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Hero Up Feeling inspired by Safe’s List of 50 Global Heroes? Put that motivated feeling to use and become a hero yourself by getting involved in any—or better yet, all—of the following ways. No matter where you live, there are opportunities to engage with organizations in your community—find a local empowerment group; a shelter for women and children; be a mentor; and above all be an informed voice against violence! The following are some of the opportunities we found to play a part in ending violence again women and children while working in support of some of the heroes and organizations you just read about.

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Teach the power of school for girls—and learn from girls who fight for the right to learn. Girl Rising is a global campaign for girls’ education started in 2013. Help break the cycle of poverty by introducing the Girl Rising curriculum to a local educator or school, or host a screening of the eponymously titled “Girl Rising” film, which is all about the challenges school-aged girls face around the world. The curriculum is designed to help students understand the issues surrounding girls’ education in the developing world. To do it: girlrising.com. In collaboration with the Global Women’s Institute at George Washington University, the Malala Fund launched the Malala Curriculum Project. The curriculum developed for high school and university students is designed to integrate themes addressed in Malala’s book I Am Malala into existing courses. The curriculum features a guide to student activism and tools to create community-focused movements. To do it: globalwomensinstitute.gwu.edu/malala-curriculum-project.

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Make hygiene kits for girls in need. In many countries, menstruating girls don’t have access to sanitary pads and as a result have to miss school several days each month. Days for Girls has a kit—with patterns and instructions—that shows you how to make washable feminine hygiene kits. These kits recoup up to six months of a girl’s productivity in just three years of use. Volunteer to sew or make the kits to give girls across the globe the opportunity to live healthier, happier, safer and more dignified lives. You can send your kit to a local chapter or directly to Days for Girls International. If you are working with a local organization or are interested and willing to provide training on reproductive health, hygiene, safety and how to use and care for kits, Days for Girls can partner with you to get kits to you. To do it: daysforgirls.org.

84 Safe. Issue 2

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Picture It! Illustrate what gender equity means to you. Twenty years ago, leaders came together in Beijing to discuss the future of women’s empowerment and rights. The result? The Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action—a landmark international agreement to achieve gender equality and empowerment of women and girls adopted by 189 nations. On the occasion of the 20th anniversary of the declaration, UN Women invites you join the conversation happening via their Empowering Women – Empowering Humanity: Picture It! campaign for gender equality. Picture It! invites you to imagine what gender equality and women’s empowerment look like and post images of that vision to social media. This is how it works: Visit the Beijing +20 “Get Involved” page, download your favorite image and share it with your own message. If you’re short on time, you can also use one of the tailored messages—just copy and paste. Don’t forget to add your Facebook or Twitter profile picture to the campaign! And follow along on Twitter @ #Beijing20. To do it: beijing20.unwomen.org.

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Advocate! Show your selfie to help ensure that the rights of women and girls are included in the next version of the global development agenda. In 2000, all UN member states adopted the eight Millennium Development Goals (MDGs)—and agreed to try to achieve them by 2015. The MDGs called nations to address issues such as poverty, the spread of disease and access to education—but the specific needs of girls were not spelled out in the MDGs. As the deadline for the MDGs approaches, a new set of targets, known as the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are in development. The Girl Declaration was written to ensure that the needs of girls are factored into the next generation of the global development agenda. A synthesis of the insight of 508 girls living in poverty and the expertise of

Profile for Together for Girls

Safe issue 2  

Safe Magazine, Issue II. Meet the 50 global heroes committed to ending violence against children around the world.

Safe issue 2  

Safe Magazine, Issue II. Meet the 50 global heroes committed to ending violence against children around the world.

Profile for safemag