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ARCHITECTURAL PORTFOLIO Safwan Sheikh


www.issuu.com/safwansheikh/docs/portfolio3 www.linkedin.com/in/safwan-sheikh sheikh1996safwan@gmail.com


Contents

01MOABIT GASTRONOMIE

Culinary organisation run by refugees

02THE VOID

Celebration of European Contemporary City

03DAMSON VILLAGE Social housing project

04KOSHINO HOUSE

Render visualisation project

05COMMUNITY CENTRE Passive design project


01 MOABIT GASTRONOMIE Location: Moabit, Berlin Gross floor area: 5850m2 The brief of this project is a culinary organisation in the form of a live/work building in the district of Moabit in Berlin run by the clients: refugees, migrant workers and asylum seekers. A palimpsest method was used to analyse the feelings and atmosphere of the site which was previously a prison which enforced isolated imprisonment. The layers of history from the palimpsest were then extracted to give a massing form and proposed building outline. Environmental research was used to improve the journey of migration and possibly loss of the refugees that are to reside in this project. The scheme followed a journey of entering the building with anxiousness of a new place, community and culture but then transform over time into a confident and integrated member of the community. The deeper inside the building you go, the more playful the architecture gets. The proposal hosts: ‘isolation’ spaces for retreat, privacy and seclusion including residential; ‘transition’ spaces that help a newcomer socialise and communicate; and ‘integration’ spaces for community gatherings, meetings and other social events.


DERIVING FORM THROUGH PALIMPSEST

Using a palimpsest method by extracting the layers of history and connecting them through overlapping to derive a form or massing. After research and spatial composition from research, form is developed into proposed scheme

ISOLATION

Emotional and atmospheric darkness due to the isolated location of the ex-prison as well as the historic isolated cells which tortured the prisoners


ENVIRONMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY - HOW TO PREVENT ISOLATION

Using cognitive architecture and psychological research to use ‘isolation’ from the site and also from the feelings of newer refugees. Then providing architectural solutions for a ‘transition’ into the opposition of that ‘isolation’ - ‘integration’. Integration within oneself as well as with the community and environment

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TRANSITION

TRANSITION

TRANSITION

ISOLATION 1 Focused vision gives anticipation of entrance and prevents distraction 2 Standard transition provides reassuring walkway and acknowledges the way we walk 3 Refugee adaptation stages 1-2: learning language/new skills 4 Square shapes and edges give comfort to the ‘tendency to refrain from the inner zone of a novel place’. Safety is felt by being on a cantilevered outside of a building with views. Residentail spaces are more intimate - determined to allow 0.5m between each other 5 Corten steel contrasts rough concrete enhancing idea of opposition in the isolation-integration relationship 6 Gradual walkway with a focused vision makes orientation easy. Ramped transition adds level of playfulness. Space transitioning towards social integration. Refugee adaptation stage 3: sharing 7 Shifting perspectives makes navigation more intensive and demands user alertness to create interaction opportunities INTEGRATION 8 Concrete ring provides bright social space - determined to allow 3m between each other. Ring space because circular shapes are a symbol of unity and protection, and makes eye contact during conversations more efficient. Glass roof increases natural light to combat lack of low-light tolerance in human psychological senses 9 Peripheral vision integrates us with space with changes in gradient to slowly reveal views 10 Landscaping strategies to improve psychological health: open spaces, nature and vegetation, natural light 11 Green spaces promote health and well being, create opportunity for social interaction and social support (less loneliness) 12 Refugee adaptation stages 4-5: meeting and interacting, breaking boundaries

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‘Isolation’ - ramped corridor to double height apartments provides playfulness to help improve confidence and ‘integrate’

‘Isolation’ - edged mezzanine spaces for views, privacy and seclusion. More intimate spaces

‘Transition’ - relaxing spaces between floor levels with atrium views to improve socialising skills

‘Integration’ - gastronomic research lab where refugee residents come together to produce cuisines. Glass floor integrates chefs at different floor levels

‘Integration’ - ground floor starts 3m below ground level. Pathway to entrance allows immersion into site

‘Integration’ - building view as well as landscaping features including broken wall (‘broken’ boundary into community)

APPLICATION

Architectural features derived from environmental research are adopted into the proposal. Spatial composition corresponds to the research in correlation to the form extracted through the palimpsest method


DOUBLE GLAZED ROOF GLASS PANELS 30mm AIR GAP FIBERGLASS DRAINAGE/GUTTER

2° FALL

600mm REINFORCED CONCRETE WALL 100Ø PIPE TO SOAK AWAY

150mm CONCRETE SLAB FLASHING CORRUGATED STEEL DECKING 300X300 BOX STEEL FRAME 50X35mm C-SECTION 20mm CORTEN STEEL 50mm AIR GAP 12mm PLASTER BOARD 80X45 TIMBER BATTEN 80mm INSULATION

300X300 BOX STEEL FRAME

80X80mm EDGE INSULATION CORRUGATED STEEL

STEEL JOINT

(Welded onto 300x300 steel frame) (Plate bolted on concrete wall)

60mm FLOOR INSULATION 22mm TIMBER FLOOR FINISH 60X45mm TIMBER BATTEN 150mm CONCRETE SLAB

CONCRETE WALL (Slope detail) 15mm MORTAR 12mm TILE SKIRTING 12mm TILE FLOOR FINISH 80mm FLOOR INSULATION COMPACT HARDCORE LAYER PAD FOOTING AS PER eng. SPECS


02 THE VOID Location: London St. Pancras Station Gross area: 37m2

An installation for the celebration of the European contemporary city was the brief provided for St. Pancras through reflection of current issues of Brexit and the European identity. The concept is to promote cohesion of European cities and identity through their architectural landmarks. Silhouettes of pre-programmed European buildings will form from a barrier to a gateway, as an ‘open’ border, to allow passengers through towards the exit. The proposed design consists of vertical pine beams hanging off steel cables which are motorised and are activated on the arrival of Eurostar passengers.


Conducting site analysis of St. Pancras Station through the medium of hand sketching to better understand location and context with regards to the urban scale. Drawing is inclusive of St. Pancras Renaissance Hotel, The British Library, Kings Cross Station and the Regents Canal.


Analytical sketches of plans and section of St. Pancras Station and St. Pancras Renaissance Hotel


Sketch plan of installation on Eurostar platform

Sketch section of installation on Eurostar platform


Swivel jaw beam clamp on iron truss of St. Pancras

Motor to winch steel cables

Connection of 7x19 steel cable to pine beam

Connection of aluminium stabilising plate


1. Motor clamped onto lattice beam

2. Lattice beam clamped onto iron truss

3. Steel cables winched down

4. Steel cables attached to pine beams

5. Pine beams lifted

6. Motor activated


03 DAMSON VILLAGE

Location: Saffron, Leicester Land space: 7961m2 This masterplan was for a social housing project primarily using sustainable materials and technology. To cater for all ages and family sizes, there are 3 types of residential units proposed: -type1: existing ground floor can accommodate small families and/or wheelchair access with the possibility of adding an extra floor -type2: typical units are 20. 2 bed double-height units with an expandable modular timber frame on 12 of the 20 units to increase to 3 bed units -type3: 4 bed units for larger or multi-generational families with roof terrace There is also potential of a residential tower on the east side of the site with space of up to 20 residences, and a community hall has been provided in one of the type1 units. The structural frame is modular made from timber and pre-fabricated SIPs to cater for the expansion of families. The scheme encourages social interaction between people of different backgrounds to form a community through the public gardens and front-to-back arrangement of the units.


Concept visual of potential residential tower on east side of site


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First floor plan

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Ground floor plan


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North (Side) Elevation

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Safwan Sheikh

DMU - P14165205

Saffron social housing project Leicester LE2 6LS 22/05/2017

Section AA - West to East

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Sheet no.1: Plans, section and elevations

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External structural frame is made of 45x170mm timber beams. Kingspan (TEK or SIPs) panels of 1200width x 172depth (mm) form external construction. Insulation between two OSBoards. External screed render and timber cladding. External wall thicknesses: 250mm Internal structural frame is made of 45x95mm timber beams. Plasterboard and plaster layer form construction for internal walls. Internal wall thicknesses: 100mm Triple glazed window openings. Rear double door and balcony door also triple glazed. Front door is double glazed.

1:200 on A3 Section AA is 1:100 on A3

Please send enquiries to P14165205@my365.dmu.ac.uk

All dimensions to be confirmed by a structural engineer and not strictly followed from this drawing


“I don’t believe architecture has to speak too much. It should remain silent and let nature in the guise of sunlight and wind.” “You cannot simply put something new into a place. You have to absorb what you see around you, what exists on the land, and then use that knowledge along with contemporary thinking to interpret what you see.” “One aspect of my design was to situate the house on a slope.” -Tadao Ando

04 KOSHINO HOUSE Rendered visualisation project of Tadao Ando’s ‘Koshino House’. Experimentation of different software was undertaken for this project


05 COMMUNITY CENTRE Location: Ghadames, Libya Gross area: 224m2

This is a building for the community to provide space for meetings, gatherings and activities. Among desired spaces included an office space, a meeting room but mainly a communal hall for the residents of the area. Sustainable characteristics were the prime focus of this design by incorporating old passive design techniques in a contemporary way. This included the use of thick walls made of rammed earth, a central courtyard and an external roof to shade the entire structure from direct sunlight.


Community hall - 120sqm

Boardroom - 15sqm

Office - 20sqm

Kitchen - 28sqm


Exploded diagram showing structural and constructional strategy of individual ‘blocks’. The design consists of 500mm thick load-bearing rammed earth walls which are poured into the mould on site. There is reinforced concrete in the strip foundation at ground level, and also in the slab foundation at 1.5m below ground. The flat roof surface which is 5mm bitumen felt is supported on 13mm plywood decking. Timber beams running above the rammed earth walls support the plywood and bitumen.


The building has been designed based on an eastwest long axis because it is preferable to avoid openings and sunlight penetration on the east and west walls, but to maximise natural light on the north and south faรงades. This is because the sun in an arid climate is mostly overhead throughout the day.

Organisation of rooms have been decided based on commonly used rooms and essential spaces. Public spaces like the community hall have been positioned towards the south because there is more natural sunlight, whilst the other rooms are facing the other axis since not as much natural light is required in comparison.

The entrance and courtyard is facing north-east to take in the benefit of the wind flow direction, hence maximising natural cool air and helping to circulate it within the central courtyard.


The roof design overlaps to protect from the sun but gaps allow for ventilation and cool air to pass through overhead. The draught comes from the north entrance into the courtyard and passes through the gap in between the internal and external roofs.

Small openings throughout the building prevent overheating. The openings on the north side are lower down the wall to allow the cool air to enter the building due to air pressure based on temperature, and the warm air in the room is then extracted through the higher windows on the south side.

Summer Sun Winter Sun

Direct and intense light from the sun in summer should be avoided, hence there are overhangs in the roof. In order to achieve the winter sun, the external roof has been raised to allow natural light penetration into the spaces.


Profile for Safwan Sheikh

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