Page 1

VOL. 2 ISSUE 3

MAY - JUNE 2010

Prevent your child from

WANDERING see page 5

TEXTING WHILE DRIVING

Both eyes off the road see page 7

HURRICANE PREPAREDNESS 2010 CHART & GUIDE

see page 10


No More False Alarms

Portable, Wireless

HOW IT WORKS

Video Security System CAS-MotionView XL Features: • Instant video of intrusion with 2-way voice over GSM mobile • Wireless MotionViewer (sensor/camera) with true night vision • GSM mobile communicator eliminates all VoIP, IP or PSTN connections • Privacy assured as each MotionViewer camera is only active during alarm • UNPLUGGED - totally wireless and no AC power needed • Intergrated proximity card arming/disarming for ease of use • Up to 20 cameras (sirens, reed contacts, keypads or other devices) • 4 years battery life on panel and other devices

Fewer False Alarms. Faster Police Response. Greater Situation Awareness.

For More Information Call 225-928-7867 or visit http://www.certifiedalarms.com/casmotionviewer-wireless-video.html

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Video is recorded and sent upon alarm detection only.

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contents

MAY - JUNE 2010 VOL. 2 ISSUE 3

publisher/ceo

Rusty Howard info@certifiedalarms.com

04

executive editor

05

Jan Howard jan@certifiedalarms.com

Hurricane Prepardness

07

08

20

2010 TRACKING CHART & GUIDE

Inside this issue...

> 02 > 04 > 05 > 07 > 08 > 09 > 10 > 14 > 18

> 20

CAS-MOTIONVIEW CAMERA PORTABLE WIRELESS SURVEILLANCE BEWARE OF IMPOSTERS! from the publisher

PREVENTING YOUR CHILD FROM WANDERING BOTH EYES OFF THE ROAD TEXTING WHILE DRIVING By Jacquelyn Valentine

WHAT‘S COOKIN‘ WITH MEME TROPICAL FRUIT TOSS OUTDOOR COOKING SAFETY FIRE WATCH with Howard Ward

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art director

Mary Milton mary@certifiedalarms.com

graphic designer April Mae Boudreau april@certifiedalarms.com

contributing writers Jacquelyn Valentine newsletter@certifiedalarms.com Howard Ward hlward@bakerlafire.org

webmaster Venkat Kommalapati venkat@certifiedalarms.com

Safe & SOUND is a bi-monthly publication provided by

Certified Alarm Systems & Home Theaters 1113 Florida Blvd., SE Denham Springs, LA 70726 Main Office 225.928.7867 certifiedalarms.com Marketing Dept 225.791.7179 safeandsoundmagazine.com

CUT THE CORD! NO PHONE ALARM IS HERE!

All rights reserved. Safe & SOUND cannot be held responsible for any unsolicited materials. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. Publisher is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts and artwork. The opinions expressed in Safe & SOUND are those of the authors or advertisers and do not necessarily reflect the views of the owners, nor do they constitute the endorsement of products or services herein. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any paid advertisement.

FATHER‘S DAY GUIDE COOL GIFTS FOR DAD

Copyright 2010 Certified Alarm Systems & Home Theaters. All rights reserved.

HURICANE PREPARDNESS 2010 RESOURCES & GUIDE

2010 HURICANE CHART

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3


from the publisher

Dear Readers, Many of you have informed us that another alarm company is going door to door claiming, to be associated with Certified Alarm Systems and GE Home Security. They are offering free upgrades to existing systems, and say they are able to do this upgrade ON THE SPOT..... do NOT be fooled! Who Are They Really? During previous summer months, an out of state company employs college students in the area to go door to door to homes with existing security systems and offer this upgrade. When school starts back in the fall, the company representative that contacted you will be no where to be found.

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What Should You Do? If this has happens to you or someone you know please contact us immediately. If it sounds to good to be true...it usually is! Never turn over your Certified yard sign or equipment to anyone without contacing Certified Alarm Systems to verify the validity of the transaction. Ask for proof. All persons employed by Certified Alarm Systems & Home Theaters is required to carry an ID card issued by the State Fire Marshal. Always ask to see this card before letting anyone into your home. Thank You for your continued loyal support, Rusty & Jan Howard -Publisher, Safe & SOUND Magazine -President / CEO, Certified Alarm Systems & Home Theaters, Inc.

To Advertise Please Visit Us Online at SafeandSoundMagazine.com or call 225-928-7867


Wandering

Prevent Your Child From

Our children need to be safe no matter where they are or what they doing, this also applies to shopping, keeping out of the way of those uncontrollable shopping trolleys and their drivers, and to be save from traffic on the roads.

Curious children make a mental picture of all the fun things they will see and be able to do, almost like a shopping list just like parents, the only problem is, the items on the child’s list takes top priority position according to them and so begins the chaos. Let your child know the rules before getting out of the car, and make sure you enforce them even if the tantrums begin, remind your child for his safety he must at all times remain by your side when going anywhere. In time this will become a natural habit. Bear in mind, once you let

your child stroll off, he will continue to do so.

Setting The Rules…

On the way to shopping or even at home after kinder are good times to lay down the ground rules. Tell your children exactly what you expect of them when out in public. For example, say, “you must stay in reach of me to prevent you being injured or lost, even worse, taken by a stranger.”

Refresh Your Childs Memory…

For our children to be expected to know how to behave in public, we need to test their memories by often asking them if they remember what is required of them.

continued on page 6

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5


Prevent Your Child From

Wandering continued from page 5

Put it to the test, tell your children when you are about to go out, lets see if we can all stay close together and if so, also praise, thank you for helping me keep you safe. Tell your children they were all very good shoppers for staying close.

Teaching Them To Come When Called

During a neutral time, ask your child to come to you from near or far, and when this happens, give him a pleasing hug. When this becomes second nature to your child it’s time to try it at the supermarket and if all goes well, cuddle your child and tell him how grown up he is for doing as he was asked.

Giving Responsibility…

We need to give children a responsible job to do while out. Get your children to help you with the groceries by putting the items in your trolley; keeping them occupied will deter the wandering away, and less you have to cope with.

Change Rules To Suit Maturity…

As our children become accustomed to the rules and behave in the correct manner, we need to extend the leash, so to put it. We should give them more room to move, for example, purposely forget an item, making

continued on page 19

6

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BOTH EYES OFF THE ROAD… By Jacquelyn Valentine

O

ne hand off the wheel, both eyes off the road…for less than five seconds, enough time to travel the length of a football field at 55 mph. That’s what you have when you text while driving, and that’s all it takes to cause a crash that will alter lives forever. Virtually everyone has a cell phone these days, and more and more of us are using the texting feature that comes with most phone plans. Not a problem- until you get behind the wheel. A recent survey found that 71 % of people between the ages of 18 and 49 admit they text or talk on the phone while they drive.

EVERYONE’S PROBLEM

It’s the worst of what law enforcement personnel refer to as “distracted driving”. The crash statistics surrounding distractions in vehicles, such as cell phone usage and texting, is growing. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reports that distracted drivers account for almost 80% of all crashes and 65% of near crashes in the United States. This relatively new phenomenon of texting while behind the wheel is a serious public health hazard that has ended tragically for many. Nearly 500,000 people are injured and 6000 are killed each year because drivers are talking or texting while driving. Moreover, the dreary statistics promise to increase if we don’t address the situation and make the effort to change our ways.

NEW DRIVERS, NEW HABIT

One of the most alarming aspects of this situation is the fact that our youngest and newest drivers are forming this habit from the beginning of their driving experiences. According to Neilsen, “The average U.S. mobile teen now sends or receives an average of 2,899 text messages per month”, and its safe to say that some of those texts are being sent while behind the wheel. Even though they’ve certainly heard the warnings from their parents and others, teenagers (and many adults) take that chance, banking on getting away with sending a small text just one more time. But assuming one time won’t hurt is foolhardy. Veering into the wrong lane just once because you glanced down at your phone is all it takes to lose your life or cause someone else to lose theirs.

MOBILE NANNY TO THE RESCUE

Thank goodness someone has thought this through for us and has come up with a way to help parents combat this danger to their children. Enter Mobile Nanny, a mobile parental control software program that allows you to “restrict, block and monitor every aspect of your child’s mobile phone usage. For example, you can block cell phone usage for a certain time of the day, whether it’s during school hours when they should be paying attention to their teachers or from 8 p.m. to 8 a.m. to assure they get some sleep. With these smart programs, you can block certain numbers from communicating with your child, and you can even monitor your child’s location. You can record activities of your child’s cell phone usage keeping a log of all text messages sent or received and information about each text. So, if you know they’re on the road between 3 p.m. and 3:30 p.m., there shouldn’t be any text messages logged at that time. Of course, Mobile Nanny is only one program of this nature. You can check with your cell phone provider to see what they offer or recommend, or check out other parental control software.

AS ALWAYS, PARENTS NEED TO BE CONSISTENT

Though this is a situation to be taken seriously, we as parents have a few options that can really make a difference for our children. The first thing to do is to get the point over to them that texting while driving will not be tolerated. Recently, a disturbingly graphic public service announcement was made in the U.K. which depicted a group of girlfriends before and after a wreck caused when the driver sent a text as she was driving. While shocking and certainly focused on the drawbacks of texting and driving, some people are concerned that this form of advertisement might have an adverse affect on teens; specifically, it might desensitize them to the horrors that can actually happen if they don’t control the compulsion to send text messages while driving.

continued on page 8

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7


BOTH EYES OFF THE ROAD… continued from page 7

What we know is a sure bet is for parents to model the behavior they want to see in their children. Many teens admit they’re much more likely to listen to the words of the parent who (a) does what they are telling the teen to do, and (b) consistently enforces the rules that have they have laid down. So the question becomes, can you give up texting while driving in order to have your child do the same? Can you not only set limits for your children but consistently enforce the limits? We all know that consistency is the key to teaching rules to be followed. Could you do this if your child’s life depended on your consistency? In reality, it just may.

Wondering What To Make This Summer?

This Hawaiian dessert salad is both tasty and healthy. Customize each serving with a sprinkle of grated coconut, chopped macadamia nuts, and/or chocolate chips.

Tropical Fruit Toss

HOW TO AVOID DRIVING DISTRACTIONS • • • •

• •

Pull off the road. Don’t drive while calling or texting. Use speed dialing or voice-activated dialing if you have to make a call while driving. Let your voicemail take the call. You can call back later when you are not driving. Know when to stop talking. If the conversation ids long, emotional or stressful continue it when you are not driving. Do not take notes while driving. If you don’t want to forget a note, use of portable recorder of pull off the road. Do not eat or drink while driving. Groom yourself at home, not in the vehicle.

These guidelines can be followed as part of a set of family driving rules. SADD (Students Against Destructive Decisions) suggests that you set family driving rules with clear consequences for breaking them. Examples: • • • •

• •

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No alcohol or drug use No cell phone use, including test messaging No driving after 10 p.m. Keep two hands on the wheel- no eating, changing CDs, handling iPods or other activities while driving Limit or restrict friends in the car without an adult Follow your own family’s rules. Your teen will follow your driving example, so be sure you are keeping your own rules.

Ingredients • 2 navel oranges • 1/2 fresh pineapple • 1 banana • 1 kiwi • 1/2 cup red seedless grapes

• 1 tbsp of each:

sweetened coconut flakes, chopped macadamia nuts 4 slices of star fruit (optional)

Instructions Peel and section one of the oranges. Cut each section in half, then add to a bowl. Wash the second orange and zest it into the bowl. Then cut it in half and squeeze the juice into the bowl. Peel, core, and cut the pineapple into chunks (about 1-1/2 cups). Peel the banana and slice it into rounds. Peel the kiwi and cut it into 1-inch pieces. Add the pineapple, banana, kiwi, and grapes to the bowl and toss well. Divide the fruit salad among 4 plates. Garnish each with coconut, macadamia nuts, chocolate chips or sprinkles, and a slice of star fruit, if desired. Serves 4.

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FIRE FI REWATCH WATCH With Howard Ward -BAKER FIRE DEPARTMENT

I want to ask you guys a question…Who’s done with this lingering cold weather?!....can I get a show-of-hands please! It would blow my mind if every one of you did not have your hand up at this moment. A lot of folks I have spoken to have told me they are...“done”…done with cold weather and ready for some warmer days. With warmer weather and extended daylight hours there are a host of outdoor activities to enjoy every day in south Louisiana and I think you guys will agree with me there’s nothing like outdoor cooking. So with that said, it‘s time to take that grill out of hibernation and throw on some big ole burgers and sausage or grab those big boiling pots and cook up some of our delicious Louisiana seafood’s. And on a personal note, there is nothing

better to smell than to get a whiff of someone in your neighborhood bar-b-cuing, grilling or boiling up a big pot of crawfish. It makes me hungry just thinking about it. BUT…before you get started cooking …I want to encourage all of you to take a moment to do a safety check by carefully inspecting all your outdoor cooking equipment thoroughly. Every year in the USA, fire departments around the country respond to several thousand home fires involving gas cooking equipment and charcoal grills. These fires account for hundreds of civilian injuries and in some cases death. So if you smell the odor of gas while attempting to light or while you are cooking, turn the gas off immediately and if you are unable to repair the leak have your unit serviced by a professional.

If everyone fire safety while cooking outdoors, this seasons cookouts will be memorable for all the right reasons. Stay Safe, Howard Ward -Baker Fire Department PUBLIC RELATIONS OFFICER (225) 706-0574 HLWard@BakerLaFire.org

c i t y o f b a ke r f d .c o m

OUTDOOR COOKING SAFET Y TIPS 1. Only use ropane and charcoal BBQ grills outdoors 2. The grill or cooking pot should be placed well away from the home, deck railings and out from under the eaves and overhanging branches 3. Keep children and pets away from the cooking area 4. Keep your grill clean by removing grease or fat buildup from the grills and in the trays below the grill 5. Always use long handled cooking utensils and heat resistant oven mitts to avoid exposure burns from heat and flames. 6. Never leave any outdoor cooking equipment unattended To Advertise Please Visit Us Online at SafeandSoundMagazine.com or call 225-928-7867

9


Are you prepared for a H

istory teaches that a lack of hurricane awareness and preparation are common threads among all major hurricane disasters. By knowing your vulnerability and what actions you should take, you can reduce the effects of a hurricane disaster.

Hurricane hazards come in many forms: storm surge, high winds, tornadoes, and flooding. This means it is important for your family to have a plan that includes all of these hazards. Hurricane Preparedness Week will be held May 23rd through May 29th, 2010.

? Look carefully at the safety actions associated with each type of hurricane hazard and prepare your family disaster plan accordingly. The first and most important thing anyone should do when facing a hurricane threat is to use common sense.

How To Track A Hurricane

The National Hurricane Center, which is part of the National Weather Service and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, tracks tropical storms and hurricanes. Hurricane watches and warnings are issued when the storms get close to the U.S. You can track the progress of storms by listening to the coordinates given by your television meteorologists.

2010

For the latest longitude and latitude locations issued by the National Hurricane Center, visit http://www.nhc.noaa.gov.

Hurricane Names By Renee Chapple, About.com Guide

H

ave you ever wondered about the system used for naming hurricanes? Where did those names come from, anyway? Will we have to suffer through another „Hurricane Andrew“? The system is not that complicated. Hurricanes used to be designated by a system of latitude-longitude, which was a great way for meteorologists to track them. However, once the public began receiving storm warnings and trying to keep track of a particular storm path, this got very confusing. A system of names to refer to them was much easier to track and remember. In 1953, the National Weather Service picked up on the habit of Naval meteorologists of naming the storms after women. Ships were always referred to as female, and were often given women‘s names. The storms‘ temperament certainly seemed female enough, shifting directions at a whim on a moment‘s notice. In 1979, male names were inserted to alternate with the female names,to the delight of women‘s-libbers everywhere. There are actually six lists of names in use for storms in the Atlantic. These lists rotate, one each year; the list

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Alex Bonnie Colin Danielle Earl Fiona

Gaston Hermine Igor Julia Karl

Lisa Matthew Nicole Otto Paula

Richard Shary Tomas Virginie Walter

of this year‘s names will not be reused until 2011. The names get recycled each time the list comes up, with one exception: storms so devastating that reusing the name is inappropriate. In this case, the name is taken off the list and another name is used to replace it; there will not be another Hurricane Andrew, because Andrew has been replace by Alex on the list. A storm must start as a Tropical Depression and move on to become a Tropical Storm before it is given a name. Once a storm is named, preparations for the possible hurricane should be well under way. One question I‘ve heard a lot recently is “What happens if we run out of hurricane names?“ If we‘re unlucky enough to deplete the year‘s supply of names we won‘t, contrary to popular opinion, simply start using names from next year‘s list. In that case, the National Hurricane Center will turn to the Greek alphabet and we‘ll have Hurricanes Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta, etc. The forecast is calling for a much more active 2010 season with above-normal threats on the US coastline. Learn more at http://www.nhc.noaa.gov

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2010

Hurricane Season

H urricane season officially begins June 1st, and now is the time to prepare. Preparations can

constitute something as big as installing storm shutters or as small as checking your supplies of water and non-perishable food. This online guide has been put together with families in mind. There are so many critical questions when preparing for a storm; like “Where’s the closest shelter?” or “What do I do with my pets?” The guide will help you find answers to these and hundreds of other questions. Use it wisely, and feel free to refer to it over and over again this year.

Hurricane Terminology Tropical Storm Watch

Hurricane Warning

Tropical Storm Warning

A warning that hurricane conditions are expected in a specified coastal area within 24 hours or less. This is the time to prepare yourself for severe weather. High winds and coastal flooding will develop many hours before the eye of the storm actually comes ashore.

Tropical Depression

A tropical system with a maximum sustained surface wind of 64 knots (74 mph) or greater. A hurricane is the worst and strongest of all tropical systems.

An announcement that a tropical storm or tropical storm conditions pose a threat to coastal areas generally within 36 hours. A warning that a tropical storm or tropical storm conditions, including sustained winds of 39 to 73 mph, will affect a specified coastal area within 24 hrs or less. A tropical system with a maximum sustained surface wind of 33 knots (38 mph) or less. Tropical depressions can produce tremendous rainfall amounts.

Tropical Storm

A tropical system in which the maximum sustained surface wind ranges from 34 to 63 knots (39 to 73 mph). A tropical storm can produce a lot of rainfall and wind which can cause some beach erosion and boat damage.

Hurricane

Hurricane Eye

The calm center of a storm. In this area, winds are light and the sky often is only partly covered by clouds. The period of calm may only last 10-20 minutes before the severe weather returns.

Storm Surge

An abnormal rise in sea level accompanying a hurricane or other intense storm.

Hurricane Watch

An announcement that hurricane conditions pose a possible threat to coastal areas generally within 36hrs.

Tornado Threat

Tornadoes pose a substantial threat during hurri-

cane season. Hurricanes often spin-off tornadoes which produce significant damage to homes and property. Almost all hurricanes making landfall in the US spawn at least one tornado provided enough of the hurricane’s circulation moves over land. Atlantic coast hurricanes making landfall are less likely to produce spin-off tornadoes than hurricanes approaching over the Gulf coast because they tend to sideswipe the coastline rather than move onshore and inland. Tornadoes typically appear 50200 miles from the storm’s center. Tornadoes have been documented within the inner core or even the hurricane’s eyewall. Surprisingly, hurricanes may spawn tornadoes up to three days after landfall! Tornadoes are most likely to strike du-

ring daylight hours, although some occur at night. Hurricane-spawned tornadoes are particularly difficult to deal with because they are difficult to detect. These tornadoes are produced by unusually small storm cells and do not appear especially dangerous on weather radar. They also produce little or no lightning or thunder and are often obscured by rain. Be sure to take the precautionary measures recommended in this guide to stay out of nature’s way when a hurricane could potentially strike.

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Must Have Supplies FIRST AID SUPPLIES & MEDICINES • Adhesive bandages in various sizes • Anti-bacterial ointment • Cotton balls • Scissors • Aspirin or non-aspirin pain reliever • Complete first-aid kit • Prescription medicine for at least 3 days

SANITARY & HYGIENE SUPPLIES • Tooth paste and tooth brush • Sunscreen & insect repellent • Shampoo and deodorant • Denture needs, extra eyeglasses, contact lenses • Toilet paper, towelettes, feminine supplies • Diapers and wipes • Liquid detergent and disinfectant • One complete set of clothing per person and sunglasses

FOOD & WATER • Water (one gallon per person per day for at least 3 days) • Canned meats, fruits, vegetables and soups • Dried fruits and nuts, cereal, crackers and cookies • Coffee, tea and powdered drinks • Powdered, evaporated or boxed milk • Staples (salt, spices, sugar, etc.) • Packaged condiments • Peanut butter and jelly • Baby food and/or formula

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EQUIPMENT, TOOLS & ACCESSORIES

• Battery operated alarm clock • Chlorine bleach, tincture of iodine, water purification tablets • Plastic garbage bags and ties • Paper cups, plates and plastic utensils • Plastic bucket with lid, ice chest • Flashlight, battery operated radio, TV and clock • Extra batteries and bulbs • Cash or travelers checks, change • Manual can opener, utility knife • Fire extinguisher (small canister ABC type) • Tools, including shut-off wrench, pliers, nails, rope • Outdoor extension cord, duct or masking tape • Compass and whistle • Matches in waterproof container • Fuel for generators & cars in approved containers • Sterno, propane gas, charcoal, lighter fluid • Plastic storage containers • Camera and film • Plastic sheeting, tube tent • Rain gear • Blankets or sleeping bag • Games and entertainment for kids

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BEFORE THE STORM • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Review your family plan or create one. Review your insurance coverage Clear or secure rain gutters and down spouts. Keep trees and shrubbery trimmed of deadwood. Learn safe routes inland. Learn locations of official shelters. Make a plan for what to do with your pets if you stay or need to evacuate Store plywood cut to windows, check existing shutters or purchase hurricane shutters. Find out about retrofitting your home. Inventory Must-Have Supplies Check manufactured home tie downs. Activate your family plan. Protective measures should be initiated; especially those actions that require extra time (i.e. securing a boat). Fill gas tank in car. Secure small craft or move to safe shelter. Secure lawn furniture and other loose material outdoors or simply bring inside. Board or shutter windows to prevent shattering. Wedge sliding glass doors to prevent lifting from their tracks. Stay tuned to official bulletins on local/cable TV

stations, radio or NOAA radio.

DURING THE STORM Remain Calm: • • • • • • • •

Continue to stay tuned to official bulletins on local/cable TV stations, or radio. Go indoors and stay indoors until the storm has passed. Some people think the storm has passed, but it’s the eye of the storm. Turn off circuit breakers before the power goes. Leave one circuit breaker on with a lamp so you will know when power is resumed. Use flashlights, not candles or kerosene lamps during the storm. Stay in your safe room even if you hear breaking glass. Do not expose yourself to the hurricane’s winds. If your house starts to break apart, cover yourself with a mattress. If your safe room is a bathroom with a bathtub, get in the tub under a mattress. Use the phone for urgent calls only. Don’t use the phone if you hear thunder. If you’re in a very tall building, avoid the top floors as wind speeds are stronger the higher you go. Go to a safe room.

EVACUATION If evacuating

• Check with your city or parish Office of Emergency Management or watch local/cable TV stations to see if you need to evacuate. If you do, decide if your family can stay with friends or relatives outside evacuationzones who live in a hurricane-safe house. • Leave early, in daylight if possible to avoid traffic and darkness • Shut off water and electricity at main stations. • Lock up house. • Drive carefully to nearest designated shelter using recommended evacuation routes. Last Resort Evacuation • A shelter should be your last resort. Don‘t go until you hear from officials that a specific shelter has opened. If not evacuating • Know your safe room. • Move valuables to upper floors. Bring in pets. • Fill bathtub with water for flushing toilet. • Turn up refrigerator to maximum cold setting and don’t open unless necessary. • Use phone only for emergencies. • Stay indoors on the downwind side of house a way from windows.

AFTER THE STORM • • • • •

If your house is damaged, get out until it is inspected by officials. Stay away from all downed power lines and nearby water puddles. Report downed or sparking power lines and broken gas or water mains. Do not pile debris near power lines. Avoid driving because of debris and road blockage. Call your out-of-town emergency contact and communicate that you’re all right. If filing a claim, notify your insurance as soon as possible with an address and phone number to reach you.

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OurThisFamily Pro is a reduced version of the

Certified Alarm

1113 Florida Blvd. SE


Tracking Chart

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otecting Your Family Since 1990. chart used to track hurricanes at the National Hurricane Center

Systems & Home Theaters

., Denham Springs, LA 70726 • 225-928-7867 • CertifiedAlarms.com


HURRICANE PREPAREDNESSfor Pets 6 COLLAR, TAG & LEASH

Be sure to include these. The easiest way to insure these get packed is, of course, to have the collar and tag on the animal at all times in the first place. Pack a spare leash that remains in the kit so you won’t have to look for it at the last minute when other things seem more important than hunting for the dog’s leash.

7 MEDICINES

1 WATER

Allow at least enough to hold each animal for a week. After you have gathered these supplies, be sure to refresh this supply every 6 weeks. Mark the date of each change to keep this straight.

2 FOOD

A one week supply of their normal food should be kept on hand. Animals can get really sick when they change foods, especially since they may be in a new and strange environment, so making sure they have their regular diet can avoid stomach upsets.

3 CLEANING SUPPLIES

Be sure your animal’s kit contains soap, paper towels and newspapers. For dogs, a pooper scooper and trash bags, for cats, add a temporary litter box and some kitty litter.

4 RECENT PHOTOS

Take a picture of your pet(s) in order to help identify them in case the two of you get separated for some reason.

5 SHOT RECORD

Be sure your animal’s shots are up-to-date, and have a copy of their shot record with you.

TRASH TIPS • • •

Bulky waste, such as tree trimmings and yard trash, can easily become dangerous projectiles during a storm. Do not begin tree pruning or yard work during a hurricane watch. During hurricane warnings, garbage pick up is suspended. It is ideal to secure your waste indoors or in your garage until the storm is over.

After the Storm • Check with your city or parish Office of Emergency Management or watch local/cable TV stations for information on the resumption of trash collection. • When garbage pick-up resumes, only dispose of hurricane related trash. • Cut tree limbs no more than 4 feet long and then place on curb for easy pick up. • Several trash and recycling centers are conveniently available in your area and accept debris of all sizes.

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Take at least a week’s supply of whatever medicines your animal may be on. This could include flea powder and eye and ear drops. Be sure your dog is up on its heartworm medicine. As we all know, dogs exposed to mosquitoes are also exposed to heartworms.

8 CRATE OR CARRIER

This is a must! Many times, transportation of animals is impossible unless all animals are contained in their own crate.

9 METAL STAKES & A SECURE CHAIN

This mainly pertains to large breed dogs, and won’t always be necessary. However, if you end up staying with someone who can’t have your dog inside, this will help out with keeping your dog safe and the homeowners at ease. Stakes that twist into the ground and turn with as the dog moves around are the best choice.

10 TOYS AND THEIR OWN BED

Animals are often comforted by things from home, and their own toys and bed can go a long way toward helping them to remain calm.

11 FIRST AID KIT

Bandages, Q-tips, antibiotic cream, antiseptic wipes, tweezers, scissors, instant cold pack and disposal gloves should be kept on hand just in case your animal should be wounded.

PRECAUTIONS Before the Storm • Do not lower water in preparation for a storm. Never completely drain your pool. This may lead to struc tural damage and may cause your pool to pop out of the ground. • Turn off all electrical power and pool components • Remove all loose objects around the pool such as patio furniture, plants, and pool accessories. • Add extra chlorine to the pool to prevent contami nation. If water is properly cared for, it can be used for washing or flushing toilets should internal plum bing fail. After the Storm • Clear debris from the pool. This will prevent the plumbing from getting clogged and avoids conta mination. • Replace child safety fences. • Run the pool until conditions are back to normal.

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PROTECTING YOUR PROPERT Y Before A Storm A good homeowner’s (or renter’s) insurance policy is critical to recovering from a severe hurricane. Discuss the following with your insurance representative: • Value of land and structure. Ask policy and exclusions. • Value of home contents. Prepare a complete home inventory. Take photos or videotape where possible. Store the information at the office or in a safe deposit box. • Ask if your policy covers the value (replacement cost less depreciation) or replacement cost. • Is it worth picking up riders on special items? • Do you need flood insurance? • Do you require windstorm insurance? After A Hurricane • Take photos of damaged areas and possessions. • Make temporary repairs to protect your property from further damage. Cover holes in the roof/walls with plywood and use heavy-duty plastic to cover broken windows. • If you can’t make repairs yourself, check the contractor’s references with your insurance agent, Chamber of Com merce or Better Business Bureau. • Get an estimate first and discuss payment terms. Be sure to receive a receipt for the labor and materials. • Keep records, bills and paid invoices until your insurance representative visits. • If damage is of sufficient magnitude and severity, federal disaster assistance may be available. • Stay tuned to local/cable TV stations or radio for updates and instructions. Filing A Claim • Notify your agent as soon as possible. Give an address and phone number where you can be reached if you have vacated your home. • Present your photos and inventory to help your adjuster assess the damage. • Be patient. Cases are expedited based on severity.

CALL BEFORE YOU DIG

Before you replace that fence, install a new mailbox, remove a tree or grind that stump, call Louisiana One Call to avoid damaging buried utility lines that may be in your yard. Follow these steps to stay safe, prevent injury and avoid longer service outages: • Call 811 or visit www.laonecall.com • Wait two full business days before digging to give utility owners time to locate, mark the area with paint and flags. • Protect the marks until the job is done and dig carefully within 24 inches of the mark. • Only use a flashlight for emergency lighting, not candles. • Turn off electrical equipment in use before power went out.

FLOODING Safety Rules • Avoid areas subject to sudden flooding including dips and low spots. Make sure to check flood map to see if your area is in flood zones. • Avoid already flooded and high velocity flow areas. Do not attempt to cross flowing streams. • Never drive through flooded roadways because the

depth of the water is not always obvious. Turn around and go another way. • If the vehicle stalls, leave it immediately and seek higher ground. Rapidly rising water may engulf the vehicle and iweep it away. • Use caution at night when it is more difficult to recognize flood dangers. • Do not park your vehicle along canals or lakes particularly during threatening conditions. After the Flood • If fresh food has come in contact with flood waters, throw it out. • Boil drinking water before using. Wells should be pumped out and the water tested for purity before drinking. Call your local public health authority for more information. • Seek necessary medical care at the nearest hospital. Food, clothing, shelter and first aid are available from the Red Cross. • Do not visit disaster areas. You may hamper rescue and other emergency operations. • Electrical equipment should be checked and dried before being returned to service. • Report broken lines to appropriate authorities. • Children should never play around high water, storm drains or via ducts. There is always a chance that a downed power line may be hidden from sight. Also, there is a possibility of that water being contaminated.

POWER OUTAGE SAFET Y • • • •

Avoid opening the refrigerator and freezer. If you use a computer, keep files and operating systems backed up regularly. Consider buying xtra batteries and a power converter if you use a laptop computer. Get a high quality surge protector for all of your computer equipment. Have a standard or cellular telephone that doesn’t require power.

GENERATOR SAFET Y • • • •

Buy a generator that is listed with the Underwriter’s Laboratory (UL) or Factory Mutual (FM). If you use a generator, connect the equipment you want to power directly to the outlets on the generator. Do not use indoors, including inside a garage. Be sure to let generators cool before refueling.

WATER SAFET Y

To treat water, filter the water using a piece of cloth or coffee filter to remove solid particles, unless officials announce it is safe to drink. 1. Bring to rolling boil for a full minute and cool 30 minutes, or one of these methods (per gallon); • Add 12 drops of 2% tincture of iodine • Add 16 drops of unscented chlorine bleach 2. Use water purification tablets.

Learn more at SafeandSoundMagazine.com.

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Prevent Your Child From

Wandering

continued from page 6

Be Definite And Precise…

It’s best you don’t change the rules without telling your child. Be consistent and firm, the new rules will obviously cause some conflict, but at least you and your children will not feel insecure when you are both on new territory.

Solving The Problem…

note where you seen it and ask your child if he could go and get it, then come straight back, we may be just in the next aisle but we are out of sight. Our child will realize he has earned our trust, and the reward for your child is more independence for following the rules.

Give your child fair warning of the consequences for not obeying the rules and stick to them. If your child won’t do as he is asked, Time Out while out shopping can be arranged on nearby public seating although you will have to sit as well for about ten minutes, with out talking to one another. At the end of Time Out, ask your child if he is going to behave this time, you will find twice is enough to teach most children, but don’t be afraid to use it as often as needed.

Remember, your child is to remain seated the whole time in Time Out.

Remember Who’s Boss…

Its no good threatening to take him home, as this is possibly what he wants and of course he will do what it takes to make sure he gets it. We can’t let our children dictate our agenda; children need to learn to fit in with the way we run life daily and to go along with what is expected.

Know Your Childs Shopping Limit…

Make a note of how long your child can behave while out in public, and keep it in mind for future reference. As his tolerance must be considered, knowing his limits before going out for long periods will help all concerned in the long run.

Article by Theresea Hughes, creator of ree-toddlers-activity-and-discipline-guide.com

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Cool Gifts For Dad Father‘s Day - June 20th, 2010.

Make This Father‘s Day One To Remember. Items such as these, can be purchased at most local retailers.

Outdoor Cooking Supplies

Personalized Frame

Travel Tool Kit Gadget Charging Station

3-2-1 Home Theater AVAILABLE AT CERTIFIED HOME THEATERS

Shaving Set

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Golfer‘s Gift Basket

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May -June 2010 Safe & Sound Magazine  

Safe & SOUND brings its readers the safety-related news that is meaningful to life. In the coming months Safe & SOUND will increase the news...

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