander Resort & Marina 2864 Fisherman Bay Road Lopez Island 98261 Rosario Resort & Spa 1400 Rosario Road Eastsound 98245 Smuggler’s Villa Resort 54 Hunt Road Eastsound 98245

WHIDBEY ISLAND

Turtleback Farm Inn 1981 Crow Valley Road Eastsound 98245 Best Western PLUS Harbor Plaza 33175 State Route 20 Oak Harbor 98277

The Coupeville Inn 200 Coveland Street Coupeville 98239

Guest House Log Cottages 24371 State Route 525 Greenbank 98253 Langley Chamber of Commerce 208 Anthes Avenue Langley 98260 Whidbey and Camano Island Tourism PO Box 365 Coupeville 98239

    133

 70

30

  

  

 

  

                  

132

   

 

   

 

   

  

  

 

    

  

      

     

  

       

   

 

      

      

  

   

 

 

  

  

  

  

  

   

                  70

6

                  

   

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

 

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

3 TH E I S L A N D S

ANACORTES

Listings are sorted alphabetically, by region and city

Typ

HMR = Hotel/Motel/Resort B&B = Bed & Breakfast VRH = Vacation Rental Housing

eo

ACCOMMODATIONS

75


S u n n y

Photos: George Gerkitz

V i s i t

Lavender Capital of North America John Wayne Marina Olympic Discovery Trail Dungeness Spit and Lighthouse

1-800-737-8462 visitsunnysequim.com


Peninsulas & Coast THE PACIFIC OCEAN AND THE OLYMPIC AND KITSAP PENINSULAS

PHOTOGRAPH BY JOANN SNOVER/SHUTTERSTOCK

CAPE DISAPPOINTMENT

Lush with evergreen rain forests, punctuated by snow-coated peaks, and laced with deepwater canals, Washington’s western peninsulas embody the Northwest. Olympic National Park teems with natural hot springs, venerable lodges, and the country’s largest herd of elk. Port Angeles and Port Townsend harbor thriving artists’ communities. And with Pacific Ocean shorelines stretching hundreds of miles, coastal towns like Long Beach and Ocean Shores offer infinite sandy places to harness the breeze.

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

77


Neah Bay

N

CAPE FLATTERY

E

W 112

Port Angeles

LAKE OZETTE

LAKE CRESCENT

101

PE N I N S U L A S & C OA S T

RIALTO BEACH

110

La Push

Port Townsend

3

Sequim Chimacum

SOL DUC

4

HURRICANE RIDGE

Forks

RUBY BEACH

Amanda Park

Lilliwaup

Quinault

2 HOOD CANAL

Bremerton Belfair

LAKE CUSHMAN

109

Suquamish

Poulsbo Brinnon Eldon

LAKE QUINAULT

Port Gamble

Quilcene Olympic National Park

Kalaloch 101

Seattle

Port Orchard 16

1

Hoodsport

Gig Harbor 101

Pacific Beach Seabrook

5 Ocean Shores

Tacoma

Shelton

GRIFFITHS-PRIDAY STATE PARK

8

Hoquiam

Aberdeen

GRAYS HARBOR

Olympia

Montesano

Westport

12

101 105

Grayland

Raymond South Bend

Chehalis

6

WILLAPA BAY

Ocean Park

6 Long Beach Seaview

5

103

4

Ilwaco CAPE DISAPPOINTMENT

EXPLORE

Small Towns

78

Bellevue

BAINBRIDGE ISLAND

Moclips

1 GIG HARBOR Spilling down a hillside to a sailboat-dotted harbor, Gig Harbor is a spectacular setting rimmed by an evergreen forest. Soak up the scenery on a guided kayak tour, check out gift shops, or grab a bite to eat. The new Netshed No. 9 dishes up creative breakfasts, while historic Tides Tavern serves fresh, local shellfish. 2 POULSBO Arts aficionados have plenty to admire in Norwegian-inspired

20 mi

104 MOUNT OLYMPUS

Queets

Everett

Port Ludlow

HOH RAIN FOREST

FIRST BEACH

S 5

Poulsbo, with its clutch of galleries on a charming main street paralleling the harbor. Check out the Front Street and Verksted galleries for local artwork, plus Nordic Maid for Norwegian imports. Four new craft breweries offer a cool and refreshing break from shopping. 3 SEQUIM At the tip of the Olympic Peninsula, the town of Sequim is drenched in sunshine for most of the year. More than two dozen lavender farms

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

WANDER HERE

• All Rivers & Saltwater Charters (p. 15) • Hurricane Ridge (p. 16) • Heritage Distilling Company (p. 17) • Rhody Run 12k; Discovery Trail Half Marathon; North Olympic Discovery Marathon (p. 17) • Grays Harbor’s Shorebird Festival (p. 22) • Suquamish Museum (p. 22) • Steepwater Surf Shop (p. 30)

Cathlamet

rain also has plenty of pop-culture cred as the setting for the Twilight movie series. In summer, town streets swarm with teens and tweens on quests to find popular film props, such as Bella’s red truck. For non-Twihards, make this the lavender driftwood-piled ocean capital of the nation; the beaches and the lush, annual Lavender Festimoss-draped Hoh Rain val is a highlight in July, Forest can be found just but you can tour many outside of town. 5 OCEAN SHORES farms year-round. For more outdoor fun, trek With the maritimeto the lighthouse at the focused Coastal end of the 5.5-mile-long Interpretive Center Dungeness Spit. and gift shops selling 4 FORKS kites and baubles, this This Olympic Penlaid-back community insula logging town feels like a blast from with a reputation for the past. Resorts and

4

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

restaurants back a pancake-flat beach that attracts clam diggers and horseback riders, plus zipping dune buggies and cruising cars. 6 LONG BEACH Anchoring a 28-milelong sand peninsula, this small town offers big adventure, with kite flying, clam digging, and biking on the beachside Discovery Trail. Dig into exquisitely prepared seafood at The DEPOT Restaurant, and stop by the Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center, high atop a rugged headland in nearby Ilwaco, to learn how the duo found their way to the Pacific. —LESLIE FORSBERG

PHOTOGRAPH LEFT BY KINGWU/ISTOCKPHOTO.COM

4

CAPE ALAVA


SHI SHI BEACH

7 SEAS BREWING

LOCAL SIPS

Swell Swills

HIKE THE COAST

PHOTOGRAPH LEFT BY LEE RENTZ, RIGHT BY CATHERINE JOHNSON/FOXINTHEPINE.COM

A FREEWAY OF ROCKS, worn smooth by millennia of Pacific Ocean

waves, crunches underfoot. Jake and Katy, 8 and 9 years old, respectively, linger behind, then run ahead. Backpacks a third their weight tower above their heads—Jake insisted on carrying the bear canister. The sky had been brilliant blue overhead—at the Olympic National Park ranger station outside where we bought our backcountry permits, and in Forks, where the kids posed beside cardboard cutouts of vampires and werewolves—but along the coast a fog has rolled in. On our right, the rain forest descends in lush green. To our left, sea stacks poke out from waves and banks of mist. It is ethereal and stunning. The five of us—the kids, their parents, and myself—are making our first Pacific Ocean coast backpacking expedition. More than 73 miles of coastline run along the Olympic National Park (nps.gov/olym) between South Beach, near Queets, and Cape Alava, with innumerable pocket campsites scattered between. All it takes to make the expedition is gear (much of which can be rented from outfitters), a $5 Olympic Wilderness backcountry permit (plus $2 a night for those 16 and older), which can be purchased at the Olympic National Park information centers near Port Angeles or Quinault, and a tide table. Because portions of the coast are inaccessible during high tide, it also requires some planning. From Rialto Beach, we hike along the coast for 45 minutes until we reach Holein-the-Wall, a water-carved arch of rock protruding into the ocean. Our arrival is perfectly timed; this passage is accessible only during low tide. Miss that and you’re stuck on either side, or reduced to a steep, huffing climb up and over the headwall. We choose our steps with care, dazzled by starfish clinging to the walls below, gaping at the life ebbing in small tide pools. At last, we’re on the other side and, as the kids climb driftwood, the adults make note of the high tide line in the sand and eye the shoreline for fresh water. Less than an hour up the coast, we find our campsite. We TRIP TIP Rent a bear cannestle tents between the rain forest banks and massive driftwood ister at Olympic logs the size of cars and go in search of water, which we find in National Park centhe form of a tiny stream trickling off a mossy rock. Throughout ters near Quinault or Port Angeles. the weekend we will have a near constant boil of water sterilizing on the fire. We fill the bear canisters with food and ChapStick, then lodge them in the sand 100 yards from camp. We wander the beach and toss a rope over a leaning tree, then hoist the rest of our tempting goods high in the air. During the day, we explore tide pools, collect water, and gather driftwood for the fire. We watch sea otters race from the ocean across the sand. At night, we wait on the stars and listen, hoping to hear whales just past the lapping waves. —JULIE H. CASE WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

The Olympic Peninsula may be known for Twilight towns and Dungeness crab, but an enticing beverage industry is staking claim among oysters and werewolves. Gig Harbor’s 7 Seas Brewing (7seas brewing.com) was at the forefront of a recent beer-canning renaissance. Bremerton’s Der Blokken Brewery (derblokken. com) is known for its “woman-brewed beers” and all-Sunday happy hour, and Poulsbo’s Sound Brewing (soundbrewery. com) produces Belgian-style ales. Shelton’s Walter Dacon Wines (walterdacon wines.com) uses fruit from eastern Washington in its Rhône and Mediterranean-style wines. Brinnon’s Geoduck Tavern (307103 US 101) was one of Esquire’s 2012 best bars in America thanks in part to its local beer selection. Not that it’s a battle of the sexes, but the 101 Brewery at Twana Roadhouse (101brewery.com) is home to woman-made beers, as well as oysters pulled from the nearby Dabob Bay. Head north to Port Townsend Brewing Co. (porttownsendbrewing.com) for a Boatyard Bitter ale, Propolis (propolis brewing.com) for herbal ales, and a cider route that could fill a day. Start at Chimacum’s Finnriver Farm & Cidery (finnriver. com) for sparkling artisan cider, map your way to Alpenfire Organic Hard Cider (alpenfirecider.com) for a bone-dry rendition of spiked apple juice, and end at Eaglemount Cider (eaglemountwineand cider.com) for a stunning quince version. To the west, Port Angeles has 15-year-old Peaks Brewing (130 S Lincoln St) and Twin Peaks Brewing & Malting Co. (2506 W 19th St), which has beer pong tournaments. Westport Winery (westportwinery.org) also has a bakery and views of Grays Harbor, while coastal Westport Brewing (west portbrewing.com) makes all its beer with local water and regional hops. —ERIN JAMES

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

79


WOODEN BOAT FESTIVAL

DISCOVERIES

From the ferry, Port Townsend seems to perch along a hairline shelf above the harbor. Victorian houses stick out from the bluffs, a stark contrast to the modern, earthy architecture that seems to occupy so many Washington shorelines. Then comes the town, a few rows of quaint shops. Galleries sparkle. Bookshops beckon. Lumberjack-size slices of pie tease from coffee-shop windows steamed over against briny air. Climb the hill out of town—stopping first at Mt. Townsend Creamery (mttownsend creamery.com) for a sample of handcrafted toma cheese washed in scotch ale—then head to where Fort Worden State Park (parks.wa.gov) juts into the sea. The retired army base is home to history exhibits, the arts colony Centrum (centrum.org), and the bunker where Richard Gere famously uttered the line “I got nowhere else to go!” in An Officer and a Gentleman. Meanwhile the Chamber Music Festival takes place here in March and June, and Jazz Port Townsend (centrum.org) plays July. Every September the Wooden Boat Festival (woodenboat.org/festival) brings 300 wooden vessels to town. And there’s the offbeat. Every January comes the Strange Brewfest (strange brewfestpt.com), an event dedicated to uniquely crafted regional beers and ciders. June brings not only the Festival of American Fiddle Tunes (centrum.org), but also the Brass Screw Confederacy (brassscrew.org), a weekend-long “steampunk hootenanny.” Most famously, though, is October’s Kinetic Sculpture Race (ptkinetic race.org), when amateur engineers build artistically enhanced, human-powered vehicles that must traverse sand, mud, hills, and salt water in a race for the coveted “mediocrity award.” —JULIE H. CASE

80

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

PHOTOGRAPH BY JOELROGERS.COM

Port Town


LAKE CRESCENT

EXPLORE

PHOTOGRAPH BY JEFFREY M. FRANK/SHUTTERSTOCK

Olympic National Park Hoh Rain Forest A dozen feet of rain fall each year in the Hoh Valley, where mosses hang from the thick canopy. Mountaineers start their ascent of 7,980-foot Mount Olympus here, but mere mortals can traipse old-growth forests on lesser routes. Hurricane Ridge In summer, films and exhibits inside the park’s most panoramic visitor center are a break from the jawdropping view outside. Come winter it’s a scene of local skiers and snowshoers. Ozette Dedicated souls make the roundabout drive out to Ozette Lake, separated from the Pacific by a sliver of land. The hike up the coast to remote Shi Shi Beach is beautiful, but expect a combination of boardwalks, detours, and tidal crossings. Kalaloch Drive right up to the sandy beach. Up the road from Kalaloch Campground are Ruby Beach’s photogenic headlands—rocks with flat tops like mesas. Lake Quinault The lake is only half in the National Park but is fully surrounded by the Quinault Rain Forest. Day hikers head for cascading terraces, arboreal giants, and the historic Kestner Homestead. Sol Duc Salmon runs, a hot springs resort, and a misty waterfall sit in the Sol Duc Valley. Backpackers embark for the alpine meadows of the High Divide Trail, which boasts glimpses of Mount Olympus. Lake Crescent Legend claims that the blue-green lake is bottomless. Since 1916 boaters have paddled it from Lake Crescent Lodge, next to the Nature Bridge. Staircase Douglas firs line the North Fork of the Skokomish River. Hikes range from easy ramblers, like the two-mile Shady Lane Trail, to stunning gaspers like the 3,000-foot ascent to Flap Jack Lakes. nps.gov/olym —ALLISON WILLIAMS WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

81


GET OUT

Just Beachy

PE N I N S U L A S & C OA S T

Ocean waves tumble onto miles of tawny sand in southwest Washington, which boasts some of the state’s most accessible and recreation-friendly beaches. A string of charming coastal hamlets offers easy access to sand and surf, along with family-friendly activities and plenty of opportunities to view wildlife. Seaside town Ocean Shores is a lowkey recreation destination with six miles of flat, hard-packed sand perfect for horseback riding, biking, and even driving (a holdover from the ’60s). The blustery North Jetty, where you can see gray whales in spring, plus seals and pelicans year-round, is an exciting spot for dodging waves. Boating on the town’s extensive network of canals and lakes is a more serene alternative. Across Grays Harbor, the quaint communities of Westport and Grayland make

LONG BEACH

a splash with activities like kite flying, surfing, jetty fishing, and crabbing. Hunt the 18 miles of beach for sun-bleached driftwood, or tour a bog to see why this is nicknamed the Cranberry Coast. Farther south, the 28-mile Long Beach Peninsula is a powerhouse of family fun. A string of seaside communities— including Ocean Park, Long Beach, and Seaview—is home to arcades, souvenir shops, and a broad sweep of breezy beaches with plentiful outdoor recreation. Don’t miss the World Kite Museum (kitefestival.com) in Long Beach.

Continue down to Cape Disappointment, a headland overlooking the roiling Columbia River, where Lewis and Clark reached the Pacific Ocean. In Cape Disappointment State Park (parks.wa.gov) you can hike to 19th-century lighthouses and discover rocky coves. Between Long Beach and Ilwaco, on the peninsula’s southern edge, the 8.5mile beachside Discovery Trail (olympic discoverytrail.com) is ideal for hiking or biking. If the forecast calls for rain, try Marsh’s Free Museum (marshsfree museum.com) instead, which is filled with vintage arcade games and souvenirs. Or you can just amble over to a restaurant for fresh, local fare; the peninsula has a well-deserved reputation for regional cuisine, including fresh-caught fish, wild mushrooms, and tart cranberries harvested from area bogs. No matter which coastal community you choose to explore, life’s always a beach. —LESLIE FORSBERG

NEW PREMIER EXHIBIT

Ancient Shores Changing Tides

www.SuquamishMuseum.org

Open Daily 10am-5pm On the Port Madison Indian Reservation Suquamish, WA

82

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

PHOTOGRAPH BY MATT D’ANNUNZIO

4


f lo dg ing Sta (se ek o f f n d ar e y) pe d g ak u e /pe st Nu ak uni t mb r at er es of un Se it s ea do np Me ag eti e ng /re F ir ep t re l ac at sp e Re ac s t a in r o e om ur a Co n t /l mp o un l g Hi g im e n t ar e o n h-s yb s pe re a i te Mi ed c ro k In t wa er n f a s t Ki t v e/ et ch ac en re fr i ce g et t Ind e u er ato s s oo ni t r rp s o Ou tdo ol or Lo c a p o ol l sh ut t Tel l ev i sio e n Kid - fri en Pe dl y ts all ow Sp a/m ed as Fit sa ne ge ss se ce Sm nte r vic e ok s r e -f re e AD A -f po rie l ic y n Wa t e r dl y vie w

Listings are sorted alphabetically, by region and city 206-842-7026 www.skiffpoint.com

B&B

Baymont Inn & Suites Bremerton 5640 Kitsap Way Bremerton 98312

360-377-7666 www.baymontinns.com

HMR

360-377-8881 www.super8.com

HMR

The Inn at Gig Harbor 3211 56th Street NW Gig Harbor 98335

253-858-1111 www.innatgigharbor.com

Westwynd Motel and Apartment Suites 6703 144th Street NW Gig Harbor 98332

2

  

 

152

  

  

64 75

75

  

  

HMR

99 199

64

    

800-468-9963 www.westwyndmotel.com

HMR

62 105

24

360-374-5267 www.quileuteoceanside.com

HMR

69 299

71

133

360-642-2351 www.theanchoragecottages.com

HMR

80 138

10

133

Boreas Bed & Breakfast Inn 607 Ocean Beach Blvd. N Long Beach 98631

360-642-8069 www.boreasinn.com

B&B

179 219

5

 

Hi-Tide Ocean Beach Resort 4890 Railroad Avenue Moclips 98562

1-800 MOCLIPS www.hi-tide-resort.com

HMR

89 249

33

The Canterbury Inn 643 Ocean Shores Blvd. NW Ocean Shores 98569

800-562-6678 www.canterburyinn.com

HMR

39 292

44

 

The Polynesian Resort 615 Ocean Shores Blvd. NW Ocean Shores 98569

800-562-4836 www.thepolynesian.com

HMR

69 429

69

Ramada Ocean Shores 845 Ocean Shores Blvd. NW Ocean Shores 98569

360-289-7700 www.ramada.oceanshores.com

HMR

360-289-4600 www.shiloinns.com

HMR

99 209

Lake Crescent Lodge 416 Lake Crescent Road Port Angeles 98363

888-723-7127 www.olympicnationalparks.com

HMR

Lake Quinault Lodge 345 South Shore Road Quinault 98575

360-288-2900 www.olympicnationalparks.com

Log Cabin Resort 3183 E Beach Road Port Angeles 98363 Sol Duc Hot Springs Resort 12076 Sol Duc Hot Springs Road Port Angeles 98363

Quileute Oceanside Resort & RV Park 330 Ocean Drive La Push 98350 Anchorage Cottages 2209 Ocean Beach Blvd. N Long Beach 98631

OCEAN SHORES

170 260

134

  

     

  

   

 

 

  

  

  

  

  

  

   

  

 

       

  

   

 

 

113 131

 

   

 

102 272

55

76

  

 



HMR

99 299

91

76

  

  



888-896-3818 www.olympicnationalparks.com

HMR

66 161

27

 



866-476-5382 www.olympicnationalparks.com

HMR

143 373

33

  



Seabrook Cottage Rentals 4275 State Route 109 Pacific Beach 98571

877-779-9990 www.seabrookcottagerentals.com

VHR

99 1250

   



Colette’s Bed & Breakfast 339 Finn Hall Road Port Angeles 98362

360-457-9197 www.colettes.com

HMR

150 375

5

The Resort at Port Ludlow One Heron Road Port Ludlow 98365

877-805-0868 www.portludlowresort.com

HMR

149 299

37

   



Poulsbo Inn & Suites 18680 State Hwy. 305 NE Poulsbo 98370

360-779-3921 www.poulsboinn.com

HMR

79 130

83

Little Creek Casino Resort 91 W State Route 108 Shelton 98584

800-677-7711 www.little-creek.com

HMR

49 179

190

800-255-9101 www.chateauwestport.com

HMR

104 299

104 133

Shilo Inn Suites Oceanfront Hotel 707 Ocean Shores Blvd. NW Ocean Shores 98569

Chateau Westport 710 Hancock Westport 98595

145 133

 

133

  

  

   

 

  

 80

     

 

 

    

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

  



    

  

 

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

4 PE N I N S U L A S & C OA S T

Skiff Point Guest House & Retreat 11040 NE Mountain View Road Bainbridge Island 98110

Super 8 Bremerton 5068 Kitsap Way Bremerton 98312

O LY M P I C N AT I O N A L PA R K

Typ

HMR = Hotel/Motel/Resort B&B = Bed & Breakfast VRH = Vacation Rental Housing

eo

ACCOMMODATIONS

83


Discover Washington’s railroad history. A trip to Washington and Mt. Rainier isn’t complete without a ride along this historic railroad.

Mt. Rainier Scenic Railroad

Weekly excursions May-Oct, plus year-round special events! Be sure to ask about the new museum!

Learn more and book your visit at mrsr.com or by calling 888-STEAM-11


The Volcanoes

PHOTOGRAPH BY LIJUAN GUO/SHUTTERSTOCK

MOUNT RAINIER, MOUNT ST. HELENS, AND MOUNT ADAMS

MT. RAINIER NATIONAL PARK

Glaciers and snow may cap the Cascades volcanoes year-round, but their surrounding foothills are a riot of shifting, seasonal beauty. In the National Park, hikers trek through alpine meadows

abloom with wildflowers and ancient old-growth forests to reach sublime views. The majestic peak is also training ground for accomplished mountaineers, both past and present. To the south, learn all about Mount St. Helens on a drive to the craggy volcano that blew its top in 1980. WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

85


To Seattle

N E

W S

TH E VO L CA N O E S

101

Graham Olympia

2 Greenwater

Wilkeson

410

Carbon River

1 Eatonville

123

Ashford Centralia

Paradise

Longmire

5

7

Chehalis

6

Silver Creek

5

Randle

Packwood

Longview

SILVER LAKE

MOUNT ADAMS

MOUNT ST. HELENS

Kelso

7

APE CAVES

Cougar Ariel Woodland

503 LAKE MERWIN

14

Co l

umb

86

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

97

i ia R

Chehalis-Centralia Railroad & Museum, which 7 features a glimpse into the past and offers 12or 18-mile rides with a 1 EATONVILLE whatever else may have 1916-vintage steam This rural town, nestled mysteriously popped up locomotive on weekends. 6 LONGVIEW in Mount Rainier’s foot- among the moss. 3 ASHFORD hills, is wild: Visitors of Located at the juncall ages can spend the Many small towns have tion of the Cowlitz and day on a wildlife tram risen up around the markets—on Labor and Columbia Rivers, this tour or zip-lining through necessities—flour, gas, Memorial Day weekport city is home to Lake the trees at Northwest and hammers—but in ends—that attract tens Sacajawea Park and Trek Wildlife Park. Ashford, the essentials of thousands of people its 3.5 miles of walking 2 SECRET GNOME are more like crampons, to this hamlet, dratrails, 17 parks, several VILLAGE ice axes, and climbing matically sandwiched bridges, numerous buildOff 410, deep in Fedharnesses. The former between Mount St. Hel- ings on the National eration Forest resides logging town is the gate- ens and Mount Rainier. Register of Historic 5 CHEHALIS a happy little colony of way to Mount Rainier’s Places, and the Nutty gnomes. Stop between Paradise entrance, the History reigns supreme Narrows Bridge—one of mileposts 40 and 41, base camp for mountain in this old railroad town. three in town designed amble to an info kiosk, guide organizations, and Its historic district is and built strictly for and take the far right home to Whittaker’s full of brick buildings, scurrying squirrels. 7 COUGAR trail west, paralleling Motel & Historic Bunkantique malls, and cofthe White River. Stop 25 house. Nearby Copper fee shops where locals Come for the small-town minutes or so later for Creek Inn has epic pie. say hello to passersby. atmosphere, but don’t 4 PACKWOOD thimbles of imaginary Also here are a Vintage miss the nearby Ape tea, but don’t miss the If you’re not a logger or Motorcycle Museum, full Caves. The two-plushidden doors tucked into a nature lover, it’s the of original and restored mile-long underground logs, gnome jails, and two-decades-old flea pre-1916 bikes, and the lava tube is the nation’s

Small Towns

• Crystal Mountain; White Pass (p. 16) • Centralia Antique Mall (p. 20) • Lelooska Foundation & Museum (p. 22) • White Salmon River river guides (p. 30) • Music on the Mountain (p. 38)

ve r

Vancouver

EXPLORE

12

WANDER HERE

GIFFORD PINCHOT NATIONAL FOREST

25

504

6

WHITE PASS SKI AREA

131

RIFFE LAKE

Toutle

Castle Rock

Ohanapecosh

4

Morton

12

Pe Ell

CRYSTAL MOUNTAIN SKI RESORT

MOUNT RAINIER

3

20 mi

Sunrise

third largest, features an eight-foot-tall lava fall, and is easy to explore with headlamps. DON’T MISS

MT. RAINIER NATIONAL PARK Five developed areas welcome guests to this national park. In the southwest, Paradise offers lush meadows, glacial overlooks, and the circa-1916 Paradise Inn. In summer, visitors can shuttle from Longmire to Paradise, then hike the Wonderland Trail back. In the northwest, Carbon River is open year-round and happens to have a rain forest climate. In the northeast, Sunrise offers sweeping views of other ranges, while Ohanapecosh features oldgrowth forests and hot springs. —JULIE H. CASE

PHOTOGRAPH BY KEN PAULSEN

5

Enumclaw Tacoma Sumner


JOHNSTON RIDGE OBSERVATORY

CARBON GLACIER DISTILLERY

LOCAL SIPS

Tipple the Mountains

VOLCANIC MAJESTY

PHOTOGRAPH LEFT BY RICK DALRYMPLE, RIGHT COURTESY CARBON GLACIER DISTILLERY

PART OF THE FUN of visiting Mount St. Helens—the craggy volcanic

mountain that famously blew its top in 1980—is getting there. Visitors can access Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument (fs.usda.gov/ mountsthelens) via the dramatic Spirit Mountain Highway (SR 504), which begins just off Interstate 5 in Castle Rock and winds for 54 miles through a shifting and healing landscape to Johnston Ridge Observatory (milepost 52), the closest of the four interpretive centers along this scenic road. Start your trip five miles into the drive at Mount St. Helens Visitor Center at Silver Lake (milepost 5), where you can watch a short film featuring footage of the eruption, view exhibits tracing the geological and human history of the region, read newspaper articles about the blast, and walk through an elaborate scale model of the mountain. Continue 14 miles for lunch at Patty’s Place at 19 Mile House (facebook. com/pattysplace19), a quirky little roadhouse open mid-May through mid-October that is renowned for its burgers, huckleberry pie, and strawberry-rhubarb cobbler. From Patty’s it’s just a few miles to the 2,340-foot-long Hoffstadt Creek Bridge, the edge of the 1980 blast zone. This stretch of road rises to 4,000 feet above the Toutle and Cowlitz River Valleys, through which a devastating torrent of volcanic mud and rock zoomed at speeds of 100 miles per hour following the eruption. Continue to the Charles W. Bingham Forest Learning Center (milepost 33) to view a herd of elk grazing far below on the valley floor and learn about ongoing efforts to reforest the mountainsides. Drive another seven miles to Hoffstadt Bluffs Visitor Center (hoffstadtbluffs.com), the site of a poignant memorial grove planted as a tribute to the 57 people who lost their lives in the eruption; the striking contemporary lodge also houses the casual Fire Mountain Grill (fmgrill.com) restaurant, offering burgers of both the classic and exotic (think TRIP TIP Some mountain bison and elk) variety, plus panoramic valley views. passes close in Once you reach Coldwater Lake (milepost 44), stop to stretch winter; confirm your legs. Trailheads for both short (like the 2.5-mile Hummocks at wsdot.com/ traffic/passes. Trail loop) and long hikes amble across a landscape that ranges from rock-strewn to quite lush. From May through October, continue on SR 504 to Johnston Ridge Observatory, named for the volcanologist killed near this point during the 1980 blast. Watch a riveting 16-minute movie about the eruption, explore jarring exhibits about the plight of both survivors and victims, and stroll along a paved path that affords breathtaking views of the 920-foot-tall lava dome that has formed inside Mount St. Helens’s gaping crater, just five miles south. —ANDREW COLLINS WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

Washington’s wilderness encourages travelers to play hard—and relax with vigor. Luckily, artisanal breweries and distilleries have taken the Cascades by storm and introduced flavors as compelling as any ski slope or Class IV rapid. Make your next après memorable, be it with world-class perry (hard cider made from pears) at Enumclaw’s Rockridge Orchards (rockridgeorchards.com) or local brews at Crystal Mountain’s Austrianinspired Snorting Elk Cellar (crystal hotels.com/the-snorting-elk-cellar). Or head to tiny Wilkeson, an old mining town shadowed by Mount Rainier, where Carbon Glacier Distillery (carbon glacierdistillery.com) revived an old-timey storefront as a tasting room. The veteranled company turns out small batches ripe with character—like its bright citrusy gin— and claims to make spirits for veterans. Its signature B4 Vodka won a 2012 medal at the Washington Cup Spirits Competition. Dick’s Brewery (dicksbeer.com) in Centralia also threads the “work hard, party hardy” needle with 24 beers, many of which celebrate the great outdoors, like the hoppy Double Diamond Winter Ale and the dark, rich Lava Rock Porter. A newer brewery in Longview also nods at the landscape’s power: Ashtown Brewing Company (ashtownbrewing.com) draws its name from the Mount St. Helens eruption of 1980. Just a 60-mile drive west of the crater, the taproom serves twists like coconut porter and raspberry wheat beer. Soon it’ll be joined by Five Dons Brewing (1158 11th Ave, Longview) around the corner. And Parker’s Restaurant and Brewery (parkerssteakhouse.com) already brews in-house nearby in Castle Rock. —AMANDA CASTLEMAN

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

87


MOUNT RAINIER

5

GET OUT

The first documented summit of Mount Rainier (nps.gov/mora), the tallest volcano in the Lower 48, was in 1870 by Hazard Stevens and P. B. Van Trump. Since that premiere climb, the volcanoes of Washington have served as training ground for some of the most accomplished mountaineers in the world. Jim Whittaker, the first American to summit Everest, cut his teeth on Rainier, climbing it in 1945 with his twin brother, Lou, at the age of 16. In 1969, Lou and friend Jerry Lynch founded Rainier Mountaineering Inc (rmiguides.com), one of the most prestigious guide services in the country, which offers guided expeditions and training programs for adventurers. If you already have the experience to attempt a summit on your own, Emmons Route

and Disappointment Cleaver are two good routes on Rainier. Just south of the state’s iconic peak, Mount St. Helens (fs.usda.gov/mount sthelens)—the most active volcano in the range—has a variety of alpine climbing routes and good options for mountaineers who are just starting out. First-timers often tackle the Monitor Ridge Route, which gains a lot of vertical, but isn’t too technical. It’s this accessibility and diversity of

Historic Lodging surrounded by Timeless Majesty

AD Photograph by Donavon Preiser

Experience all that Mount Rainier National Park and its 14,410 feet can offer. Stay in the historic National Park Inn or Paradise Inn, where breathtaking views of glaciers, spectacular waterfalls and wildlife are steps from your room.

routes in the area that has allowed the local alpine culture to flourish. Though any climb here can be treacherous, there aren’t many other places in the world where high mountain peaks are quite so approachable. These days, even elite climbers like Everest guides Melissa Arnot (the first American woman to summit the peak five times) and Seattleborn Garrett Madison spend their late summers guiding on Rainier. —HEATHER HANSMAN

Your Trip through Washington State Begins HERE

Everything you need for planning a quick weekend escape, a winding road trip, or an Evergreen adventure.

Reserve your room online now. (360) 569-2275 •

www.mtrainierguestservices.com

Rainier Guest Services, LLC., A National Park Service Concessioner

88

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

Insider Stories • Accommodations Trip Ideas • Maps Itineraries • Calendars

PHOTOGRAPH BY MATT RAGEN/SHUTTERSTOCK

TH E VO L CA N O E S

Flag Planters


Mount St Helens Motel

Quality Inn & Suites

mountsthelensmotel.com

qualityinn.com

Castle Rock 360.274.7721

Photo by Protik M. Hossain

Woodland 360.225.1000

Red Lion Hotel

Treehouse Island Zip Line Adventures

America’s Hub World Tours

redlionhotel.com

thetreehouseisland.com

americashubworldtours.com

Kelso 360.636.4400

Silver Lake 360.274.2425

503.896.2464 800.637.3110


DISCOVERIES

The hike to Camp Muir on 14,410-foot Mount Rainier (nps.gov/mora) is one of the most spectacular in the Northwest. Pass through fields of yellow avalanche lilies and Indian paintbrush for views of the nearby Tatoosh Range and beyond. It’s a challenging route best suited for experienced hikers—nine miles round-trip with 4,680 feet of elevation gain—but the views are worth it. Consider it a window into the world of the high and alpine, without the need of ice axe, rope, or guide. The hike starts on an asphalt trail, heading up through the meadows and alpine fir trees. At 1.5 miles, pass Glacier Vista and marvel at the south face of Mount Rainier, the tallest glaciated peak in the Lower 48. At a fork in the trail, head left, feeling the burn of the steep ascent in your calves. The angle eases at Panorama Point, where you can take in the snow-covered Tatoosh Range to the south. At 2.5 miles, the trail crosses Pebble Creek and dwindles to a boot track through the snow. If you’re not comfortable in these conditions, this is a good place to turn around. But if the weather is clear, you’re wearing good hiking boots, and have a ski pole for balance, keep going. The views just keep getting better. By the time you arrive at Camp Muir, a popular base camp for those attempting a summit, you’ll be ready to sit and rest. Take in the panoramic views of Paradise and the Cascades before heading back. This hike may be a spectacular choice, but it is by no means the only one. The Grove of the Patriarchs trail (1.3 miles round-trip) reaches a forest of massive ancient trees, some 300 feet tall and 40 feet in diameter. The Spray Park trail (six miles round-trip) traverses some of the most beautiful alpine meadows around. —NICHOLAS O’CONNELL

90

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

PHOTOGRAPH BY TUSHARKOLEY/SHUTTERSTOCK

Hike Rainier


Listings are sorted alphabetically, by region and city McMenamins Olympic Club 112 N Tower Avenue Centralia 98531 

HMR

50 95

360-330-2057 www.motel6.com

HMR

37 87

Best Western PLUS Park Place Inn & Suites 201 Interstate Avenue Chehalis 98532

360-748-4040 book.bestwestern.com

HMR

100 180

Econo Lodge Chehalis 122 Interstate Avenue Chehalis 98532

360-740-5339 www.chehalisinn.com

HMR

360-740-1800 www.hiexpress.com/chehaliswa

HMR

Camp Lakeview 32919 Benbow Drive E Graham 98338

360-879-5426 www.camplakeview-wa.com

HMR

Alta Crystal Resort at Mt. Rainier 68317 State Route 410 E Crystal Mountain 98022

800-277-6475 www.altacrystalresort.com

HMR

139 329

24

360-663-2262 www.crystalhotels.com

HMR

85 300

70

800-832-3248 www.lodgingmtrainier.com

HMR

90 120

32

360-569-0910 www.mt-rainier.com

ALL

60 250

360-569-2275 www.mtrainierguestservices.com

HMR

122 172

25

888-674-3554 www.lodgingmtrainier.com

HMR

90 130

24

360-569-2275 www.mtrainierguestservices.com

HMR

119 221

121

Seasons Motel 200 Westlake Avenue Morton 98356

877-496-6835 www.lodgingmtrainier.com

HMR

90 120

49

Silver Skis Chalet 33000 Crystal Mountain Blvd. Crystal Mountain 98022

360-663-2558 www.silverskischalet.com

HMR

150 275

60

84

360-274-7721 www.mountsthelensmotel.com

HMR

65 125

32

89

   

360-425-3229 www.motel6.com

HMR

40 75

63

131

 

360-569-2275 www.mtrainierguestservices.com

HMR

122 172

25

88

360-225-1000 www.qualityinn.com

HMR

69 89

52

89

360-636-4400 www.redlion.com

HMR

85 249

161

89

360-274-6002 www.timberlandinn.com

HMR

60 200

40

134

360-494-4444 www.escapetothemountains.com

HMR

65 100

31

134

800-477-5339 www.lodgingmtrainier.com

HMR

90 120

27

CHEHALIS MT RAINIER

Holiday Inn Express & Suites Chehalis 730 NW Liberty Place Chehalis 98532

Crystal Mountain Hotels 33818 Crystal Mountain Blvd. Crystal Mountain 98022 Mill Village Motel 210 Center Street E Eatonville 98328 Mt. Rainier Business Association & Visitor Center 30027 Hwy. 706 E Ashford 98304 National Park Inn Mount Rainier National Park Longmire 98397 Nisqually Lodge 31609 State Route 706 Ashford 98304 Paradise Inn Mount Rainier National Park Paradise 98398

Mt. St. Helens Motel 1340 Mt. St. Helens Way NE Castle Rock 98611 Motel 6 Kelso 106 Minor Road Kelso 98626 National Park Inn Mount Rainier National Park Longmire 98397 Quality Inn & Suites 1380 Atlantic Avenue Woodland 98674 Red Lion Hotel & Conference Center Kelso 510 Kelso Drive Kelso 98626 Timberland Inn 1271 Mt. St. Helens Way NE Castle Rock 98611 Cowlitz River Lodge and Conference Center 13069 U.S. Hwy. 12 Packwood 98361 Crest Trail Lodge 12729 U.S. Hwy. 12 Packwood 98361

55 64

89 179

27

134

122 131

60

134

  

65

112

  

     

 

 

84

 

  

84

 134

 

 

 

  

  

  

  

  

  

   

  

  

 

  

 

         

88

 

   

88

  

 

 

 

  

 

  

  

   

  

 

  

 

 

  

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

 

   

  

 

  

   

   

  

  

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

5 TH E VO L CA N O E S

360-736-5164 www.mcmenamins.com/olyclub

Motel 6 Centralia 1310 Belmont Avenue Centralia 98531

MT ST HELENS

eo f lo dg ing Sta (se of f nda ek p e rd g e y) ak u e /pe st Nu ak uni mb r at t er es of un Se i t ea s do np Me ag eti e ng /re F ir ep t r e l ac at e sp Re ac s t a in r o om e ur a Co n t mp /l o un l g Hi g im e n t ar e o n h-s -s yb Mi p e e d re a i te c ro w a In ter k f a s t n v e/ Ki t re f e t ac ch e ri c Ind ne t te ger a e s s tor oo un rp i t s o Ou tdo ol or Lo c a p o ol l sh ut t Tel le ev is Kid ion - fri en Pe dl y ts all ow Sp a/m ed as Fit sa ne ge ss se ce Sm nte r vic e ok s r e -f re e AD A -f po rie l i cy n Wa t e r dl y vie w

HMR = Hotel/Motel/Resort B&B = Bed & Breakfast VRH = Vacation Rental Housing

Typ

ACCOMMODATIONS

91


The Gorge

VANCOUVER, USA & THE COLUMBIA RIVER GORGE

PHOTOGRAPH BY SUSAN SEUBERT

BEACON ROCK

When it comes to gorgeous sights, the Columbia River Gorge is tough to top. In Vancouver, Lewis and Clark laid the groundwork for the city’s network of trails that reveal everything from waterfalls to river views. Meanwhile, an 80-mile-long scenic byway offers jaw-dropping vistas and access to charming waterfront towns, wineries, hikes, and more. Peer up at the planets at Goldendale Observatory, or find a comfortable perch on the basalt cliffs to keep a lookout for windsurfers below.

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

93


To Seattle

N

Tacoma

E

W S

TH E G O RG E

6

20 mi MOUNT RAINIER

123

WANDER HERE

• Vancouver USA Marathon and Half Marathon (p. 17) •Columbia Gorge Interpretive Center (p. 22) •Vancouver Old Apple Tree Festival (p. 26) •Windsurfing and kiteboarding (p. 30) •Maryhill Winery Concerts (p. 38)

12 RIFFE LAKE

131

5 504

Castle Rock Kelso

97

Cougar

503

LAKE MERWIN

ICE CAVES

Rive

Yacolt

7 Goldendale

r

1

kitat Kl ic

Woodland

Battle Ground

BEACON ROCK

3 Vancouver

North Bonneville

2

Camas

4

DOG MOUNTAIN

Stevenson

5 6

White Salmon Carson

14

Bingen

Lyle

Maryhill Columb

r

Washougal

homemade waffle cone at Granny’s Gedunk 4 Ice Cream Parlor, or dig into a plate of regional cuisine at Clark and 1 BATTLE GROUND antique malls. At Lewie’s, a new waterSituated between Van1927-era Liberty Thefront restaurant in the couver and Woodland, atre, movie buffs pair a Old Saloon building. 5 WHITE SALMON Battle Ground was hoppy Dragonfly Black named for an anticiRye IPA from Camas’s or soak in therapeutic While orchards, alpaca pated battle in 1855 own Mill City Brew Werks mineral water at Bonnfarms, and logging mills between U.S. soldiers with their indie flicks. eville Hot Springs Resort dot White Salmon— 3 NORTH BONNEVILLE & Spa. and the Klickitat tribe. population 2,260—it’s 4 STEVENSON The battle never actually From 1976 to 1978, the town’s easy access occured, but the name the entire town of This riverfront town to the Gorge and the stuck. Today this town North Bonneville—400 tucks into the Gorge’s Gifford Pinchot National draws skaters and locals residents at the time— basalt cliffs, where Forest that makes it a to its 27,500-square-foot relocated to make way everything from Native haven for outdoor enthuskate park and annual for a new powerhouse. American petroglyphs siasts. Rafters charge Harvest Days festival Today this community is to laid-back eateries is through the White every July. a popular stop on High- open for exploration. Salmon River’s rapids, 2 CAMAS way 14 for windsurfing Drop by the impressive windsurfers and paraMaple trees shade the on the Columbia River Columbia Gorge Intersailers go with the flow, sidewalks in this former and an abundance of pretive Center Museum and hikers explore the mill town, nestled on the hikes (hint: keep an eye to trace the history chilly Ice Caves carved banks of the Columbia out for carved-wood of the region, keep from ancient lava flows. 6 MARYHILL River, where shoppers sasquatches along the a lookout for nesting stroll the charming trails). Watch salmon waterfowl at Rock Creek No need to do a doubledowntown to peruse hopping up the BonnCove, stop for a scoop of take. Tiny Maryhill—just boutiques, galleries, and eville Lock and Dam, Umpqua ice cream in a 58 Washingtonians call

EXPLORE

Small Towns

94

ia Rive

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

this place home—does indeed sport a life-size replica of Stonehenge. Fashioned after the original neolithic monument, the modern-day version is made from concrete, wood, and crumpled tin and was dedicated in 1918 as a World War I memorial. 7 GOLDENDALE Situated on a plateau 13 miles north of the Columbia River, Goldendale was once just a watering hole for Oregon Trail pioneers. Today turkey and deer hunters survey the public lands along the Klickitat River, and fishermen cast their lines for king, coho, steelhead, and rainbow trout. Goldendale Observatory State Park, with one of the nation’s largest public telescopes, is a must for stargazers. —ANGELA CABOTAJE

PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY STEVENSON BUSINESS ASSOCIATION

Longview

MOUNT ADAMS

25

MOUNT ST. HELENS


MARYHILL WINERY

SKAMANIA LODGE

LOCAL SIPS

Gorge Gulps

SCENE IT

PHOTOGRAPH LEFT BY SUSAN SEUBERT, RIGHT COURTESY SKAMANIA LODGE

A MAJESTIC RIVER , vines clinging to windswept canyon walls, and

unusual art set the stage for breathtaking adventures along the Columbia River Gorge Scenic Byway (wsdot.wa.gov). The continuous 80-mile panorama along SR 14 begins in Washougal, continues through the evergreen-studded Cascades, then extends into a starkly alluring, arid expanse of grassy knolls and columnar basalt cliffs. Travel SR 14 in the dry, eastern region to U.S. 97—passing beneath columns of sleek, white, 41-story wind turbines—to Goldendale Observatory (parks.wa.gov/512), where year-round presentations reveal stars, planets, and galaxies many light-years away. Back on SR 14 alongside the Columbia River, scenery abounds. In 1914 construction began on Maryhill, Samuel Hill’s imposing Beaux-Arts dream house, on a bluff above the river. A visionary railroad and highway engineer, Hill died before the building’s 1940 completion. By then the majestic edifice had been turned into the Maryhill Museum of Art (maryhillmuseum.org), home now to eclectic collections (Eastern European Orthodox icons, Rodin sculptures, and Native American baskets) and eye-popping vistas from the museum’s terrace and cafe. Stroll the museum’s sculpture park, then head five miles east to visit a full-scale replica of Stonehenge. Nearby, sip vino and, in summer, watch concerts against a backdrop of awesome river views at Maryhill Winery (maryhillwinery.com), which has an expansive trellised terrace for tastings as well as a 4,000-seat amphitheater overlooking the Columbia. TRIP TIP The Columbia You’ll find numerous trailheads along the drive through River Gorge the Gorge. For a jaw-dropping view of Oregon’s highest peak, National Scenic Area covers 11,240-foot Mount Hood, scramble up Coyote Wall (Courtney Rd 292,500 acres. at SR 14, Lyle); this 8.25-mile loop trail climbs steadily along a sheer basalt ridge to an elevation of nearly 2,000 feet. West of White Salmon, SR 14 becomes dramatically more verdant. One of the best points for hiking is Beacon Rock State Park (parks.wa.gov/474) near Stevenson, where you can ascend a steep but well-marked trail to the top of the 848-foot column, or embark on a more ambitious 15-mile round-trip trek to the 2,438-foot summit of Hamilton Mountain, which affords vistas of Pierce National Wildlife Refuge (fws.gov/ridgefieldrefuges/ pierce), historic Bonneville Dam (usace.army.mil), and the soaring palisades that frame this magnificent gorge. —ANDREW COLLINS WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

Stop for fine wine, craft beer, and artisan coffee along the Columbia River Gorge. Vancouver’s Loowit Brewing (loowit brewing.com) hosts occasional brewer’s dinners and also sells its bottled beer— try the crisp Shadow Ninja IPA—while Mt. Tabor Brewing (mttaborbrewing.com) has earned raves for its oaky Wild Red, which is aged in single-malt whiskey barrels. Elsewhere in Vancouver, French bistro Willem’s on Main (willemsonmain.com) is a great spot for sampling Washington wines and bubbly, house-made cream soda. And Paper Tiger Coffee Roasters (papertigercoffee.com) uses house-roasted single-origin beans in its Chemex pourovers for java aficionados. In Camas, Krystal’s Champagne Lounge (krystalschampagnelounge.com) is a classy milieu for sipping both international and Northwest sparkling wines, plus local beers and ciders by the glass. To the east around Carson, White Salmon, and Lyle, you’ll discover the Columbia Gorge Wine Country, where several small but prolific wineries are quickly gaining devoted followings. Syncline (synclinewine.com) specializes in Rhône grapes, many of which—counoise, grenache blanc, mourvèdre—you seldom see bottled on their own. Other notables include AniChe Cellars (anichecellars. com), which has a tasting patio with spectacular Gorge vistas. Restaurants like The Glass Onion (the glassonionrestaurant.com) in Goldendale and the Cascade Dining Room at Stevenson’s Skamania Lodge (skamania.com) also carry extensive selections of wines from both the Gorge and other prominent Northwest winemaking hubs. —ANDREW COLLINS

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

95


Bonneville Hot Springs Resort & Spa North Bonneville www.bonnevilleresort.com

SKAMANIA COUNTY ….

Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument, Gifford Pinchot National Forest, Sasquatch Refuge and so much more ...

Carson Hot Springs Golf & Spa Resort Carson www.carsonhotspringresort.com

RENAISSANCE TRAIL

Carson Ridge Cabins Carson www.carsonridgecabins.com Columbia Gorge Riverside Lodge Stevenson www.cgriversidelodge.com Lewis & Clark RV Park North Bonneville www.lewisandclarkcampground.com Resort at Skamania Coves Stevenson www.skamaniacoves.com Rodeway Inn Stevenson www.rodewayinn.com

Skamania Lodge Stevenson www.skamania.com Timberlake Campground & RV Park Home Valley

www.timberlakecampgroundandrvpark.com

Wind Mountain RV Park & Lodge Home Valley www.windmountainresort.com

Skamania County Chamber of Commerce/ Visitor Information Center 167 NW Second Avenue (Highway 14), Stevenson 800-989-9178 www.skamania.org

Starlight Viewing Deck

and visit Columbia Gorge Interpretive Center Museum Stevenson www.columbiagorge.org

Authentic Paddlewheel

On Board Galley Freshly Prepared Food

Captain’s Wheelhouse

LET’S CRUISE

Brunch - Dinner - Sightseeing - Landmarks

Columbia Gorge Sternwheeler

www.portlandspirit.com 96

800-224-3901

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

DISCOVERIES

Trail Mix Lewis and Clark laid down the first of many trails that now traverse Vancouver. Today this booming river city has designated trails geared toward everyone from history buffs to bird-watchers. The paved Columbia River Renaissance Trail connects downtown’s Waterfront Park to 26-acre Marine Park, which has trails and a boat launch, to 12.5-acre Wintler Community Park, with its beach and views of Oregon’s Mount Hood. From Waterfront Park, detour north about a half-mile to reach the Fort Vancouver National Historic Site (nps. gov/fova), a full-scale replica of the early1800s fur-trading post, and Officers Row (fortvan.org), which contains some 22 restored Victorian buildings that housed Fort Vancouver’s commanders. On the city’s west side, the paved Frenchman’s Bar Trail leads 2.5 miles from 120-acre Frenchman’s Bar Park, overlooking the mighty Columbia, to 234-acre Vancouver Lake Park, noted for volleyball, swimming, windsurfing, and stand-up paddleboarding. Other popular greenways include the gravel-top Lacamas Heritage Trail, which wends for 3.5 miles alongside Lacamas Lake—passing waterfalls and terrific birdwatching spots—before ending at Heritage Park in Camas, plus the paved three-mile Salmon Creek Greenway Trail, a favorite of equestrians, bikers, and joggers. For a more rugged experience, head north of Vancouver to Yacolt, where the 2.6-mile Moulton Falls Trail passes beneath towering evergreens in 387-acre Moulton Falls Regional Park, offering views of two scenic waterfalls. Find trail maps at cityofvancouver.us/ parksrec. —ANDREW COLLINS

PHOTOGRAPH BY DEVON BRAY

Sandhill Cottages Carson www.sandhillcottages.com


f lo dg ing Sta (se ek o f f n d ar e y) pe d g ak u e /pe st ak uni t Nu r at mb es er of un Se ea it s do np ag Me e eti ng /re F ir ep t re l ac at e s Re s t a in r o p ac e om ur a Co n t mp /l o un l ge Hi g im e n on t ar h-s - si yb pe te r Mi c r o e d In e ak f as ter wa t ne v e/ Ki t ta ch re f cc e r Ind ne t te iger a e s s tor oo u ni t rp s o Ou tdo ol or Lo po ca o l l sh ut t Tel l ev i sio e n Kid - fri en Pe dl y ts a S p ll owe a/m d as Fit sa ne ge ss se ce r vi Sm nte ce ok s r e -f re e AD A -f r i e p o li c n Wa y t e r dl y vie w

Camas Hotel 405 NE 4th Avenue Camas 98607

360-834-5722 www.camashotel.com

HMR

Quality Inn & Suites Goldendale 808 E Simcoe Drive Goldendale 98620

509-733-5881 www.choicehotels.com

HMR

Rodeway Inn Stevenson 40 NE 2nd Street Stevenson 98648

509-427-5628 www.rodewayinn.com

HMR

55 90

30

Hampton Inn & Suites Vancouver East 315 SE Olympic Drive Vancouver 98684

360-426-7866 www.vancouvereastsuites. hamptoninn.com

HMR

109 209

99

Heathman Lodge 7801 NE Greenwood Drive Vancouver 98662

360-254-3100 www.heathmanlodge.com

HMR

89 199

182

  

Holiday Inn Express & Suites Vancouver N - Salmon Creek 13101 NE 27th Avenue Vancouver 98686

360-576-1040 www.ihg.com/holidayinn express/hotels/us/en/vancouver/ vanwa/hoteldetail

HMR

79 179

78

Homewood Suites by Hilton 701 SE Columbia Shores Blvd. Vancouver 98661

360-750-1100 www.vancouverportland. homewoodsuites.com

HMR

119 259

Residence Inn by Marriott 8005 NE Parkway Drive Vancouver 98662

360-253-4800 www.marriott.com/vanwa

HMR

360-573-0511 www.shiloinns.com

HMR

Shilo Inn & Suites 13206 Hwy. 99 Vancouver 98686

10176_VisitorsGuideAd_CFO.indd 1

24



 

  

 

 

  

 



  

 

  

 



  

104

a a

aa a a

a aaa a

a

99 219

120

 

  

 

  

79 149

66

 

  

131

  

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

6 TH E G O RG E

VA N C O U V E R

Listings are sorted alphabetically, by region and city

eo

HMR = Hotel/Motel/Resort B&B = Bed & Breakfast VRH = Vacation Rental Housing

Typ

ACCOMMODATIONS

a

97

2/18/14 1:17 PM WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014


Solar-Powered Vacations in Grant County, Washington • Concerts at the Gorge Amphitheater • Moses Lake Surf ‘n Slide Water Park • Wineries and Tasting Rooms • 15 Golf Courses • Over 100 Lakes • World-Class Hunting and Fishing • Wildlife and Geographical Tours/Sites • The Grand Coulee Dam At tourgrantcounty.com you’ll find: • Complete Accommodations, Campgrounds and RV Park Listings • Complete Events, Activities and Festivals Calendar • Popular Grant County Attractions Listing • Free Grant County / Eastern Washington Travel Planner For more information, contact: Grant County Tourism Commission PO Box 37, Ephrata, WA 98823 509.765.7888 • 800.992.6234

tourgrantcounty.com


North Central

LEAVENWORTH, WENATCHEE, LAKE CHELAN, AND THE OKANOGAN

ENCHANTMENT LAKES

PHOTOGRAPH BY GRANT GUNDERSON/TANDEMSTOCK.COM

Names don’t lie: The North Central region is just as charming as its glimmering Enchantment Lakes might suggest. Dive in to find Leavenworth, a Bavarian hamlet in the hills that’s as big on outdoor fun as it is on beer and brats; the Methow Valley, where seasonal escapades range from Nordic skiing to river rafting; and Lake Chelan, known for its bevy of sun, sports, and wine. Elsewhere, round up that Old West spirit in small towns, and see why this is called Apple Country with artisan ciders galore.

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

WASHINGTON WASHINGTON STATE STATE VISITORS’ VISITORS’ GUIDE GUIDE 2014 2014

99 99


C A N A D A

N

Oroville

E

W Molson

S

7

Okanogan Tonasket National Forest

Mazama

20

Republic

N O R TH C E NTR A L

1 20

2 GLACIER PEAK

20 mi

Conconully

Winthrop

NORTH CASCADES HWY

LOUP LOUP SKI BOWL

Omak

20

Okanogan

Twisp

Stehekin

155

97

M eth

R ow

LAKE CHELAN

Brewster

iv

er

Bridgeport

Grand Coulee Electric City

Manson

LAKE WENATCHEE

BANKS LAKE

Chelan

2

Plain

17

Waterville To Seattle

2

Leavenworth

5

Cashmere

90

Coulee City

Orondo LAKE LENORE

Wenatchee

6 Roslyn

7

MISSION RIDGE

97

4

SOAP LAKE

28

Ephrata Quincy

Crescent Bar

Cle Elum

WANDER HERE

3

90

8

17 MOSES LAKE

Moses Lake

9

Ellensburg

Vantage

Othello

82 Co l

Yakima

EXPLORE

Small Towns 1 WINTHROP The frontier spirit lives on, thanks to the town’s Old West–themed buildings. It’s also a spectacular launchpad for fly-fishing, mountain biking, and more. 2 TWISP Located at the southern end of the Methow Valley, Twisp is the largest of the area’s three towns. The community vibe is strong with little galleries and natural markets showcasing the artistic and edible fruits of the valley. Fuel a tour of the burg with a visit to award-winning Blue Star Coffee Roasters.

100

3 COULEE CITY At the turn of the century, seven gambling halls graced this tiny town. Things have since settled down: while it retains its frontier spirit, there’s more walleye fishing now than Wild West. Don’t miss Dry Falls, a giant Ice Age exwaterfall once five times the width of Niagara. 4 SOAP LAKE Legend has it that Native tribes used to come to the mineralladen waters to heal. Now its shores are often packed with the town’s Russian and Ukrainian immigrant

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

umbi

r ive aR

warehouse by Riverfront Park, that’s full of specialty eateries and a farmers market. 6 ROSLYN Once a coal-mining town, Roslyn was largely abandoned with the advent of diesel—until it was discovered by Holcohort, whose influence lywood: its 1886 church is reflected in Mom’s was showcased in a ’79 European Foods and Dick Van Dyke flick; its Deli, with its fascinatstreets, the faux-Alaska ing comestibles: from setting for ’90s show poppy-seed confections Northern Exposure. 7 CLE ELUM to little dumplings. 5 WENATCHEE This riverside hamlet Stone Age artifacts have is the perfect base for been discovered near outdoor exploring—be it this town at the core of around Suncadia Resort the state’s apple trade. or in the woods. Get a Now, the historic down- dose of history on the town’s streets are lined Coal Mines Trail, a 5.5with shops and cafes, mile trek that traces the and nearby is Pybus path of the old Northern Market, a restored Pacific Railway.

1

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

• Loup Loup Ski Bowl; Mission Ridge; North Cascade Heli (p. 16) • Old Schoolhouse Brewery (p. 17) • Anderson Family Farm; Liberty Orchards (p. 18) • Apple Annie’s Antique Gallery; Cashmere Antique Mall (p. 20) • Omak Stampede (p. 22) • Osprey Rafting; Stehekin; the Lady of the Lake (p. 30) • Sasquatch! Music Festival; Winthrop Rhythm and Blues (p. 38)

8 ELLENSBURG Located smack in the middle of the state, brick-lined Ellensburg holds a heap of annual events, like January’s WinterHop BrewFest, February’s Spirit of the West Cowboy Gathering, June’s infamous dachshund races, and the crowning glory, Labor Day Weekend’s rodeo. 9 VANTAGE The basalt pillars nearby are so popular with climbers that there are more than 700 routes. That’s not all that draws people here; there’s also the Gingko Petrified Forest, with its rare preserved trees, and killer milkshakes at Blustery’s, the lone restaurant in town. —ANNE LARKIN


SNOWDRIFT CIDER

LOCAL SIPS

Hand Pickled LEAVENWORTH

LITTLE BAVARIA

PHOTOGRAPH LEFT NATALIA BRATSLAVSKY/SHUTTERSTOCK, RIGHT COURTESY SNOWDRIFT CIDER

A BEAUTIFUL ALPINE SETTING makes Leavenworth an ideal locale for

its colorful Bavarian-themed architecture, many fine shops and restaurants, and window boxes full of pink and red geraniums. Surrounded by the soaring granite peaks of the Stuart Range, the town hosts yearround festivals inspired by Bavaria, including the Christmas Lighting Festival in winter and Maifest (cityofleavenworth.com) in May. In addition to the beer halls and polka concerts, the town is also gaining renown as an outdoor sports capital, offering superb hiking, climbing, skiing, and rafting. The Icicle Gorge Loop Trail (wta.org) makes a great introduction to the Leavenworth outdoors (four miles round-trip, 150 feet of elevation gain, high point 2,800 feet). Leaving the Icicle River Road at 15.3 miles, it passes over a bridge above roaring Icicle Creek, which compresses into a slot canyon, sending up hissing clouds of mist. Walk the trail in spring, summer, or fall, as its lower elevation stays accessible when the high country is still covered with snow. The width and gentle grade make it an excellent choice for first-time hikers, families with small children, and those out for a short, scenic jaunt. The trail passes through stands of pine and Douglas fir, with interpretive signs providing commentary on forest succession, stream habitat, and local wildlife. Halfway through the loop, the trail crosses back over to the east side of the creek and winds through cedar forests with stunning views of the jagged granite spires of the Stuart Range in the distance. The challenging Snow Lake Trail (13 miles round-trip, 4,185 feet of elevation gain, high point 5,500 feet) takes you right to the edge of the Enchantments, a storied high alpine basin with glacier-sculpted rock and dwarf fir and larch trees. After your hike, stop at Gustav’s Beer Garden & Grill (gustavsleavenworth.com) for a burger and Icicle Ale. For Italian fare, try Visconti’s Restaurant (viscontis.com). Then take in world-class music and drama at the Snowy Owl Theater at the Icicle Creek Center for the Arts (icicle.org). Book a trip with Northwest Mountain School (mountainschool.com) to experience exciting rock and mountain climbing in Icicle Creek Canyon and the Stuart Range. Osprey Rafting Company (ospreyrafting.com) offers thrilling tubing and rafting adventures on the Wenatchee River. —NICHOLAS O’CONNELL

The town is also gaining renown as an outdoor sports capital.

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

Some 70 percent of the nation’s apples and nearly half its pears hail from Washington. In North Central Washington, tree fruit is king, so it’s only natural that brewers here use what the good land gave them. In Bavarian village Leavenworth, wine lovers can encounter the charm that is musician-winemaker Rob Newsom and his Boudreaux Cellars (boudreauxcellars. com), as well as a range of ales and lagers from Icicle Brewing Company (icicle brewing.com). In Wenatchee artisan cider house Snowdrift Cider Company (snow driftcider.com) produces hard ciders such as the semi-dry “orchard select” and a sparkling pear “perry.” Also here are a number of wineries, like the Francophile Chateau Faire Le Pont (fairelepont.com). Journey north from Wenatchee on U.S. 97 to Orondo, Chelan, and Manson, where apples are embraced by Orondo Cider Works (orondociderworks.com) and Lake Chelan Winery (lakechelanwinery.com). Take a 20-winery tour around Lake Chelan, visiting KARMA Vineyards Winery (good karmawines.com) for sparkly, and Hard Row to Hoe (hardrow.com) for a jounce through vineyards. In Winthrop, meet the affable Wasson family at Methow Valley Ciderhouse (methowvalleycider house.com) and sample ciders from their five-acre orchard. South across the Cascades in Roslyn is The Brick Saloon (bricksaloon.com), made famous by Northern Exposure. East is Ellensburg WineWorks (ellensburg wineworks.com), which also offers “Hoppy Hours,” and Iron Horse (iron horsebrewery.com), whose downtown micropub has seven of its beers on tap. —ERIN JAMES

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

101


LAKE CHELAN STATE PARK

A trip to Stehekin, your gateway to the North Cascades, is a journey into an unspoiled frontier, forgotten by time and accessible only by boat, float plane, or foot. Stay in the North Cascades Lodge at Stehekin and enjoy the captivating views of glistening snow-covered mountains and the deep, clear waters of Lake Chelan. Reserve your room online at www.lodgeatstehekin.com | 509.682.4494

We offer 165 full hook up sites for RV’s (water, electric, sewer & cable), which will accommodate up to a 40’ RV including 22 sites with 16x16 tent pads for those campers who enjoy sleeping out under the stars. There are picnic tables, a dump station available and ADA accessible restrooms and showers. We also provide free internet access for our guests thru a wireless access point near the Main RV office. The 65 Slip Lakeshore Marina offers quality boat moorage with or without power, in the heart of the city. Pump-out station, launch and ample pay parking are all conveniences offered by the Lakeshore Marina.

DISCOVERIES

Into the Deep From the road, Lake Chelan shimmers in the distance: blue and serene. A patchwork of pear, apple, cherry, and peach orchards and sinuous vineyards cascade toward the lake—a striking combination of outdoor sports and culinary possibility. The 50.5-mile glacier-fed lake is cool, clean, and clear, perfect for swimming. Public beaches—like Lake Chelan State Park and Don Morse Park (parks.wa.gov)— make getting in the water easy. Resorts like Campbell’s Resort (campbellsresort.com) and Darnell’s Lake Resort (darnellsresort. com) offer nearby private alternatives. And then, hidden in the hills, is the tantalizing Slidewaters (slidewaterswaterpark.com), with its 15 rides, slides, and attractions. Those who prefer to troll the lake’s deep, cool depths will discover mackinaw whose rich oily flesh yields some of the finest smoked trout anywhere. Book a trip with Darrell and Dad’s Family Guide Service (darrellanddads.com) to land a monster. All is not water. Duffers will enjoy hitting long drives at the area’s many courses, including Lake Chelan Golf Course (lakechelangolf.com). And the Lake Chelan AVA is gaining acclaim for the satisfying minerality of its wines, which reflect the region’s rocky soil. Don’t miss Benson Vineyards Estate Winery (bensonvineyards.com), Lake Chelan Winery (lakechelanwinery.com), Vin du Lac (vindulac.com), Tsillan Cellars Winery (tsillancellars.com), and Nefarious Cellars (nefariouscellars.com), renowned for smoky syrahs and flinty Rieslings. Pair local wines with Italian-inspired cuisine at Sorrento’s Ristorante (tsillancellars. com/sorrentos-ristorante), which affords commanding views of the lake from its outdoor veranda. —NICHOLAS O’CONNELL

102

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

PHOTOGRAPH BY TUSHARKOLEY/SHUTTERSTOCK

North Cascades National Park


#pickwenatchee

We live a life of abundant choices. Underneath sunny skies we take to the rivers, the trails, the parks, and the loop to paddle, kayak, climb, hike and bike. We enjoy the fruits of our labor in creating fresh meals, award-winning wines and hand crafted brews. We invite you to choose this place; to visit, to explore and to stay.

What will you pick today?

WWW.WENATCHEE.ORG

1.800.572.7753


METHOW VALLEY

GET OUT

The snow came in the night. By morning, a white blanket lay thick and soft as a down comforter over the Methow Valley. My wife and I bundled up our kids, strapped on cross-country skis, and set off to explore the Methow Valley Nordic ski trails system and its 120 miles of inter-connected, groomed trails. Each is distinctive, with beginner trails offering less elevation gain and more advanced trails exploring steeper, wilder terrain. We chose an easy three-mile loop that ended at the Chickadee Trailhead and a shelter serving hot chocolate. Later, I took a long ski along Meadowlark Trail, kicking and gliding along through the timber, then returning to Sun Mountain Lodge (sunmountainlodge.com) for dinner. In spring, this trail system becomes an outstanding mountain biking course. The Twisp River Trail system is great for beginners and intermediate bikers; adrenaline junkies should tackle the Buck Mountain Loop, a winding, thrilling ride through open land and forests of Ponderosa pine. And there’s the other route through the valley, the Methow River, which offers up excellent fly-fishing. Guides such as Globetrouters Guide Service (methowflyfishing .com) will gladly introduce visitors to the pristine stream. In spring, the Methow runs high and wild, attracting river rafters, though in calmer times it is good for a simple float, too. Methow River Raft and Kayak (methowrafting.com) offers a range of tubing, rafting, and kayaking. End your adventure at Winthrop’s Three Fingered Jack’s Saloon (3fingeredjacks. com), the first legal saloon in Washington. Nearby, Trails End Bookstore (trailsend bookstore.com) offers local guidebooks, maps, and handpicked titles in all genres, with specialties in nature and outdoor adventure literature. —NICHOLAS O’CONNELL

104

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

PHOTOGRAPH BY ED STOCKARD/BIG BLUE MARBLE PHOTOGRAPHY

Hit the Trail


509-682-2015 www.darnellsresort.com

HMR

75 315

38

Midtowner Motel 721 E Woodin Avenue Chelan 98816

509-682-4051 www.midtowner.com

HMR

59 139

45

Best Western PLUS Snowcap Lodge 809 W Davis Street Cle Elum 98922

509-674-0200 www.snowcaplodge.com

HMR

99 119

50

Ala Cozy Motel 9988 Hwy. 2 E Coulee City 99115

877-678-2918 www.alacozymotel.com

HMR

57 77

64

  

  

509-632-5596 www.bankslakelodge.com

HMR

60 135

11

  

  

509-632-5364 www.bluelakeresort washington.com

HMR

60 95

12

  

509-632-5565 www.couleelodgeresort.com

HMR

70 125

14

509-632-5664 www.laurentsresort.com

HMR

60 135

19

509-632-5291 www.sunlakesparkresort.com

HMR

80 199

63

800-633-6421 www.columbiariverinn.com

HMR

83 225

35

800-715-7767 www.couleehouse.com

HMR

69 169

61

Crescent Bar Resorts 9217 Red Cliff Drive NW Quincy 98848

509-787-2665 www.crescentbarvacation rentals.com

HMR

175 425

20

Select Rentals 23572 Sunserra Loop #3 Quincy 98848

509-787-1496 www.selectrentals.com

VRH

150 300

877-787-5888 www.suitesatcrescentbay resort.com

HMR

509-932-4300 www.desertaire.com

Banks Lake Lodge and RV Resort 109 N 6th Street Coulee City 99115 Blue Lake Park Resort 31199 Hwy. 17 N Coulee City 99115 Coulee Lodge Resort 33017 Park Lake Road NE Coulee City 99115 Laurent’s Sun Village Resort 33575 Park Lake Road NE Coulee City 99115 Sun Lakes Resort 34228 Park Lake Road NE Coulee City 99115 Columbia River Inn 10 Lincoln Avenue Coulee Dam 99116

CRESCENT BAR

Coulee House Inn & Suites 110 Roosevelt Way Coulee Dam 99116

Suites at Crescent Bay Resort 23758 Crescent Bay Drive NW Quincy 98848 Desert Aire Motel 525 Thunderbird Way S Desert Aire/Mattawa 99349 Sky Deck Motel 138 Miller Avenue Electric City 99123 Sunbanks Lake Resort 57662 Hwy. 155 N Electric City 99123 Ellensburg Quality Inn & Conference Center 1700 Canyon Road Ellensburg 98926 E P H R ATA

f lo dg ing Sta (se ek o f f n d ar e y) pe d g ak u e /pe st Nu ak uni t mb r at er es of un Se it s ea do np Me ag eti e ng /re F ir ep t re l ac at sp e Re ac s t a in r o e om ur a Co n t /l mp o un l g Hi g im e n t ar e o n h-s yb s pe re a i te Mi ed c ro k In t wa er n f a s t Ki t v e/ et ch ac en re fr i ce g et t Ind e u er ato s s oo ni t r rp s o Ou tdo ol or Lo c a p o ol l sh ut t Tel l ev i sio e n Kid - fri en Pe dl y ts all ow Sp a/m ed as Fit sa ne ge ss se ce Sm nte r vic e ok s r e -f re e AD A -f po rie l ic y n Wa t e r dl y vie w

Darnell’s Lake Resort 901 Spader Bay Road Chelan 98816

Best Western Rama Inn 1818 Basin Street SW Ephrata 98823 Ephrata Travelodge 31 Basin Street SW Ephrata 98823 Ivy Chapel Inn Bed and Breakfast 164 D Street SW Ephrata 98823

104

  

 

    

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

 

 

  

 

  

 

  

  

 

110

  

 

   

125 325

14

 

  

  

   

HMR

74 89

24

  

 

800-708-3014 www.skydeckmotel.com

HMR

65 170

21

 

 

888-822-7195 www.sunbanksresort.com

HMR

45 525

48

  

  

 

  

509-925-9800 www.ellensburginn.com

HMR

69 129

106 134

   

  

  

509-754-7111 www.bestwestern.com/ramainn

HMR

59 134

70

     

  

 

509-754-4651 www.travelodge.com

HMR

66 82

28

  

866-991-4815 www.theivychapelinn.com

B&B

85 125

6

  

134

  

 

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

 

 

 

7 N O R TH C E NTR A L

COULEE CITY

Listings are sorted alphabetically, by region and city

eo

HMR = Hotel/Motel/Resort B&B = Bed & Breakfast VRH = Vacation Rental Housing

Typ

ACCOMMODATIONS

 

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

105


Listings are sorted alphabetically, by region and city Sunland Inn 1257 Basin Street SW Ephrata 98823

509-754-5226 www.sunlandinn.com

HMR

45 99

16

  

  

866-633-2860 www.grandcouleemotel.com

HMR

51 150

32

   

  

  

Trailwest Motel 108 Spokane Way Grand Coulee 99133

866-633-8157 www.trailwestmotel.com

HMR

65 110

26

  

  

 

Alpen Rose Inn 500 Alpine Place Leavenworth 98826

509-548-3000 www.alpenroseinn.com

HMR

120 250

15

 

 

800-873-3960 www.alpineriversinn.com

HMR

99 129

27

   

 

Enzian Inn 590 Hwy. 2 Leavenworth 98826

800-223-8511 www.enzianinn.com

HMR

125 155

105

 

 

 

 

  

Icicle Village Resort 505 Hwy. 2 Leavenworth 98826

800-961-0162 www.iciclevillage.com

HMR

130 580

141

        

Mazama Country Inn 15 Country Road Mazama 98833

509-996-2681 www.mazamacountryinn.com

HMR

90 290

18

509-764-7500 www.ameristayinn.com

HMR

77 119

59

   

Best Western PLUS Lake Front Hotel 3000 W Marina Drive Moses Lake 98837

509-765-9211 www.bestwesternwashington.com

HMR

72 140

157

   

Comfort Suites Moses Lake 1700 E Kittleson Road Moses Lake 98837

509-765-3731 www.comfortsuitesmoseslake.com

HMR

109 180

60

 

HMR

45 60

20

L E AV E N W O R T H

Grand Coulee Center Lodge 404 Spokane Way Grand Coulee 99133

MOSES LAKE

N O R TH C E NTR A L

7

Alpine Rivers Inn 1505 Alpensee Strasse Leavenworth 98826

Ameristay Inn & Suites 1157 N Stratford Road Moses Lake 98837

    

  

   

 

      

  

       

      

El Rancho Motel 1214 S Pioneer Way Moses Lake 98837

509-765-9173

Holiday Inn Express 1735 Kittleson Road Moses Lake 98837

509-766-2000 www.hiexpress.com

HMR

80

  

Inn at Moses Lake 1741 E Kittleson Road Moses Lake 98837

509-766-7000 www.innatmoseslake.com

HMR

44

   

  

 

  

  

  

Interstate Inn 2801 W Broadway Avenue Moses Lake 98837

509-765-1777

Lakeshore Resort Motel 3206 W Lakeshore Court Moses Lake 98837

509-765-9201 www.lakeshoreresortmotel.com

Lakeside Motel 802 W Broadway Avenue Moses Lake 98837

509-765-8651

MarDon Resort 8198 Hwy. 262 SE Othello 99344 Motel 6 2822 W Driggs Drive Moses Lake 98837 Motel Imperial 905 W Broadway Avenue Moses Lake 98837 Motel Oasis Inn 466 Melva Lane Moses Lake 98837

106

eo f lo dg ing Sta (se n ek o f f d ar e y) pe d g ak u e /pe st u Nu ak ni t mb r at er es of un Se it s ea do np Me ag eti e ng /re F ir ep t re l ac at sp e Re ac s t a in r o e om ur a Co mp n t /l o un lim ge Hig e o h - s n t ar y b n - si t pe e re a Mi ed c ro k In t wa er n f a s t Ki t v e/ e t ch ac en re fr i ce g et t Ind e u er ato s s oo ni t r rp s oo Ou l tdo or Lo c a p o ol l sh ut t Tel l ev i sio e n Kid - fri en Pe dl y ts all ow Sp a/m ed as Fit sa ne ge ss se ce Sm nte r vic e ok s r e -f r AD A -f ee po rie l i c n Wa y t e r dl y vie w

HMR = Hotel/Motel/Resort B&B = Bed & Breakfast VRH = Vacation Rental Housing

Typ

ACCOMMODATIONS

  

  

 

   

HMR

46 80

30

 

HMR

35 120

33

   

HMR

45 75

21

  

 

800-416-2736 www.mardonresort.com

HMR

48 250

29

  

  

  

509-766-0260 www.motel6.com

HMR

45 72

40

 

  

 

HMR

49 69

40

 

  

  

HMR

40 50

36

   

  

509-765-8626

509-765-8636 www.moteloasisinn.com

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

  


Ramada Inn 1745 E Kittleson Road Moses Lake 98837

HMR

90 130

75

    

509-765-1755 www.sagensandmotel.com

HMR

45 60

37

  

509-765-9317 www.shiloinns.com

HMR

75 145

100

    

Sunland Inn 309 E 3rd Avenue Moses Lake 98837

509-765-1170 www.sunlandinn.com

HMR

43 99

22

Super 8 Motel 449 Melva Lane Moses Lake 98837

509-765-8886 www.super8.com

HMR

65 180

63

Travel Inn at Moses Lake 316 S Pioneer Way Moses Lake 98837

877-765-8631 www.travelinnml.com

HMR

50 90

40

Omak Inn 912 Koala Drive Omak 98841

509-826-3822 www.omakinnwa.com

HMR

63 125

65

a

Cave B Estate Winery and Resort 344 Silica Road NW Quincy 98848

509-787-8000 www.cavebinn.com

HMR

55

  

Country Cabin Motel and RV Park 711 2nd Avenue SW Quincy 98848

509-787-3515 www.countrycabinmotel.com

HMR

509-797-7001 www.knightsinn.com

HMR

Sage N Sand Motel 1011 S Pioneer Way Moses Lake 98837

QUINCY

Shilo Inn Suites 1819 E Kittleson Road Moses Lake 98837

Knights Inn 710 10th Avenue SW Quincy 98848

SOAP LAKE

f lo dg ing Sta (se ek o f f n d ar e y) pe d g ak u e /pe st Nu ak uni t mb r at er es of un Se it s ea do np Me ag eti e ng /re F ir ep t re l ac at sp e Re ac s t a in r o e om ur a Co n t /l mp o un l g Hi g im e n t ar e o n h-s yb s pe re a i te Mi ed c ro k In t wa er n f a s t Ki t v e/ et ch ac en re fr i ce g et t Ind e u er ato s s oo ni t r rp s o Ou tdo ol or Lo c a p o ol l sh ut t Tel l ev i sio e n Kid - fri en Pe dl y ts all ow Sp a/m ed as Fit sa ne ge ss se ce Sm nte r vic e ok s r e -f re e AD A -f po rie l ic y n Wa t e r dl y vie w

509-766-1000 www.ramada.com

Sundowner Motel 414 F Street SE Quincy 98848

509-787-3587

Inn at Soap Lake 226 Main Avenue E Soap Lake 98851

550

call call

  

55

32

509-246-1132 www.innsoaplake.com

HMR

52 135

29

Masters Inn 404 4th Avenue NE Soap Lake 98851

509-246-1831 www.mastersinnsoaplake.com

HMR

42 99

17

Notaras Lodge 236 Main Avenue E Soap Lake 98851

509-246-0462 www.notaraslodge.com

HMR

68 145

15

North Cascades Lodge at Stehekin One Stehekin Landing Stehekin 98852

509-682-4494 www.lodgeatstehekin.com

HMR

228 500

28

Twisp River Suites, LLC 140 W Twisp Avenue Twisp 98856

855-784-8328 www.twispriversuites.com

HMR

109 259

16

Waterville Historic Hotel 102 E Park Street Waterville 98858

509-745-8695 www.watervillehotel.com

HMR

49 109

12

134

509-662-1234 www.coasthotels.com

HMR

99 279

147

58

509-664-6565 www.lq.com

HMR

74 159

65

a a a

21

39 105

La Quinta Inn & Suites 1905 N Wenatchee Avenue Wenatchee 98801

  

a

  

 

  

  

  

 

 

a a a

    

 

  

a

 

  

a a a

 

  

  

        

   

102

  a

  

  

  

   

  

   

   

HMR

Coast Wenatchee Center Hotel 201 N Wenatchee Avenue Wenatchee 98801

  

  

  

   

 

a a a a

a a a a

a a a

   

   

     

    

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

  

7 N O R TH C E NTR A L

MOSES LAKE

Listings are sorted alphabetically, by region and city

eo

HMR = Hotel/Motel/Resort B&B = Bed & Breakfast VRH = Vacation Rental Housing

Typ

ACCOMMODATIONS

  

  

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

107


Wine Country

PHOTOGRAPH BY JANIS MIGLAVS

TRI-CITIES, YAKIMA VALLEY, PROSSER, AND WALLA WALLA

YAKIMA VALLEY

Situated at roughly the same latitude as the storied French wine regions Bordeaux and Burgundy, the Yakima Valley, Tri-Cities, and Walla Walla provide the ultimate taster’s treat. Within an hour’s drive, visitors can sample as many

as eight different American Viticultural Areas and a mindboggling 160 wineries. Another ubiquitous trait? Blue skies: Vineyards (such as Red Willow Vineyard, pictured here) bask under more than 300 days of sunshine each year, meaning anytime’s a good time to raise a glass and celebrate.

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

109


N Wenatchee

• Bale Breaker Brewing Company; Vintner’s Village (p. 17) • Liberty Bottleworks in Union Gap (p. 18) • Antique Mall of Walla Walla; Shady Lawn Antiques (p. 20) • Yakama Nation Museum and Cultural Center (p. 22) • Columbia River Journeys (p. 30)

W I N E C O U NTRY

8 Ellensburg

E

W

WANDER HERE

S

Ritzville

20 mi

410

1 Naches Tieton

82

3

Klickitat R

iver

Toppenish FORT SIMCOE

240

24

2 Zillah Sunnyside

4 Grandview

YAKAMA INDIAN RESERVATION

97

SNIPES MOUNTAIN

HANFORD SITE

395

er

Union Gap

MOUNT ADAMS

Connell

Yakima

RED MOUNTAIN

6

Richland

Pasco

5

Benton City Prosser

Sn a

12

Kennewick

ke

v Ri

Waitsburg

124

SACAJAWEA STATE PARK MCNARY WILDLIFE REFUGE

12

Walla Walla

82 r Columbia Rive

Valley Fair & Rodeo, a rowdy four-day event that includes steer wrestling, wild cow milking, and barrel racing. 1 NACHES Come for apple-bin There’s also a cowboy The first Naches resiraces, a lip-sync compecamp where kids can dents arrived by wagon tition, chainsaw carving, learn how to lasso a in the late 1800s, optand a fishing derby. cow, saddle a horse, 2 ZILLAH ing to set up in the lush and even pan for gold. valley rather than push This town lives up to the only Hop Museum in 5 PROSSER on over the Cascades. its quirky name: Main the U.S., which is fitting Homesteaded by a The orchards they attractions include a seeing as the Yakima Union colonel way back planted flourished—so teapot-shaped building— Valley produces more in 1882, Prosser is now did their little town on a inspired by a presidenthan 75 percent of the surrounded by more river of the same name. tial oil-for-bribes scandal hops in the country. than 30 wineries and Things really get hopin the 1920s—and the The town is also layhas grown into a riverping during Sportsman’s Church of God, Zillah, a ered in history: It has a side destination. During Days in mid-September: house of worship inadmuseum devoted to the one busy September vertently named after railroad. weekend the town 4 GRANDVIEW a colossal Japanese simultaneously hosts lizard. (They’ve run with Named for its views of a hot air balloon rally, 2 the pun and erected a Mounts Rainier and a street painting and replica of the creature Adams, this little comchalk art extravaganza, behind the church.) munity is situated just and a harvest festival. 3 TOPPENISH about halfway between Stroll past food vendors Located just across the Yakima and the Triand artists hawking Yakima River from ZilCities. Every August, the their wares to enjoy the lah, Toppenish boasts town hosts the Yakima small-town vibe.

EXPLORE

Small Towns

110

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

5

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

6 BENTON CITY This city of 3,000 became a green spot in the desert with the arrival of irrigation in the middle of the last century. Wedged in a bend in the Yakima River, it’s a known fishing spot for hooking bass and salmon. If you’re looking for adventures of the Old West sort, visit any of the 30 nearby horseroping arenas.

DON’T MISS

TASTING ROOMS Stop and sip around Naches, Yakima, Zillah, Prosser, Red Mountain, the Tri-Cities (Richland, Pasco, and Kennewick), and Walla Walla. —ANNE LARKIN

PROSSER PHOTOGRAPH BY LIJUAN GUO/SHUTTERSTOCK

Goldendale


YAKIMA VALLEY

UNCORK WALLA WALLA BEYOND THE EDGES of rolling wheat fields, Walla Walla rises out of the

PHOTOGRAPHS FROM TOP: COURTESY VISITYAKIMAVALLEY.ORG, COURTESY WALLAWALLA.ORG, BY GREG LEHMAN

landscape. Washington’s wine industry came of age here, and the town is now home to 100-plus wineries and nearly as many tasting rooms, not to mention the Washington State Wine Awards’ 2014 Restaurant of the Year: The Marc Restaurant at Marcus Whitman Hotel (marcuswhitmanhotel.com). Merlot struts its stuff in Bordeaux blends, and the heat of the valley makes for great syrahs and cabernets that are dense and lush. The best way to get a taste of the area, and to explore Walla Walla Valley, is to make a long weekend of it. The town is split into five regions: In the area west of town—the “vintage loop”— you’ll find winery Long Shadows (longshadows.com), as well as L’Ecole No. 41 (lecole.com) and Woodward Canyon (woodwardcanyon.com), both established in the early ’80s. A contingent of downtown tasting rooms from the likes of Rotie Cellars (rotiecellars.com), Spring Valley Vineyard (springvalleyvineyard.com), and Maison Bleue (mbwinery.com) make for great afternoon strolling, especially paired with a bite at Brasserie Four (brasseriefour.com) or Public House 124 (ph124.com). The airport area has 20-plus tasting rooms—including Dunham (dunhamcellars. com), Buty (butywinery.com), and SYZYGY (syzygywines.com)—many of which reside in converted military buildings. Other pioneers east of town include Abeja (abeja.net), Walla Walla Vintners (wallawallavintners.com), and àMaurice (amaurice. com). To the south are Northstar (northstarwinery.com), Pepper Bridge (pepper bridge.com), Waters (waterswinery.com), and Sleight of Hand (sofhcellars.com). See the town especially decked out for event weekends—spring and fall releases, for WALLA WALLA VINTNERS example—or during Celebrate Walla Walla Valley Wine (June 19–21, celebratewalla walla.squarespace.com). In 2014, more than 60 wineries, a winemaker panel led by Rajat Parr, and industry experts will come together to discuss the history and legacy of syrah, all while celebrating the noble grape’s legacy in the valley with dinners and tasting events. —JULIE H. CASE

LOCAL SIPS

More Pours Some 75 percent of the nation’s hops are grown in Washington, which is also the second-largest premium wine producer in the country. More than one-third of the state’s vineyards are in the Yakima area. Sample rosé at Gilbert Cellars (gilbertcellars.com), bubbles at Treveri (trevericellars.com), or Stumptown beans at North Town Coffeehouse (northtowncoffee.com). Bale Breaker Brewing Company (balebreaker. com) may be a new taproom, but the owners’ grandparents planted hops here in 1932. More can be had along the Yakima Valley Spirits and Hops trail (spiritsandhopstrail.com). In Prosser 10 wineries occupy Vintner’s Village (prosservintnersvillage .com), which has occassional live music on the lawn, and vintners regularly gather at Horse Heaven Hills Brewery (horse heavenhillsbrewery.com). East of town are Chinook Wines (chinookwines.com), one of the state’s founding wineries, and Mercer Estates (mercerwine.com). The state’s smallest AVA, Red Mountain, is known for deep, concentrated reds. Some 15 wineries call this area home, including Fidélitas (fidelitaswines.com), with its palatial views of vineyards, and Col Solare (colsolare.com), the perfect place to catch a sunset and a sip. Multiple wineries greet visitors in the Tri-Cities, including J. Bookwalter (book walterwines.com), with literary-themed wines, and Barnard Griffin (barnard griffin.com), with a glass studio. Walla Walla and its surrounding valley are home to more than 100 wineries, but spirits can still be had from Walla Walla Distilling Company (wallawalladistilling company.com). —JULIE H. CASE

WALLA WALLA

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

111


8

SEEK SCIENCE

Geek Out

112

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

HANFORD B REACTOR

586-square-mile landscape is full of rolling tumbleweeds and scrub brush, with an occasional nuclear reactor building jutting into the skyline. Some 10,000 people tour the reservation every year, with online reservations typically opening in early March. Also open to the public from April 1 through September 30 is Hanford’s B reactor, the world’s first full-scale plutonium-production reactor, built in just 11 months. For a broader view from the bow of a boat, outdoor enthusiasts can paddle the Hanford Reach National Monument (fws.

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

gov/refuge/hanford_reach) in a kayak or hop aboard a jet boat. Science isn’t the only kind of geeking out to be done here. History buffs learn about the intersection of pioneer and Native cultures in small towns such as Toppenish, with its 75 murals; at the Whitman Mission National Historic Site (nps.gov/whmi); and at Fort Walla Walla Museum (fortwallawallamuseum.org). And throughout the year, find Civil War reenactments at parks like Fort Simcoe State Park (parks.wa.gov) and Fulbright Park in Union Gap. —JULIE H. CASE

PHOTOGRAPH BY LARA SEVEN PHILLIPS

W I N E C O U NTRY

Down a two-lane road, at the edge of the Hanford Site nuclear reservation, scientists are attempting to exploit Einstein’s theory of relativity to detect the next collision of black holes. Within twoand-a-half-mile-long arms of tubes and tunnels that stretch at 90-degree angles above ground, they are measuring gravitational disturbances that originate in space with lasers and mirrors. This is the LIGO Hanford Observatory (ligo-wa.caltech.edu), outside Richland, which offers public tours twice a month, annual stargazing events, and other opportunities to interact with science. All this within the Hanford Site (hanford.gov), where some of the plutonium used in the 1945 Fat Man bomb was produced. A serious cleanup effort—and atomic tourism—is all that remains now. The


share the charm

14TWW003 “Walla Walla Hotel & Motel Commission” ad 2014 Washington State Visitors Guide, Insertion Order #51051 4-color, 1/3 pg 4.5625” x 4.75” DVA Advertising and Public Relations dan@dvaadv.com 541-389-2411


8

GET OUT

Indie Scene

114

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

TOPPENISH

(yakimavalleymuseum.org), which showcases more than 45,000 works of art and historic objects, including 15-million-year-old petrified trees and hundreds of Native baskets and pottery. Then there’s Walla Walla, with its Gesa Power House Theatre (powerhousewalla walla.com), in a former power plant. The Walla Walla Chamber Music Festival (wwcmf.org) is held here (and often at wineries around town), and touring bands take to the stage as well, but it has been the Bard who has made the biggest appearance of late. The Blackfriars

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

Theater–inspired interiors—designed to replicate the London playhouse where the poet once staged winter productions—became the home of Shakespeare Walla Walla (shakespearewallawalla. org) in 2011, and there may be no cooler place in the state to see a performance of the masters. Beneath a tin roof and surrounded by brick walls, the company takes the stage year-round, performing masterpieces such as Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest during the spring, then staging the Shakespeare Festival in summer. —JULIE H. CASE

PHOTOGRAPH EGOR GUDAEV

W I N E C O U NTRY

Atop a plateau of fruit orchards rolling toward mountain peaks, artists and doit-yourselfers are laying mosaic tiles, wrapping colorful paper onto piñatas, and stretching wool into felt. This is Mighty Tieton’s (mightytieton. com) Mini Maker Faire, just one of the ways this incubator for artisan businesses is helping bring art to the masses. It’s just one of a handful of events and exhibits open to the public. Also here is the Trimpin Sound Space—full of sculptural contraptions from the renowned sound artist—the annual juried 10x10x10 exhibit, and every December, a Chandelier Festival, featuring some 100 works by artists from around the region. Farther east, in Toppenish, 75 murals invite a stroll, while in Yakima, a blinking collection of neon signs fills a lofty celestroy in the Yakima Valley Museum


Baymont Inn & Suites Kennewick 4220 W 27th Place Kennewick 99337

Comfort Inn 7801 W Quinault Avenue Kennewick 99336

Courtyard by Marriott Richland, Columbia Point 480 Columbia Point Drive Richland 99352

Hampton Inn Richland 486 Bradley Blvd. Richland 99352

Motel 6 Richland 1751 Fowler Street Richland 99352

Red Lion Hotel Columbia Center 1101 N Columbia Center Blvd. Kennewick 99336

Red Lion Hotel Pasco 2525 N 20th Avenue Pasco 99301

Red Lion Hotel Richland 802 George Washington Way Richland 99352

Red Lion Inn & Suites Kennewick 602 N Young Street Kennewick 99336

WA L L A WA L L A

Shilo Inn Suites Hotel 50 Comstock Street Richland 99352

Americas Best Value Inn 305 N 2nd Avenue Walla Walla 99362

Best Western PLUS Walla Walla Suites Inn 7 E Oak Street Walla Walla 99362

La Quinta Inn 520 N 2nd Avenue Walla Walla 99362

Marcus Whitman Hotel 6 W Rose Street Walla Walla 99362

Red Lion Inn & Suites 325 E Main Street Walla Walla 99362

Ledgestone Hotel 107 N Fair Avenue Yakima 98901

Red Lion Hotel Yakima Center 607 E Yakima Avenue Yakima 98901

f lo dg ing Sta (se ek o f f n d ar e y) pe d g ak u e /pe st Nu ak uni t mb r at er es of un Se it s ea do np Me ag eti e ng /re F ir ep t re l ac at sp e Re ac s t a in r o e om ur a Co n t /l mp o un l g Hi g im e n t ar e o n h-s yb s pe re a i te Mi ed c ro k In t wa er n f a s t Ki t v e/ et ch ac en re fr i ce g et t Ind e u er ato s s oo ni t r rp s o Ou tdo ol or Lo c a p o ol l sh ut t Tel le ev is Kid ion - fri en Pe dl y ts all ow Sp a/m ed as Fit sa ne ge ss se ce Sm nte r vic e ok s r e -f re e AD A -f po rie l ic y n Wa t e r dl y vie w

509-736-3326 www.baymontinns.com

HMR

509-783-8396 www.comfortinn.com/hotelkennewick-washington-WA701

HMR

69 169

56

509-942-9400 www.richlandmarriott.com

HMR

114 199

120 134

a

509-943-4400 www.hamptoninnrichland.com

HMR

109 169

130

509-783-1250 www.motel6.com

HMR

40 60

93

131

509-783-0611 www.redlion.com/columbiacenter

HMR

99 139

182

4

509-547-0701 www.redlion.com/pasco

HMR

99 139

279

509-946-7611 www.redlion.com/richland

HMR

99 139

509-396-9979 www.redlion.com/kennewick

HRM

95 155

509-946-4661 www.shiloinns.com

HMR

69 169

888-529-4161 www.americasbestvalueinn.com

HMR

509- 525-4700 www.bestwestern.com

HMR

79 149

77

509-525-2522 www.laquintawallawalla.com

HMR

69 159

61

866-826-9422 www.marcuswhitmanhotel.com

HMR

129 369

127 112

509-529-4360 www.redlion.com/our-hotels/ washington/walla-walla/

HMR

65 159

83

509-453-3151 www.yakimawahotel.com

HMR

99 110

110

509-248-5900 www.redlion.com/yakimacenter

HMR

80 130

156

53

a

  

  

  

  

  

 

a a

a

a a

a a a a

  

  

   

 

 

4

 

149

4

 

61

4

150 131

56

  

  

  

   

  

  

    

    

  

  

    

  

  

  

  

 

  

 

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

   

  

  

  

37

4

  

  

  

 

  

  

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

8 W I N E C O U NTRY

TRI CITIES

Listings are sorted alphabetically, by region and city

eo

HMR = Hotel/Motel/Resort B&B = Bed & Breakfast VRH = Vacation Rental Housing

Typ

ACCOMMODATIONS

115


Celebrating 100 years of world-class hospitality in 2014. davenporthotelcollection.com • 800.899.1482

Spokane, WA


Northeast

PHOTOGRAPH BY ERIC STRATE

SPOKANE AND THE INLAND NORTHWEST

SPOKANE

Some call the northeast corner of the state Washington’s final frontier, where untamed lands roll from soaring mountains to sprawling valleys to dense forest glades. Grizzly bears and caribou still roam the SalmoPriest Wilderness, while Ice

Age glaciers were responsible for carving three deep valleys into Colville National Forest. Bucking the backcountry trend is Spokane, the state’s second-largest city and home to everything from a groundbreaking distillery to a bustling nightlife scene.

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

117


C CA AN NA AD DA A Laurier

9

N

Northport 25

COLVILLE NATIONAL FOREST

Marcus

2

Kettle Falls

Colville

WANDER HERE

20 mi

er iv lle R

20

Orei

N O R TH EAS T

1 Republic

31

Pend

Tonasket

S

Metaline Falls

395

20

LAKE ROOSEVELT

• 49 Degrees North; Mt. Spokane (p. 16) • Bloomsday 12k (p. 17) • Dry Fly Distillery (p. 18) • Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture (p. 22) • Grand Coulee Dam tours; houseboating on Lake Roosevelt (p. 30) • ElkFest (p. 38)

20

Gifford

3

21

49° NORTH MOUNTAIN RESORT

Chewelah

Usk

5 Newport 2

I D A H O

25 231

Grand Coulee

395

MOUNT SPOKANE

FORT SPOKANE

Colbert

174

Spokane River

Wilbur

6

2

Davenport

Coulee City 21

Spokane

Metaline Falls School (now the Cutter Theatre), still stand. The theater even features a library, an art gallery, 1 REPUBLIC tree, Colville is home and live performances Founded as Eureka to a wealth of hiking, on its stage. 5 NEWPORT after an 1896 gold mountain biking, and rush, Republic retains ski trails. Originally in Idaho, this its pioneer charm to this 3 CHEWELAH river and lumber town 4 METALINE FALLS day. You may not find This Colville Valley comrelocated to Washington traffic lights or chain munity is the gateway after the local post 6 Perched on the banks stores here, but you can to the Flowery Trail, a of the Pend Oreille office moved there. find an organic bakery, scenic mountain road. River and surrounded Many of its historic artifamily-owned brewpub, Head for the hills to by lofty peaks, tiny facts are on display at and the renowned the 49 Degrees North Metaline Falls was the the Pend Oreille County Stonerose Interpretive Mountain Resort, or stay site of a cement plant Historical Society and Center and Eocene Fos- in town to try your luck for 75 years. The comMuseum, adjacent to sil Site among historic at the Chewelah Casino. munity was consistently Centennial Plaza, which buildings graced with Chewelah Museum’s col- covered in dust—which is housed in the original murals. lection of photographs, would harden in wet Idaho & Washington 2 COLVILLE letters, and historic arti- weather. Today more Northern depot from Located in a broad valfacts captures the area’s than a dozen historic 1908. Newport’s downley surrounded by the pioneer spirit, while a structures, including the town invites leisurely Colville National Forest, stroll through downtown old cement plant, the strolls, while the nearby provider of the 2013 is all it takes to soak up 1906-era Washington Wolf Donation Trails is a National Christmas the quaint feel. Hotel, and the 1912 scenic spot for a hike.

Small Towns

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

Liberty Lake

Cheney 195

Odessa

EXPLORE

Spokane Valley

Airway Heights

90

28

118

E

W

4

1

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

6 DAVENPORT Surrounded by rolling wheat fields, basaltic coulees, and pothole lakes, Davenport captures the essence of the Columbia Plateau. The Lincoln County Historical Museum, with its railroad and farming memorabilia, and the 1880s frontier army post Fort Spokane preserve the community’s past. Celebrate its rich heritage at Pioneer Days in July, plus the Vintage Harvest Demonstration and the Lincoln County Fair, which has a stellar rodeo, in August.

—CRAIG ROMANO

Coeur d’Alene


SALMO-PRIEST WILDERNESS

NECTAR TASTING ROOM

LOCAL SIPS

Drams Near Dams

INLAND NORTHWEST

PHOTOGRAPH LEFT BY JOHNATHAN ESPER/DREAMSTIME.COM, RIGHT COURTESY VISIT SPOKANE

STARE IN ANY DIRECTION from 5,575-foot Sherman Pass, the highest

highway pass in the state, and behold Washington’s final frontier. The northeast corner of the state is a rural patchwork full of small towns, lofty mountains, and wide-open spaces. State Route 20 traverses this final frontier from Tonasket to Newport, undulating between deep valleys and forested highlands. Travel it discovering scenic, historical, and cultural surprises around every bend. Hike sections of the Pacific Northwest National Scenic Trail (pnt.org), exploring century-old fire lookouts among the oldest in the country on Mount Bonaparte and Columbia Mountain. Wander on lonely trails deep into the sprawling, mountainous Salmo-Priest Wilderness, home to endangered mountain caribou and grizzly bears. Camp at the Colville National Forest’s (fs.usda.gov/colville) Sullivan Lake among golden aspens and larches, or on the piney shores of Curlew Lake State Park (parks.wa.gov). Go bird-watching on the Little Pend Oreille National Wildlife Refuge’s (fws.gov/ littlependoreille) nature trails in the rolling hills southeast of Colville. Return in winter to cross-country ski across snow-shrouded meadows and glades. Dig up the distant past searching for fossils at Republic’s Stonerose Interpretive Center and Eocene Fossil Site (stonerosefossil.org). Catch a taste of cowboy life at the nearby K Diamond K Guest Ranch (kdiamondk.com). Poke around old ghost towns near Wauconda Pass, or stop at interpretive sites displaying an old log flume and Civilian Conservation Corps-era Camp Growden along the Sherman Pass Scenic Byway (wsdot.wa.gov). Amble around Saint Paul’s Mission near Kettle Falls, an 1847 chapel built by Jesuit TRIP TIP missionaries and Native peoples at the confluence of the Kettle SR 20 joins SR 31 as part of the 280and Columbia Rivers. mile International Canoe, kayak, or raft those great rivers, tracing fur-trading Selkirk Loop; selkirkloop.org. routes from the 19th century. Great adventures await, too, on the Pend Oreille River. Near Metaline Falls, kayak the Boundary Dam Reservoir to the base of 200-foot Peewee Falls careening down a rock face. Or take a train ride on the Pend Oreille Valley Railroad (povarr.com) from the Ione Depot through Box Canyon, hovering across lofty trestles and hugging sheer cliffs. —CRAIG ROMANO WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

The area’s northeast beverage makers have come of age. Colbert’s Townshend Cellar (townshendcellar.com) harvested its 15th vintage in 2013, Spokane Valley’s Twelve String Brewing (12stringbrewingco. com) has up to 19 craft brews on tap, and Spokane-based Dry Fly Distillery (dryfly distilling.com) was the first distillery in the state after Prohibition. Also in Spokane, find brown liquor at Zola (zolainspokane.com), specialty drinks at Wild Sage (wildsagebistro.com), a farmto-cup approach at Roast House Coffee (roasthouse.net), and—if you’re lucky— cocktail legend Paul Harrington at Clover (cloverspokane.com). Breweries pack this area, too. No-Li (nolibrewhouse.com) celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2013, and Viking Bar & Grill (vikingbarandgrill.com) provides on-tap and in-bottle local brews. Orlison Brewing Co. (orlisonbrewing.com) in Airway Heights is known for its Clem’s Gold lager, while Northern Ales (northernales. com) produces IPAs and dark ales in Kettle Falls and Republic’s Republic Brewing Company (republicbrew.com) has eight rotating taps and a variety of sodas. Oenophiles can sample sips from five wineries at Spokane’s Nectar Tasting Room (drinknectar.com), taste the fruit of Red Mountain and Walla Walla at Liberty Lake Wine Cellars (libertylakewinecellars. com), or try Bordeaux blends at Spokane’s Barrister Winery (barristerwinery.com). Want to experience it all? The Spokane Cork & Keg Festival (spokanecorkandkeg .com) pours tastes of local wines and brews every year. —ERIN JAMES

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

119


Ice Age Floods and Wooly Mammoths • Spokane Tribe of Indians • Julyamsh and Pow Wows • Bing Crosby and Mildred Bailey • Balazs and Kienholz • Spokane’s Chinatown

HOOPFEST

Spokane’s Kentucky Derby Winner • US Army and Indian Wars • Stagecoaches and Combines • Natatorium Park and Streetcars • Coeur d’Alene Tribe • Timber, Wheat and Wine • Forts Walla

Discover the History, Glover and JamesTribal Chase • 100+ Year-old Companies • Kalispel Cultures Tribe of Indians • Inventors and Innovators • Victorian Fashion and• Art of the and Everyday Clothes Chief Spokane Garry • Bloomsday and Community Gatherings • Buffalo Soldiers and Fairchild Inland Northwest. Walla, Spokane and George Wright • Campbell, Cannon,

Suffrage and Father’s Day • Ms. Tokushima and Sister Cities • Silver Valley Mines, Railroads and Labor Unrest • Confederated Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture

Tribes of the Colville Reservations • Historic Davenport Hotel • 1 mile west of downtown Spokane Renovated Fox Theater and The Bing • Miss Spokane Promotes Presenting Sponsor

the Inland Northwest • Jaco Finlay and Spokane House • May Arkwright Hutton and Kirtland Cutter • Felts and Geiger Fields

Join us for sweet dreams and warm cookies.

DoubleTree by Hilton. Where the little things mean everything.™

Hilton HHonors membership earning of Points & Miles and redemption of points are subject to HHonors Terms and Conditions. ©2013 Hilton Worldwide

120

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

So Spokane Most cities are defined by what they carve out of nature, but Spokane is all about how it seamlessly blends into it. City Hall is a stone’s throw from Spokane Falls, the nation’s second-largest urban waterfall. River Park Square (river parksquare.com), a vibrant shopping hub, overlooks the Spokane River’s free-flowing waters. And Riverfront Park (spokaneriver frontpark.com), created in 1974 when Spokane became the smallest city to host the World’s Fair, has 100 acres of tranquility and wildlife in the heart of downtown. Nearby, five ski mountains, pristine hiking in the Spokane River Gorge, and miles of epic single-track in 14,000-acre Riverside State Park (parks.wa.gov) make Spokane an urban trailhead. Downtown lights up with art, music, and restaurants during First Friday (down townspokane.org). Catch Broadway shows at INB Performing Arts Center (inbpac. com), and rock out at the Knitting Factory (knittingfactory.com), one of the area’s coolest music venues. Explore trendy neighborhoods such as the South Perry District, with its hip Thursday farmers market (one of several around town), and Browne’s Addition— home to the Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture (northwestmuseum.org). While you’re here, don’t miss a trip on Riverfront Park’s SkyRide, a gondola that whisks you high above Spokane Falls for sweeping views of the city. Another way to explore? Try an annual festival. The Bloomsday Run (May 4, blooms dayrun.org) is one of America’s largest footraces; Hoopfest (June 28–29, spokane hoopfest.net) is the world’s biggest threeon-three basketball tournament; and Spokefest (September 7, spokefest.org) is all about cycling. —JACOB BAYNHAM

PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY VISIT SPOKANE

AFB • Watering the West with Grand Coulee Dam • Women’s

DISCOVERIES


SOMEWHERE IN T HE NEIGHBORHOOD

OF UNIQUE, FUN AND EXCITING.

Spokane’s hip downtown is surrounded by thriving communities. Diverse recreation in Spokane Valley. Wildlife watching in Cheney. Liberty Lake’s award-winning golf. And Spokane’s eclectic neighborhoods are filled with memories waiting to be made. Find international flavor in East Central and a great farmers market in South Perry. Experience the artsy Boho chic of Browne’s Addition or the art deco vibe of the Garland District. Come. Spend a few days with us, and find yourself in the neighborhood of something memorable. Just call us at 1.888.SPOKANE or find us at VisitSpokane.com


Reflection Lake, Mt. Rainier National Park

Do you dream of majestic peaks, captivating sunsets or a stroll through a quiet vineyard? Washington State is full of memorymaking adventures. So whether you’re a first-time visitor or resident expert, start your adventures at experiencewa.com.

Start your adventure at experiencewa.com


Kettle Falls Inn 205 E 3rd Avenue Kettle Falls 99141

HMR

65 75

24

888-345-5355 www.kdiamondk.com

HMR

95 179

12

Apple Tree Inn 9508 N Division Street Spokane 99218

509-466-3020 www.appletreeinnmotel.com

HMR

50 100

71

The Davenport Hotel & Tower 10 S Post Street Spokane 99201

509-455-8888 www.thedavenporthotel.com

HMR

125 325

611 116

509-455-9600 www.spokane.doubletree.com

HMR

99 189

375 120

  

  

HMR

49 59

132

  

  

509-747-1100 www.hamptoninnspokane.com

HMR

109 225

129

   

  

  

509-244-5866 www.spokaneairport.hgi.com

HMR

139 219

120

 

  

  

Holiday Inn Spokane Airport 1616 S Windsor Drive Spokane 99224

509-838-1170 www.hispokane.com

HMR

109 139

122

 

  

  

Hotel Lusso 808 W Sprague Avenue Spokane 99201

509-747-9750 www.hotellusso.com

HMR

100 249

48

  

  

509-838-8504 www.hojo.com

HMR

  

   

  

509-926-5399 www.motel6.com

HMR

44 70

130 131

 

  

509-481-6000 www.northernquest.com

HMR

119 199

250 138

509-467-4900 www.qualityinnoakwood.com

HMR

99 159

131

Ramada Limited Suites Spokane N 9601 Newport Hwy. Spokane 99218

509-468-4201 www.ramada.com

HMR

Ramada Spokane Airport and Indoor Water Park 8909 W Airport Drive Spokane 99219

509-838-5211 www.ramada.com

HMR

509-924-9000 www.mirabeauparkhotel.com

HMR

509-924-3838 www.ramada.com

HMR

DoubleTree by Hilton Spokane City Center 322 N Spokane Falls Court Spokane 99201 Econo Lodge Inn & Suites 1503 S Rustle Road Spokane 99224 Hampton Inn Spokane Airport 2010 S Assembly Road Spokane 99224 Hilton Garden Inn Spokane Airport 9015 W Hwy. 2 Spokane 99224

Howard Johnson Spokane Downtown 123 S Post Street Spokane 99201 Motel 6 Spokane - East 1919 N Hutchinson Road Spokane 99212 Northern Quest Resort & Casino 100 N Hayford Airway Heights 99001 Quality Inn Oakwood 7919 N Division Street Spokane 99208

Mirabeau Park Hotel & Convention Center 1100 N Sullivan Road Spokane Valley 99037 Ramada Spokane Valley 905 N Sullivan Road Spokane Valley 99037

509-747-2021 www.econolodge.com

  

 

 

  

 

  

   

       

50

89 129

   

 

  

  

  

76

  

  

  

161

 

 

  

236 121

  

76

   

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

  

    

  

   

 

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

9 N O R TH E A S T

509-738-6514 www.kettlefallsinn.com

K Diamond K Guest Ranch 15661 Hwy. 21 S Republic 99166 SPOKANE

f lo dg ing Sta (se ek o f f n d ar e y) pe d g ak u e /pe st Nu ak uni t mb r at er es of un Se it s ea do np Me ag eti e ng /re F ir ep t re l ac at sp e Re ac s t a in r o e om ur a Co n t /l mp o un l g Hi g im e n t ar e o n h-s yb s pe re a i te Mi ed c ro k In t wa er n f a s t Ki t v e/ et ch ac en re fr i ce g et t Ind e u er ato s s oo ni t r rp s o Ou tdo ol or Lo c a p o ol l sh ut t Tel le ev is Kid ion - fri en Pe dl y ts all ow Sp a/m ed as Fit sa ne ge ss se ce Sm nte r vic e ok s r e -f re e AD A -f po rie l ic y n Wa t e r dl y vie w

Listings are sorted alphabetically, by region and city

eo

HMR = Hotel/Motel/Resort B&B = Bed & Breakfast VRH = Vacation Rental Housing

Typ

ACCOMMODATIONS

123


from landscapes to

GRANDSCAPES!

Photo by Niels Nielsen 

There is no other place on the planet like the Palouse. And Pullman is home to great wineries and breweries, world class golf, 35 miles of paved biking trails, PAC 12 Athletics and the National Lentil Festival. Get your FREE Activities Guide, pack your boots and camera, and plan your expedition today!

pullmanchamber.com—800-365-6948

Pullman, WA—The Picture Perfect Palouse


Southeast

PHOTOGRAPH BY KAN KHAMPANYA/SHUTTERSTOCK

THE PALOUSE AND SNAKE RIVER COUNTRY

PALOUSE FALLS

This February, the roughly 186-foot Palouse Falls became Washington’s official waterfall. The falls are not all that makes the eastern quadrant of the state a favorite of photographers. The region is home to spectacular silt-and-sand

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

dunes, covered in grasses, which form the picturesque Palouse Prairie. Here, too, are rolling wheat and legume fields, the wild channeled scablands, the fertile hills and prairies around the Snake River, and land grant school Washington State University.

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

125


To Spokane

N E

W S

10

90

Moses Lake

Rosalia

Lamont

Ritzville

S O U TH E A S T

1 Tekoa

195

20 mi 23 STEPTOE BUTTE

Palouse River 395 261

2

3 Colfax

Othello 26

WAWAWAI PARK

261 12

Pomeroy Clarkston

6

5

Dayton

Asotin 129

Waitsburg BLUEWOOD SKI RESORT

convent next door has been converted into a quaint B&B. 5 ASOTIN A Nez Perce word for 1 TEKOA of town, this is an the freshwater eels that Tucked at the base artsy haven amid the used to run aplenty in of a mountain of the agriculture. The Bank a nearby creek, riversame name, this town Left Gallery, housed in side hamlet Asotin still of 800 marks the end an old—you guessed sports steelhead, sturof the 300-mile John it—bank, showcases which commemorates geon, bass, and more in Wayne Pioneer Trail that regional artists in a the 1988 rematch of a the Snake River. Don’t traces a former railway sunny space adjacent 1938 high-school rivalry miss The Clucking Hen, from the Cascades to to a Euro-style tearoom. game. On the other where proudly kitschy the Idaho border. In Across the street, The end of the spectrum: antiques and local chitthe middle of town is Green Frog Cafe, a colthe Perkins House, a chat run aplenty. the Empire Theatre, a orful joint with locally restored Victorian, hosts 6 DAYTON restored 1940s art deco famous sandwiches on its 42nd annual ice Old-time Dayton, with space that now hosts homemade bread, hosts cream social in June. its 100-plus historic 4 UNIONTOWN movies, music, and the monthly open mics. buildings, is a little slice 3 COLFAX Small Town American Incorporated in 1879, of the Columbia County Idol competition during The award for strangwee Uniontown is espe- of yore. The town holds the summer’s Slippery est attraction goes cially winsome with its a beautifully restored Gulch Celebration. to the Codger Pole, a early-1900s buildings in depot (the oldest surviv2 PALOUSE 65-foot-tall wooden downtown.The gorgeous ing one in the state), Named for the region pole with the faces of St. Boniface Church, and the Boldman House and the river that runs 51 golden-aged football built in 1905, is not to Museum, an 1880 through the middle players carved into it, be missed. Plus, the Victorian that’s being

6

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

HELLS CANYON NATIONAL RECREATION AREA FIELDS SPRING STATE PARK

brought back to its former glory. 7 WAITSBURG Seeing as this 1,200-person town is still operating under its territorial charter, circa 1886, it’s only right that every September Waitsburg holds a hopping Fall Festival. Relive those days with demos on churning butter, making candles, and sewing sacks for wheat. If you miss the festivities, though, Preston Avenue has a lost-in-time look year-round with everything from a custom leather shop to an award-winning brewery. —ANNE LARKIN

PHOTOGRAPH BY PETER LEWIS

7

EXPLORE

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

4

Uniontown

Walla Walla

126

Pullman

iver

LYONS FERRY STATE PARK

Tri-Cities

Small Towns

Snake R

I D A H O

• Bluewood (p. 16) • Palouse Brand lentils (p. 18) • Confluence Project at Chief Timothy Park (p. 22) • Birdfest; Othello’s Sandhill Crane Festival; (p. 22) • Jet-boating in Hells Canyon (p. 30)

Dusty

127

PALOUSE FALLS

WANDER HERE

26

Lacrosse

Washtucna

Palouse KAMIAK BUTTE


HELLS CANYON

JIMGERMANBAR

LOCAL SIPS

The Potable Palouse

HELLS BENT

PHOTOGRAPH LEFT BY THINAIR28/ISTOCKPHOTO.COM, RIGHT BY ALI WALKER

THERE’S NO CONTEST when it comes to the depths of Hells Canyon’s

black-and-buff walls. The Snake River, which separates the southeast corner of the state from Idaho before veering west at Clarkston, rushes along 8,000 feet below Idaho’s He Devil Peak, making Hells Canyon the deepest river gorge in North America—2,000 feet deeper than the Grand Canyon. Hells Canyon is also a lot less crowded than its Arizona counterpart. It has seen a lot of action since people first moved into the area 7,000 years ago—mining, ranching, the Nez Perce Indians’ crossing on their flight toward Canada—but it still feels remote. “I’ve taken several tours with folks who were just astonished at how rugged and remote it is,” says Dan Ermovick, recreation manager for the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest (fs.usda.gov/wallowa-whitman), which oversees the 652,000-acre Hells Canyon National Recreation Area. In Washington, helpful first stops are the Hells Canyon Visitor Bureau (visitlcvalley.com) and the National Forest office in Clarkston (2535 Riverside Dr). You can see the knife-blade peaks of the Seven Devils Mountains and the baked landscape between them from viewpoints off the paved Hells Canyon Scenic Byway (hellscanyonbyway.com), along the canyon’s west side. To explore the canyon’s depths, though, travel by water. Jet-boat tours run from the Clarkston area, where aluminum craft with big engines ply the river all year, taking visitors to see ancient petroglyphs and area wildlife. Backcountry enthusiasts can hike or ride horses all the way from the rim to the bottom, but this is not for the timid or inexperienced; go with a guided trip if you’re not familiar with the area. Easier trails skirt TRIP TIP Don’t float? Seathe river’s edge near the half-dozen or so primitive campgrounds plane tours also along the river (there are more up top). trace the Snake Ermovick’s tips for a trip to Hells Canyon: Pack for all kinds River deep into Hells Canyon. of weather, and remember that temperatures vary a lot with altitude. Plan ahead—cell phone coverage is spotty to nonexistent, so make sure you have maps, supplies, and a plan before you go into the backcountry. Bring a camera (in a waterproof case if you’ll be boating), wildlife identification guides, a GPS unit, and especially binoculars, since you could spot anything from mountain goats to black bears to bighorn sheep. —CHRISTY KARRAS WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

The state’s great wine regions may be just a few miles away, but the hills of the Palouse hold something special for imbibers: The wheat that makes the backbone of so many great Washington spirits often comes from this area. Locals make the most of state fruit, too. In Pullman, Whiskey Barrel Cider Company (whiskeybarrelcider.com) is producing cider from Washington apples and serving it regularly at The Cider House (588 SE Bishop, Ste G). In Dayton, Mace Mead Works (macemead works.com) brews handcrafted honey wines from local wildflower honey and serves them by the bottle or glass. Down the road, in an old train depot, Dumas Station Wines (dumasstation.com) pours its line of Walla Walla Valley red wines. Also in Dayton, at Monteillet Fromagerie (monteilletcheese.com), owner Joan pairs whatever is fresh from her goats with a variety of local wines. Then there’s Waitsburg, home to Laht Neppur (lahtneppur.com) brewery— winner of a 2013 Washington Beer Awards gold medal for its Backseat Blonde—and to a main street dotted with establishments dedicated to local flavors. Charles Smith’s The Anchor Bar (theanchorbar. net) is here with beer, booze, and live acts, as is the Southern comfort food– loving Whoopemup Hollow Cafe (whoop emuphollowcafe.com), which carries a host of local wines. But it’s across the street, at Jimgermanbar (jimgermanbar. com), that you’ll find the most intriguing cocktails in town. Order from a list that strongly favors local spirits, or ask them to concoct som thing special for you. —JULIE H. CASE

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

127


S O U TH E A S T

Picturesque Palouse Tucked in the heart of the rolling Palouse hills is Pullman, home to nearly 30,000 residents; Washington State University; a 4,500-pound bronze cougar; and, once a year, a very large bowl of chili. The undulating hills surrounding town are ancient silt dunes blown in during the Ice Age—now perfect for growing wheat and legumes, starring in gorgeous photos, and exploring by air or bike. The loopy roads winding through the fertile countryside are ideal for all kinds of cyclists; the more hard-core can enjoy climbing up to the top of Steptoe Butte (parks.wa.gov), a 3,612-foot quartzite hunk sticking out of the surrounding basalt. It’s 32 miles from Pullman and a 1,000-foot elevation change to the top. Some bold folk even hang-glide or paraglide from here for a full aerial view of

THE PALOUSE

the rippling landscape. A little easier but just as nice is the Bill Chipman Palouse Trail—eight paved miles past the state border to Moscow, Idaho. After a roundtrip, reward yourself at Paradise Creek Brewery (paradisecreekbrewery.com), housed in Pullman’s former 1930s post office. The brewpub makes a mean lamb burger and a citrus-leaning Hop Hammer Rye IPA. The next day, get cultured at Washington State University’s Museum of Art

LEWISTON, ID

SHOPPING and DINING

WINERIES and BREWERIES

HISTORY and CULTURE

HellsCanyonVisitorBureau

128

CLARKSTON, WA

HELLS CANYON ADVENTURES

877.774.7248 hellscanyonvisitor.com @HellsCanyon

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

(museum.wsu.edu), where the collection ranges from 19th-century English prints to paintings by Washington’s own Kenneth Callahan, as well as new works from near and far. (Stay tuned: a $5 million donation has set plans in motion for a grand new museum.) While on campus, don’t miss the shiny cougar statue outside Martin Stadium (wsu cougars.com). Post-art, do as the Cougs do and pop down to Cougar Country Drive In (cougarcountrydrivein.com), a 40-year-old institution beloved for its old-school burgers and Dandy Bars, awesome candy-dipped ice cream pucks. Come late August, Pullman really comes alive with the National Lentil Festival (lentilfest.com), a two-day celebration featuring sunshiney live music, legume-themed food, the Tour de Lentil bike ride, and—of course—the world’s largest bowl of lentil chili. Stirred with an oar and served to the masses, it’s the true taste of Pullman. —ANNE LARKIN

MILES and MILES OF RIVER RECREATION

FAMILY FUN

800.933.2128 lcvalleychamber.org lcvalleychamber

@lcvchamber

PHOTOGRAPH BY LIJUAN GUO/SHUTTERSTOCK

10

GET OUT


Holiday Inn Express Hotel & Suites Pullman 1190 SE Bishop Blvd. Pullman 99163

f lo dg ing Sta (se ek o f f n d ar e y) pe d g ak u e /pe st Nu ak uni t mb r at er es of un Se it s ea do np Me ag eti e ng /re F ir ep t re l ac at sp e Re ac s t a in r o e om ur a Co n t /l mp o un l g Hi g im e n t ar e o n h-s yb s pe re a i te Mi ed c ro k In t wa er n f a s t Ki t v e/ et ch ac en re fr i ce g et t Ind e u er ato s s oo ni t r rp s o Ou tdo ol or Lo c a p o ol l sh ut t Tel l ev i sio e n Kid - fri en Pe dl y ts all ow Sp a/m ed as Fit sa ne ge ss se ce Sm nte r vic e ok s r e -f re e AD A -f po rie l ic y n Wa t e r dl y vie w

888-465-4329 www.hiexpress.com/pullmanwa

HMR

109 199

130 135

  

Quality Inn Paradise Creek 1400 SE Bishop Blvd. Pullman 99163

509-332-0500 www.qualityinn.com/hotelpullman-washington-WA015

HMR

79 179

66

  

Residence Inn by Marriott - Pullman 1255 NE North Fairway Road Pullman 99163

509-332-4400 www.wsuresidenceinn.com

HMR

119 299

131 135

COULEE CITY

  

        

     

   

  

425-747-9181 www.trailerinnsrv.com/seattle

25 48

100

   

509-682-8023 www.chelancityparks.com

28 44

165

  

Blue Lake Park Resort 31199 Hwy. 17 N Coulee City 99115

509-632-5364 www.bluelakeresort washington.com

24 24

81

       

Coulee City Community Park South End of Banks Lake Coulee City 99115

509-632-5331 www.couleecity.com

25 30

155

     

509-632-5565 www.couleelodgeresort.com

27 30

35

       

  

509-632-5664 www.laurentsresort.com

28 28

96

 

509-632-5291 www.sunlakesparkresort.com

25 42

119

   

877-444-6777 www.recreation.gov

5 53

87

509-633-2671 www.couleeplayland.com

18 99

65

       

        

888-226-7688 www.parks.wa.gov

16 36

211

    

   

509-754-5102 www.oasisrvandgolfresort.com

20 30

72

   

     

  

509-787-0105 www.sunbasinrvpark.com

20 25

26

   

  

  

Sunnysprings Resort and Campground 5707 Hwy. 28 W Ephrata 98823

800-422-8447 www.sunnysprings.com

25 35

78

   

       

  

Cedars RV Resort 6335 Portal Way Ferndale 98248

360-384-2622 www.htr.ca/thecedars

30 41

167

   

  

City of Chelan Lakeshore RV Park & Marina 619 W Manson Hwy. Chelan 98816

Coulee Lodge Resort 33017 Park Lake Road NE Coulee City 99115 Laurent’s Sun Village Resort 33575 Park Lake Road NE Coulee City 99115 Sun Lakes Resort 34228 Park Lake Road NE Coulee City 99115 Spring Canyon Campground 1008 Crest Drive Coulee Dam 99116 Coulee Playland Resort 401 Coulee Blvd. E Electric City 99123 Steamboat Rock State Park 51052 Hwy. 155 N Electric City 99123 E P H R ATA

   

Sta o f f n d ar pe d ra ak t e /p ea kr Nu ate mb s er of s p Fu ac ll h es oo k- u Du ps mp sta tio Sh no ow er s rs ew Pe er ts all o we Wa d ter vie w Pu ll - t hr o ug Ca h b in /co tta Gr oc ge er i ren es t al Po /ic s o l/ e/p sw rop im Ye an mi areo ng rou n-s nd i te Pic av ni c ar e ai l ab i Gr li t y a ou pr Ten eser v tc ati am on s p in Bo g at ren t al Fis hin gb ai t Pla /t a yg r ck ou le nd La on un - si dr y te Toi let

RV PARKS & CAMPGROUNDS Trailer Inns of Bellevue, LLC. 15531 SE 37th Street Bellevue 98006

Oasis RV Park and Golf Course 2541 Basin Street SW Ephrata 98823 Sun Basin RV Park 5522 N Frontage Road W Ephrata 98823

 

   

  

      

   

   

  

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

       

  

 

       

  

     

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

10 S O U TH E A S T

PULLMAN

Listings are sorted alphabetically, by region and city

Typ

HMR = Hotel/Motel/Resort B&B = Bed & Breakfast VRH = Vacation Rental Housing

eo

ACCOMMODATIONS

129


Sta o f f n d ar pe d ra ak t e /p ea kr Nu ate mb s er of s pa Fu ce ll h s oo k- u Du ps mp sta tio Sh no ow er s rs ew Pe er ts all ow Wa ed ter vie w Pu ll - t hr o ug Ca h b in /co tta Gr oc ge er i ren es t al Po / i s c o l/ e/p sw rop i m Ye an mi areo ng rou n-s nd i te Pic av ni c a il a ar e b ili t Gr a y ou pr Ten eser va tc tio am ns p in Bo g at ren t al Fis hin gb ai t Pla /t a yg r ck ou le nd La on un - si dr y te Toi let

RV PARKS & CAMPGROUNDS Camp Lakeview 32919 Benbow Drive E Graham 98338

360-879-5426 www.camplakeview-wa.com

Grand Coulee RV Park Bridgeport Hwy. 174 Grand Coulee 99133

509-633-0750 www.grandcouleedam.com/gcrv

31 31

34

800-759-2608 www.kingscourtrv.com

25 33

360-374-5267 www.quileuteoceanside.com

   

     

   

 

32

   

15 40

66

       

509-764-3805 www.mlrec.com

20 165

85

    

Desert Oasis RV Park 600 Yakima Avenue Moses Lake 98837

509-764-5319 www.moseslakerv.com

27 27

34

   

Grant County Fairgrounds 3953 Airway Drive NE Moses Lake 98837

509-765-3581 www.gcfairgrounds.com

15 25

500+

   

509-765-8294

30 30

44

     

509-765-0355 www.suncrestresort.com

27 40

83

   

509-765-7531

33 35

68

   

800-416-2736 www.mardonresort.com

15 38

240

                 

Colockum Ridge Golf 17056 Road 5 NW Hwy. 281 Quincy 98848

509-787-6206 www.colockumridgegolf.com

20 20

18

 

Country Cabin Motel & RV Park 711 2nd Avenue SW Quincy 98848

509-787-3515 www.countrycabinmotel.com

18

 

Crescent Bar Resort 8894 Crescent Bar Road NW Quincy 98848

509-787-1511 www.crescentbarresort.com

60

 

Quileute Oceanside Resort & RV Park 330 Ocean Drive La Push 98350 MOSES LAKE

    

    

King’s Court RV Park 212 E Grand Coulee Avenue Grand Coulee 99133

Cascade Park Campground 2001 W Valley Road Moses Lake 98837

Lakefront RV Park 2300 W Marina Drive Moses Lake 98837 Suncrest Resort 303 Hansen Road Moses Lake 98837 Willows Trailer Village 1347 Road M SE Moses Lake 98837 MarDon Resort 8198 Hwy. 262 SE Othello 99344 QUINCY

53

Gorge Amphitheatre Campground 754 Silica Road NW Quincy 98848 Shady Tree RV Park 1099 Hwy. 283 N Quincy 98848

37 140

509-785-6262 www.gorgecamping.com

  

30 30

509-398-0543 www.wildhorsecampground.com

30

Soap Lake RV Resort 22818 Hwy. 17 N Soap Lake 98851

509-246-0413 www.soaplakervresort.com

20 34

Alderwood RV Resort 14007 N Newport Way Spokane 99201

888-847-0500 www.alderwoodrv.com

   

200

 

  

 

  

  

 

    

  

   

  

 

    

 

  

49

 

 

509-785-3101

Wild Horse Campground 22456 W Baseline Road Quincy 98848

 

  

   

 

128

 

107

   

       

  

         

  

Trailer Inns of Spokane, LLC. 6021 E 4th Avenue Spokane 99212

509-535-1811 www.trailerinnsrv.com/spokane

25 42

96

   

 

  

Trailer Inns of Yakima, LLC. 1610 N 1st Street Yakima 98901

509-452-9561 www.trailerinnsrv.com/yakima

25 46

135

   

     

  

130

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM


Explore Washington GREAT TRAVEL RESOURCES FROM EVERY CORNER OF THE STATE

Welcome to Seattle

METRO SEATTLE

Business or pleasure. The Hilton Seattle Airport & Conference Center is conveniently located just minutes from SeaTac Airport, offering a professional, friendly staff to make you feel right at home.

!

Inn at

Snohomish Clean, Comfy, Cozy In the Heart of Historic Snohomish

17620 International Boulevard, Seattle, WA 98188 (206) 244.4800 SeattleAirport.Hilton.com

323 Second St. Snohomish,WA 98290 360.568.2208 / ! 1.800.548.9993 www.snohomishinn.com

Aerial Adventure just minutes from Seattle! www.adventuraplay.com 866.981.8665

“A F F O R DA B L E E XC E L L E N C E ”

5LOCATIONS

CONVENIENT

Ocean ShOreS / tacOma / richland mOSeS lake / SalmOn creek,vancOuver

Ocean ShOreS

A Warm Welcome At the DoubleTree by Hilton Seattle Airport, it starts with a warm welcome and one of our signature chocolate chip cookie.

richland

DoubleTree by Hilton. Where the little things mean everything.TM SalmOn creek / vancOuver

Adventure is Calling!

18740 International Boulevard, Seattle, WA 98188 (206) 246.8600 SeattleAirport.DoubleTree.com

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

800.222.2244 ShILOINNS.COm WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

131


“The Best Value

NORTH CASCADES

in Anacortes

And “Most Fun” Located in Historic Old Town Across the street from the Marina, Restaurants, Shops, & Galleries. Walk to Everything!

C

M

Y

W W W. H T R . C A

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

Owned by Upper Skagit Indian Tribe

Bainbridge Island. Stay awhile longer.

Double Your Rewards!

360-293-0602 / 800-852-0846 www.capsanteinn.com

We’re the only casino in Washington that gives you Player-Bucks and Cash-Back Points every time you play your favorite slots! • Two Hotels • Las Vegas-Style Casino • Three Restaurants • Headline Entertainment

Spike Africa

Must be a Rewards Club Member, Membership is FREE! Sign up on your first visit.

On I-5 at Exit 236 One Hour North of Seattle theskagit.com • 877-275-2448

WSVG

Casino opens at 9 am daily. Must be 21 or older with valid ID.

THE ISLANDS Just 35 minutes by ferry from downtown Seattle www.bainbridgedowntown.org 132

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

Join The Adventure! See the San Juan Islands from the deck of a traditional Windjammer. Day sails, extended voyages, special events, weddings and private charters.

Schooners North sails from Friday Harbor 680 Spring Street Friday Harbor, WA 98250 360-378-3031 • Fax 360-378-4228 www.fridayharborsuites.com For Reservations Call 1-800-552-1457 WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

360.378.2224 www.SailtheSpike.com


The

COUPEVILLE INN

Water view rooms with balconies Walk to historic waterfront, shops, & restaurants. Free WIFI Extended continental breakfast One & two bedroom suites with fireplaces and kitchens available.

200 Coveland St. www.thecoupevilleinn.com Coupeville, WA 98239 1-800-247-6162

Whale Watching

Orcas Island Eclipse Charters since 1990 800 376-6566 www.orcasislandwhales.com

OrcasEclipse VG08 1_24.pdf

COAST & PENINSULAS

The Perfect Ocean Getaway

Quietly cozy cottages in Long Beach www.theanchoragecottages.com 1-800-646-2351

Charter Fishing • Waterfront Dining Fresh Seafood • Shopping Working Waterfront

PORT OF ILWACO

$38

Saturday Market, May–September at the Port of Ilwaco Marina

Oceanfront, Great Views, Near Forks and Twilight Tours.

Located at the mouth of the Columbia River

Follow us on Facebook at Discover Ilwaco www.portofilwaco.com 360-642-3143

Quileute Oceanside Resort and RV Park

330 Ocean Drive, La Push, WA 98350 (360) 374-5267 (800) 487-1267

www.quileuteoceanside.com

www.PortLudlowResort.com WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

133


$15 discount with this ad*

AY TO MOUNT ST. HELENS ! GATEW  

∗ ∗ ∗ ∗ ∗ ∗ ∗

800.795.9980 reservations: innatgigharbor.com

MT. RAINIER VISITORS CENTER

On the web at www.mt-rainier.com Events www.road-to-paradise.com 360-569-0910 30027 SR 706 E, Ashford WA 98304 • Clean Quiet Rooms • Free HBO • AAA approved • High Speed Internet • Family & Jacuzzi Suites 1271 Mt. St. Helens Way Castle Rock, WA 98611 I-5 Exit 49

Escape to the MOUNTAINS

Cowlitz River Lodge

TEL: 360-274-6002 TOLL FREE: 888-900-6335 www.timberlandinn.com

*(Not Valid with Other Discounts or Online Booking)

MORE THAN JUST A DAY AT THE BEACH!

Located between Mt Rainier and Mt. St. Helens in Packwood, WA

Hike, Ski, Relax, or Watch Elk Graze From the Comfort of Your Room

BEST WESTERN PLUS Park Place Inn & Suites

1-888-305-2185 • 360-494-4444 www.escapetothemountains.com

On the way to Rainier Smoke free • Dog Friendly

Ask About Our Visitor Guide Rate!* 201 Interstate Ave, Chehalis, WA • 360-748-4040 bestwesternwashington.com/hotels/ best-western-plus-park-place-inn-and-suites *For 15% off use Code: WSVG. Discounts based on availability.

NORTH CENTRAL waterville historic hotel A Unique Lodging Experience recently restored Basic to Deluxe rooms wi-Fi, Great rates listed in Northwest Best Places 102 e. Park st. waterville, wa 98858 25 mi. from wenatchee & chelan

www.watervillehotel.com

509-745-8695

Quality Inn

& Conference Center

REQUEST YOUR FREE GUIDE SeasideOR.com | 888.306.2326 VisitSeasideOR

@VisitSeasideOR 1700 Canyon Road • Ellensburg, WA (509) 925-9800

THE VOLCANOES

RESERVATIONS 877-662-4494 www.columbiariverinn.com • info@columbiariverinn.com

RESERVE YOUR ROOM NOW! Our AAA Rated Two Diamond Inn is located next to historic Grand Coulee Dam and Lake Roosevelt. This area is full of outdoor adventure.

Your Trip through Washington State Begins

AMENITIES INCLUDE: • In-Room: Refrigerator, Microwave, Coffee, Internet, Iron/Board • Outdoor Pool/Hot Tub • Fitness Center & Sauna • Corporate & Government Rates • Business Center/Conference Room

HERE

StayInWashington.com 134

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM


WINE COUNTRY

NORTHEAST

SOUTHEAST

Your Trip through Washington State Begins

An exceptional stay, no matter what brings you by.

HERE

www.experiencewa.com

1190 SE Bishop Blvd Pullman, WA 99163 (509)334-4437

StayInWashington.com

www.hiexpress.com/pullmanwa

hiepullman@hiepullman.com

City Convenience, Resort State of Mind...

Business or Pleasure with Ease 480 Columbia Point Drive | Richland, WA 99352

(509) 942-9400 | (800) 321-2211 www.richlandmarriott.com

Horseback riding, hunting, fishing, family reunions, corporate retreats, weddings. New log lodge with 16 bedrooms open year round. www.kdiamondk.com kdiamondk@yahoo.com 1-888-345-5355

Small Town Charm At Its Best Ritzville Area Chamber of Commerce 111 West Main Ave 509-659-1936 chamber@ritzville.com www.VisitRitzville.com

Pullman’s Newest Hotel For reservations and more information:

wsuresidenceinn.com (509) 332-4400 131 spacious suites designed for longer stays! Separate living and sleeping areas Fully equipped kitchens Complimentary hot breakfast Complimentary evening socials Lobby bar open nightly Patio with barbecue and fire pit Large 24-hour fitness center Free high-speed Internet 1,863 square feet of flexible meeting space

986 S. Main, Suite B, Colville, WA 99114 WSU campus–near the Student Recreation Center and Palouse Ridge Golf Club, 1255 NE North Fairway Road

WWW.EXPERIENCEWA.COM

WASHINGTON STATE VISITORS’ GUIDE 2014

135


BEYOND MARVELOUS

FOUR-DIAMOND

LUXURY

Indulge in the luxury & entertainment of Tulalip. Unrivaled amenities, impeccable service and the most excitement in Washington State await your arrival.

J U S T 3 0 M I N U T E S N O R T H O F S E AT T L E

R E S E R VA T I O N S : 8 6 6 . 7 1 6 . 7 1 6 2 | T U L A L I P C A S I N O . C O M

WA State Visitors' Guide 2014  

The insider's guide to Washington State

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you