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FlightCm African Commercial Aviation

Edition 305 June 2021 Cover: Shane Doyle

EVOLUTION OF MILITARY TRANSPORTS

JIM:

TIGER MOTH

SCARES! CHASING CAR THIEVES WITH A ROBBIE! GARRISON : AIRSPEED OR ANGLE OF ATTACK? 1

CEMAIR'S NEW LIVERY

FLIGHT TEST: THE SAVAGE

BOBBER - IT’S A BLAST! AMS HELI PILOT

AVIONICS:

AUTOPILOT AS A CO-PILOT!

WONDERBOOM AIRPORT REVIEW

June 2021


p

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POSITION REPORT THERE IS AN ENDURING PERCEPTION in Africa that general aviation (GA) is the plaything of rich whites. So we continue to lose airports to population pressure and land hunger. This is exacerbated by the location of informal shack settlements – often right up against the fences of small town airports. Gliding clubs have been hardest hit by the failure of law and order in South Africa. Donaldson Dam was overrun by squatters. As a former member said, “One day they were on the outside of the fence, next they were walking on the runway. The rest is history.” Some years ago Estcourt Gliding Club was burned down by adjacent shack dwellers. Before that it was the Kranskop Club at Odi Airport that was burned, also with the loss of its gliders. Seeing the burned remains of their cherished planes makes any glider pilot weep.

The point the politicians miss is that small planes beget big aeroplanes. People have to learn to fly. Business people may need to get to a place that takes two hours by air and two days by road. A patient needs to get to hospital quickly and efficiently. A business may want to invest millions in opening a new branch – but if the CEO can’t fly there, it won’t happen. All these missions and many more, require small planes. And all these small planes need pilots, who need training. The aircraft require regular maintenance, which needs engineers, and they need skilled managers as operators. All these little aeroplanes need airports. And the whole thing needs a regulator – albeit not one overpaid and overstaffed.

INDUSTRY NEEDS TO BE PROTECTED FROM STUPID GOVERNMENT

The latest airport to be lost is Harrismith, where the hangars were petrol bombed by a mob. Talk is that the local politicians let the shack dwellers know that the CAA had issued a NOTAM closing the airport, so vandals accelerated the takeover by burning the hangars to destroy the ‘white mans’ toys. Not even towns’ power aircraft airports are safe. Hermanus was closed by squatters years ago and Nylstroom has recently been de-registered and all but shut down. These closures do untold damage to the town’s economy.

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June 2021

So the whole heaving industry needs to be protected from stupid government if it is to be safe from short-term venality and long-term mistakes which destroy lives.

The point is that GA is not just the poor stepchild of the airlines and the military. It constitutes a significant part of the economy and forms a key component of its transport infrastructure, without which many other key components will be constrained or just not be possible. GA is highly skills and capital intensive – and both skills and capital are notoriously fickle and transportable. GA needs government care and protection, yet it is all too often left to incompetent officials with self-serving political agendas in rural towns to protect and grow the key GA infrastructure – their airports.

j

Guy Leitch


June 2021

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COLUMNISTS SA FLYER

16 Guy Leitch - ATTITUDE FOR ALTITUDE 22 George Tonking - HELI OPS 26 Peter Garrison - IMPOSTORS 32 Jim Davis - PLANE TALK 40 Johan Walden - A SLIM LOGBOOK 60 Jim Davis - ACCIDENT REPORT 70 Ray Watts - REGISTER REVIEW

FLIGHTCOM

14 16

FLIGHT TEST: THE 8 June 2021

Bush Pilot - HUGH PRYOR History - STEVE TRICHARD

FC 16

Edition 305

CONTENTS

SAVAGE BOB


Reaching new heights

OUR FLEET OF AIRCRAFT: Virginia Flight School currently has a wide range of aircraft that a person may choose to fly, these include: Cessna 152 (C152), Cessna 172 (C172), Cessna 172 Retractable (C72R), Piper Cherokee 140 (P28A), Simulator (FNPT11)

THE DOUBLE LIFE MEET THE PILOT

FC 24

BBER

Tel: +27 31 563 2080 Mobile: +27 82 826 6413 Website: www.vfs.co.za

June 2021


Edition 305

CONTENTS FEATURES SA FLYER

48 68 76 78 95

FLIGHT TEST: The Savage Bobber MINI FEATURE - Mark Holliday SAVAGE SAFARI: Craig Lang AVIONICS - A True Story WONDERBOOM AIRPORT REVIEW

REGULARS 14 FLIGHTCOM

06  Cemair: CFO Laura van der Molen 10 Dassault Unveils the Falcon 10X 13 Aerion Closes Shop 24 Meet the pilot: AMS Donovan Kohl 30  Defence - Darren Olivier

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June 2021

Opening Shot

74 Bona Bona Register Review 76 SV Aviation Fuel Table 84 Aviation Direct Events Calender

FLIGHTCOM

22 Starlite Flight School Listing 29 AME Directory 23 Atlas Oils Charter Directory 30 AEP AMO Listing 32 Aviation Directory


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OPENING SHOT

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June 2021


June 2021

Send your submissions to guy@saflyermag.co.za

We love real life adventure stories of pilots having fun with their planes. In this month’s issue we feature the safari Craig Lang of Flying Frontiers organised around South Africa. This picture of Jason Beamish in the minimalist Savage Bobber was taken by Shane Doyle from Craig’s Savage Cub. Shane used his Canon 6D with an ISO of 100 and a slow prop-blurring 1/60th second shutter speed at f18 at 100mm.

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ATTITUDE FOR ALTITUDE: GUY LEITCH

One of the unexpected pleasures is having a fondly cherished idea booted into touch. For me one such notion was that hydrogen powered planes are not practical. Hydrogen has always just seemed like a bad idea – think of the Hindenburg disaster – and for a hundred other reasons. ONE OF THE BIG DRIVERS for hydrogen planes has been to reduce carbon emissions. But the aviation industry is not a big polluter – it contributes less than 3% of carbon emissions worldwide. Yet it has always been a huge target, from those who, like Chicken Little, think condensation trails mean the sky is falling. And also for the ‘flight shaming’ movement – which tries to make everyone who buys an airline ticket feel guilty.

airlines offset their emissions using negative carbon emissions technology. One such is biofuels and Sustainable Aviation Fuel (SAF) but these are currently a publicity stunt as the growing and conversion of crops to liquid fuels is carbon-intensive. And besides – the world needs farmers to produce food – not JetA. Electric planes are still even more farfetched – especially for any airline wanting to fly sectors longer than 30 minutes. And for less than 30-minutes, people should take trains and busses if they are that worried about the environment.

there is just no substitute for fossil fuels

Responding to the pressure of populism, the airline industry is super sensitive to flight shaming and has created huge and costly programmes such as CORSIA – the Carbon Offsetting and Reduction Scheme for International Aviation. But the real problem is that there is just no substitute for good old fossil fuels – especially for the allimportant gravimetric efficiency, which is the amount of energy in fuel compared to its weight. Fossil fuel’s energy-density advantage is all but impossible to beat, so CORSIA aims to have

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June 2021

And then the other day I got invited to a webinar organised by the Aeronautical Society of South Africa (AeSSA) on hydrogen powered flight. The presenter was the splendidly named Professor Pericles Pilides from Cranfield University. Turns out both Airbus and Boeing are seriously looking at hydrogen power. Airbus says it will decide by 2025 whether there is a market for


Airbus is pushing ahead with hydrogen power.

hydrogen-fuelled airliners and if so, it reckons the first hydrogen airliners will enter service in 2035. For Airbus the issue is not whether the technology is do-able but whether they can sell it to the airlines. Back in 2008 Boeing built and operated the first aircraft ever to fly solely on hydrogen power. The fuel cells on the single-person plane were supplemented with power from lithiumion batteries during takeoff and ascent. Four years later, the company unveiled the Phantom Eye, a liquid-hydrogen-powered unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). It was designed to fly reconnaissance missions of up to four days at an altitude of 20,000 metres. Boeing was unable to sell the UAV to the military, however, and it is now a museum piece.

airliners. Like Airbus, Boeing estimates it will be two decades or more before a hydrogen powered Boeing airliner flies. But key bits such as the engines are already in development. WEIGHT AND ENERGY DENSITY Prof Pericles Pilides acknowledges that the biggest challenge is the extra weight required for hydrogen fuel tanks, be it for gaseous or liquid form. For liquid hydrogen, the challenge will be making lightweight vacuum-insulated tanks that maintain the fuel below its super-cold 20 degree Kelvin boiling point. Carrying fuel in gas form carries an even greater weight penalty, since the tanks must be huge.

massively large hydrogen f uel tank s

Boeing says that its more immediate focus is on sustainable aviation fuels and in its view there will be a mix of solutions, with hydrogen power more likely to fill the short-haul, smaller end of the sector. Although Boeing has shown that hydrogen will work as aviation fuel, the big challenge will be to prove that an aircraft’s structure and fuel tanks can be built to operate as safely as today’s

Surprisingly, in terms of gravimetric efficiency, liquid hydrogen has 2.8 times the energy density of aviation fuel. But, when you factor in the weight of the hydrogen tanks, JetA has the advantage over hydrogen by a factor of 1.6. Whereas JetA constitutes about 78% of the combined weight of tank and fuel, liquid hydrogen accounts for just 18% of the total in current storage designs. Prof Pilides reckons that to compete with fossil fuels, the fuel weight fraction of hydrogen has to reach at least 28%. June 2021

17


The three waves of hydrogen plane development.

To accommodate the massively large hydrogen fuel tanks a potential solution is a blended wing– fuselage design. This will be like a flying LPG bottle with the hydrogen compressed to 350 bar. With fuel-cell technology it is expected that this blended wing could manage short-haul flights of 500 nautical miles. Gaseous hydrogen would however occupy about twice as much space as tanks containing liquid hydrogen. The tanks would be made from combinations of existing composites and resins and the current best fuel-to-tank weight ratio for gaseous hydrogen is 11–12%. The future is coming – liquid hydrogen tanks that have ratios greater than 50% are being tested. This has led to designs that look like the Airbus A380 – but with the entire top deck used for gaseous hydrogen. FUEL CELLS OR COMBUSTION? One of the great things about hydrogen is that modern jet engines can burn hydrogen with few modifications. But emissions are a surprising problem. I fondly imagined that the hydrogen would burn with the oxygen in the air and

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June 2021

produce H2O – i.e. water. Although it would produce no carbon dioxide, due to the nitrogen in the air, burning hydrogen produces nitrogen oxides and water vapour. And Prof Pericles points out that water vapour at high altitudes becomes a greenhouse gas. The solution is hydrogen-fuelled proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. These are emission-free if the hydrogen comes from carbon-free sources, and their exhaust water vapour can be condensed before release. PEMs, though, provide only half the 3.7 kW/kg power per unit weight of modern gas turbines burning conventional fuel, plus of course the weight of the fuel and the tank. It’s a big improvement from the 0.3 kW/kg of 15 years ago, and continued improvements can be expected. Airbus has produced three concepts for hydrogen-fuelled airliners with capacities of up to 200 passengers and ranges of 2000 nautical miles or more. Each will be powered by a hybrid system of combustion turbines and fuel-celldriven motors. In a turboelectric configuration, a hydrogen-fuelled gas turbine drives an electric generator, and the fan is driven by an electric motor.


The problem with hydrogen is the size and weight of the fuel tank.

The good news for general aviation is that modern PEM fuel cells can compete with piston aircraft engines in powering four- to six-passenger aircraft. But their energy-toweight ratio is still far below that of turboprops and turbines. The fan of a turbofan provides about 80% of the engine’s total thrust, with the remainder delivered by combustion. It’s hoped that fuel-cell systems can be developed to deliver the entire thrust of a turbofan by electric power. Alternatively, fuel cells could be supplemented with battery power during takeoff and climb. SAFETY With the Hindenburg in mind, safety will be at the forefront of many passengers’ concerns, especially if they are sitting under huge gaseous hydrogen tanks. Of course hydrogen-fuelled aircraft will need to meet the same levels of safety and integrity as those powered by JetA, even if hydrogenspecific safety and regulatory standards don’t yet exist. The questions are big: How do you ensure the structural integrity of the fuel tank? How do you inert a fuel tank with hydrogen? How do you refuel the plane? Refuelling will require a whole new airport fuel storage and delivery infrastructure. However, one advantage is that hydrogen could be produced on site, eliminating distribution costs.

A number of hydrogen suppliers have already lined up to provide fuel to airports should A or B get to fly on hydrogen. SO HOW FAR INTO THE FUTURE IS HYDROGEN? Most analysts expect the cost of fuel cells to follow a similar trajectory as photovoltaics, whose costs have fallen more than 80% in the past 10 years. And a high aviation demand should drive down the price of hydrogen from its current level of $12–$15/kg. Prof Pilides expects there will be three waves of development as hydrogen technology matures. The first wave will begin with the commitment to mobilise U$100 billion for development costs over 15 years. This may sound like a lot, but is just 1% of the value of the European tourism industry. In years 1 – 5 a JetA1 powered protype will be flown to test the handling qualities of a plane with a massively pregnant fuselage. In years 4 – 9 a four-engine test bed will be flown with two engines on hydrogen and two on JetA. In years 5-10 we should expect to see pure hydrogen protypes flying. Then in year 11 cargo planes, and from year, 13 passenger planes. So chances are, anyone younger than sixty will get to fly on a hydrogen powered passenger airliner.

j

guy@saflyermag.co.za June 2021

19


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June 2021

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HELICOPTER OPS: GEORGE TONKING

I’m often asked whether our air-to-ground operations in the security industry make a real difference. Granted, the media seems to bombard us almost daily with accounts of another cash in transit vehicle bombed or courier van hijacked. BAD NEWS SELLS. But without good-news accounts, we may as well just hide-out at home, pack our bags for some imagined utopia abroad, or go stark raving mad in the meantime. I refuse to do that: I love this beautiful country and its people way too much. Which is partly why I do what I do.

because of its reliability, but also for its direct operating cost. During holiday periods, we’ve found we need to have more helicopters in the air simultaneously to cover our 200-plus square mile Gauteng grid. Shortly before the Easter weekend we had one of those incidents that makes my job so worthwhile. I had run out of available R44s, which led me to the 44’s younger sister, the R66 turbine. The R66 is pretty similar to the R44, although 75kg (a whole person) lighter – and turbine powered. This gives the ship an great power to weight ratio – a winning recipe for the hot and high operating conditions found on the Reef.

I received a call from his s obbing wife

The statistics show that our airwing operations are making a difference – not only with our presence in the sky being a deterrent to potential criminals on the ground, but also that we are able to respond more quickly to in-progress situations, and have a favourable vantage point compared to ground responders. We operate the Robinson R44 (of which we usually have half a dozen on hand) not only

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June 2021

My pilot-friend Joel from Mercy Air (whom I wrote about in our November 2020 edition)


The Robinson R66 turbine - built for the Highveld.

happened to be in town for the holidays. Naturally I invited him along to co-pilot the R66 and, as most pilots would, he jumped at the opportunity. The day’s mission started early with a normal patrol around the East Rand. Not long into the flight, however, I received a distress call from a colleague. He explained that one of our fixed-wing pilot’s brothers had been hijacked in the Bapsfontein area earlier that morning. The alarm had only been raised when the victim’s family had been alerted by his bank about irregular ATM withdrawals from his account in a high-risk area in the East Rand. Being close to the area, I decided to continue our patrol in that direction while trying to gather more information. I was then convinced I needed to help when I received a call from his sobbing wife. “Ma’am, he’ll be fine, we’ve done this many times before. Hang tight,” I assured her and myself.

As I’ve mentioned in my previous columns, it takes a team and good networking to bring a multi-discipline operation online, especially at short notice. First, I posted the details on one of our WhatsApp operational groups. Next, I made a call to Faheem Abramjee, a tracking specialist operator, with whom I had a good working relationship. He confirmed he had heard about the missing bakkie. “George, come and fetch me!” was Faheem’s response to the urgency in my voice. I turned my ship towards Kempton Park, and pulled firmly on the collective, at which she leapt in response to the Rolls-Royce RR300’s surge of power. A local landing zone was arranged. In a true Mission Impossible-style move we plucked up Faheem at the LZ, an easy task for the R66. “Let’s go and check the local ‘cool-off’ spots.”

June 2021

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George, Joel and Faheem on a mission.

The recovered NP200.

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June 2021


Faheem pointed to the horizon as we exited OR Tambo’s always-busy CTR.

the mall on our first pass, both Faheem and I exclaimed in unison, “There!”

Our plan was to scout the area where the last contact had been reported and possibly spook the captors or spot the vehicle. Faheem had in the meantime pulled up an exact picture of the bakkie on his phone. The distinctive stripes on its canopy would hopefully help us to identify it visually from the air. By now, I had received several calls about the case, including from a pastor friend, ‘Foxy’, who also knew the victim well. It’s amazing what a small world we live in when it comes to situations like this.

We had spotted a vehicle which matched the description parked in a side street. Joel then managed to get a zoomed pic of the licence plate from the left seat. Bingo! As we continued circling, after notifying the police of the vehicle’s position, a call came through, this time from the victim’s family, with the words that made our day, “They’ve let him go!”

spook the captors – or spot the vehicle

“Help us find him Georgie!” pleaded Foxy. I continued towards the last contact – a busy urban area with a mall – and started setting up a grid pattern for a visual search. As we rounded

A short time later, the victim walked into a police station in the vicinity. I was flying (metaphorically speaking) for days. For, although we never actually saw the perpetrators, we are convinced that our presence above them played a large role in their victim’s release. And much of the success is down to the perfect machine we had for the day; the silky-smooth Robinson R66.

j

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IMPOSTORS - PETER GARRISON

I MPOSTORS I N THE COCK PI T Things aren’t always what they seem. One of the pleasures of this job is hearing from readers. Some write to correct my errors or to note my omissions. Some are hostile, though the population recommending my immediate consignment to the infernal fires has for some reason dwindled in recent years. Maybe they went first. Some ask questions. Some of the questions are standard ones, but some are ones that would never have occurred to me and get me thinking about stuff in new ways. LAST WINTER, FOR EXAMPLE, cold spells in the middle Atlantic states produced reports of negative density altitudes in places where they aren’t usually seen. A reader wrote to inquire what a negative density altitude meant and what effect it would have on his flying. A negative density altitude is no different from a positive one, but the question made me reflect upon confusions that can arise from our use of proxy scales for measuring things – in this case, using an altitude as a way of describing a physical property. A negative density altitude is quite a different thing from a negative density. It’s hard to imagine what a negative density would be like – similar to antigravity, I suppose – but a negative density altitude is an ordinary enough thing. At the Dead Sea in Israel and Jordan, where the water surface is 1,363 feet below sea level, it must take a very hot day just to get the density altitude above zero. At any near-sea-level location, a high barometric pressure or a chilly temperature will bring out the minus signs. Density altitude is a proxy scale – one kind of measurement used in place of another

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because it is more convenient or more familiar, or because it can be anchored at some readily comprehensible value like zero or one. A scientist might express the density of air in slugs per cubic foot or kilograms per cubic metre. (In case you’ve never quite gotten slugs, air weighs around .08 pounds per cubic foot at sea level. The air in a beach ball a yard in diameter would weigh, if you could weigh it, about a pound. Water is almost 800 times heavier.) Air becomes less dense when it gets warmer, and is also less dense at higher levels in the atmosphere (even though it’s colder there); so warming and ascending produce similar effects. We employ the proxy scale because it is handier for pilots to know that conditions are roughly – a lot of aviation is about roughly – what they would be on a warmish day in Denver than to base a go/no go decision on the information that the air density at the airport today is .063 pounds per cubic foot. The operational implications of negative density altitude are minor. A reciprocating engine will deliver a little more than its rated power, because denser air contains more oxygen and


It is possible to have a negative density altitude.

The most important and potentially the most dangerous proxy we use is speed. Another reader’s question got me thinking about the tangled role of airspeed in flying and how it is related to stall-spin accidents in the traffic pattern. Here is the question: A friend of mine lowers his flaps while turning base and again while turning final. He does so to lessen the pitch sensation that accompanies the flap deployment. Instead of the plane changing pitch only in the vertical plane some of the force is directed into the turn. Is this safe? I don’t know aerodynamically what is happening with the wing. Although I don’t think extending the flaps would affect the bank angle (save an asymmetric deployment), would it in some way tighten the turn radius and raise the stall speed, or would the flap extension offset that effect? Could this practice lead to an uncoordinated turn?

so the engine can burn fuel at a greater rate; but maximum power is used only briefly and engines have built-in margins of safety. Indicated airspeed will be greater than true airspeed. But with all that power the airplane will quickly leave those creepy negative density altitudes behind anyway. Another proxy scale that we don’t think much about is pressure altitude. Below the

so-called transition altitude, 18,000 feet in the U.S., pressure altitude doesn’t have much practical importance, but in the flight levels everybody sets the altimeter to 29.92 (1013mb) regardless of the local altimeter setting. When you’re at FL240 the altimeter reads 24,000 feet, but you’re really wherever the pressure is 11.59 in Hg. In other words, a flight level is really not an altitude at all, it’s a pressure.

Like doctors of different nationalities, pilots sometimes talk about familiar phenomena in terms that other pilots do not understand. It took me several readings to untangle the threads here. First, as a matter of basic flying technique, if I were a flight instructor, I would teach students to add flap during wings-level portions of the approach, not during the turns, for the sake of clarity and simplicity. The pitch change with flap deployment just June 2021

29


complicates the management of the turn; why pile one complication on another? A skilled pilot wouldn’t have any trouble with it, but that is not a good reason for making it standard practice. Besides, different aeroplanes pitch differently with flap deployment, some nose-up, some nose-down, and an unfamiliar airplane could surprise you at an awkward time. The explanation that adding flap during turns “lessens the pitch sensation” may be subjectively true, but I think it is misleading. For the humans inside the airplane, and their glasses of water, the sense of down and up remains the same even in a turn (unless it is an uncoordinated turn); the pitching effect of lowering flap is in the same axis, relative to the aeroplane, as it would be if the wings were level. If the Cirrus pilot perceives the turn as somehow lessening the pitching sensation, I think it is only because the changing G forces in the turn mask those due to the flap. Adding flap would not affect bank angle, but it would probably reduce the turning radius because the airspeed would drop, and turn radius is a function of bank angle and true airspeed and nothing else. Adding flap never raises the stall speed; it always lowers it. But the stall speed in a turn, while mathematically quite predictable, is always a bit of a mystery to pilots.

Fiddling with the flaps during a turn just deepens the mystery. As to whether this practice could lead to an uncoordinated turn, the answer is no. Flap deflection has nothing to do with turn coordination, which is simply a matter of keeping the fuselage lined up with the direction of flight and is the job of the rudder. The key to all these puzzles is angle of attack. Angle of attack is arguably the single most important piece of information a pilot can have when handling an airplane at low speed, for instance during the landing approach, and yet it is one that remains hidden behind the proxy of airspeed. For as long as I’ve been writing for aviation magazines we have been harping on the importance of angle of attack and decrying the lack of emphasis on it in flight training and cockpit instrumentation. The FAA has finally awakened to the voices – not just ours – crying in the wilderness and has produced a rule that will make it easier for AoA instruments to gain approval. It will be interesting to see whether a pilot population conditioned to rely on the airspeed indicator will adopt an unfamiliar, but superior, instrument. Will pilots stick with the surrogate, or go for the real thing? j

The Air Speed Indicator remains a proxy for an angle of attack indicator - here to the left of the compass.

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PLANE TALK - JIM DAVIS

WHAT A BUSINESS SWELLENDAM. I would like to report that my little flying school in George was expanding, and so it was. But not because it had so much business, but rather because it had so little. I’M INCLINED TO IGNORE the economics of running a flight school. Fuel was dirt-cheap, maintenance was minimal because my Cherokee was brand-new, and the thought of putting money aside for engine overhauls didn’t enter my mind. Here’s the sort of stupid thing I would do. I flew west for one hour and 15 minutes to the pretty little town of Swellendam. This was in order to do two hours of instruction in Tiger Moth ZS-DND, and one hour in a delightful little Piper Cruiser, ZS-BHZ. Total income for the venture was R12. And my expenses were two and a half hours of Cherokee flying and two days of my time. Okay in those days the Rand was slightly stronger than the US Dollar – but it still didn’t make any business sense. Financially I was going backwards.

some aerobatic training. As soon as we got off the ground I became suspicious of the aircraft. All Tigers rattle and shake, but this one had taken the vibration to a new level. It was as if there was someone under the cowl beating the engine with a four pound hammer. I told Eddie to do a tight circuit and put us back on the ground before something broke. “Don’t worry” Eddie shouted into the Gosport, “it’s always like this.” “Not while I’m in it – isn’t” I bellowed. So we shuddered round the field, plopped down on the stony uphill runway and taxied back to the hangar while Eddie complained about people who imagined noises in airworthy aeroplanes.

Not w hile I’ m in it

32

Both the Tiger and the Cruiser had interesting lessons for me.

Of course the clattering stopped when the engine did. This left me in a rather silly position. We opened the cowlings and peered at Mr de Havilland’s black, oily lump of pig-iron, but of course there was no clue as to where the clatter had come from.

Edwin Sands was The Main Man of the Swellendam Flying Club and I was there to do some Tiger flying with him, and then to give him

A couple of other club members wandered over and formed a small Afrikaans-speaking focus group, with each member trying to simulate the

June 2021


June 2021

33


noise by rattling their tongues or gurgling the backs of their throats. Reading between the lumps of gob, they seemed to conclude was that I, ‘die Engelsman’, was a bit of a coward. This led to a sort of stalemate. They said it was fine, and I said it wasn’t. So we stood around in a semi-circle staring at the offending engine. Of course it wouldn’t make a noise while it was stationary, and it left no visible trace of what was causing the problem. Eventually I decided to run the engine with the cowls open. Now, this is a dodgy thing to do. The cowlings hinge upwards, and the front is very close to the whirling prop. Each one is kept open by an oily metal rod, which can easily jump out of its catch. No matter what happens, everyone must think carefully and move slowly. So, after sticking the chocks in front of the wheels, and dumping a stick holder-backer in the rear cockpit to keep the tail down, I swung her into life. It only took a moment to see that there was serious trouble. The engine was jumping around like a rock star at a rave. It was not difficult to see what had happened. The bolt that was meant to attach the right hand bottom engine-mount to the fuselage was mostly undone. The engine was about to depart the airframe. On closer inspection I could understand why it had probably never been tightened in the first place – it’s a bastard to get at. A smallish

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contortionist with exceptional spanner wielding skills, and much perseverance, must slime, upside-down and head-first, into the front cockpit, wedge his coconut against the rudder pedal and work with his hands above his head where he can’t see what he is doing. I learned two things from this: First, if you think there’s a strange noise, there IS a strange noise. Second, if you want to do a pre-flight properly, you have to endanger your life by running the engine with the cowlings off. Hmmmm… not really practical on a modern aircraft – but I still do it on strange Tigers.

Cruiser Crisis The Cruiser had equally profound lessons for me. • Don’t risk your life trying to train a student who doesn’t understand the only language in which you are proficient. • Ensure that the student has the mental capacity to follow simple instructions. • Find out if the student can read and understand labels on the panel. • Try to establish whether the student could be described as not the sharpest knife in the kitchen. Do this before you climb into an aeroplane in which he can reach a number of vital controls that you can’t.

Jim with his two Cherokees ZS-EKE and ZS-ELK.


The bolt that was meant to attach the right hand bottom engine-mount to the fuselage was mostly undone.

This particular student was a really nice guy but he didn’t look great – he had taxi-door ears, squiffy teeth and long floppy arms. He was a kind and decent human being, but that’s the way he had been kitted out. None of his previous instructors had encouraged him to take up a less intellectually demanding pursuit, but they had all avoided flying with him again. Poor man. So I am doing circuits and bumps with this guy, and they are not happy events. While his body is in the aircraft, his mind sits on a stone in the sun, chewing grass. We were doing a glide approach when all the Swiss cheese-holes align themselves with the planets. In the last few seconds he has done two things wrong. He has started the glide too early, and he has forgotten to use carb-heat. In those days, most training landings were from a glide approach that started at 1000 ft on base. Now, before I go on, I should tell you that the Cruiser has fore-and-aft seating – like a Cub. The instructor sits in the back and only has access to four controls – the stick, the rudder the throttle and the door handle. You can see little more than the back of the pupe’s head unless you loosen your seat-belt, stretch forward

to peer over his shoulder. So there we are in a glide with no carb-heat – and the engine is about to stop. This wouldn’t matter if we were going to make it to the field – but we weren’t. “Carb heat,” I say. Nothing happens, so I repeat my request, louder. We didn’t use head-sets – we just shouted. But the comparative silence of a glide approach made comms pretty easy. It wasn’t that he couldn’t hear me – it just wasn’t getting through. His mind was still sitting in the sun chewing grass. “Carb heat!” I shout and tap him on the shoulder. He is made of rubber. His head twists round 180 degrees, like a turkey, and he seems surprised to find someone else in his vicinity. I point at the panel and repeat my instruction slowly as if talking to a defiant infant. He faces ahead again and yanks out the mixture. The engine noise ceases completely and the prop slows to a very slow windmill. “Not that one,” I say cranking the voice to a greater volume. So he pulls another knob that works the cabin heat. But leaves the mixture out. I seldom shout at a pupe, but this calls for decisive action, June 2021

35


The need to get back on the ground before something broke.

so I bellow at him to push the red knob – the mixture – in. There is only one other red knob in the whole cockpit – it’s not even on the panel – it’s the throttle on the left sidewall, just below the window. So that’s what he goes for. As he moves it forward the only thing that changes is the look on his face. Of course it makes not a damn of difference, because the mixture has killed the engine. We are very low so I grab the controls and we skim over the dirt road and plonk down in a boulder-strewn area 50 yards short of the runway. And stop almost immediately. There is no damage, but I have to get out and swing the prop to get us to the runway, and thence to the hangar.

Another Cruiser And while we are talking about Cruisers, here’s another quick story about one in Port Elizabeth, a couple of years later.

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Ian Ritchie, the engineer, has done a major rebuild on this one. I am the only commercial pilot around – so the test-flight is mine. This time I sit in the front. There is a southerly wind, so we taxi to 17. We go through all the normal pre-takeoff formalities, and I tell the tower we were ready to go. They say okay, so I line up and pour on the coal. Initially everything goes as expected, then I get the impression that I am falling over backwards. This is because I AM falling over backwards. Ian’s appy has forgotten to secure my seat to the floor. My head crashes down on Ian’s lap and my feet get stuck under the panel while my bum is pushed up by the now vertical base of the seat. Ian hauls his throttle back as we sail off the runway into the grass, while ATC bleats feebly through the overhead speaker. It could have been really embarrassing if this had happened after lift-off. Someone had taken the rear stick out, so Ian would have been left at 20 feet with only the throttle and rudder, and a sack of potatoes in his lap.j


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A SLIM LOGBOOK - JOHAN WALDEN

THE

DOUBLLEE DOUB LIFE Every student pilot leads a double life. In one you get to fly aeroplanes, wear Ray-Bans, and think you’re Tom Cruise. In the other, you spend months crawling your way through that insurmountable pile of textbooks that dominates your shelf. FOR TWO YEARS MY STORIES have been dedicated to the former; flying adventures of PPL and CPL training. But today that must be fixed and balance restored to show the true picture every student pilot faces. So I’m going to deviate from my usual ‘story’ and get into the nitty-gritty of exams, books, and ground-school. What follows is simply my own experience and the information as it revealed itself along the way.

What is the problem? Why solve it? How do I solve it? Where and who can I go to for help? And when do I need to do it?

The What What is the “problem”? Well, it’s a very big one… a 10 exam problem. The hard truth of the CPL is that there are eight exams, all of which you must pass within 18 months of your first. If you don’t, you’ll have to start all over again – a fate more common than you might think! In addition, there are the Night Rating and General Radio licence exams. And if you want an Instrument Rating with your CPL then you can add that to the pile as well.

I T ’ S CL E A R WE ’ R E GOI NG T O NEED T HE R I GHT S UP P OR T

I was very fortunate to have an “aviation Gandalf” in my life who looked out for me. Owen didn’t have a pointy hat or a flowing grey beard, but he always gave me a steer where I needed one. Whenever I faced a problem or task, he would tell me to ask the “what, why, when, where, how, who?” questions. If you say them quickly it sounds professional.

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Just breathe...


I got the picture when the instructor piled the CPL books on the table

The Why

How And Who

18 months sounded like a long time to me, but my instructor was quick to warn me not to fall into a false sense of security. And to make sure I got the message, he plonked the whole pile of textbooks on the desk in front of me. As I watched book after book come crashing down on the table, I asked myself. “Why oh why did I decide to become a pilot?”

Now that we know what the task is, it’s clear we’re going to need the right support to accomplish it. Some might prefer to strike out on their own, but for me at least, now was not the time to be bold. So a must-have was a flight school that offered a solid ground-school course where I could get the help and guidance I needed.

It’s a very important question to ask – and one Owen asked me. Because the honest answer will either give you reason to stop (which is perfectly fine if you decide you actually want to do something else with your life) or the courage to ‘suck it up’ and get studying.

One school I visited had a very regimented course with intakes at the beginning and middle of the year. A strong pace seemed like a good idea but I quickly ran into problems with their rigid “sausage machine.” With a shipping time of several weeks for the textbooks and the course starting soon, I realised I would be playing

catch-up before I even started. That, or a six month wait for the next course. So I kept looking. Another school had a different approach. Their courses were more flexible; a saving grace for students juggling full time jobs. Many of the classes were given by airline pilots – people who know their stuff. And there was also the option of extra one-on-one time if I was struggling to pass. They seemed less of a clone factory to me and appeared genuinely interested in their students’ progress, so I enrolled with them. Everyone’s situation and preferences are different, so you’ll know what works best for you.

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Enrolling in a solid ground-school course was a must-have.

Getting Started Which textbooks to buy is a can of worms I’ll open next month. But while I waited for said books to hit my doorstep, I got started with a night rating – a logical next step after PPL. This, I found, was an excellent way to ease my brain back into study mode again. While not too overbearing, the night rating theory has fingers in all the pies: Meteorology, Aircraft Technical, Law, Human Performance, and so on. It doubled as a nice refresher course on PPL theory while I got to learn something new and to explore the wonders of night flying.

My instructor hammered into me just how important a strong PPL foundation is, as most of the new theory builds on those principles. In his words, “We often fail CPL exams because of PPL theory, and ATPL exams because of CPL theory.” In hindsight it was often the stuff I thought I knew that caught me out in the exams. And my face burned especially hot if I knew the answer lay in my PPL notes at home.

CP L WOUL D B E MOR E S T UDY I NG T HA N I ’ D E V ER DONE

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June 2021

CPL would be more studying than I’d ever done, and I knew it. But with a strong foundation and the right people around me I knew it could be done. The work is huge, but so is the reward. j


The Night Rating theory has fingers in all the pies, and is a great refresher.

1.1 Night rating: General The aim of the night rating theoretical knowledge instruction syllabus referred to in sub-regulation 61.14.1(2)(a) is to ensure that the applicant has a thorough understanding of the theoretical aspects surrounding the night rating. Night flying takes place in a potentially hostile environment and applicants must understand each element of the environment in which they are operating. (a) Air Law – (CAR 1.00.1; CAR 61.14.5; CAR 91.02/04/06/07; SA-CATS-OPS 91.06) (i) The definition of night flying; (ii) The privileges and limitations associated with the night rating; (iii) The pilot-in-command’s responsibilities; (iv) The equipment to be carried on board for night flying; (v) Aircraft lighting including navigation lights; (vi) VFR differences from day flying; (vii) Aerodrome requirements for night flying. (b) Meteorology – (Air Pilot’s Manual, Volume 2, Chapter 17, 20, 24 & 25) (i) The formation of fog; (ii) Various types of fog; (iii) Katabatic winds; (iv) Mixing, veering and backing of winds at night; (v) Formation of ice and frost; (vi) Nocturnal Thunderstorms. (c) Human performance – (Air Pilot’s Manual, Volume 6, Chapter 1-3) (i) Factors affecting night vision; the preservation of night vision; (ii) Visual illusions; (iii) Hypoxia; (iv) Vertigo; (v) Autokinesis. (d) Lighting systems – (Air Pilot’s Manual, Volume 5, Chapter 24-26; SA-CATS-OPS 91.06) (i) External aircraft lighting; (ii) Internal cockpit lighting; (iii) Taxiway lighting; (iv) Runway lighting; (v) Approach lighting systems; (vi) Obstruction lighting; (vii) Aerodrome identification beacons; (viii) Where to find information on lighting systems; (ix) Pilot-operated lighting.

June 2021

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+ ALL FLYING EXERCISES June 2021

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S Q U OTATI O N T ON REQUES Contact: Rashid Snyders Tel: 012 689 2007 I Cell: 076 920 3070 Email: admin@mnacoustics.co.za June 2021

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FLIGHT TEST: THE SAVAGE BOBBER

THE SAVAGE BOBBER Text: Jason Beamish and Guy Leitch Images: Shane Doyle

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The Bobber's stripped airframe is all about customising - and pure open cockpit fun.

The Savage Bobber must be the ultimate Piper Cub in that it has been stripped down to the absolute bare essentials for flight. This unique aircraft with its uncovered fuselage is like nothing else on the market. June 2021

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THE BIG IDEA IS THAT BEING stripped down to basics gives the owner the opportunity to customise their plane to their heart’s desire. Those familiar with motorcycle customisation will understand the idea of a bobber motorcycle, which is basically a minimalist custom bike. With the Bobber, over 90 modifications can be made to the base aircraft. Czech plane builder Zlin looked at the many Piper Cub reincarnations and reckoned they could build a better Cub. Zlin started with a standard Savage and took off everything that wasn’t entirely necessary. Taking stuff off made it 25 kg lighter, which makes it more agile, and the absence of covering on the fuselage makes it more resistant to lateral gusts. Excellent visibility and functional design, together with a robust, resistant structure, combine to render the Bobber particularly suitable for flights into the bush.

THE WALK-AROUND Jason Beamish writes: On my arrival at Flying Frontiers’ base at Eva’s Field, Craig introduced me to the unique looking plane. The first thing that strikes you is the uncovered bare tube fuselage with the unique Harley Davidson style saddle bags behind the rear seat. The engine cowling is also minimalist – the same as the classic J3 Cub, with the cylinders exposed for cooling. Large ‘tundra’ tyres are

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Like a J3 Cub, the cylinder heads protrude from the cowling.


mounted on the very effective rims and brakes from Beringer. Craig did the walk-around with me, pointing out key pre-flight items, as well as uniquely positioned essentials such as the fuel drain, which is on the underside of the fuselage at the lowest point of the fuel system behind the back seat, instead of at the base of both wing tanks. The Bobber’s Rotax 912ULS is happy on both Mogas and Avgas, which makes her much easier to operate knowing you can get fuel almost anywhere. The engine draws fuel from two 46 litre tanks – one in each wing. The wing and steel tube fuselage structure is reassuringly strong, despite having been built to the 600 kg Light Sport Aircraft weight limit. In the design testing, Zlin subjected the Bobber’s frame to more than 1,600 pounds of load at 6G for over two minutes without deformation. A close look at the airframe reveals some surprising details – the ailerons and elevators have gap seals – favoured by gliders for high speed and minimal drag, and so an unlikely item to have on a slow speed design. Out on the end of the left wing, to minimise position error, is an unheated pitot tube – beyond the reach of over-reading created by prop wash. Along the front of the wing are vortex generators to keep the airflow attached to the wing and reduce the stall speed to give good STOL performance.

Old fashioned round steam gauges are preferred rather than finicky and rain vulnerable EFIS glass.

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ABOVE: Rear seater gets even more basic instrumentation. BELOW: With the doors off the minimalist cockpit provides true fun flying.

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ABOVE: Vortex generators give great STOL performance. BELOW: Leather saddle bags and tool bag.

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Like the Super Cub, the pilot sits in the front, so a rear seater changes the CofG significantly. To cater for this, the pitch trim wheel next to the throttle adjusts a trim tab on the left elevator. The rear fuselage has manoeuvring handles on both sides and the tail is easy to lift. This is a function of the absence of a rear fuselage skin. The tailwheel in connected to rudder pedals but beyond 30 degrees of travel it uncouples and becomes free-castering. The tailwheel assembly looks strong and there is a large easy to inspect shock absorber.

I love d how s he handle d and he r unique minimalis t appearance THE COCKPIT Getting into the Bobber requires some agility, especially if you want to get into the back seat. You stand on a step on the landing gear leg and then hold onto the frame inside the cockpit roof and swing yourself up and in. It gets smoother with practice. The control cables are exposed, so it’s best not to snag them. The instrument panel on the black Bobber we flew is properly minimalist – with just three big round gauges and smaller ones for the engine. Avionics are limited to just a small round VHF Comm and a transponder. EFIS is however an option and a MGL EFIS is fitted in the red Bobber.

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Neither of the seats is adjustable, so short pilots may want to bring a cushion. There is no baggage bay as you put your stuff in the saddle bags bolted onto a fuselage tube. Simple but effective – and it keeps the bags away from the long elevator push rod. Unlike the original Cub or the more radical Shock Cub, the Bobber has toe brakes. To aid instruction, the rear seater also gets brakes, but they are squeezed between the side of the front seat and the fuselage wall, so narrow shoes are recommended. Prominent in the cockpit is the flap lever mounted at the pilot’s left knee. So like all proper planes – you fly it with your right hand on the control stick and use your left for power and other gross motor skill functions. Sticking faithfully to the Cub’s simple heritage, the fuel tank gauges are clear sight tubes in the wing roots, albeit buried a little further into the wing structure than optimal.

FLYING THE BOBBER Craig set me free to go make friends with the Bobber before launching on our cross country safari to some very interesting places. I strapped the machine on, a snug fit, settled into the immaculate blanket stitched leather seats and fired up the 100hp Rotax. With a bit of choke for a cold start, she burst to life. Taxiing is very easy. There is great tail wheel ground control and powerful brakes if needed. I lined up on the runway at Eva’s Field, waited for the temperatures to get into the green, did the run up and vital actions, set first flap and she was all set to take to the sky. Opening the throttle, she leaped into the air. We used very little runway and the climb-out was great. In all aspects of flight I found she has responsive and well-balanced flight controls. In


ABOVE: Bags are suspended above the elevator tube. BELOW: Jason Beamish with the two Bobbers on the beach.

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slow flight she flew dead straight, and stalling was a non-event in any configuration. Throwing her around is a delight – the Bobber is just an all-round sweet aeroplane.

tandem seating and an open cockpit, it provides unsurpassed visibility, making an ideal platform for anti-poaching patrols, game counts and aerial surveillance.

t he machine was r ewar ding in all conditions

The sensation of freedom becomes an unforgettable experience. For cold weather, cabin heating and a kit for enclosing the entire cabin section are available.

Once the upper air work was done, I set myself up for some circuits to see how she handles the landing, and to prepare for what was to come along our trip. You can really fly her tight on downwind, base and final and have an almost illegal amount of fun.

Thank you to the Flying Frontiers team and family. If anyone wants a proper adventure, make sure to give Craig a call on 082-459-0760.j

Final is set up with full flap and you fly her into a gentle touch down. She really is just such an easy plane to fly. Open power to set sail again and off we went. I did anther two touch and goes and was really impressed at how she handled, especially that day as we had a stiff crosswind at Eva’s. For our safari I got to put around 30 to 40 hours’ worth of adventure into the Bobber. The big tyres made landing on the beaches and remote places safe, and the great handling of the machine was rewarding in all conditions. In conclusion, the Bobber really impressed me. I wanted to hightail it with her back to our hangar at Coves but could see Craig reading my mind, so he kept a close eye on me! What an awesome machine. I loved how she handled and her unique minimalist appearance. I reckon everyone needs one. The Bobber is designed for fun, with

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Quality construction evident in elevator tube and aileron controls.


Sturdy Alaska Baby Bush tail wheel can handle most rough stuff.

SAVAGE BOBBER SPECIFICATIONS ENGINE FUEL TANK CAPACITY PROPELLER WING SPAN LENGTH HEIGHT WING AREA WING CHORD CABIN WIDTH

ROTAX 912 ULS 100hp 5800 rpm 92 litres (24 Gallons) 2M Meglin composite 935 cm (368 in) 640 cm (252 in) 223 cm (87.8 in) 14,2 m2 (152.85 sq ft) 156 cm (61.4 in) 60 cm (23.6 in) June 2021

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REPORT AND PICS BY GARTH CALITZ

PRESIDENTS TROPHY AIR RACE 2021

The Flying Lions put on an immacualte display.

The normally sleepy town of Ermelo became the hub for air racing enthusiasts from 20 to 22 May with the 2021 rendition of the prestigious Presidents Trophy Air Race – the famous PTAR. 56

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Johan Whiteman and Quintin Kruger round turnpoint 1.

THE PTAR HAD BEEN STRUGGLING with the number of entrants dwindling each year, so organisers Rob Jonkers and Jonty Esser came up with a new format and simplified handicapping system. The new format was tried and tested, and proved to work well on the short course Speed Rally Series. Saldanha Bay hosted the “new” format PTAR in 2019 and the feedback from pilots and navigators was positive so the format was adopted for future PTAR’s.

Aeronautical Society were still willing to host the event. The team form Ermelo intermediately went to work and by the time the first aircraft arrived on Wednesday they were ready for a great race. Flight tests were done on the Wednesday and Thursday to insure the handicap issued to each aircraft was as accurate as possible.

B Y T HUR S DAY E V ENI NG T HE E X CI T EMENT WA S B UZ ZI NG

Ermelo was chosen to host the 2020 PTAR, but sadly the Covid-19 pandemic caused the cancellation of the event. With the easing of the lock-down restrictions, SAPFA decided to run with the 2021 PTAR and the Ermelo

By Thursday evening the excitement was buzzing, although the weather was looking worrying. A pre-race briefing was held in the marquee. Race Director Rob Jonkers explained the start procedure for the following day and ran through the rules pertaining to turn points and arrival at the airfield after the race. After a hearty dinner most crews opted for an early night.

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2021 winners Leon Boutell and Martin Meyer get airborne.

Race Day 1 dawned with beautiful blue skies but a blustery north easterly wind which kept the temperature in the low single figures for most of the morning. After the 8:00 briefing the crews made their way to their aircraft to allow the scrutineers to give the planes a once over, ensuring tanks were full and autopilot devices were disabled. Cell phones and other mobile electronic devices were placed in a sealed bag – not to be opened until checked by the judges on landing – unless the competitors were properly lost. The race starter at work.

Leon Boutell and Martin Meyer with winners trophy.

The first day of competition starts with the faster aircraft with the slowest aircraft taking-off last. This means that the competitors fly against the clock and hardly see one another. Once all the aircraft were safely home, everyone was treated to a wonderful sunset display by the Puma Energy Flying Lion Harvards, accompanied by music from the opera Carmen. Brian Emmenis and his Capital Sound team are masters matching music to flying and the beautiful sunset added spectacle. Day 2 of the race takes on a different life as the slowest aircraft depart first with the faster machines chasing them from behind. All aircraft are released at specific times and if they all mange to fly a perfect course, to their handicapped speeds, they should all cross the finish line at the same time.

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Key people - Race Master Rob Jonkers and Safety Officer Nigel Musgarve.


The pilots and navigators allow themselves to be herded into a group photo.

The route for Day 2 was again a figure of eight which saw the competitors crossing over the airfield at the mid-point. The fastest aircraft was getting airborne when the first aircraft passed overhead. The finish was, as planned by the handicappers and starters, a very close affair with all the aircraft arriving within seven minutes of each other. The team of controllers from ATNS were kept very busy with 57 aircraft entering the circuit in close succession, at times there were 20 aircraft on final approach. The scoring team then had to spring into action and start downloading the GPS logger information. The bulk of the crews decided to make for their guest houses after a well deserved beverage to prepare for the formal dinner. The overall winner of the race would only be announced at the formal dinner that was to

be held at the Ermelo Inn later in the day. At the dinner the anticipation was sharp as few had few knew who would be the crowned the 2021 PTAR champion. The evening was kicked off with a welcome note from Brain Emmenis and talks by Theodor Boshoff, the Chairman of the Ermelo Aeronautical Society. Jan Hanekom paid homage to the recently deceased SAPFA stalwart Chris Booysen. After dinner it was prize giving. Leon Boutell and his navigator Martin Meyer managed to edge out all other teams to become the 2021 champions. For Leon it was a particularly special day as he had just learnt that he had qualified for the National Rally Flying team and would be eligible to compete in the World Rally Flying championships taking place in Stellenbosch later this year. j

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ACCIDENT REPORT: JIM DAVIS

B ONA NZ A VFR I NT O I MC

AIRCRAFT ACCIDENT REPORT

AC CI DENT R EP OR T : Time of Accident: ±1517Z Date of Accident: 13/09/2012 Aircraft Registration: ZS-TVR Type of Operation: Private flight Type of Aircraft: Beech F33A Pilot-in-command License Type: Private Pilot Age: 64 License Valid: No Pilot-in-command Flying Experience:

• This report is to promote aviation safety and not to establish legal liability. • The CAA’s report contains padding, repetition, poor English and incompetence. So, in the interest of clarity and readability, I have had to correct and paraphrase extensively

Briefly The pilot and two passengers, took off from Newcastle on Thursday morning, 13 September 2012 on a private flight and landed at Pietermaritzburg at 0523Z. The aircraft was parked and the occupants attended a conference in the city. That afternoon they returned for their intended flight home. At

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Total Flying Hours: 1 047,4 Hours on Type : 984,9 Last point of departure: Pietermaritzburg Next point of intended landing: Newcastle Location of the accident site: Ophatha, near Cato Ridge (GPS position; 29° 38.679’ South 030° 42.236’ East, elevation 1 574 feet) Mete.: Surface wind 130°/10 kts; Temp 15°C, Dew point 12°C, Overcast Number of people on board: 1+2 No. of people injured: 0 No. of people killed: 1+2 1507Z ATC cleared them for takeoff on runway 16 under special VFR. Approximately ten minutes after takeoff a witness heard an aircraft flying above the clouds, and seconds later he saw it descending through the clouds and spiraling down. It remained in a spiral until it impacted in dense bush and mountainous terrain. Following impact it was consumed by fire. All three occupants were fatally injured.


Weather

Pilot history

The satellite and radar data indicated broken to overcast low-level clouds in the FAPM area. In the area of the accident site thundershowers and poor visibility prevailed.

The pilot took over 80 hours to get his PPL, 63 being on Cessnas and 20 on a Beech 85. He only flew the Beech 33/35 after obtaining his PPL.

The captain of a domestic flight, Link 741, stated that they had to enter into a holding pattern for approximately 20 minutes to the north of FAPM where they waited for thunderstorm activity to move away to the east before they could start the approach for Runway 16.

“ I adv is e d t he s t ude nt to f l y w it hout autopilot mor e r e gular l y “

The weather was IMC. Link 741 broke cloud at 2 200 feet AGL in haze with limited visibility for the approach. The pilot told ATC he would not advise a VFR departure. The pilot of ZS-TVR, however, opted to continue with the takeoff regardless. He had not obtained a weather briefing.

In 2000, the year his PPL was issued, he retracted the landing gear instead of the flaps on a V-tail Bonanza at Newcastle. And ten years later, also at Newcastle, in the accident aircraft, he forgot to lower the undercarriage.

Ten years before the fatal accident he flew 13 hours of IF and 3 hours of night dual in order to get his night rating. There is no mention of night solo. The night rating instructor wrote, “I advised the student to fly without autopilot more regularly in order to improve accuracy”.

Oblivious to advice, the pilot took off and headed east into the thunderstorms.

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Avionics The aircraft was well equipped with Bendix avionics including two nav/comms, DME, marker beacons, ADF, transponder, stormscope, radar altimeter, ELT and a two axis auto pilot.

Communications

terrain16,2 nautical miles east of FAPM. It was in a vertical trajectory during impact. The wreckage was contained at one location, without any debris field. The landing gear was retracted. The empennage remained intact and both elevators and the rudder control surfaces were still attached at their hinging points. The cabin and both wings were consumed by fire.

The pilot requested takeoff clearance, but ATC advised him that the CTR was in IMC. The communication between the pilot and ATC lasted approximately 20 minutes. At 1508Z ATC cleared the aircraft for takeoff under special VFR. The transcript indicates that the pilot was agitated by ATC asking him what his intention was several times.

The manifold pressure and fuel flow indicator was the only gauge that presented a readable display. It showed 28,5 inches, and 11 to 12 US gallons per hour. These were both within the expected range.

No mayday call was picked up.

The pilot did not file a flight plan. Improper flight planning played a major role in this accident.

Wreckage and impact information The aircraft crashed in dense bush in mountainous

Flight Planning

During communication with ATC the pilot requested to fly via Greytown, 36 nm north-east of FAPM, and then to climb above cloud and fly

Manifold and fuel pressure were within normal limits. The pilot had not throttled back.

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direct to Newcastle. The aircraft crashed 16,2 nm east of FAPM. The pilot’s decision to take this route took him directly into thunderstorms. When ATC issued the pilot with a special VFR clearance, they were very specific that he should remain clear of cloud and in sight of ground at all times. The pilot displayed an over eagerness to get home.

remember what they learn. Unfortunately this guy wanted to run before he could walk. He bought a Bonanza while he was still training. Hmmm, this brings to mind the old saying “more money than sense”. As a general rule converting to a 210, a Bonnie, a Mooney or a Comanche before you have 200 hours is pushing it. And so it turned out in this case – before the ink had dried on his license he crashed it by pulling up the gear, instead of the flaps, after landing. Next red flag, perhaps also smallish, ten years later he lands with the gear up. Another old saying, “There are those pilots who have done it, and those who are going to.” And one more, “It can happen to anyone.”

he is gett ing impat ie nt w it h ATC

During this investigation it became apparent that the pilot was very dependent on the autopilot. It is believed that, due to thunderstorm turbulence the auto-pilot probably disengaged, forcing the pilot to fly manually. By the time the pilot became aware of the situation, the aircraft had most probably entered an unusual flight attitude from which he needed to recover without any visible horizon. The first time the pilot became aware of the ground was probably when the aircraft came out of the clouds in a nose down-spiral with a high rate of descent. The pilot was unable to start recovery prior to impact.

JIM’S COMMENTS There’s quite a bit going on here - it’s more than a simple VFR into IMC. If I knew the pilot’s history there’s no way I would have sat in the back of that aircraft. Some of the red flags are small and may seem unimportant - but they are there nonetheless, while others are huge things being waved in your face - like marshals at a grand prix. Let’s run through them. A smallish one to start with. The pilot only started flying when he was 52. In my book this is great. Older pilots often take a little longer to learn, but they generally learn better - they are inclined to

Sorry, I don’t buy any of it. Things didn’t just happen to you – baring mechanical failures – you cause things to happen. There are tens of thousands of pilots with a lifetime of flying who have never landed gear up. Those who have done it didn’t have their finger out at a critical phase of the flight. The next little red flag is a night rating. Yep, a good thing if you are working towards a com. Or if you plan to do a fair amount of night flying. In this case my intuition tells me that he is just one of the many pilots who claim they want the rating just in case they get home half an hour after dark. This is generally bull. The more honest ones say just in case I get caught out with bad weather. But no one admits that it will make them feel more comfortable doing illegal auto-pilot IF - which is often the bottom line. His instructor suspects that to be the case, and advises him to practice hand-flying on instruments instead of using the auto pilot. I suspect that his limited exposure to instrument flying may have given him a false sense of security around clouds. Are you starting to feel perhaps you also wouldn’t want to be in the back with this guy in dodgy weather? It gets worse. He has a serious case of get-home-itis. He is in a hurry, he hasn’t obtained a met report, he hasn’t June 2021

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filed a flight plan, he is getting impatient with ATC, he won’t listen to the advice of an airline pilot who has just flown in that very weather. And worst of all, he hasn’t done any flight planning apart from telling ATC that he plans to get on top of the weather. Really…with thunderstorms? And how does he plan to get there with no instrument rating? Auto pilot of course. You still want to fly with him? Let’s have a closer look at the weather. The system was moving rapidly eastwards – but the pilot elected to divert to the east - slap into it. Had he waited half an hour, or diverted slightly to the west, he would have been in clear air all the way home. During the final graveyard spiral the pilot must have been paralyzed by fear – he didn’t even throttle back. Allow me a little rant because I am tired of repeating the same old story of a pilot who ignores

the weather and takes off against competent advice. If you think this is an unduly brutal attack on a pilot who is no longer around to defend himself – you are right. And some of it is based on conjecture because we don’t have all the facts. But we do know that he killed two trusting pax. Perhaps the final red flag is the fact that the pilot’s license was not valid. Although this may not alter his physical handling of the controls, or even his decision making, it points to his attitude which is a major safety concern. Also no license can invalidate his insurance, and possibly the life insurance of his passengers. I wonder if he had told them he didn’t have a valid license. This is not a legal debate - it’s a flight safety article and if it keeps just one pilot – perhaps you – out of trouble, then I have done my job. Rant over – just as the thunderstorms were soon over.

The Bonanza impacted almost vertically.

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TAKE-HOME STUFF

• Never buy, or fly, more aeroplane than you can handle. Baby steps first. • If you start losing control in IMC Beech recommend chucking out the gear. • A night rating is not an invitation to stick your nose into cloud. • An autopilot is also not an invitation to stick your nose into cloud.

APPENDIX Disorientation (from POH) Disorientation can occur in a variety of ways. During flight, inner ear balancing mechanisms are subjected to varied forces not normally experienced on the ground. This, combined with loss of outside visual reference, can cause vertigo. False interpretations (illusions) result, and may confuse the pilot’s conception of the altitude and position of his airplane. Under VFR conditions, the visual sense, using the horizon as a reference, can override the illusions. Under low visibility conditions (night, fog, clouds, haze, etc.) the illusion predominates. Only through awareness of these illusions, and proficiency in instrument flight procedures, can an airplane be operated safely in a low visibility environment. Flying in fog or dust, cloud banks, or very low visibility, with strobe lights or rotating beacons turned on can contribute to vertigo. They should be turned off in these conditions, particularly at night.

• The met office is there to give you a safe and comfortable flight - use it. • Plan the flight and then fly the plan. • If what you are doing sounds like the start of an accident report, perhaps it is – slow down and take stock. • Flying without a valid license is illegal, it’s not fair to your passengers or your family. • Please don’t give me reason to write about you. do so. This can happen when the pilot’s physical condition will not permit him to concentrate on his instruments; when the pilot is not proficient in flying instrument conditions in the airplane he is flying; or, when the pilot’s workload of flying by reference to his instruments is augmented by such factors as turbulence. Even an instrument rated pilot encountering instrument conditions, intentional or unintentional, should ask himself whether or not he is sufficiently alert and proficient in the airplane he is flying, to fly under low visibility conditions and in the turbulence anticipated or encountered. If any doubt exists, the flight should not be made, or it should be discontinued as soon as possible. The result of vertigo is loss of control of the airplane. If the loss of control is sustained, it will result in an excessive speed accident. Excessive speed accidents occur in one of two manners, either as an inflight airframe separation or as a high speed ground impact; and they are fatal accidents in either case. All airplanes are subject to this form of accident.

All pilots should check the weather and use good judgement in planning flights. The VFR pilot should use extra caution in avoiding low visibility conditions. Motion sickness often precedes or accompanies disorientation and may further jeopardize the flight.

For years, Beech Pilot’s Operating Handbooks and FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manuals have contained instructions that the landing gear should be extended in any circumstance in which the pilot encounters IFR conditions which approach the limits of his capability or his ratings.

Disorientation in low visibility conditions is not limited to VFR pilots. Although IFR pilots are trained to look at their instruments to gain an artificial visual reference as a replacement for the loss of a visual horizon, they do not always

Lowering the gear in IFR conditions or flight into heavy or severe turbulence, tends to stabilize the airplane, assists in maintaining proper airspeed, and will substantially reduce the possibility of reaching excessive airspeeds with catastrophic June 2021

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The pilot's decision to fly east is evident in the location of the wreckage.

consequences, even where loss of control is experienced. Excessive speed accidents occur at airspeeds greatly in excess of two operating limitations which are specified in the manuals: Maximum manoeuvring speed and the “red line” or “never exceed” speed. Such speed limits are set to protect the structure of an airplane. For example, flight controls are designed to be used to their

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fullest extent only below the airplane’s maximum manoeuvring speed. As a result, the control surfaces should never be suddenly or fully deflected above the maximum manoeuvring speed. Turbulence penetration should not be performed above that speed. The accidents we are discussing here occur at airspeeds greatly in excess of these limitations. No airplane should ever be flown beyond its FAA approved operating limitations.

j


EAGLES CREEK CLUB HOUSE NOW OPEN TO THE PUBLIC Eagles Creek Club house is now open Wednesday to Sunday 7am to 4pm. Fly in, Drive in or Ride in for breakfast or lunch.

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June 2021

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MINI FEATURE - MARK HOLLIDAY : OUTLANDINGS

This brief reminiscence brings to an end the series of anecdotes from Doc Mark Holliday reflecting on his many outlandings experienced during thirty years of competitive gliding. MY VERY FIRST SA NATIONALS competition was back in the good old days in Vryburg. I had leaking waterbags, so I launched an hour after the field had started and had an enjoyable flight going from storm to storm watching the lightning viciously strike through the lightly raining areas.

my crew Thomas Burki’s relationship with Jackie, who he eventually married. What could be more conducive to intimate conversation than driving hundreds of kilometres across the South African landscape with the biggest sky in the world as your theatre?

a massive storm cut us off

When you are that close to lightning, it looks different and the sound of thunder seems more muted. Since that day I have always felt quite safe going near to lightning as long as I stay out of the rain. The late start worked in my favour as I won, and I wasn’t to win another day at the Nationals for 11 years. That competition saw me land out many times and I am sure that the long retrieves cemented

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One afternoon a massive storm cut us off and I remember Dave Mortimer and I sat in our ASW20s on the Delareyville airfield after dark, balancing our wings as the lightning danced all around us. It was only later that I thought that we were high points on the ground and could have easily been struck. That night however still remains a beautiful and enduring memory. j


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REGISTER REVIEW: RAY WATTS

APRI L 2021

ZS-TDF BD700-1A10 was exported to the USA. Photo Ray Watts.

THE REGISTER REVIEW this month shows the resilience of our economy. Although business still labours under the oppression of Covid-19, on the aviation side things are beginning to recover, judging by the numbers of TCA aircraft added this month. In total there were seven aircraft added, of which one is a new Agusta AW139 helicopter for Rustenburg Platinum Mines, appropriately registered ZS-RPM. This is the fourth time this registration has been used. The first one was a Bell 430 which became ZS-VDM, the second was also an AW139 which became ZS-HHL and was eventually exported to Spain as EC-MLK. The third was again an AW139 and was exported to Italy this month. I have a note in my records saying that an Agusta 109 was also registered ZS-RPM in 1999 but I can only assume that it was not imported.

added are used aircraft and all have come from African countries. There are three new Bell 230s registered this month – all of them ex Ecuador. The NTCA register is still growing with six new aircraft having been added this month. There is also another Gazelle helicopter added. This one has never seen any military service, having spent all its life in Canada and the USA. The number of deletions from the register continue to grow with another nine being noted. One of these was a Robinson R44II that was scrapped and the rest being exported to various countries. One of Solenta’s ATR72 aircraft has gone to a new airline – Green Africa Airlines – which is based in Nigeria. As you can see the rest have scattered all over the world.

There are three n e w B e l l 2 30 s registered

There is another Air Tractor that has come in, as well as a Boeing 737-300 freighter which has returned from Tanzania. All the other aircraft

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One ZT-R registered helicopter was exported to Sweden.


ABOVE: I-RAIO which has now become ZS-RPM.

BELOW MIDDLE: Thew previous ZS-RPM now traded in. Photo Omer Mees. BELOW BOTTOM: ZS-XZD ATR72 has been exported as 5N-GAE.

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ABOVE: ZS-PKV is a freighter B737-300 back from Tanzania. Photo Ray Watts. BELOW MIDDLE: ZS-ZAC is a Let 410 now exported to Algeria.

BELOW BOTTOM: A relatively rare pressurised C210, 9J-DIG which has become ZS-TKJ. Photo Omer Mees.

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ZS-KZG Beechcraft Baron 58 was exported to Zimbabwe. Photo Dave Becker.

There were another twenty-six drones added to the register and twelve were scrapped. On a very sad note, my friend Andrew Pappas succumbed to the dreaded Covid-19 virus in early April. His passing leaves a large gap in the NTCA market. He owned the company that built the highly successful Bat Hawk aircraft that has proved itself over and over again in the fight against wildlife poaching. R.I.P. Andrew.

Tail piece Last week there was an tragic mid-air collision between two flying school Cessna 172s over the Grasmere VOR. My sympathies go out to the owners and staff of the two schools involved as well as the families and friends of the four people killed. By careful out there please. By the time this will be read the 2021 PTAR will have taken place at Ermelo. Please enjoy yourselves and keep safe.j

June 2021

73


A la Carte Restaurant

Weddings & Spa Conferences

Luxury Accommodation

Bush Picnics Game Drives

Bona Bona are the sponsors for our Register Review Page

APRIL 2021 Reg New Registrations ZS-

Manufacturer

Type Name

Serial number

Previous Identity

ZS-KSI

CESSNA AIRCRAFT COMPANY

210N

210-63963

7Q-…, N8243J, ZS-KSI, N6345Y

ZS-PKV

THE BOEING COMPANY

737-300

24789

5X-GBT, ZS-PKV, F-GIXB, F-OGSD, F-GFUI

ZS-RPM

AGUSTA S.P.A

AW139

31907

I-RAIO

ZS-TKH

BEECH AIRCRAFT CORPORATION

200

BB663

5N-HIS

ZS-TKI

RAYTHEON AIRCRAFT COMPANY

B200

BB-1805

5Y-FDE, ZS-TIP, N4205G

ZS-TKJ

CESSNA AIRCRAFT COMPANY

P210N

P210-00721

9J-DIG, N72DH

ZS-XAW

AIR TRACTOR INC

AT 502B

502B-3275

New Registrations ZUZU-IUF

DAVID JAMES SMITH

ANSSEC 58

001

ZU-IUG

MICRO AVIATION SA

BAT HAWK R

0082

ZU-IUH

JABIRU AIRCRAFT (PTY) LTD

J170

375

ZU-JLO

SLING AIRCRAFT (PTY) LTD

SLING 4 TSI

251S

ZU-ROT

JOHN FRANCIS LOCHNER

RAZZO 4411

R12104

ZT-ROU

AEROSPATIALE INDUSTRIES

SA 341 G

1137

N71PU, C-GVHC, N47308, C-HVIT, N90776

CX-DLM, N230LF, N840SF, N8110R, TC-HZH, N23890, C-GFNQ

New Registrations ZT-H ZT-HDA

BELL HELICOPTER CO

BELL 230

23017

ZT-HDB

BELL HELICOPTER CO

BELL 230

23018

CX-LRN, N870SF, N2163J, N390MH, YV-921, N2163J C-GAHJ

ZT-HDC

BELL HELICOPTER CO

BELL 230

23038

CX-MPR,

Aircraft Deleted ZSZS-HGX

ROBINSON HELICOPTER COMPANY

R66

0028

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA as N641RZ

ZS-HSM

ROBINSON HELICOPTER COMPANY

R44 II

12822

SCRAPPED

ZS-HTM

EUROCOPTER

AS 350 B3

7019

CANADA

ZS-KAY

CESSNA AIRCRAFT COMPANY

206H

20608259

KENYA

ZS-KZG

BEECH AIRCRAFT CORPORATION

58

TH-1234

ZIMBABWE

ZS-RPM

AGUSTA S.P.A

AW139

31363

ITALY

ZS-TDF

BOMBARDIER INC

BD-700-1A10

9603

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA as N603GX

ZS-XZD

ATR-GIE AVIONS DE TRANSPORT REGIONAL

ATR72-600

1047

EXPORTED TO NIGERIA aa 5N-GAE

ZS-ZAC

AIRCRAFT INDUSTRIES A.S

L 410 UVP-E20

3001

ALGERIA

EC 120B

1406

EXPORTED TO SWEDEN

Aircraft Deleted ZT-R ZT-RTC

EUROCOPTER

BONA BONA VIDEO 74

June 2021

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75 Contact: Nicola +27 83 449 5868 | nicola@penguinpalace.co.za June 2021


FUEL TABLE www.sv1.co.za Fuel FuelPrices Pricesasasatat01/04/2021 01/04/2021

SA Flyer 2021|06

Pri Prices cesi nclude i ncludeVAT VATbut butexclude excludeany anyservi servicecefees fees AiAirfirfield Avgas Jet eld Avgas JetA1 A1 Baragwanath RR21,50 Baragwanath 21,50 Beaufort RR21,85 RR14,50 BeaufortWest West 21,85 14,50 Bethlehem RR22,97 RR15,62 Bethlehem 22,97 15,62 Bloemfontei RR18,76 RR11,00 Bloemfonteinn 18,76 11,00 Brakpan RR20,80 Brakpan 20,80 Brits RR16,75 Brits 16,75 Cape RR22,79 RR9,51 CapeTown Town 22,79 9,51 Eagles RR22,05 EaglesCreek Creek 22,05 East RR18,61 RR10,04 EastLondon London 18,61 10,04 Ermelo RR20,01 Ermelo 20,01 FiFisantekraal RR21,51 santekraal 21,51 Fly-In RR19,50 Fly-In 19,50 Gari RR21,50 RR14,50 Gariep epDam Dam 21,50 14,50 George R19,77 R11,03 George R19,77 R11,03 Grand RR18,40 RR12,71 GrandCentral Central 18,40 12,71 Hei RR19,60 Heidelberg delberg 19,60 KiKimberley RR17,34 RR10,49 mberley 17,34 10,49 Kitty RR19,60 KittyHawk Hawk 19,60 Klerksdorp R20,13 R14,80 Klerksdorp R20,13 R14,80 Kroonstad RR19,09 RR12,08 Kroonstad 19,09 12,08 Kruger RR19,32 RR12,02 KrugerIntl IntlNelspruit Nelspruit 19,32 12,02 Krugersdorp RR19,60 Krugersdorp 19,60 Lanseri RR20,70 RR14,03 Lanseriaa 20,70 14,03 Margate RR22,50 RR14,00 Margate 22,50 14,00 Morningstar RR20,95 Morningstar 20,95 Mosselbay RR22,75 RR11,65 Mosselbay 22,75 11,65 Nelspruit RR18,86 RR13,05 Nelspruit 18,86 13,05 Oudtshoorn RR17,10 RR12,50 Oudtshoorn 17,10 12,50 Parys RR20,19 RR12,80 Parys 20,19 12,80 Pietermaritzburg RR22,00 RR13,80 Pietermaritzburg 22,00 13,80 PiPietersburg RR18,95 RR11,80 etersburgCiCivivil l 18,95 11,80 Port RR21,40 PortAlfred Alfred 21,40 Port RR21,27 RR12,48 PortElizabeth Elizabeth 21,27 12,48 Potchefstroom RR20,19 RR10,56 Potchefstroom 20,19 10,56 Rand RR19,87 RR13,49 Rand 19,87 13,49 Robertson R18,50 Robertson R18,50 Rustenberg RR18,62 RR13,50 Rustenberg 18,62 13,50 Secunda RR18,98 RR12,19 Secunda 18,98 12,19 Skeerpoort RR17,95 R10,56 Skeerpoort*** ***Customer Customertotocollect collect 17,95 R10,56 Springbok RR20,50 R13,22 Springbok 20,50 R13,22 Springs RR20,50 RR11,50 Springs 20,50 11,50 Stellenbosch RR19,50 Stellenbosch 19,50 Swellendam RR18,90 RR11,40 Swellendam 18,90 11,40 Tempe RR19,73 RR11,79 Tempe 19,73 11,79 Thabazimbe RR20,69 RR13,30 Thabazimbe 20,69 13,30 Ultimate RR21,39 RR14,00 UltimateHeli Heli(Midrand) (Midrand)*** *** 21,39 14,00 Upington RR19,46 RR11,71 Upington 19,46 11,71 Vereeni RR17,88 RR10,32 Vereenigiging ng 17,88 10,32 ViVirgi RR21,27 RR12,48 rgininiaa 21,27 12,48 Welkom RR19,09 RR12,08 Welkom 19,09 12,08 Wi RR21,25 Wings ngsPark ParkELEL 21,25 Witbank RR19,50 Witbank 19,50 RR18,45 RR10,56 18,45 10,56 Wonderboom Wonderboom Worcester No contact Worcester No contact *** ***Heli Helicopters coptersonly only

Tel: +27 14 576 2522 Ina: +27 82 553 9611 Email: aviation@sv1.co.za Marina: +27 82 924 3015 Co-ordinates: S25°50’37 E27°41’28 76 GPS June 2021 Import/Export no. 21343829

Fuel FuelPrices Pricesasasatat03/05/2021 03/05/2021 Pri Prices cesi nclude i ncludeVAT VATbut butexclude excludeany anyservi servicecefees fees AiAirfirfield Avgas Jet eld Avgas JetA1 A1 Baragwanath R21.50 Baragwanath R21.50 Beaufort R21-50 R14.70 BeaufortWest West R21-50 R14.70 Bethlehem RR22,97 RR15,62 Bethlehem 22,97 15,62 Bloemfontei R18.15 R10.42 Bloemfonteinn R18.15 R10.42 Brakpan R20.80 Brakpan R20.80 Brits R18.96 Brits R18.96 Cape R23.67 R9.05 CapeTown Town R23.67 R9.05 Eagles R23.12 EaglesCreek Creek R23.12 East R19.46 R10.29 EastLondon London R19.46 R10.29 Ermelo R20.01 Ermelo R20.01 FiFisantekraal R20.01 santekraal R20.01 Fly-In R19.50 Fly-In R19.50 Gari R21,50 R14,80 Gariep epDam Dam R21,50 R14,80 George R20.64 R11.37 George R20.64 R11.37 Grand R20.70 R13.80 GrandCentral Central R20.70 R13.80 Hei R20,50 Heidelberg delberg R20,50 Hoedspruit Not Hoedspruit NotAvbl Avbl R14.06 R14.06 New New KiKimberley R18.39 R10.65 mberley R18.39 R10.65 Kitty R21,50 KittyHawk Hawk R21,50 Klerksdorp R20.13 R14.80 Klerksdorp R20.13 R14.80 Kroonstad R19.09 R12.08 Kroonstad R19.09 R12.08 Kruger R19.50 R1.95 KrugerIntl IntlNelspruit Nelspruit R19.50 R1.95 Krugersdorp R19,60 Krugersdorp R19,60 Lanseri R20.70 R14.10 Lanseriaa R20.70 R14.10 Margate R24.13 R14.89 Margate R24.13 R14.89 Middelburg R20,70 New Middelburg R20,70 New Morningstar 20.55 Morningstar 20.55 Mosselbay R22.90 R13.05 Mosselbay R22.90 R13.05 Nelspruit R19.44 R12.88 Nelspruit R19.44 R12.88 Oudtshoorn R19.05 R12,50 Oudtshoorn R19.05 R12,50 Parys R20.19 R12.80 Parys R20.19 R12.80 Pietermaritzburg R21.70 R14.10 Pietermaritzburg R21.70 R14.10 PiPietersburg R20.10 R12.75 etersburgCiCivivil l R20.10 R12.75 Port R21.40 PortAlfred Alfred R21.40 Port R23.95 R13.74 PortElizabeth Elizabeth R23.95 R13.74 Potchefstroom R20.19 R12.80 Potchefstroom R20.19 R12.80 Rand R20.73 R13.86 Rand R20.73 R13.86 Robertson R18.70 Robertson R18.70 Rustenberg R19.10 R14.10 Rustenberg R19.10 R14.10 Secunda R18.98 R12.19 Secunda R18.98 R12.19 Skeerpoort R17.95 R10.56 Skeerpoort*** ***Customer Customertotocollect collect R17.95 R10.56 Springbok R20.50 R12.65 Springbok R20.50 R12.65 Springs R20,50 R11,50 Springs R20,50 R11,50 Stellenbosch R19.50 Stellenbosch R19.50 Swellendam R18.90 R11.40 Swellendam R18.90 R11.40 Tempe R19,73 R11.85 Tempe R19,73 R11.85 Thabazimbe R20.69 R13.30 Thabazimbe R20.69 R13.30 Ultimate No Contact UltimateHeli Heli(Midrand) (Midrand)*** *** No Contact Upington R19.08 R11.34 Upington R19.08 R11.34 Vereeni R19.31 R10,22 Vereenigiging ng R19.31 R10,22 ViVirgi R22.98 R13.74 rgininiaa R22.98 R13.74 Welkom R19.09 R12.08 Welkom R19.09 R12.08 Wi R21,25 Wings ngsPark ParkELEL R21,25 Witbank R19.50 Witbank R19.50 R17.95 R10.56 R17.95 R10.56 Wonderboom Wonderboom Worcester R21.79 Worcester R21.79 *** ***Heli Helicopters coptersonly only


SA Flyer 2016|11

• SKEERPOORT • THABAZIMBI • PARYS AIRFIELD • ULTIMATE HELIPORT, MIDRAND • POTCHEFSTROOM AIRPORT

Tel: +27 14 576 2522 Ina: +27 82 553 9611 Email: aviation@sv1.co.za Marina: +27 82 924 3015

WE ALSO HAVE AN ON-SITE HELI-PAD FOR CONVENIENT REFUELING. CALL US FOR A QUOTE OR VISIT OUR WEBSITE FOR MORE INFORMATION.

SEALED 200L AVGAS DRUMS • SEALED 200L JET A1 DRUMS • AVGAS 100LL • JET A1 • PETROL • ILLUMINATING PARAFFIN • DIESEL • LUBRICANTS

June 2021

77


TEXT AND IMAGES - CLINTON CARROLL

DIRECTOR: AERONAUTICAL AVIATION; LANSERIA

AVIONICS – A TRUE STORY HOW THE GFC 600 SAVED MY BACON

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June 2021

When you lose an engine in a twin - the GFC 600 autopilot is a co-pilot that can be a life saver.


I often get asked, “Why are avionics so expensive?” or “What is the point in upgrading and old aircraft?”, or I get told; “I don’t want to over capitalise on my aircraft”. At the end of the day, I always ask my clients one question. “What do you use your aircraft for and what type of flying do you do?” THE ANSWERS ALWAYS DIFFER. Fortunately the beauty of the new avionics packages available in the market today make customising a solution that meets the mission or brief very easy. The options can also be tailored to suit various budgets. Avionics have a serious role to play in how we navigate the skies today. It is essential for situational awareness, and the development of avionics leads the aviation industry in all aspects. Avionics has become the ‘brain’ of what we fly. Legislation tries to keep up with the new capabilities being launched but as soon as one approval becomes available, so the software/hardware has grown to new abilities.

damper which is essential for passengers in the back of a twin, plus it has VNAV and IAS hold. In late January I needed to help a client with his avionics in Mossel Bay. After an early departure, 3h30 later I landed and parked on the ramp. We spent most of the morning sorting out some software issues on his aircraft with the sun beating down on us like we were in the middle of a desert. We had a quick bite to eat when we finished, I refuelled the baron and was on my way back to Lanseria. This is where things got tricky. I departed off Runway 09, straight towards the coastline. George Tower routed me out to sea due to other IFR arrivals. They kept me at 2500ft and once I was at least 15nm out over the bay they cleared me direct to OKSOP, an RNAV intersection, and cleared me for the climb to FL115.

T h e GF C 6 0 0 w a s a c o -p i l o t lik e no other

We bought our Baron 58 three years ago with the vision of having an aircraft to demonstrate Garmin’s latest and greatest technology. It’s one thing playing with a screen on a test bench or seeing a video on how the new autopilot works, but to fly and experience it in real life is something else. Never did we imagine we would get to see how it saves lives in real life. One of the most important factors for me, being the pilot of this aircraft, was to have accurate engine information, situational awareness, good IFR capability as well as a reliable autopilot. Especially considering we were going to use the aircraft as a “we come to you” value added service too. We opted for the Garmin GFC 600 Autopilot during this process as it has a yaw

I had the autopilot engaged with the yaw damper, so I pressed NAV to couple to the GPS route and pre-selected FL115 for the climb. I selected an IAS hold of 138 kts as this is the Baron’s best cruise climb speed. The aircraft obediently rolled its wings left onto heading, pulled its nose up and started the climb. Monitoring the precision the GFC 600 flies is always a thrill. As I stretched across to pick up my flight planning paperwork from the right hand seat, I heard a sudden change to the sound of the engines and felt the swing from an abrupt loss of power. This is where training kicks in. Having only around 50 hours on twins, I am not highly June 2021

79


ABOVE LEFT: A Garmin pilot's watch should be part of every pilot's basic equipment. ABOVE RIGHT: A stormscope is invalauble in helping you pick a way through Charlie Bravos. BELOW: A well equipped pilot uses all tools at his disposal.

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June 2021


experienced in this type of situation. After test flying various aircraft post maintenance in my career and having my fair share of emergencies, this was my first one, on my own, in my own aircraft. I followed the drill; gear up, flaps up, identify: dead leg - dead engine, wait, what..... well this was different. I confirmed the gear and flaps were up but the rudder pedals were not fighting me at all. No dead leg to identify the dead engine. The GFC 600 yaw damper took the yaw in its stride and held the aircraft straight on its own. A little disconcerting, considering this is not what I had been taught.

maintained the speed above blue line and with the right side engine at full power, controlled the speed to allow me to climb, gaining valuable altitude in an emergency, especially over water. The Engine Management System helped in a huge way in diagnosing and giving me the essential information I needed to make an informed decision to feather and land. The rest of the equipment was brilliant in helping me with my situational awareness and getting me back to Mossel Bay in the shortest time possible, considering I had never flown there before today. I had woken up at 5 am, driven to Lanseria, fuelled the plane, flown 3h30 to Mosel Bay, worked in the scorching sun for at least two hours, fuelled again, had a quick bite to eat and taken off again for another 3h30 hrs home.

this was my first e m e r g e n c y, o n my own, in my own aircraft

On checking the Engine Management system (EMS) I could see immediately I had no fuel flow or fuel pressure on the left engine. So that must be my problem. I disconnected the autopilot to confirm this, and the aircraft yawed to the left as I was expecting. A quick engagement of the autopilot took care of the yaw again and I selected IAS HOLD at Blue line +10kts. Now I knew the aircraft would not stall, it was flying straight and undistracted, I could apply myself to diagnosing the engine issue.

I tried the electric fuel pump and the engine came back to life, but it was very rough. I confirmed on the EGT’s that two cylinders were not firing. It was so rough that I decided to rather shut it down completely and feather the prop.

I was tired and slightly fatigued from the sun, so to have the avionics look after the flying was a welcome relief. I’ve always said it would never happen to me, but it did, and it can happen at any time. The following day my AMO had flown down to come and change the mechanical fuel pump on the engine so I could get home for the weekend. This turned into an extremely long day as we had no hangar to work in, so the pump had to be changed in the baking sun.

Everything went smoothly from there and I landed without incident.

When the fuel pump was removed, we could see it had a complete failure of the vanes and all the filters in the system were now full of debris. We cleaned all the filters and flushed the fuel system. Debris from the pump was blocking the fuel nozzles, which is why I saw what I did on the EGT’s and why I decided to shut it down and feather the prop.

On reflection of what had happened, I realised what an asset it was to have those avionics, especially a very capable autopilot, during this sequence of events. The GFC 600 took care of the massive yaw from the asymmetric thrust, it

A few ground runs and a fuel pressure adjustments later, she was purring like a kitten once more. Later in the afternoon, with the sun already starting to creep down, I refuelled and it was time to head home.

The Baron was still climbing on one, getting me valuable height, and flying straight, so I decided to declare the emergency with George and route back to Mossel Bay.

June 2021

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I took off on 09 again and turned back out to sea for the climb and routing back to Lanseria. This turned into quite a trip, and having been in the sun the entire day, I was sunburnt and tired. I levelled off at FL115 and sat back with the GFC 600 engaged and for the first time that day I could relax. I was listening to the various communications with Cape Town and quickly realised that the weather en-route that was predicted to be overcast was turning into thunderstorms. I was still a good 30 minutes from them. I used the Baron’s radar and Storm Scope to monitor what was happening in the distance. There seemed to be quite a big gap between two cells and I headed in that direction. I was met with lighting off to the left and right and some rain through the middle, but nothing too severe. I popped out the other side into a beautiful sunset.

I had declared an emergency so was very happy I didn't need the rescue services.

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June 2021

The rest of the flight home was uneventful until the descent into Lanseria. Just before TOD, the whole sequence of events from the day before happened again. Loss of power on the left engine, loss of fuel flow, etc. This time, when I put the electric pump on the engine came back to life and ran smoothly so I continued the descent and landed at Lanseria. Again, the GFC 600 took all the pressure out of the situation and held the aircraft steady while I got the engine running again. After putting the Baron away in the hangar that night, I considered the events of the previous two days. I am 100% convinced things would have ended differently if I did not have all the information at hand to make my decisions. The GFC 600 was a co-pilot like no other and kept me safe the entire time and ensured I was home with my family that Friday night. j

Safe on the ground - the mechanical fuel pump was a the cuplrit.


June 2021

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Events by 2021 ZIM AIR RALLY

NEWCASTLE AIRSHOW

2 June - 6 June Charles Prince Airport FVCP zimairrally@gmail.com Marion Kalweit +263 77 257 0009

5 June Newcastle airfield Contact Johan Pieters E-mail: Johan@champ.co.za Cell: 082 923 0078

BOTSWANA AIR RACE AND AIR SHOW

AVIATION AFRICA EXPO

29 July – 31 July Matsieng Gaborone hentie@dwddrilling.com www.botswana-airshow.com

14 & 15 October 2021 Kigali Rwanda www.aviationafrica.aero Alison Weller: alison@accessgroup.aero

DRONES AND UNMANNED AVIATION CONFERENCE 24 June - 25 June Emperors Palace Convention Centre Contact Mandaza: E-mail: info@12stonereality.co.za

Cell: 063 580 6400

SAPFA WORLD RALLY CHAMPIONSHIPS 14 - 19 November Stellenbosch Contact Mary de Klerk: maryd@expandingbranding.co.za

Cell: 084 880 9000

Flying in Africa – that’s what we love

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June 2021


Flying in Africa that’s what we love!

Comprehensive airfield information, up-to-date aeronautical data, friendly and efficient customer support, easy Flight Planning, electronic logbook, In-flight Navigation with EasyCockpit, Weather overlays, Weather cams, Events notification ... you have it all.

www.aviationdirect.co.za • info@aviationdirect.co.za • +27 11 465 2669 •June 0722021 340 994385


STORY BY CRAIG LANG, PHOTOS BY SHANE DOYLE. PART 1

2 0 2 1 PA R T 1 :

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A thin wisp of smoke rose from behind some bushes on the far side of the rock pool as we swam in the crystal clear cold water of a Wild Coast stream. Movement above the little waterfall some 50m away caught our eye, and out of nowhere stepped the figure of a young woman with long hair, and to our amazement, walked topless across the waterfall carrying what looked like a small bow and arrow. Freedom - the five planes on the beach.

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Cullen flies low over the beach before landing.

NOW, ADMITTEDLY we’d been in the bush for 2 days, but not long enough to hallucinate a mirage of this nature. When we’d all made sure we’d seen the same thing, we noticed a long haired and bearded figure of a chap approaching us from the little encampment that was the source of the smoke. We established he was taking care of a young woman who had spent the past 3 years studying to be a herbalist or sangoma amongst a local isiXhosa tribe, and in her final rights of passage, had to camp out and be self-sufficient before her graduation.

we landed on a f lat and deser ted stretch of beach

This was the second day of our Savage Safari, and we had landed on a remote grassy ridge above the spectacular cliffs of Waterfall Bluff on the Transkei Wild Coast.

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June 2021

Our trip had started the afternoon before, from a grey and overcast Eva’s Field, near Hilton in the KZN Midlands, the base for African Bushflying Safaris and our Flying Frontiers operation. We’d made a short flight from Eva’s to a flat-topped mountain to the east of Pietermaritzburg, landing under a low cloud base, where under the watchful eye of some local cattle, we had pitched tents and started a campfire. We had an interesting mix of characters in our group: myself, flying my Savage Cub, my 20 year old son Cullen, flying the Savage Classic I’d ferried back from Uganda in late 2019 and his friend Tyron Gibbs, flying his recently acquired Classic ZU-SAV. I’d invited Jason Beamish, well known South African aerobatic pilot and personality to fly our red Bobber as a guest pilot, and along with Patrick Warnking from Switzerland, who


On the beach.

owns the striking all-black Savage Bobber, made up the five pilots on the tour. I was also very fortunate to convince an old photographer friend of mine, Shane Doyle, to join us as official photographer for the safari, and to trust this motley crew of pilots to keep him alive over 10 days of flying the South African back-country. Brave man, this Doylie! My plan for the trip was two-fold: I wanted to explore a new route for our Flying Safari operation, and secondly, I wanted to showcase the true ruggedness and off-field capabilities of the Savage range of bush planes. Our routing would take us along the Wild Coast to the Kei River, up towards Gariep and then along the Orange River to Augrabies, and from there north to the Hakskeenpan and the Kgalagadi, before turning back and routing south of Kimberley and through the Free State back to KZN.

So with some generous sponsorship from Zlin Aviation (Savage Aircraft) and Beringer Aero, we set off with full tanks and luggage compartments overflowing with food and supplies for 10 days on 21 March. After a wet first night, we struck camp soon after sunrise, and took off for the coast, stopping to top up our fuel at Umkomaas Airfield on the way to the Wild Coast. The Umkomaas crew of Noel, Brad and Nic were accommodating as always, helping us get fuel and breakfast, and by mid-morning we were heading south along the coast, low level, getting used to the five aircraft flying together in loose formation (until Jason sneaks up under your wing to have a photo taken - this became a pattern for the whole trip!), and figuring out the best positions for Shane to get photos from the rear seat. We’d recently installed sliding

Re x f i e l d i s a b u s h -p i l o t s paradise

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windows in our Savages to accommodate photographers on our tours. There’s nothing more frustrating than perspex reflections on potentially great photos. Once beyond Port Edward the coastline clears of houses and flats, and the deserted, pristine beaches of the Wild Coast beckon you lower until you’re just clear of the raging surf, breathing in the salty sea air, the 100Hp Rotax engines performing to their full potential. This is flying in its purest form. We flew for 90 minutes over cattle lazing on the white sand, over rolling grassy hillsides and the rocky shoreline with angry waves crashing with towering spray like fingers reaching up to engulf our planes as we passed overhead. Needing to empty bladders and stretch our 6 foot something frames, we landed on a flat and deserted stretch of beach, a first for a couple of the guys on the trip. As is always the case in Africa, a deserted stretch of beach or bush is seldom deserted for long. A crew of curious young locals soon appeared, and cheerfully hung around for some photos and selfies before drifting off up the dunes to watch our takeoff.

Setting up camp - first night.

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Winging our way south, we were soon approaching our destination above Waterfall Bluff. I’d flown this stretch of coastline many times, and had scouted a campsite the month before with Cullen and Tyron, so we knew where we had to land. The wind was blowing 10-15kts and helped make the tricky landing on the extremely bumpy grass ridge very manageable. Soon we had all five aircraft securely tied down for the night and were again pitching camp before taking the short walk to the pool where our Sangoma Maiden had made her appearance. The sunset from atop the cliffs was breathtaking, and with the drone up, we managed to get some wonderful photos and video of the planes lining the horizon with the Indian Ocean sparkling in the background. Tyron and Shane did a sterling job of feeding us, and as a light drizzle began to fall, a tired but happy crew settled down in our tents. Before long, what would become the familiar sound of loud snoring would shatter the silence. No name mentioned, but you know who you are….. Morning coffee and rusks helped start the day,


ABOVE: The Bobber on the beach. BELOW: Welding the Bobber exhaust at the Savannah Factory.

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Passing Hole in the Wall.

and soon we had packed up camp, loaded and pre-flighted the wet and cold aircraft, and were backtracking the bumpy ridge to take off over the cliffs and the ocean 500ft below. The cool calm air of the coastal morning made flying a pleasure. Passing over pods of dolphins and the occasional turtle or manta ray, we made good time past Port St. Johns towards Hole-in-theWall, a rocky piece of hillside isolated some 50m offshore, with a prominent hole that the surf rages through.

noise. We soon spotted the clean break in the exhaust pipe on #3 cylinder, which had cracked through. After removing the cowling, and some head-scratching, we decided on a repair there and then. No alternative was available. So with my Leatherman we cut open a can of tuna, cutting a strip the right size, and with the use of some duct tape to hold the tin in place, we clamped one of our strong GoPro strut mount clamps around the tuna tin. Satisfied with our field repair, I opted to fly the Bobber on to Wavecrest, where we planned to stop for lunch. The plane started and flew perfectly normally, and our repair held firm. Relieved, we landed at Wavecrest from where I made contact with Dave Prioleau from Savannah Aircraft in

Pa s s i n g o v e r pods of dolphins and the occas ional tur tle or mant a ray

Fairly soon thereafter, Jason reported a change in engine noise, and we conducted a precautionary landing on a flat stretch of beach on a river inlet to investigate the source of the

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East London, and made arrangements to fly to them after lunch to have the exhaust welded up. The flight from Wavecrest to Robertsvale, home of Savannah Aircraft Africa, was scenic and uneventful. The Savannah guys quickly had the Bobber’s exhaust off and tig welded back up again. There were one or two other small issues which they were very kind to help sort out and my PTT was working intermittently, so that was replaced. By this time we had decided to refuel and stay the night in a nearby BnB, before heading off the next morning for Rexfield, home to the Wardle family. As usual, the famous Eastern Cape hospitality came to the fore, and we had the most incredible help and hospitality from Dave, his wife Debbie, Jeff and the rest of the guys at Savannah. We had a slow start the next day in some pretty crappy weather, and unfortunately had to route at higher altitude than we would have preferred up the Kei River. I’ve flown a number of times up the Kei, low level, and it is one of the most beautiful stretches of river and bush I have

flown - wild, rugged and untamed, real frontier country. But this morning a strong northerly wind was blowing, and we got hammered whenever we descended too close to the river canyon. A couple of bumpy hours later we emerged onto a plateau near Cathcart, and made our way to Rexfield. Reid had flown out to meet us and guided us into his home strip in his beautifully maintained Kitfox, with his young daughter in the passenger seat. Reid and his brother Mark, extensive stock farmers in the Cathcart area, are both flying mad. They have mowed a dozen or more firebreaks all over their farms, allowing them to land and inspect livestock, water and fences from their aircraft. Mark soon flew over from his home strip in his Bushbaby and joined us in a flight of seven taildraggers as we were given the guided tour of the farm and the numerous firebreaks. After some playing in the wind, Reid guided us into the airstrip adjacent to his rustic little bush camp, which was still a work in progress. The vital

Lining up to take off next morning.

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amenities such as gas-powered hot shower and flush toilets were in place, and soon we had a fire going in the little boma while we pitched tents and set up camp. Reid had arranged some beers and braai meat for us, which was a welcome treat, and we enjoyed a great evening around the fire, albeit a little damp in the evening drizzle. Reid is planning on covering the boma with a roof in the future, and adding one or two further creature comforts. A low cloud base the next morning didn’t allow us to leave the Wardles, although we did fit in about an hour of playing around on the little runways near camp. Rexfield is a bush-pilots paradise, and with the right aircraft (Savages!) you could spend days challenging your flying skills and trying out the various approaches into the fields, some uphill, some downhill, some sloped, some one way in and out….the list just goes on. We managed to fly up to Reid’s house

Sunrise from Table Mountain in a Valley of 1000 Hills.

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and refuel the aircraft, but as the rain came down, resigned ourselves to spending another night and to only head out for the Orange River the next day. Reid settled us into accommodation at Thomas River, a tiny privately owned railway station dating back over a century. The railway lines are long gone, but the buildings are beautifully maintained, and are basically a museum to the colonial days of the eastern Cape. The accommodation was basic but comfortable, and the meal from the little restaurant was a delightful surprise. A few stiff beverages kept us warm, as we settled in for a comfortable night’s sleep. Tomorrow would be a long day, as we were determined to make up for lost time, and would be in the air for over seven hours…. (…. to be continued) j


EAGLE AIR -

DEDICATED TO FLIGHT TRAINING EXCELLENCE

WONDERBOOM

AIRPORT

REVIEW June 2021

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Companies

Eagle Air Flight School was established in 2005 and few could have predicted that just fifteen short years later the school would have reached the heights this Eagle has achieved. Father and daughter team - the Managing Director Iemei Mendillo with her father Tommy Tseng - also a Director.

EAGLE AIR CURRENTLY HAS OVER 400 full-time students who are guided on their aviation journey by a highly experienced team of instructors with a combined 60,000 hours experience. One of the secrets to the success of Eagle Air is the refreshing attitude towards training and the family feel that everyone embraces. This family atmosphere forms the Eagle Air ethos – yet without jeopardising standards or discipline. Although Eagle Air have a company hierarchy that is adhered to, they have developed an

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open-door approach, enabling students and pilots to liaise directly with management – or with the directors when needed. Eagle Air pride themselves in not only teaching their students to fly – and fly well, but also in preparing them for the challenges they will face as professional pilots, whether they choose to follow the airline route, or any other commercial aviation operation. At Eagle Air the students and staff are always encouraged to maintain their individuality, yet


The Eagle Team.

become an active part of the collective. This guarantees that students will never become just a number and get lost in the system. Every student’s progress is monitored individually by management to ensure that every student always receives the necessary attention to obtain the best results in the least amount of time. Each week the students’ numerous achievements are recognised on Eagle Air’s social media to congratulate and celebrate with them. Eagle Air feels this forms part of making each student feel valued and that their hard work and dedication are recognised. The school is also proud of its CBT (Computer based Training) platform that makes studies for student more interactive and ensures that they have access to updated information at all times –and

its environmentally friendly as well. Iemei Mendillo, Managing Director and fellow Director Tommy Tseng have made a strong effort to promote women in aviation and this initiative is bearing fruit. Eagle Air now boasts both a female Chief Flight Instructor and a female Deputy Chief Flight Instructor. The Chief Flight Instructor is a former Airline Pilot with a total of 26 years flying experience and the Deputy CFI is one of the youngest pilots who went solo in 2013 at the age of 15. The Eagle team of instructors are almost as diverse as the student body. With students from all over the world it is a real advantage to have instructors that can speak a wide variety of languages: English, Afrikaans, Arabic, Urdu, Hindi, French, Creole, Portuguese, Gujarati and Dutch can be heard as the instructors interact with the students.

The Eagle fleet of aircraft is also diverse as it was carefully selected to accommodate most budgets and types of flying. It is thus possible to cater for a variety of income groups, offering a wide range of students the opportunity to receive excellent quality training. Eagle air has a total of 29 training aircraft. The increasing fleet consists of the following: Cessna 172

11

Piper Cherokee

7

Piper Archer

3

Jabiru 430

1

Jabiru SP

1

Piper Arrow 2

2

Piper Arrow 3

1

Piper Seneca 2

2

Beechcraft BE55

1

Pilatus PC-12

1

Beechcraft King Air

1

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The Cessna 172 is the most popular training aircraft on the Eagle Air fleet.

Eagle Air operates a state of the art simulator.

Safety is the number one priority at Eagle Air and this is clearly reflected in the excellent condition of all the aircraft in the fleet. Eagle Air use only the most reputable maintenance organisations based at Wonderboom Airport. The maintenance facility exposes pilots to the mechanical aspects of aircraft maintenance, thus enhancing their total understanding of aviation. Eagle Air has its own state of the art FNTP 2 simulator which is CAA certificated for RNAV and MCC. It is capable of simulating aircraft ranging from a Piper Cherokee to a Cessna 425 twin-turbine Conquest. With its free-standing cockpit and 270˚ projected screen, it is certified for multi-crew training, aspects of the initial instrument rating skills test, annual instrument revalidation checks from PPL to ATPL, GR I and GR II Flight instructor’s revalidation flight test, maintenance of competency for ATP, MCC training as approved syllabus and RNAV/GNSS Training as per approved syllabus. In addition, Eagle Air acts as a training service provider for large commercial companies for specialised training on the Beechcraft Premier, Cessna 406 Caravan, Cessna Hawk XP and Bombardier Challenger.

Students are encouraged to become emersed in the technical and maintenance aspects of aircraft operations.

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Eagle Air have a pilot shop in the main terminal of Wonderboom. The pilot shop stocks a wide range of aviation products for pilots, aircraft owners and aviation enthusiasts. Feel free to visit the flight school to find out more.j


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Wonderboom Airport’s

key role as a regional airport

Main terminal from airside.

Air connectivity is essential for a town, and indeed an entire country’s economic growth. There is strong evidence available from around the world that if a town is not served by an efficient and wellrun air transportation system, it will slowly atrophy as investments move elsewhere. IN SOUTH AFRICA THERE ARE also excellent examples of how regional cities and towns have experienced a boom simply by making themselves an accessible destination for trade and tourism by air. Durban, Cape Town, and George are a case in point – since local and foreign airlines have been increasing flying into the once stagnant and sleepy cities, investment and tourists are flowing in – and boom times have arrived – all thanks to the focused strategic air connectivity initiatives by

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the Dube TradePort in Durban and Wesgro in Cape Town Experience from ACSA with regional airports in Kimberly, George, Port Elizabeth, Bloemfontein, and East London attest also to the fact that these airports make a significant contribution to the South African economy in the form of job creation, local investment in infrastructure development, and tax revenue flows, all of which are pivotal to the growth of our gross domestic product (GDP).


Wonderboom National Airport is one such slumbering regional airport. It is the general aviation airport which, in terms of traffic movements, is the busiest in the country and perhaps in the rest of the African continent. ATNS recorded traffic volumes at the airport averages 17,000 aircraft movements month-onmonth and in April 2021; reached their highest peak in recent years of 24,000. This record is unprecedented and surprisingly achieved against the backdrop of the downgrade of the airport’s license status from Category 5 to 2 and the Corona virus pandemic which has ravaged the entire aviation industry; bringing many commercial airports locally and around the world to a standstill. It therefore does not warrant any expert reasoning to realise the strategic nature of Wonderboom National Airport to the economy of the City of Tshwane Metropolitan Council – the reality however as it stands is that Wonderboom airport is not fully exploited commercially.

standards applicable to a Category 7 SACAA licensed commercial airport, upgrading the aeronautical infrastructure and turning the airport into one of the most reputable regional airports with aircraft maintenance activities, flight training, chatter and scheduled flight services that connects to the other regional centres nationally and within SADC.

As the owner and operator of Wonderboom National Airport, the Tshwane Metropolitan City Council fully appreciates the strategic importance of the airport and is therefore now pulling out all the stops to restore and enhance Wonderboom National Airport to its rightful place as the key regional airport for the Capital City’s conurbation. The Tshwane Metropolitan City Council has partnered with ACSA to drive Wonderboom National Airport airlift to new levels of air safety, security, commerce, and service quality excellence.

Williams describes the airport as, “The training ground for hundreds of pilots across the country. Training activities account for 70% of the total airport traffic, with maintenance, flight charters, recreational flying, fly-overs and private flying constituting the remaining 30% of the traffic mix.”

the general aviation airpor t which is the busiest in the count r y

The memorandum was signed by Tshwane Mayor Randall Williams with Acting City Manager Mmaseabata Matlaneng and the CEO of ACSA, Mpumi Mpofu.

Tshwane’s Mayor Williams said that the airport holds immense potential for future development and the generation of increased economic opportunities in the city, especially as a logistics hub. “That requires a partner that understands how to optimise its operations as a strategic asset [and] it is for this reason that this administration decided to enter into this agreement with ACSA,” he said.

The airport is located close to a variety of resources and amenities: bulk freight and transport infrastructure is already in place, meaning that the region has high potential for business growth. “The airport is a strategic transportation asset for the city – both for air travel and tourism in the capital city,” he said.

THE ACSA PARTNERSHIP A partnership with ACSA was signed in March 2021 and will enable ACSA to assist the City of Tshwane Metropolitan Council in its renewed effort to make Wonderboom National Airport compliant with all the civil aviation norms and

FUTURE PROJECTS Wonderboom Airport has a rich history of more than 82 years and it may play a central role in Tshwane’s aim to increase the flow of business and travel to the region in support of its industry June 2021

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WONDERBOOM ABOVE: The ACSA memorandum was signed by Tshwane mayor Randall Williams who was joined by acting city manager Mmaseabata Matlaneng and the CEO of ACSA, Mpumi Mpofu. BELOW: Inside the terminal.

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An aerial photo taken in 2010.

parks and diplomatic missions. The City is aware of the airport’s vast potential towards ensuring that the capital city is accessible by air from key tourism and trade markets. Therefore, to latch onto the current organic growth in airport operations, planned capital projects for Wonderboom National Airport amongst others involve the extension of its primary runway, upgrade of the entire ground lighting systems, communication, navigation and surveillance systems, extension of the main terminal building; relocation of the air traffic control tower (ATC); and provision for land and bulk services for expansion of aeronautical properties and activities.

the City’s’ vision for the airport with the right marketing positioning as a regionally operated airport alongside the two big international airports in Gauteng – OR Tambo and Lanseria. The national civil aviation policy will remain the key enabler to the enhancement of Wonderboom National Airport with envisaged air commerce which will require designated international airport status. With ACSA’s experience and guidance, the City of Tshwane Metropolitan Council is planning to revive its 2012 application for the international status of the airport with the Department of Transport.

A par tnership w i t h ACSA was signed in Ma r c h 2 0 2 1

The developmental plans are aimed at supplying the right infrastructure to meet the prevailing market demand and attracting the right capacity of traffic mix for the Airport in fulfilment of

The year 2021 is seen as the year of recovery as the airport with its new partner ACSA is now more than ready to meet the challenges of the past and the expectations of the future. j

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eral n e g t s e i s “The bu a.” c i r f A n i t r irpo aviation a

WONDERBOOM NATIONAL AIRPORT

LOCATED AT THE HEART of the capital city, and conveniently located in the middle of a fast-growing industrial and tourism hub, Wonderboom National Airport is proudly a dynamic base for all general aviation activities and many aviationrelated enterprises. The state-of-the-art infrastructure makes Wonderboom National Airport ideally superior for all types of aeronautical activities. This infrastructure includes two runways, multiple taxiways, two large aprons, Category 7 Rescue, NDB and VORs, air traffic control tower, and advanced runway and taxiway aeronautical ground lightning for use in inclement weather conditions. Air commerce is on a steady increase thanks to superior service standards and ultra-low rates for property rental and aeronautical activities. To build on its current strengths, Wonderboom National Airport is planned for further development. This includes the extension of its runway to create air links that will support growth in all facets of the airport’s operations. These include turning the airport into a port of entry, and capitalising on the industrial parks and the agribusiness, mining and tourism sectors primarily located within the northern half of Tshwane.

“Wonderboom National Airport is more than just an airport, it is the mecca for general aviation.”

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Tel: 012 358 4028 Email: info@wonderboomairport.co.za www.wonderboomairport.co.za


Republic Aircraft Parts Republic Aircraft Parts,

Wonderboom Airport Pretoria. 50 years of serving the South African aviation industry, being wholesale suppliers of all general aviation aircraft parts, aircraft grade hardware, pilot and student supplies.

SA Flyer 2021|06

Contact: William Pelcher +27 (0)12 567 5141 / 2 / 3 +27 (0)83 778 9252 • pelcher@lantic.net

Dr. Rudi Britz Medical Examiner

• Aviation Medicals • Diving Medicals • Maritime Medicals • Executive Medicals Please call +27 66 177 7194 or rudiavmed@gmail.com June 2021

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Leonardo

South Africa

European helicopter maker Leonardo has strengthened the level of support and maintenance services offered to its customer base in South Africa with the acquisition of Precision Aviation Services (Pty) Ltd.

THE SITE HAS BEEN OPERATING as an Authorised Service Centre for Leonardo’s helicopters in the country over the last 25 years and is the first Leonardo Excellent Service Centre on the Continent. This state of the art service centre demonstrates Leonardo’s long-term commitment to the region and its customers, improving support to a fleet of more than 120 helicopters mainly operating in Sub-Saharan African civil market. This is in line with Leonardo’s Industrial Plan focus on stronger customer support services and proximity. The Wonderboom facility comprises 2275 m2

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of floor space, 450 m2 of workshop and store, and an equivalent amount of office space. The service centre includes maintenance hangars, a bonded warehouse, workshops and other services, and provides maintenance, product support and engineering services. The facility reinforces spares availability for a range of models including: the AW119 single engine, AW109 light twin series, the AW Family including the AW139, AW169 and AW189. Leonardo plans to extend these capabilities to all future products. With the team’s extensive experience acquired while operating as an Authorized Service Centre


for Leonardo Helicopters over the past 25 years, it was a natural progression to become the first Leonardo Excellent Service Centre on the African continent. The “Excellent” rating is assigned to selected Service Centres focused on maintaining third party fleets and having the largest scope of service capabilities, all the while guaranteeing the continued achievement of Leonardo’s customers’ stringent expectations, and considering specific market requirements. The first area of the service enhancement implemented by Leonardo compared to previous services will be spare parts availability, which will be greatly expanded.

Leonardo’s enhanced services will contribute to maximise the helicopter fleet mission effectiveness and safety of operations to the benefit of operators, and clients. With over 100 helicopter service and maintenance centres worldwide, Leonardo plans to establish at least one ‘Excellent’ centre in all strategic markets. During the Covid-19 pandemic, Leonardo delivered continued support through its global network and leveraged digital technologies for remote maintenance services. Leonardo South Africa: AMO 090 Hangar 109 Wonderboom Airport Phone +27 12 543 0371

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COMPANIES

208 AVIATION AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE Established in 2007, 208 Aviation cc is a South African privately-owned company that strives to provide a broad range of maintenance and inspection services. Now in our twelth year of operation, we have become a key player in aviation operations on the African continent. Our speciality is the Cessna 208 Caravan, Beechcraft King Air series, Quest Kodiak, Daher TBM and Eclipse 500 aircraft maintenance and technical support.

Over the years, we have earned a reputation for providing superior quality and workmanship. Doing things right is how we do business. We consider it our responsibility to go above and beyond when it comes to aviation safety and customer satisfaction. 208 Aviation is also an authorised Quest Kodiak and Daher TBM Service Center as well as a very proud Blackhawk® installation facility. Contact Ben Esterhuizen +27 83 744 3412 Email: ben@208aviation.co.za j

AEROTRIC ELECTRICAL, IGNITION, INSTRUMENTS Aerotric (Pty) Ltd is based at Wonderboom Airport and has grown from strength to strength since opening their doors in May 2012. The Company prides itself on providing quality and reliable services such as overhauling, installing and repairing all electrical, ignition, instruments and avionics that is efficient and at an affordable rate.

Aerotric is a small company with big heart that strives to maintain relationships with all customers. Consisting of seven staff members Aerotric maintains a policy of high standards and keeping up with the latest technology and trends in aircraft maintenance. Contact Aerotric on: Office Tel: +27 87 802 1347 Email: admin@aerotric.com or Richard@aerotric.com j

E NOW SERVICING VED MO ON TH LD E V E I B A H 73 IRF SPORT PLANE BUILDERS CC AMO1189 & M712 WE GAR HE A WE ARE MOVING TO NEW PREMISES! T N F A O H Hangar 73 B Wonderboom Airport TO SIDE T S EA

SLING AIRCRAFT!

SPORT PLANE BUILDERS SERVICE MAINTAIN AND DEVELOP VARIOUS AIRCRAFTS AND COMPONENTS. Manufacturing, maintenance & repairs to various aircraft type certified and NTC aircraft. We also have have a composite repair facilities for type and non type certified aircraft. +272021 87 230 8468 108Landline: June

| Cell : 083 361 31818 | Email: info@spor tplanebuilders.co.za | Website: www.Spor tPlanebuilders.co.za

SA Flyer 2021|06

SPECIALIZING IN RAVIN 500, RV RANGE AND TECNAM’S.


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COMPANIES

admin@aerotric.com or richard@aerotric.com

ELT’s

ARTEX 345 ELT ELT INCLUDING INSTALLATION, MODS, SHEET METAL

ADS-B

Install Garmin GTX 335 ADS-B Out Transponder with GPS & GAE 12 Altitude Encoder SACAA Mod approval estimation +/- 3 months. CALL US FOR MORE INFORMATION ON 2020 AD.

SA Flyer 2021 | 06

AIRCRAFT INSTRUMENT PANEL REFURB & PRINTING IN HOUSE

APCO-Aircraft Powerplant Company AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE, ENGINE OVERHAUL Aircraft Powerplant Company (APCO) was born in 2001 as a result of the management buyout of the PLACO Engines Division. Under the guidance Tony Rodrigues and Henk Joubert, both equipped with wealth of experience and knowledge, APCO has earned a reputation for excellence within the aviation community. APCO’s Team of highly qualified factory and locally trained technicians have developed full in-house capacity to perform all required maintenance and turn key repair services, including bench testing on both Lycoming and Continental Engines. In addition APCO have an in-house component division, engine hose shop, machine shop and also have CAA approved cadmium plating and de-inbritle facility.

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The NTC engine shop specialise in the repair and overhaul of many brands of NTC engines including Lycoming and Superior Kit Engines to name but a few. As an optional extra they offer a balancing and porting service as well as many types of corrosion protective applications, ranging from polyurethane base paints to the more lavish and durable ceramic coatings. APCO are suppliers of approved engine lubricants ie: Phillips 66, Aeroshell, Mobil turbine Oil, Camguard as well as AVBlend Hangar 5A, Wonderboom Airport, Pretoria North tonyrodrigues@mweb.co.za +27 82 558 9388 henkjoubert@mweb.co.za +27 83 258 5272 j


SA Flyer 2021|06

ENGINE DIVISION

Complete overhaul facility with test bench

MACHINE SHOP

Machining, repair, modification o/h of cylinders and crankcases

TESTING

NDT, MPI, Dye Pen and Zyglo

COMPONENT DIVISION

Servicing, overhaul, repair

SUPPLIERS OF AIRCRAFT APPROVED ENGINE LUBRICANTS • SHELL • Phillips • AVBLEND and Camguard

PLATING SHOP

Cadmium Plating

Aircraft Powerplant Co. (Pty) Ltd

Tel: +27 12 543 0775 / 0181 • Fax: +27 12 567 3630 • Hangar 5A, Wonderboom Airport tonyrodrigues@mweb.co.za • Cell: +27 82 558 9388 henkjoubert@mweb.co.za • Cell: +27 83 258 5272 June 2021 www.apcosa.co.za

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COMPANIES

AVTECH AIRCRAFT SERVICES AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE Avtech Aircraft Services based at Wonderboom National airport maintains Beechcraft, Piper, Cessna, Bellanca and Aerostar aircraft. With over 28 years of operation, the family-owned business has a vast experience in aircraft maintenance and meets the highest standards, still under the guidance of Riekert, Sr. Avtech Aircraft Services component shop specialises in the overhaul and repairs of continental fuel systems, carburettors and constant speed units, which include Woodward,

McCauley, Hartzell & PCU5000. This division is run by Andre Botha, AKA Proppie, who also has many years’ experience in his field. The Avtech team have collectively over 170 years of experience, between just four people. Avtech is therefore a wise first stop for all your general aircraft maintenance requirements. For more information contact PJR Stroh, Sr, on 082 555 2808 or PJR Stroh, Jr, on 082 749 9256. Visit them at Hangar 6 Wonderboom Airport. Email: avtech1208@gmail.com j

DART AERONAUTICAL DART AERONAUTICAL WAS ESTABLISHED IN 2006 and is situated at Rand Airport. We are committed to providing excellent service with the highest technical standard, not only locally, but to surrounding airfields as well. This division is headed up by Jaco Kelly and Pieter Viljoen. The team of 15 specialises in all aircraft types ranging from homebuilt to DC9 aircraft. We are market leaders in instrument and instrument panel refurbishments, which include the use of aircraft approved paint, router cutting and laser engraving. Dart Aeronautical is an agent for all major equipment suppliers such as Garmin, Mid

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Continent, Bendix-King, Sigma Tek, JP Instruments, Airtex, S-Tec etc. Our ability to purchase directly ensures our completeness and that our customers receive value for money without any reduction in quality and safety. We carry a wide variety of serviceable units in store that can be used as loaners while working on a customer’s unit or that can be purchased or exchanged. Contact Pieter Viljoen on: Tel: +27 11-827-8204 Cell: +27 83-652-4421 Email: pieterviljoen@mweb.co.za Website: www.dartaero.co.za j


SA Flyer 2021|05

GENERAL MAINTENANCE & REFURBISHMENT ON LIGHT AIRCRAFT

COMPONENT WORKSHOP We specialize in CSU’s, carburettors and TCM Fuel System overhauls and repair of Continental and Bendix. Re-assembly and import of CofA inspections. Aircraft Sales.

NOW APPROVED FOR BENDIX (PRECISION) FUEL SYSTEM OVERHAULS &REPAIRS

Hangar 6, Wonderboom Airport. AMO1208 Tel: Riekert (SR) 082 555 2808 | Riekert (JR) 082 749 9256 | Andre (Proppie) 082 974 9713 avtech1208@gmail.com | proppie@avtechcomp.co.za June 2021

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COMPANIES

AMO 227

FLIGHT SAFETY THROUGH MAINTENANCE

Overhaul / Shockload / Repair of Continental and Lycoming Aircraft engines

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Hangar no 4, Wonderboom Airport, Pretoria PO Box 17699, Pretoria North, 0116 Tel: (012) 543 0948/51, Fax: (012) 543 9447, email: aeroeng@iafrica.com

June 2021

SA Flyer 2021|06

Overhaul Engine Components Overhaul and supply of Hartzell / McCauley and Fix pitch Propellers


DART AERONAUTICAL Pieter Viljoen +27 83 652 4421 pieterviljoen@mweb.co.za Jaco Kelly +27 84 498 4916 jacokelly@mweb.co.za

GI 275

Attitude Indicator (AI/ADI)DART AERON

Pieter Viljoen +27 83 652 4421 Jaco Kelly +27 84 498 4916

GFC 600 New Garmin Autopilot Options

GFC 600 GFC 500

G 5

N G A O

® E NC A FIN IONS T E OP ABL E AIL AV QUIR ! EN OW 115 N June 2021


COMPANIES

LOUTZAVIA LOUTZAVIA WAS ESTABLISHED IN 2004, at Wonderboom Airport, in Pretoria. We operate an exclusive Flying academy that practices the highest training standards from PPL (Private Pilot Licence) to ATPL (Airline Transport Pilot Licence). At Loutzavia you will find that we are passionate about flying and we will do our outmost to ensure your experience in Aviation is worthwhile.We are proud to say we have trained pilots who are now employed at airlines locally and internationally. Loutzavia is one of a select few flight training centres that has an in-house Grade I Designated Examiner. Jannie Loutzis has over 30 years flight training experience and more than 8000 flying hours under his belt and the foundation on which Loutzavia’s training is built is a no compromise approach to Flight Training and Flight Safety.Our team consists of thirteen instructors from diverse backgrounds.Johan Myburgh, our chief flight instructor and an ATPL holder, has been involved in flight training for

eight years and has 3000 hours of instruction. The training fleet consists of fifteen aircraft and covers single, multi-engine, turbo-prop and jet aircraft. Loutzavia recently acquired a Tecnam P2006T. We offer the full spectrum of flight training from the PPL-ATPL. Loutzavia also owns a FRASCA TRU-FLIGHT simulator that can be used for both Single and Multi-Engine Training. Open Days are held quarterly at Loutzavia where all aspiring pilots and parents are welcomed to be part of the Loutzavia experience. Introductory flights at reduced rates can be booked on the day or in advance. Should a more personalised experience be required a one-on-one booking can be made at any time. Loutzavia Your Aviation Destination! Contact Gideon on 072 919 8608 Email: info@loutzavia.co.za Website: www.loutzavia.co.za j

PILOTS and PLANES Pilots ‘n Planes is an aviation related retail outlet specialising in Pilot and Aircraft Owner requirements. Pilots ‘n Planes is one of the larger retail outlets of its kind in South Africa and has its main branch at Wonderboom Airport in Pretoria, and a second branch at Rand Airport in Germiston. • Merchandise on offer includes: • Pilot uniforms and apparel • Aviation headsets (BOSE, DAVID CLARK, AVCOMM) • Sunglasses (RAYBAN, RANDOLPH, BONDIBLU, WAVES, OAKLEY) • Study material and equipment • A wide range of Aviation related gifts and collectables

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Both our Wonderboom and Rand stores trade Monday-Friday from 8am to 5pm. On Saturdays, Wonderboom trades from 8am-2pm and Rand is open every first and last Saturday of every month from 8am-2pm. Contact Hannelien at Wonderboom Airport on: Tel: 012 567-6775 Email: pilotshop@pilotsnplanes.co.za Or Lee/Louisa at Rand Airport on: Tel: 011 824-3339 Email: rand@pilotsnplanes.co.za j


Dear Aviation enthusiast. Thank you for your interest in the LOUTZAVIA GROUP. Welcome to an exciting aviation experience.

L o u tz av i a

Loutzavia was launched in 2004 at Wonderboom National Airport as a Flight Training Centre by Jannie Loutzis, the owner and Chief Flying Instructor, and his wife Maria Loutzis as Chief Executive Officer.

Loutzavia is a leading group in the aviation industry who are dedicated to Yo u r A v i a t i o n D e s t i n a t i o n safety and specialising in all aspects of the aviation experience. We boast with various services in the greater aviation industry, covering the following:

• • • • •

Loutzavia Flight Training Centre is at Wonderboom National Airport with the objective to cater for the greater part of Gauteng Flight Charters Aircraft Sales Pilot Shop – Main Terminal building - Wonderboom National Airport and Rand Airport Aircraft Hangarage and Management Aviation Insurance consultations (Fixed Wing and Helicopter)

SA Flyer 2021|06

WHY CHOOSE LOUTZAVIA FLIGHT TRAINING CENTRE? Experience and Management • Loutzavia boasts one of the most experienced teams of aviation professionals in the flight training industry. • Our management hails from an established background in aviation, finance and recruitment. • Flight School owner and SACAA Designated Flight Examiner Jannie Loutzis, has been involved in flight training for 29 years. He has owned and operated large flying schools at Wonderboom and is well known and respected throughout the aviation industry. • It is one of a select few schools owned and managed by a Grade I Designated Flight Examiner and full time instructor. • Collectively, our management team Jannie Loutzis and Henry Miles, have in excess of 48 years and 17000 hours combined aviation experience. • A wide variety of successful training contracts for various organisations and governments have been successfully completed. This includes SACAA, South African Airways, Police air wing pilots and the Botswana government.

Ground Floor, Main Terminal Building, Hanger 70A, Wonderboom Airport Pretoria, P. O. Box 80698, Doornpoort 0017 Tel: +27 12 567 6775 Fax: +27 12 543 1519 info@loutzavia.co.za

www.loutzavia.co.za

LOUTZAVIA

FLIGHT TRAINING

LOUTZAVIA. YOUR AVIATION DESTINATION

SA Flyer 2021|06

Pilotsn Planes PLACE YOUR ORDERS ONLINE NOW AT www.pilotsnplanes.co.za EMAIL ORDERS TO pilotshop@pilotsnplanes.co.za

A20 AVIATION HEADSET

Acclaimed noise reduction for pilots – 30% greater active noise reduction than conventional headsets.

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COMPANIES

POWERED FLIGHT Having started as a helicopter pilot training school in February 2006 with a Robinson R22 helicopter, Powered Flight has grown significantly over the years and some of the important features have been: • Holding a Domestic and International AOC for both single and multi-engine helicopters • Owning our own hangar • Owning and operating several helicopters • Completed several contracts training pilots for African Governments We offer several helicopter ratings, including, night, instrument, game and sling, all using

- ATO CAA 0280

our own helicopters and crew. Our pilots are all employed full time and are focused, loyal and dedicated. All are chosen for their passion, knowledge, skill and patience. We are currently the only helicopter pilot school at Wonderboom Airport offering training in Robinson R22 and R44 helicopters. With minor changes to our infrastructure, we can train up to 40 full time student pilots. For study loans, please contact us to arrange a meeting. For further information please visit: www.poweredflight.co.za j

SPORT PLANE BUILDERS cc Sport Plane Builders cc (AMO 1189) is based at Wonderboom in Hangar 73 B, on the east side. Sport Plane Builders cc has the rating A, B, C, W and X (welding). It is mainly involved in the repair service and manufacture of non-type certified aircraft (NTCA), and is also the holder of a Part 148 manufacturing organisation license (M712). Operating since 2005 and run by Pierre van der Walt with his team, they are involved in various initiatives:

Assist owners in building RVs, as well as servicing and restoring them.

Running a composite workshop where composite repairs and parts are manufactured, including non-structural and structural repairs on type and non-type certified aircraft. They also model and construct new composite plugs and moulds. Sport Plane Builders cc supply the under carriage and composite components for the new Bat Hawk.

Maintain and rebuild various Rotax engine powered aircraft.

They also have manufacturing licenced for steel and aluminium manufacturing

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Partners in the new PCAD 700 6 seat single turbine aircraft project. Building to order the Ravin 500 – full Composite Comanche look alike. Building the turbine Compair – a six to eight seat Walter 601D turbine powered tail draggers.

Tecnam support in Southern Africa Contact Sport Plane Builders cc on: Tel: 0872308468/69 Cell: 083 361 3181 Email: info@sportplanebuilders.co.za www.sportplanebuilders.co.za j


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COMPANIES

MAVERICK AIR CHARTERS Maverick Air Charters has one of the most extensive and modernised fleets in South Africa including their recent addition of two of the newest EX Caravans in the country.

With a 100% safety track record since inception in 2004, Maverick Air Charters offer one of the most cost-effective and best practise solutions in the market.

Maverick Air Charters specialises 24/7 in both local and International: • Private air charters • Cargo transportation • Dangerous goods (certified Cat 6) • High valued goods (with or without custodians) • General (lodge transfers, golf, fishing, hunting and scenic to name a few)

For further information please contact us on 012 940 0320 or email charters@maverickair.co.za or visit us at www.maverickair.co.za

j

Maverick Air Charters received the international accolade from CorporateLiveWire for their Global Awards for 2020 in the category “Private Air Charter of the Year” Maverick Air Charters has one of the most extensive and modernised fleets in South Africa including their recent addition of two of the newest EX Caravans in the country. Maverick Air Charters specialises 24/7 in both local and International: • Private air charters • Cargo transportation • Dangerous goods (certified Cat 6) • High valued goods (with or without custodians) • General (lodge transfers, golf, fishing, hunting and scenic to name a few) With a 100% safety track record since inception in 2004, Maverick Air Charters offer one of the most cost-effective and best practise solutions in the market. For further information please contact us on 012 940 0320 or email charters@maverickair.co.za or visit us at www.maverickair.co.za

“Safety - Convenience - Value for Money” 120

June 2021


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eral n e g t s e i s “The bu a.” c i r f A n i t r irpo aviation a

WONDERBOOM NATIONAL AIRPORT

208 AVIATION:

Locations of Advertisers

Contact: Ben Esterhuizen +27 83 744 3412 Email: ben@208aviation.co.za

AEROTRIC:

Contact Aerotric on: Office Tel: +27 87 802 1347 Email: admin@aerotric.com or Richard@aerotric.com

APCO:

Hangar 5A, Wonderboom Airport, Pretoria North tonyrodrigues@mweb.co.za +27 82 558 9388 henkjoubert@mweb.co.za +27 83 258 5272

located in the middle of a fast-growing industrial Contact Details: Contact Hannelien at and tourism hub, Wonderboom NationalWonderboom Airport is proudly a dynamic Pero Visser general aviationAirport activities and aviationTel:base +27 79for 492all 0592 on: Tel: 012 many 567-6775 Email: Email: related enterprises. pero@dynamicpropeller.co.za pilotshop@pilotsnplanes.co.za Andries Visser Or Lee/Louisa at Rand Airport The state-of-the-art infrastructure makes Wonderboom Tel:National +27 82 445Airport 4496 ideally superior on: Tel: 824-3339 for 011 all types of aeronautical Email: Email: rand@pilotsnplanes.co.za activities. This infrastructure includes two runways, multiple andries@dynamicpropeller.co.za taxiways, two large aprons, Category 7 Rescue, NDB and POWERED FLIGHT: VORs, air traffic control tower, and advanced runway and EAGLE AIR: For further information please aeronautical ground lightning for use in inclement Tel:taxiway +27 12 543 1929, visit: www.poweredflight.co.za weather conditions. Fax: +27 12 543 1923 info@eagleair.co.za Air commerce www.eagleair.co.za

REPUBLIC AIRCRAFT PARTS:

AVTECH:

Hangar 109 Wonderboom Airport, Phone on +27 its 12 543 0371 To build current

pelcher@lantic.net

DART AERONAUTICAL:

MAVERICK:

GEOPHYSICS:

For more information contact PJR Stroh, Sr, on 082 555 2808 or PJR Stroh, Jr, on 082 749 9256. Visit them at Hangar 6 Wonderboom Airport. Email: avtech1208@gmail.com

Contact Pieter Viljoen on: Tel: +27 11-827-8204 Cell: +27 83-652-4421 Email: pieterviljoen@mweb.co.za Website: www.dartaero.co.za

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LOCATED AT THE HEART of the capital city, and conveniently DYNAMIC PROPELLERS: PILOTS AND PLANES:

June 2021

is on a steady increase Contact: Williamthanks Pelcher to superior service standards and ultra-low rates567 for5141 property +27 (0)12 / 2 / 3 rental and LEONARDO SOUTH AFRICA: +27 (0)83 778 9252 aeronautical activities. strengths, Wonderboom National PLANE BUILDERS: Airport is planned for furtherSPORT development. This includes the LOUTZAVIA: Tel: 0872308468/69 extension of its runway to create air links that will support Contact Gideon Cell: 083 361 3181 growth in all facets of the airport’s operations. These include on 072 919 8608 info@sportplanebuilders.co.za turning the airport into a port of entry, and capitalising on Email: info@loutzavia.co.za www.sportplanebuilders.co.za the industrial parks and the agribusiness, mining and tourism Website: www.loutzavia.co.za sectors primarily located within the northern half of Tshwane. XCALIBUR AIRBORNE 012 940 0320 Xcalibur Hangar, Lintveld Road, charters@maverickair.co.za or Wonderboom Airport “Wonderboom National Airport is more than just an www.maverickair.co.za Contact us:+27 12 543 2540 or airport, it is the mecca for general aviation.” surveys@xagsa.com www.xagsa.com

Tel: 012 358 4028 Email: info@wonderboomairport.co.za www.wonderboomairport.co.za


st general ca.” i r f A n i t r o irp

eneral g t s ie s u b hePLEASE CLICK BELOWinFOR a.” ic r f A AN INTERACTIVE MAP t r o p ir a n io t via

DERBOOM ONAL AIRPORT

WONDERBOOM NATIONAL AIRPORT 7

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

4 3

8 9

LOCATED AT THE HEART of the capital city, and conveniently 10 located in the middle of a fast-growing industrial and tourism 11 hub, Wonderboom National Airport is proudly a dynamic 12 base for all general aviation activities and many aviationLOCATED AT THE HEART of the capital city, and conveniently 13 related enterprises. 11

located in the middle of a fast-growing industrial and tourism hub, Wonderboom National Airport is proudly a dynamic The state-of-the-art infrastructure makes Wonderboom base for all general aviation activities and many aviationNational Airport ideally superior for all types of aeronautical related enterprises.

activities. This infrastructure includes two runways, multiple taxiways, two large aprons, Category NDB and 9 7 Rescue, The state-of-the-art infrastructure makes Wonderboom National Airport ideally superior for all types of aeronautical VORs, air traffic control tower, and advanced runway and activities. This infrastructure runways, multiple taxiway aeronautical ground lightningincludes for usetwo in inclement taxiways, two large aprons, Category 13 7 Rescue, NDB and weather conditions.

VORs, air traffic control tower, and advanced runway and taxiway ground lightning in inclement Air commerce is onaeronautical a steady increase thanks for to use superior weather conditions. service standards and ultra-low 1rates for property rental and

aeronauticalAir activities. commerce is on a steady increase thanks to superior

service standards and ultra-low rates for property rental and 5

To build on aeronautical its current activities. strengths, Wonderboom National 6 8 Airport is planned for further development. This includes the 2 To build on its current strengths, Wonderboom National extension of its runway to create air links that will support Airport of is planned for further development. includes the growth in all facets the airport’s operations. TheseThis include extension of its runway to create air links that will support turning the airport into a port of entry, and capitalising on growth in all facets of the airport’s operations. These include the industrial turning parks and the agribusiness, mining the airport into a port of entry,and and tourism capitalising on sectors primarily located parks withinand thethe northern half ofmining Tshwane. the industrial agribusiness, and tourism

10 12

sectors primarily located within the northern half of Tshwane.

“Wonderboom National Airport is more than just an Airport is more than just an airport, it“Wonderboom is the meccaNational for general aviation.” airport, it is the mecca for general aviation.”

Tel: 012 358 Tel: 4028 012 358 4028 Email: info@wonderboomairport.co.za Email: info@wonderboomairport.co.za www.wonderboomairport.co.za www.wonderboomairport.co.za June 2021

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CARGO

Boeing 737-300 Cargo Aircraft available for wet (ACMI) lease. Based at OR Tambo International Airport, Johannesburg South Africa.

SA Flyer 2021|06

Contact: yvonne@starcargo.co.za or peter@starcargo.co.za

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Tel: +27 11 234 7038 www.starair.co.za June 2021


FlightCm African Commercial Aviation Edition 151 | June 2021

Hugh Pryor – Flying basics:

Cub or Jumbo?

EVOLUTION 1

OF MILITARY TRANSPORTS FlightCom Magazine

CEMAIR'S NEW LIVERY


AMO 227

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Overhaul / Shockload / Repair of Continental and Lycoming Aircraft engines

Hangar no 4, Wonderboom Airport, Pretoria PO Box 17699, Pretoria North, 0116 Tel: (012) 543 0948/51, Fax: (012) 543 9447, email: aeroeng@iafrica.com

SA Flyer 2021|06

Overhaul Engine Components Overhaul and supply of Hartzell / McCauley and Fix pitch Propellers


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CONTENTS

TABLE OF

Publisher Flyer and Aviation Publications cc Managing Editor Guy Leitch guy@flightcommag.com Advertising Sales Wayne Wilson wayne@saflyermag.co.za Layout & Design Emily-Jane Kinnear Patrick Tillman

JUNE 2021 EDITION 151

ADMIN: +27 (0)83 607 2335 TRAFFIC: +27 (0)81 039 0595 ACCOUNTS: +27 (0)15 793 0708

06 10 13 14 16 22 23 24 29 30 32

Cemair's New Livery: CFO Laura van der Molen Dassault Unveils the Falcon 10X Aerion Closes Shop Bush Pilot - Hugh Pryor History: Military Transport Aircraft Starlite Directory Atlas Oil Charter Directory Meet the pilot: AMS Donovan Kohl AME Directory AEP AMO Listing Backpage Directory

© FlightCom 2021. All rights reserved worldwide. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted by any means, electronically, mechanically, photocopied, recorded or otherwise without the express permission of the copyright holders.


A NOTE FROM

THE EDITOR: As the impact of Covid-19 is limited through vaccination and the development of herd immunity, and perhaps also an acceptance of the new normal, I get a sense that the entire airline industry is moving into a new phase. Most notable is the retirement of key industry stalwarts: Willie Walsh, the CEO of IAG has retired from the stress of running multiple huge airlines and become the head of IATA. Brian Pearce, IATA’s Chief Economist, who led much of the research that informs airline policy and that the industry and government has used for its planning, retired at the end of May. And in Africa, Chris Zweigenthal has taken early retirement from running the Airlines Association of Southern Africa.

used to webinars. By 2030, global passenger numbers are expected to have grown to 5.6 billion which is 7% below the pre-Covid-19 forecast and an estimated loss of 2-3 years of growth due to Covid-19. Beyond 2030 air travel is expected to slow, due to weaker demographics and a baseline assumption of limited market liberalisation, giving average annual growth between 2019 and 2039 of 3.2%. IATA’s preCOVID-19 growth forecast for this period was 3.8%. The recovery in passenger numbers is slightly stronger than the recovery in demand measured in revenue passenger kilometres (RPKs), which is expected to grow at an annual average of 3% between 2019 and 2039. This is due to the expected strength of domestic markets like China, with large passenger numbers and shorter distances.

by the end of 2023 airline traffic should be back to normal

As the old order moves on, what can we expect from the brave new world? Brian Pearce’s farewell IATA media briefing presented a long-term view for airline recovery, which shows that people are still keen to travel, both in the short and long-term. The IATA projections are more optimistic than was hoped just a few months ago. 2021 global passenger numbers are expected to recover to 52% of 2019 preCovid-19 levels. In 2022, global passenger numbers are expected to recover to 88% of pre-Covid-19 levels. And in 2023, global passenger numbers are expected to be an amazing 105% of pre-Covid-19 levels. So yes – by the end of 2023 airline traffic should be back to normal. However, the legacy of Covid-19 will linger in suppressed growth – perhaps as people have become

The damage of the Covid-19 pandemic will be felt for years to come, but all indications are that people still have their need and desire to travel. This is evident in that, whenever there is a possibility of a border re-opening, there is a surge in airline bookings. Pearce says that consumers have accumulated savings in the lockdowns, in some cases exceeding 10% of GDP, and vaccination rates in developed countries should exceed 50% of the population by the third quarter of 2021. It’s been a long and tough fight for airline survival, but the prognosis for a full recovery is good. 


E C A F O T E I R CF O FA CCEMA

L AUR A VA N DER MOL EN Cemair is an airline that epitomises the resilience of the private sector under the immense pressures of the Covid-19 crisis. Guy Leitch spoke to Laura van der Molen about how their airline survived Covid-19, and its growth plans for the recovery. One of CemAir's eight CRJ200s in its new livery, fresh out of the paint shop.

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FEATURE OF THE AIRLINE that is van der Molen says, “It’s true that the turboprops are probably unique anywhere in the world a harder sell as passengers prefer pure jets. It would is that it is run by a husband and wife appear that passengers think that turboprops are old team of Miles and Laura van der Molen. and small. However, they perform an invaluable Laura is a former medical doctor who moved into function within our fleet and in particular, to serve our corporate finance and then met and married Miles at network of unique destinations, as we are able to get business school. Laura a 50-seat Q300 into Dr Laura van Der Molen -CemAir’s CFO and is the Chief Financial 1200 metre runways Officer and accountable AMO accountable officer. such as Plettenberg manager of the AMO Bay.” of CemAir and together Van der Molen they make a formidable explains that the team, although Laura is airline is aggressively often happier in public looking at the gaps to take a back seat to in the regional airline Miles. market created CemAir is gearing up by the demise of for a post Covid-19 SA Express, and boom. One of the bigger is focussed on changes it is making is optimising the use to freshen up the livery of smaller gauge of its fleet which up aircraft. This to now had been kept has however not deliberately plain as the prevented them from aircraft were also used taking on the low cost for ACMI ‘wet’ leases. carriers who operate 186 seat Boeing 737After an inclusive 800s. CemAir has participative process therefore entered the with the airline’s intensely competitive Johannesburg - Cape Town staff, a new livery has been decided upon. They are and Durban ‘golden triangle’ market. However, moving fast – the first four aircraft have already been she says that they are only providing seats at peak painted with the blue and red on white colour scheme. times, such as Friday and Sunday afternoons and Reflecting the commitment Monday mornings. She notes of the airline to its new that the Bombardier CRJ900 branding, the new livery is is a particularly popular option being painted on, and does with its 31-inch seat pitch and not use decals. thus better leg room than some of its competitors. The CemAir fleet currently consists of three types: Despite CemAir’s aggressive The pure jet fleet consists positioning for post-Covid of eight Bombardier CRJ growth, Van der Molen says 100/200 LRs, plus a -900. that the recovery from the The turboprop fleet consists Covid-19 lockdown has not been straightforward. of: two Dash-8 Q400s, two Dash-8 Q300s, a Q100 Notably, she says that there has been another drop off plus seven Beech 1900Ds. in demand from passengers in May with the arrival of When asked about passenger acceptance of turboprops, a Covid third wave.

how their airline survived Covid-19

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As it emerges from the Covid-19 crisis, CemAir is undertaking a fleet wide livery update.

How did the airline manage to survive the Covid-19 crisis? “We were fortunate in that we were able to successfully bid to handle more than 2000 repatriations from places as far as Iraq. A key advantage was our charter experience in that we had aircraft of a small enough gauge to cost effectively handle the specialised loads and destinations. Social media performed a key function in alerting people to these flights. We were therefore able to work with many NGOs. And I must add that the South African Department of International Relations and Cooperation (DIRCO) was extremely useful in terms of their ability to assist with arrangements for the necessary overflight clearances and customs and immigration formalities. “Arranging these repatriation flights was very work intensive and so kept us busy. And most usefully, it kept our AMO working and our pilot proficiency up. In addition, our worldwide charter operation has been very strong and is continuing to pick up. However, we were not able to do much in the way of cargo flying, as our aircraft are not specifically configured for cargo operations,” she says. One of CemAir’s strengths is that it provides essential air connectivity to the smaller towns on the coastal routes, particularly from Johannesburg to Margate, Plettenberg Bay and George. By using their smaller gauge aircraft, CemAir has been able to link these towns for thin routes such as Cape Town to George and Plettenberg Bay.

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Van der Molen notes that there has been a steady move of people away from the cities to the coastal towns and that this helped underpin the CemAir route network. She agrees with IATA that there is already a pent-up demand for travel, particularly to take advantage of the current special offer prices on accommodation. She is looking forward to the return of international tourists. She says that they are already seeing positive signs in their passenger numbers, especially in tourists from the UK and Europe, although not much is coming from the USA and Canada yet. To continue to feed and de-feed their routes CemAir has taken the opportunity to develop interline partnership arrangements with a number of other airlines, most notably Ethiopian, Qatar, Proflight (in Zambia) Emirates and LAM (in Mozambique). However, the Emirates interline agreement has not yet yielded the fruit it was hoped for, as Emirates is currently not flying to South Africa. As an IATA member CemAir is currently renewing its IOSA certification and this audit has stood it in good stead to satisfy the interline partners on internal quality controls. However, she points out that for any airline, even a basic interline agreement can be expensive in terms of updating airline booking systems and the Global Distribution System (GDS), which can cost as much as $10,000. Fortunately booking time on the GDS for testing and implementation of interlining has not been a challenge due to the current low volumes of travellers. Laura and Miles van der Molen a unique husband and wife airline team.


As it emerges from the Covid-19 crisis, the small CemAir team is agressively growing the airline's route network.

Van der Molen says that they are looking to expand their regional route network. The airline therefore has a number of applications submitted to the South African International Air Services Licencing Council. She reports that CemAir has already been awarded the Johannesburg - Luanda route, which they are sharing with TAAG, and JHB – Lagos, as well as JHB-Maputo, JHB-Lusaka and JHB -Ndola. Even though the bilateral air service agreements are already in place, actually getting the approvals from other countries to start flying can take up to four years. A case in point are the Cape Town – Gaborone, JHB-Gaborone, JHB-Maun and JHB-Kasane routes as the Botswana government has been particularly determined to protect its local airline. The length of the Johannesburg-Lagos sector will require a significant fleet upgrade. Van der Molen confirms that they have been looking at either Airbus A320s or Boeing 737-800s. However, this will entail a gearing-up by the airline in terms of its maintenance capacity and pilot training. She points out that one of the core values of the airline is that it does its own

maintenance and a move to Boeing or Airbus products would require an upgrade to its AMO in terms of skills and tooling. Van der Molen makes the interesting observation that, due to the decline in SAA Technical with its associated loss of skills, there has been a steady need for CemAir and other SAAT customers to build their own MRO capability for key components and services. Just a few years ago CemAir was engaged in a bruising battle with the South African CAA. Van der Molen says that the airline’s relationship with the regulator has now stabilised. She notes that one of the key challenges faced by the CAA is that it has lost many of its key skills and expertise, some to Covid-19. Van der Molen describes the current relationship as one of professional courtesy. She says there is now a clear understanding between the Regulator and the airline that they are both committed to providing essential air connectivity that will grow the South African economy. 

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The Falcon 10X will be Dassault's largest cabin and longest range biz-jet.

D

ASSAULT AVIATION HAS launched its latest and largest biz-jet, the Falcon 10X. Still in development, the aircraft won’t be marketed for several years, but the company had a virtual rollout to highlight the features of what it claims will be the business jet with the world’s largest cabin.

both flight deck seats fully recline

The Falcon 10X will be an ultra long range business jet. Powered by twin Rolls-Royce Pearl 10X engines

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generating 18,000 pounds of thrust, it will have a range of 7,500 nautical miles (13,900 km). This enables nonstop from Paris to northwest Australia in about 15 hours at a fast Mach 0.925. With 15 hour endurance, Dassault designed the Falcon 10X to be as comfortable as possible for both passengers – and crew. The cabin features an enlarged master suite with a full shower.


15 hour endurance demands a super-luxurious extra wide cabin with high pressurisation.

The new composite wing retains the Falcon’s shortfield landing capabilities—less than 2,500 feet.

passenger fatigue on 15-plus hour flights, the 10X’s cabin will stay at 3,000 feet up to FL 410.

Noise levels are kept low, and ambient light is maximised as the cabin has 38 windows that are 50 percent bigger than those in the Falcon 8X. To reduce

Always a leader in blending its fighter-based technology with bizjet specifications, Dassault has designed the 10X’s cockpit to be the first of its kind with a single Cabin features large master suite with full shower.

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Lie flats for the pilots.

Cockpit features Rafael fighter designed single power lever, autorecovery systems and reclining seats for the pilots to nap.

power lever to control both engines through the aircraft’s digital flight-control system. A novel feature is that both flight deck seats will fully recline in anticipation of a future relaxation of the rules to allow pilots to nap at their station. If the pilots are literally caught napping by an emergency, there is an Auto-Recovery Mode and Active Flight Path Protection derived from Rafale technology. The aircraft uses the company’s FalconEye combined vision system that uses Head Up Displays (HUDs) as 12

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the primary flight readouts, which provide enhanced and synthetic vision capabilities for zero ceiling/ visibility conditions. Dassault believes the 10X will best its two major competitors inside the cabin, which is 9-ft 6-in wide as compared to the Gulfstream G700's 8-ft 2-in cabin and the Bombardier Global 7500's 8-ft wide. The 10X is expected to enter service in 2025 with a $75 million price tag. 


AERION CLOSES SHOP

A

ERION SUPERSONIC IS shutting down operations, ending ambitious plans to bring a supersonic business jet to market later this decade.

Aerion Supersonic was launched almost twenty years ago, soon after the Concorde was retired from service in 2003. Ten years later it unveiled the first iteration of its supersonic business jet.

The AS2’s “boomless cruise” is also known as Mach cut-off flight and uses onboard and remote sensors to evaluate atmospheric conditions and limit the cruise speed to a setting at which a sonic boom would refract off warmer layers of the atmosphere or dissipate before reaching the ground. The aircraft’s design also makes use of a natural laminar flow wing which reduces turbulence and drag to increase aerodynamic efficiency, making higher speeds achievable. In a statement the company blamed an inability to raise sufficient capital to fund future development as the reason for the closure. The Nevada, USA-based company employs around 150 people.

Aerion’s planned the AS2 as a 12-passenger jet capable of a speed of Mach 1.4. Aerion had been aiming to fly the AS2 for the first time in 2024 and have it certificated and in operation two years later. Aerion’s approach to noise-reduction is different to NASA’s QueSST, which uses a technique called aerodynamic shaping and is expected to make its first test flight next year. Wind tunnel testing with models was completed last year. Over the years Aerion has partnered with several high profile aerospace firms, including Lockheed Martin, GE, Honeywell and most recently Boeing and GKN.

“The AS2 supersonic business jet program meets all market, technical, regulatory and sustainability requirements and the market for a new supersonic segment of general aviation has been validated with US$11.2 billion in sales backlog for the AS2. However, in the current financial environment, it has proven hugely challenging to close on the scheduled and necessary large new capital requirements to finalize the transition of the AS2 into production. Given these conditions, the Aerion Corporation is now taking the appropriate steps in consideration of this ongoing financial environment.” However, work stalled last year during the Covid-19 pandemic and a preliminary design review that was expected to be completed soon after was pushed back to this year, with first flight and certification also delayed to 2025 and 2027. 

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BUSH PILOT HUGH PRYOR

OR JUMBO? CUB

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What’s the difference between a Boeing 747 and a Piper Super Cub? – apart from the size? Not a lot really, if you think about it.

W

ELL OKAY, THE 747 IS pressurised and it has more engines, so it goes a bit faster and carries a few more people for longer trips. Apart from that, they both have wings, ailerons, flaps, horizontal stabilisers, elevators, fins, rudders and wheels, and something to propel them through the air. So there isn’t much difference, except that you could virtually fly a Super Cub inside a 747! If the pilots of Air France Flight 447 had learned to fly in a Super Cub, they would not have crashed. According to Airbus, Airbuses don’t stall or spin, because the on-board computers will not allow them to. If, however the computers turn themselves off... then that’s a different story altogether and they will stall and spin, just like any other aeroplane. Particularly if you put a couple of pilots up the front who only learned how to fly on computers, not the real thing.

As it so happened, he had thus handed the Snipe the precise recipe for a lively spin and it accepted the offer, hurling its terrified occupant round and round with frightening enthusiasm. So horrified was the holy man by the imminence of violent death that his brain convinced him that it would be easier to enter the next world in an unconscious state and his mind closed down, causing the Reverend to pass out. He fell onto the control column, pushing it forward and his throttle hand followed suit, inadvertently increasing the power. The increasing air flow over the wings took them out of the stall and the spin developed into a spiral dive. As the speed built up, the wind revived our pilot and he suddenly realised that Death had withdrawn its talons and left him in a perfectly controllable aeroplane, which he landed safely, bursting with enthusiasm to go up and try it again.

stall/spin accidents killed more pilots during WWI than enemy action

It’s worth remembering that stall/spin accidents killed more pilots during World War One than enemy action, because they simply did not know what was causing the aeroplanes to behave like that. In fact, so the story goes, it took a clergyman to discover the first secrets of fatal aerodynamics.

One glorious summer’s day he went up in a Sopwith Snipe, to chase the soft white puffs of sunlit cumulus. While he twisted and soared among the cotton-wool canyons, his attention slipped away from the Air Speed Indicator and as he hung it out round a steep buttress of cloud, the wings gave him a gentle warning shudder before falling into a stall. The vicar watched in horror as the world below appeared to fill his windscreen. He throttled the power and hauled back on the stick, while turning violently to avoid flying in to the next cloud.

It was thus that man discovered how to avoid the most common killer of early aviators. It did not stop them killing themselves and lots of their passengers, of course, as was proved by the A330 when it plunged from 38,000 feet into the sea while being held in the fully stalled condition by three pilots who did not understand how aeroplanes, big or small, actually stay in the air. Maybe the older generation had more of a chance simply because they had to demonstrate their ability to recognise and recover from stalls and spins, both in visual and instrument flight conditions, before they were cleared to exercise the privileges of their licenses. Maybe it is time for us to move back to ‘manual’ flying before we lose all hand-eye-brain co-ordination to the omnipotent computer. 

FlightCom Magazine

15


HISTORY

The YC-130 first flight in 1954.

STEVE TRICHARD

MILITARY

TRANSPORT

AIRCRAFT

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By the end of World War 1, aerial operations had made an impact across all forms of warfare. The majority of air power roles and missions were operational, if not thoroughly tested. However, air transport was the very last role to emerge and mature, since contemporary technology could not meet the requirement.

A

T THE BEGINNING OF WORLD War 2, no military activity could ignore the third dimension. Hard-earned experience confirmed the fundamental characteristics of air power in the minds of all military planners: speed, height, reach, ubiquity and flexibility. Transport aircraft became a high-value asset during WWII. To satisfy the high demand, existing civilian air transport designs were modified as freighters and military transport aircraft. The Douglas DC-3 airliner became the hugely successful military transport C-47 Skytrain and C-53 Skytrooper. More than 16,000 DC-3 variants were built. Loading these aircraft were time-consuming. The tail wheel and side door designs made cargo handling problematic. The search for a military transport aircraft began in all earnest. This led to aircraft purpose-built to move troops and heavy, bulky loads to semiprepared airstrips with little or no ground support.

These aircraft are the Junkers Ju 90, Arado Ar 232, Fairchild C-123 Provider and the Lockheed C-130A. Junkers Ju 90 When the Junkers Ju 89 long-range bomber programme was abandoned, the third prototype was, at the request of “Deutsche Luft Hansa”, rebuilt as an airliner with a wider passenger-carrying fuselage. The new design was designated the Ju 90 and made its maiden flight in August 1937. It was a taildragger with four engines mounted on a low wing. Anybody that ever walked in a parked Dakota DC-3 will know that getting from the tail to the cockpit is uphill and not conducive to loading the aircraft. One crucial innovation for cargo aircraft was thus introduced in 1939 on Ju 90 V5. For easier loading of passengers and cargo, the concept of the “trapoklappe” was formulated. The “trapoklappe” boarding ramp, when lowered, raised the fuselage to the horizontal position and in doing so levelled the floor. Vehicles could be “wheeled” into the aircraft, and the ramp incorporated a personnel stairway. The Ju 90 evolved into the Ju 290, the first operational military aircraft with a ramp.

The Ar 232’s landing gear could “kneel”

Design features that are considered essential for modern cargo aircraft are a high wing, a box-shaped fuselage, with the main undercarriage accommodated in sponsons on the sides of the fuselage, a high tail with an integrated ramp and turboprop engines in, or flush under, the wings. Furthermore, it must be able to operate from austere airfields. The DNA of the military transport aircraft can be traced through four aircraft that were products of exceptional innovations and groundbreaking designs.

We have to divert slightly from military air transport to discuss the production type Ju 90 A-1 (the airliner) in some detail because South African Airways (SAA) ordered two of these aircraft.

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The Junkers Ju 90 V1 was the forerunner of military transports.

designs for an “all-terrain transporter for use near the front”. The requirement called for a tactical aircraft with a rear-loading design, which could operate from “unprepared terrain”. Arado Flugzeugwerke’s design was selected, and the result was the Arado Ar 232, the first purpose-built cargo aircraft. Arado’s development team, headed by Wilhelm van Nes, faced two main challenges. Firstly, to minimise the time spent in the loading and unloading without ground support, and secondly, to design an aircraft to cope with operations on extremely rough terrain.

Junkers Ju 90 V1 The Ju 90 A-1 had a range of 1 300 km at a cruise speed of 170 knots. The maximum passenger capacity was 40. The cabin was divided into five passenger compartments, each containing eight seats. The seat layout was four seats on either side of a central aisle. The four seats were paired and facing each other. Two toilets and a cloakroom were in the rear of the aircraft. The baggage hold was forward of the passenger compartments. The fuselage interior width was 2,83m, larger than the present-day Embraer 195 width of 2,74m. The loading ramp was not fitted to the A-1. SAA ordered two A-1s with Pratt & Whitney Twin Wasp engines. These were known by the alternative designation Z-3 to distinguish them from the BMWpowered Z-2.

The Ar 232 design directly addressed the loading and unloading issues of contemporary aircraft. The cargo hold was a box-shaped design, with a winch installed in the roof. A hydraulically operated door was installed at the rear of the fuselage. The door consisted of two parts. The upper half hinged towards the ceiling, and the bottom part hinged downwards onto the ground, forming the loading ramp. The high wings allowed the cargo hold to be closer to the ground and eased movement next to the aircraft. The high mounted tail boom cleared the area behind the aircraft allowing vehicles to drive up to the loading ramp. Small vehicles could be wheeled into the cargo hold via the ramp. The Ar 232’s landing gear could “kneel”, i.e. lower the fuselage for more effortless loading. It was the blueprint for features now considered to

The two Junkers Ju 90 A/Z-3 (as referred to on the hugojunkers website) aircraft were assigned the South African Civil Aircraft Registration numbers of ZS-ANG and ZS-ANH. In the register, the type is indicated as Junkers Ju 90 B-1. Neither of these aircraft was delivered to SAA due to the start of WWII. They were delivered to the Luftwaffe and were destroyed early in the war. Arado Ar 232 In late 1940, the German Ministry of Aviation requested

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FlightCom Magazine

Junkers Ju 290 with Trappoklappe open - the tail wheel can be seen in the top right-hand corner.


be standard for military transport aircraft, with two noticeable differences. The main undercarriage was still centred in the wing, while the ramp and tail configuration were not integrated.

Arado fitted and tested a boundary layer control system on one of the prototypes. The design team went as far as using rocket units and a brake parachute, installed in the tail, to shorten the landing run.

The Ar 232’s ability to operate on extremely rough terrain must be briefly discussed. “Unprepared terrain” was defined in the requirement as a terrain with trenches 1,5 m wide, embankments of sand and rubble of maximum 80 cm high and fallen tree trunks up to 15 cm in diameter!

The unusual landing gear of the Ar 232 featured a conventional retractable tricycle undercarriage with a row of smaller non-retractable tandem wheel sets (bogeys) along the underside of the fuselage. The appearance of the row of small wheels led to the nickname “Tausendfussler” (millipede).

“...you will destroy the Lockheed Company”

The Arado design team focussed on reducing the approach and takeoff speeds to minimise ground rolls and to develop extremely robust landing gear. The takeoff and landing speeds were reduced significantly through the Arado designed ‘landing flap’. It consisted of double-slotted Fowler flaps on the entire trailing edge of the wings. The ailerons extended with the flaps while retaining their function. The wing area increased by 25% and the Ar 232-A (twinengined), at maximum takeoff weight (MTOW), could get airborne within 200 metres. The payload for the Ar 232-A was 2,500 kg, and for the 4-engined Ar 232-B payload was 4,700 kg.

The takeoff distance was further reduced by using jettisonable rocket propulsion units. The same method, referred to as JATO (Jet-Assisted Take Off) was demonstrated during the Lockheed-Martin C-130 airshow that formed part of the U.S. Navy “Blue Angels” formation displays.

During takeoff from a prepared runway, the landing gear was fully extended. In flight, the main landing gear fully retracted inwards into the wings. The nose wheel retracted until it reached the same height as the bogeys and was still exposed. For loading purposes, the aircraft was lowered by hydraulically shortening the main landing gear and retracting the nose wheel, with the aircraft settling onto the bogeys. The same landing gear configuration was used for operations from unprepared surfaces. The Ar 232 had another kneeling trick up its sleeve, by extending the nose wheel while in the loading configuration, the fuselage tilted rearwards, lowering the ramp even closer to the ground. On 13 June 1944 an Ar 232 piloted by Paul Bader

Arado Ar 232 showing the design features of modern-day cargo aircraft.

FlightCom Magazine

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Arado Ar 232 – with massive flaps extended increasing the wing area by 25%.

demonstrated the ability to meet the “unprepared terrain” requirements set four years earlier. A test track was prepared with trenches 1,5 m wide and sand embankments of 80 cm high. High-ranking officials attended the demonstration. Independent technicians that watched the flying display as guests believed that the extreme shocks that the aircraft endured caused damage to the airframe.

after WWII by the Chase Aircraft Company for the USAF, built entirely of metal. With a wingspan of almost 34 m and an AUW of 31,751 kg, it was the largest glider ever built in the United States.

Fairchild C-123 Provider

The XG-20 introduced design innovations with the main landing gear mounted in the fuselage and a high tail configuration with an integrated loading ramp. The airframe layout and features for military transport were now reaching maturity.

The Chase XG-20 was an assault glider developed immediately

The XG-20 did not enter production. However, two radial

engines were integrated into the airframe, evolving into the Chase C-123 AVITRUC. Chase began manufacturing the C-123 in 1953, but the contract was transferred to Fairchild due to a corruption scandal. Fairchild C-123 Provider The Fairchild C-123 Provider saw extensive service during the Vietnam War as a short-range assault transport used for airlifting troops and cargo to and from small, unprepared airstrips. Unfortunately, the C-123 is perhaps best known for spraying “Agent Orange”, a herbicide used to defoliate parts of South Vietnam. Lockheed C-130A

In flight, the main gear retracted while the twenty-two small wheels remained extended. 20

FlightCom Magazine

The American aircraft company Lockheed responded to a requirement from the USAF in 1951. The requirement was, in layman’s terms, for “a medium transport that can land on unimproved ground, be extremely rugged, be primarily for freight


transport with troop-carrying capability, and carry about 30,000 pounds for 1,500 miles.” Willis Hawkins, head of the Lockheed design team, responded with a design that was to become the C-130 Hercules. The design had a similar layout to the C-123 Provider, with two noticeable design differences. The main wheels retracted into fuselage sponsons that did not intrude into the cargo hold, and it used four Allison T56 turboprop engines.

on any aircraft, the first being on the Douglas C-124. Senior Lockheed officials were sceptical, advising the vice-president of Lockheed not to sign the prototype proposal document. “If you sign that letter, you will destroy the Lockheed Company.” They thought that the Hercules would not sell enough to recover the development costs. The document was signed, and the company won the contract in July 1951.

The features for military transport were now reaching maturity

The Allison T56 turboprop engine weighed 794 kg and delivered 2,796 kW of power. In comparison, the largest radial engine ever mass produced was the 2,600 kW Pratt & Whitney R-4360 Wasp Major at a weight of 1 585 kg. The T56 was developed specifically for the C-130 and was the final piece in search of the modern military transport aircraft.

The other engineering innovations on the C-130 were more than skin deep. The Allison engines generated sufficient power to allow the engineers to incorporate pressurisation into the design. The whole aircraft was pressurised, including the cargo bay. The fuselage was strengthened by the ‘double layer’ required and contributed to the durability of the aircraft. A turbine Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) was installed in the C-130. It was only the second such installation

The first flight of the prototype YC-130 took place in August 1954. The aircraft was more manoeuvrable than expected and met or exceeded all USAF requirements. The transport pilots were delighted. The C-130A, at a weight of 45 000 kg, was labelled as overpowered, could climb at 2 500 ft/min and comfortably fly with one engine out. Lockheed-Martin describes it as “The C-130 is whatever is needed, it’s an ambulance, it’s a gunship, it drops paratroopers, it carries cargo, it’s a T.V. broadcast system, it’s launched drones, and caught satellites. You name it, the Hercules has done it at some point in its career.” The military transport aircraft was now a mature design, and its versatility had an incredible impact on world affairs. 

The C-123 Provider spraying Agent Orange in Vietnam.

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: T O L I P E H MEET T

Text and images: Grant Duncan-Smith: Subiaco Photography

Flying a medical rescue helicopter is one of the most demanding roles for a helicopter pilot. Often it is literally a matter of life and death to get the patient to the hospital. We chat to Air Mercy Service pilot Donovan Kohl about how he got to qualify as an AMS pilot and what it takes.

AMS pilot Donovan Kohl.

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The AMS Agusta A119 Koala operating over Cape Town.

GDS: When did you first know you wanted to be a pilot? DK: As far back as I can recall, but from the age of 9 years old my parents said I always had a keen fascination for flying. GDS: Where were you born and where did you grow up?

GDS: Where did you learn to fly? DK: Initially I completed a fixed wing PPL through the Defence Flying Club at Air Force Base Swartkop. After leaving the SAAF I completed my helicopter PPL with Dave Mouton’s flying school, then Helibip, at Midrand. My CPL(H) was then completed with Starlite Aviation at Virginia. I earned my ATPL(H) during the course of my flying career.

The Agusta A119 Koala has been the most fun

DK: I was born in Salisbury (Harare) but grew up in Tzaneen where I completed my schooling at Merensky High School. Thereafter I joined the SAAF and my studies were all aviation related. I qualified as an Aircraft Maintenance Engineer and Flight Engineer on helicopters in the SAAF. I still hold a valid AME Licence as well.

GDS: What helicopters are you rated on?

DK: The Agusta 119 & 109, EC130, AS350; Sikorsky 76, Bell 212, RH22 & 44 and H269 helicopters, with Instrument and Night Ratings with NVG. I also have Sling and Winch and Test Pilot (Class 2) ratings. I no longer fly fixed wings.

FlightCom Magazine

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Donovan Kohl holds both winch and sling ratings as well as an instrument rating.

You gain most of this understanding with experience

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FlightCom Magazine


Winch operations require well practiced teamwork between crew and pilot.

weather conditions and wind can hamper a mission

FlightCom Magazine

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Mountain flying is the most challenging, especially with Cape Town winds.

the start of my commercial helicopter career, as I was a lowly co-pilot back then with much to learn. GDS: How long you have flown with AMS? DK: I have been with AMS for 14 years. My first 2 years were spent in Bloemfontein, the latter 12 have all been Cape Town based. When required, we also do relief duties at other AMS bases around the country. GDS: What specific skills are important as a HEMS/Mountain Rescue pilot? And what advice would you give pilots wanting to do AMS work? DK: From my own experience, the best advice I can give is that to have a good knowledge and technical understanding of the aircraft type one operates is invaluable. Respect your helicopter and know its limits – as well as your own. Regarding skills: currently the most demanding is mountain flying as it is an ever-changing environment, particularly in Cape Town with the winds we experience.

GDS: What is your favourite aircraft? DK: The Agusta 109 Grand thus far has been the most fun to fly. DS: What has been your most memorable flight? DK: During the course of my career I had the privilege to work on the Antarctic and Islands contract with CHC Africa. By far the most memorable flying was done in Antarctica using Bell 212s. That was basically

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Every rescue is different and sometimes the weather conditions and wind can hamper a mission. It is all too easy to get caught out during a mission to save a life. You have to be careful not to get pressured, and ultimately to maintain a keen eye on all aspects of safety, for yourself, the crew, the patient and the helicopter. Having a good understanding of mountain flying is important. You gain most of this understanding with experience, however there are many brilliant and skilled/experienced helicopter pilots out there and one should never be afraid to ask advice from them. 


BUMMPFFF: The used Raptor engines from SpaceX SN15's successful landing. The complexity, design for huge pressures and the signs of thermal stresses are evident

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AMO LISTING

CAPE TOWN

FAX NO

Sheet Metal Rebuilds Overhauls Electrics NDT Testing Refurbishments Structural Repairs Inspections NTCA Aircraft Seat Belts Instruments

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Interior

NAME OF AMO

Fixed Wing Helicopter Avionics Piston Engines Turbine Engines Propellers Weight / Balance Paint

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AES

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Composite Manufacturing

Structural Repairs Inspections NTCA Aircraft Seat Belts Instruments

Sheet Metal Rebuilds Overhauls Electrics NDT Testing Refurbishments

FAX NO

Interior

CODE TEL NO

Fixed Wing Helicopter Avionics Piston Engines Turbine Engines Propellers Weight / Balance Paint

NAME OF AMO

RAND AIRPORT CONTINUED Emperor Aviation

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• Overhaul / Shockload / Repair of Continental and Lycoming Aircraft engines;

•Overhaul Engine; Components; •Overhaul and supply of Hartzell / McCauley and Fix pitch Propellers Hangar no 4, Wonderboom Airport , Pretoria PO Box 17699, Pretoria North, 0116 • Tel: (012) 543 0948/51 • Fax: (012) 543 9447 • email: aeroeng@iafrica.com AMO No: 227

FLIGHT SAFETY THROUGH MAINTENANCE

FlightCom Magazine

31


BACKPAGE DIR DIRECT ECTORY ORY A1A Flight Examiner (Loutzavia) Jannie Loutzis 012 567 6775 / 082 416 4069 jannie@loutzavia.co.za www.loutzavia.co.za Adventure Air Lande Milne 012 543 3196 / Cell: 066 4727 848 l.milne@venture-sa.co.za www.ventureglobal.biz

Alpha One Aviation Opelo 082 301 9977 on@alphaoneaviation.co.za www.alphaoneaviation.co.za Alpi Aviation SA Dale De Klerk 082 556 3592 dale@alpiaviation.co.za www.alpiaviation.co.za

AES (Cape Town) Erwin Erasmus 082 494 3722 erwin@aeroelectrical.co.za www.aeroelectrical.co.za

Apco (Ptyd) Ltd Tony/Henk + 27 12 543 0775 apcosupport@mweb.co.za www.apcosa.co.za

AES (Johannesburg) Danie van Wyk 011 701 3200 office@aeroelectrical.co.za www.aeroelectrical.co.za

Aref Avionics Hannes Roodt 082 462 2724 arefavionics@border.co.za

Comporob Composite Repair & Manufacture Felix Robertson 072 940 4447 083 265 3602 comporob@lantic.net www.comporob.co.za Corporate-Aviators/Affordable Jet Sales Mike Helm 082 442 6239 corporate-aviators@iafrica.com www.corporate-aviators.com C. W. Price & Co Kelvin L. Price 011 805 4720 cwp@cwprice.co.za www.cwprice.co.za Dart Aeronautical Jaco Kelly 011 827 8204 dartaero@mweb.co.za

Atlas Aviation Lubricants Aerocore Steve Cloete Dart Aircraft Electrical Jacques Podde 011 917 4220 Mathew Joubert 082 565 2330 Fax: 011 917 2100 011 827 0371 jacques@aerocore.co.za Sales.aviation@atlasoil.co.za Dartaircraftelectrical@gmail.com www.aerocore.co.za www.atlasoil.africa www.dartaero.co.za Aero Engineering & PowerPlant ATNS DJA Aviation Insurance Andre Labuschagne Percy Morokane 011 463 5550 012 543 0948 011 607 1234 0800Flying aeroeng@iafrica.com percymo@atns.co.za mail@dja-aviation.co.za www.atns.com www.dja-aviation.co.za Aero Services (Pty) Ltd Chris Scott Aviation Direct Dynamic Propellers 011 395 3587 Andrea Antel Andries Visser chris@aeroservices.co.za 011 465 2669 011 824 5057 www.aeroservices.co.za info@aviationdirect.co.za 082 445 4496 www.aviationdirect.co.za andries@dynamicpropeller.co.za Aeronav Academy www.dynamicpropellers.co.za Donald O’Connor BAC Aviation AMO 115 011 701 3862 Micky Joss Eagle Aviation Helicopter Division info@aeronav.co.za 035 797 3610 Tamryn van Staden www.aeronav.co.za monicad@bacmaintenance.co.za 082 657 6414 tamryn@eaglehelicopter.co.za Aeronautical Aviation Blackhawk Africa www.eaglehelicopter.co.za Clinton Carroll Cisca de Lange 011 659 1033 / 083 459 6279 083 514 8532 Eagle Flight Academy clinton@aeronautical.co.za cisca@blackhawk.aero Mr D. J. Lubbe www.aeronautical.co.za www.blackhawk.aero 082 557 6429 training@eagleflight.co.za Aerotric (Pty) Ltd Blue Chip Flight School www.eagleflight.co.za Richard Small Henk Kraaij 083 488 4535 012 543 3050 Elite Aviation Academy aerotric@aol.com bluechip@bluechip-avia.co.za Jacques Podde www.bluechipflightschool.co.za 082 565 2330 Aircraft Assembly and Upholstery Centre info@eliteaa.co.za Tony/Siggi Bailes Border Aviation Club & Flight School www.eliteaa.co.za 082 552 6467 Liz Gous anthony@rvaircraft.co.za 043 736 6181 Enstrom/MD Helicopters www.rvaircraft.co.za admin@borderaviation.co.za Andrew Widdall www.borderaviation.co.za 011 397 6260 Aircraft Finance Corporation aerosa@safomar.co.za Jaco Pietersen Breytech Aviation cc www.safomar.co.za +27 [0]82 672 2262 012 567 3139 jaco@airfincorp.co.za Willie Breytenbach Era Flug Flight Training www.airfincorp.co.za admin@breytech.co.za Pierre Le Riche 021 934 7431 Aircraft General Spares Bundu Aviation info@era-flug.com Eric or Hayley Phillip Cronje www.era-flug.com 084 587 6414 or 067 154 2147 083 485 2427 eric@acgs.co.za or hayley@acgs.co.za info@bunduaviation.co.za Execujet Africa www.acgs.co.za www.bunduaviation.co.za 011 516 2300 enquiries@execujet.co.za Aircraft Maintenance @ Work Celeste Sani Pak & Inflight Products www.execujet.com Opelo / Frik Steve Harris 012 567 3443 011 452 2456 Federal Air frik@aviationatwork.co.za_ admin@chemline.co.za Rachel Muir opelonke@aviationatwork.co.za www.chemline.co.za 011 395 9000 shuttle@fedair.com Aircraft Maintenance International Cape Aircraft Interiors www.fedair.com Pine Pienaar Sarel Schutte 083 305 0605 021 934 9499 Ferry Flights int.inc. gm@aminternational.co.za michael@wcaeromarine.co.za Michael (Mick) Schittenhelm www.zscai.co.za 082 442 6239 Aircraft Maintenance International ferryflights@ferry-flights.com Wonderboom Cape Town Flying Club www.ferry-flights.com Thomas Nel Beverley Combrink 082 444 7996 021 934 0257 / 082 821 9013 Fireblade Aviation admin@aminternational.co.za info@capetownflyingclub.co.za 010 595 3920 www.@capetownflyingclub.co.za info@firebladeaviation.com Air Line Pilots’ Association www.firebladeaviation.com Sonia Ferreira Capital Air 011 394 5310 Micaella Vinagre Flight Training College alpagm@iafrica.com 011 827 0335 Cornell Morton www.alpa.co.za micaella@capitalairsa.com 044 876 9055 www.capitalairsa.com ftc@flighttrainning.co.za Airshift Aircraft Sales www.flighttraining.co.za Eugene du Plessis Century Avionics cc 082 800 3094 Carin van Zyl Flight Training Services eugene@airshift.co.za 011 701 3244 Amanda Pearce www.airshift.co.za sales@centuryavionics.co.za 011 805 9015/6 www.centuryavionics.co.za amanda@fts.co.za Airvan Africa www.fts.co.za Patrick Hanly Chemetall 082 565 8864 Wayne Claassens Fly Jetstream Aviation airvan@border.co.za 011 914 2500 Henk Kraaij www.airvan.co.za wayne.claassens@basf.com 083 279 7853 www.chemetall.com charter@flyjetstream.co.za Algoa Flying Club www.flyjetstream.co.za Sharon Mugridge Chem-Line Aviation & Celeste Products 041 581 3274 Steve Harris info@algoafc.co.za 011 452 2456 www.algoafc.co.za sales@chemline.co.za www.chemline.co.za

32

FlightCom Magazine

Flying Frontiers Craig Lang 082 459 0760 CraigL@fairfield.co.za www.flyingfrontiers.com Flying Unlimited Flight School (Pty) Ltd Riaan Struwig 082 653 7504 / 086 770 8376 riaan@ppg.co.za www.ppg.co.za Foster Aero International Dudley Foster 011 659 2533 info@fosteraero.co.za www.fosteraero.co.za

Gemair Andries Venter 011 701 2653 / 082 905 5760 andries@gemair.co.za GIB Aviation Insurance Brokers Richard Turner 011 483 1212 aviation@gib.co.za www.gib.co.za Gryphon Flight Academy Jeffrey Von Holdt 011 701 2600 info@gryphonflight.co.za www.gryphonflight.co.za

Guardian Air 011 701 3011 082 521 2394 ops@guardianair.co.za www.guardianair.co.za Heli-Afrique cc Tino Conceicao 083 458 2172 tino.conceicao@heli-afrique.co.za Henley Air Andre Coetzee 011 827 5503 andre@henleyair.co.za www.henleyair.co.za Hover Dynamics Phillip Cope 074 231 2964 info@hover.co.za www.hover.co.za Indigo Helicopters Gerhard Kleynhans 082 927 4031 / 086 528 4234 veroeschka@indigohelicopters.co.za www.indigohelicopters.co.za IndigoSat South Africa - Aircraft Tracking Gareth Willers 08600 22 121 sales@indigosat.co.za www.indigosat.co.za

Integrated Avionic Solutions Gert van Niekerk 082 831 5032 gert@iasafrica.co.za www.iasafrica.co.za International Flight Clearances Steve Wright 076 983 1089 (24 Hrs) flightops@flyifc.co.za www.flyifc.co.za Investment Aircraft Quinton Warne 082 806 5193 aviation@lantic.net www.investmentaircraft.com Jabiru Aircraft Len Alford 044 876 9991 / 044 876 9993 info@jabiru.co.za www.jabiru.co.za Jim Davis Books Jim Davis 072 188 6484 jim@border.co.za www.jimdavis.co.za Joc Air T/A The Propeller Shop Aiden O’Mahony 011 701 3114 jocprop@iafrica.com Kishugu Aviation +27 13 741 6400 comms@kishugu.com www.kishugu.com/kishugu-aviation


Kit Planes for Africa Stefan Coetzee 013 793 7013 info@saplanes.co.za www.saplanes.co.za

MS Aviation Gary Templeton 082 563 9639 gary.templeton@msaviation.co.za www.msaviation.co.za

Kzn Aviation (Pty) Ltd Melanie Jordaan 031 564 6215 mel@kznaviation.co.za www.kznaviation.co.za

Skyhorse Aviation Ryan Louw 012 809 3571 info@skyhorse.co.za www.skyhorse.co.za

United Flight Support Clinton Moodley/Jonathan Wolpe 076 813 7754 / 011 788 0813 ops@unitedflightsupported.com www.unitedflightsupport.com

North East Avionics Keith Robertson +27 13 741 2986 keith@northeastavionics.co.za deborah@northeastavionics.co.za www.northeastavionics.co.za Landing Eyes Gavin Brown Orsmond Aviation 031 202 5703 058 303 5261 info@landingeyes.co.za info@orsmondaviation.co.za www.landingeyes.com www.orsmondaviation.co.za Lanseria Aircraft Interiors Owenair (Pty) Ltd Francois Denton Clive Skinner 011 659 1962 / 076 810 9751 082 923 9580 francois@aircraftcompletions.co.za clive.skinner@owenair.co.za www.owenwair.co.za Lanseria International Airport Mike Christoph Pacair 011 367 0300 Wayne Bond mikec@lanseria.co.za 033 386 6027 www.lanseria.co.za pacair@telkomsa.net

Skyworx Aviation Kevin Hopper kevin@skyworx.co.za www.skyworxaviation.co.za

Legend Sky 083 860 5225 / 086 600 7285 info@legendssky.co.za www.legendsky.co.za

PFERD-South Africa (Pty) Ltd Hannes Nortman 011 230 4000 hannes.nortman@pferd.co.za www.pferd.com

Southern Energy Company (Pty) Ltd Elke Bertram +264 8114 29958 johnnym@sec.com.na www.sec.com.na

Litson & Associates (Pty) Ltd OGP, BARS, Resources Auditing & Aviation Training karen.litson@litson.co.za Phone: 27 (0) 21 8517187 www.litson.co.za

Pipistrel Kobus Nel 083 231 4296 kobus@pipistrelsa.co.za www.pipistrelsa.co.za

Southern Rotorcraft cc Mr Reg Denysschen Tel no: 0219350980 sasales@rotors-r-us.com www.rotors-r-us.com

Plane Maintenance Facility Johan 083 300 3619 pmf@myconnection.co.za

Sport Plane Builders Pierre Van Der Walt 083 361 3181 pmvdwalt@mweb.co.za

Precision Aviation Services Marnix Hulleman 012 543 0371 marnix@pasaviation.co.za www.pasaviation.co.za PSG Aviation Reon Wiese 0861 284 284 reon.wiese@psg.co.za www.psg aviation.co.za

Starlite Aero Sales Klara Fouché +27 83 324 8530 / +27 31 571 6600 klaraf@starliteaviation.com www.starliteaviation.com

Rainbow SkyReach (Pty) Ltd Mike Gill 011 817 2298 Mike@fly-skyreach.com www.fly-skyreach.com Rand Airport Stuart Coetzee 011 827 8884 stuart@randairport.co.za www.randairport.co.za Robin Coss Aviation Robin Coss 021 934 7498 info@cossaviation.com www.cossaviation.co.za

Starlite Aviation Training Academy Durban: +27 31 571 6600  Mossel Bay:  +27 44 692 0006 train@starliteaviation.com www.starliteaviation.com

Litson & Associates Risk Management Services (Pty) Ltd. eSMS-S/eTENDER/ eREPORT/Advisory Services karen.litson@litson.co.za Phone: 27 (0) 8517187 www.litson.co.za Loutzavia Aircraft Sales Henry Miles 082 966 0911 henry@loutzavia.co.za www.loutzavia.co.za Loutzavia Flight Training Gerhardt Botha 012 567 6775 ops@loutzavia.co.za www.loutzavia.co.za Loutzavia-Pilots and Planes Maria Loutzis 012 567 6775 maria@loutzavia.co.za www.pilotsnplanes.co.za Loutzavia Rand Frans Pretorius 011 824 3804 rand@loutzavia.co.za www@loutzavia.co.za Lowveld Aero Club Pugs Steyn 013 741 3636 Flynow@lac.co.za Marshall Eagle Les Lebenon 011 958 1567 les@marshalleagle.co.za www.marshalleagle.co.za Maverick Air Charters Chad Clark 083 292 2270 Charters@maverickair.co.za www.maverickair.co.za MCC Aviation Pty Ltd Claude Oberholzer 011 701 2332 info@flymcc.co.za www.flymcc.co.za MH Aviation Services (Pty) Ltd Marc Pienaar 011 609 0123 / 082 940 5437 customerrelations@mhaviation.co.za www.mhaviation.co.za M and N Acoustic Services cc Martin de Beer 012 689 2007/8 calservice@mweb.co.za Metropolitan Aviation (Pty) Ltd Gert Mouton 082 458 3736 herenbus@gmail.com Money Aviation Angus Money 083 263 2934 angus@moneyaviation.co.za www.moneyaviation.co.za

SAA Technical (SOC) Ltd SAAT Marketing 011 978 9993 satmarketing@flysaa.com www.flysaa.com/technical SABRE Aircraft Richard Stubbs 083 655 0355 richardstubbs@mweb.co.za www.aircraftafrica.co.za SA Mooney Patrick Hanly 082 565 8864 samooney@border.co.za www.samooney.co.za Savannah Helicopters De Jager 082 444 1138 / 044 873 3288 dejager@savannahhelicopters.co.za www.savannahhelicopters.co.za Scenic Air Christa van Wyk +264 612 492 68 windhoek@scenic-air.com www.scenic-air.com Sheltam Aviation Durban Susan Ryan 083 505 4882 susanryan@sheltam.com www.sheltamaviation.com Sheltam Aviation PE Brendan Booker 082 497 6565 brendanb@sheltam.com www.sheltamaviation.com

Sky-Tech Heinz Van Staden 082 720 5210 sky-tech@telkomsa.net www.sky-tech.za.com Sling Aircraft Kim Bell-Cross 011 948 9898 sales@airplanefactory.co.za www.airplanefactory.co.za Solenta Aviation (Pty Ltd) Paul Hurst 011 707 4000 info@solenta.com www.solenta.com

Unique Air Charter Nico Pienaar 082 444 7994 nico@uniqueair.co.za www.uniqueair.co.za Unique Flight Academy Nico Pienaar 082 444 7994 nico@uniqueair.co.za www.uniqueair.co.za Van Zyl Aviation Services Colette van Zyl 012 997 6714 admin@vanzylaviationco.za www.vanzylaviation.co.za Vector Aerospace Jeff Poirier +902 888 1808 jeff.poirier@vectoraerospace.com www.vectoraerospace.com Velocity Aviation Collin Pearson 011 659 2306 / 011 659 2334 collin@velocityaviation.co.za www.velocityaviation.co.za Villa San Giovanni Luca Maiorana 012 111 8888 info@vsg.co.za www.vsg.co.za

Starlite Aviation Operations Trisha Andhee +27 82 660 3018/ +27 31 571 6600 trishaa@starliteaviation.com www.starliteaviation.com

Status Aviation (Pty) Ltd Richard Donian 074 587 5978 / 086 673 5266 info@statusaviation.co.za www.statusaviation.co.za Superior Pilot Services Liana Jansen van Rensburg 0118050605/2247 info@superiorair.co.za www.superiorair.co.za The Copter Shop Bill Olmsted 082 454 8555 execheli@iafrica.com www.execheli.wixsite.com/the-coptershop-sa Titan Helicopter Group 044 878 0453 info@titanhelicopters.com www.titanhelicopters.com TPSC Dennis Byrne 011 701 3210 turboprop@wol.co.za Trio Helicopters & Aviation cc CR Botha or FJ Grobbelaar 011 659 1022

Vortx Aviation Bredell Roux 072 480 0359 info@vortx.co.za www.vortxaviation.com Wagtail Aviation Johan van Ludwig 082 452 8194 acrochem@mweb.co.za www.wagtail.co.za Wanafly Adrian Barry 082 493 9101 adrian@wanafly.net www.wanafly.co.za Windhoek Flight Training Centre Thinus Dreyer 0026 40 811284 180 pilots@flywftc.com www.flywftc.com Wings n Things Wendy Thatcher 011 701 3209 wendy@wingsnthings.co.za www.wingsnthings.co.za Witbank Flight School Andre De Villiers 083 604 1718 andredv@lantic.net www.waaflyingclub.co.za Wonderboom Airport Peet van Rensburg 012 567 1188/9 peet@wonderboomairport.co.za www.wonderboomairport.co.za Zandspruit Bush & Aero Estate Martin Den Dunnen 082 449 8895 martin@zandspruit.co.za www.zandspruit.co.za Zebula Golf Estate & SPA Reservations 014 734 7700 reception@zebula.co.za www.zebula.co.za

stoffel@trioavi.co.za/frans@trioavi.co.za

www.trioavi.co.za Tshukudu Trailers Pieter Visser 083 512 2342 deb@tshukudutrailers.co.za www.tshukudutrailers.co.za U Fly Training Academy Nikola Puhaca 011 824 0680 ufly@telkomsa.net www.uflyacademy.co.za United Charter cc Jonathan Wolpe 083 270 8886 jonathan.wolpe@unitedcharter.co.za www.unitedcharter.co.za

FlightCom Magazine

33

Profile for Flyer & Aviation Publications

June 2021  

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