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SAFE BUILDING IN BANGLADESH

INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP, DINAJPUR DISTRICT / SEPTEMBER 2012

Working with local NGOs, international participants will learn at ďŹ rst hand the challenges of a hand-to-mouth existence and will experiment with building technologies aimed at giving millions of people durable, hazard-resistant homes


INTERNATIONAL ORGANISATIONS Housing & Hazards The Housing & Hazards Group develops practical methodologies and links professionals, academics and practitioners based in and around the University of Exeter to make safer, hazard-resistant housing available and affordable to vulnerable rural communities around the world. Contact: Email / Tel.: Website: Address:

Robert Hodgson R.L.P.Hodgson@exeter.ac.uk / +44 (0) 1884821239 www.housingandhazards.org University of Exeter, School of Engineering, Computing & Mathematics Harrison Building, North Park Rd, Exeter, EX4 4QF, UK

REDR UK RedR is an international disaster relief charity, which trains aid workers and provides skilled professionals to humanitarian programmes worldwide, helping to save and rebuild the lives of people affected by natural and man-made disasters. Contact: Email / Tel.: Website: Address:

RedR UK info@redr.org.uk / +44 (0) 2078406000 www.redr.org.uk 250A Kennington Lane, London, SE11 5RD, UK

Engineers Without Borders-UK (EWB-UK) EWB is an international development organisation that aims to remove barriers to development through engineering, offering opportunities for young professionals to learn about technology’s role in tackling poverty. The interdisciplinary approach involves holistic engineering, active partnerships, demand-led development, sustainable use of natural resources and appropriate technology. Contact: Email / Tel.: Website: Address:

[1]

EWB-UK Placements Team placements@ewb-uk.org / +44 (0) 1223305888 www.ewb-uk.org c/o The Humanitarian Centre, Fenner’s, Gresham Road, Cambridge, CB1 2ES, UK

SAFE BUILDING IN BANGLADESH


NATIONAL ORGANISATIONS Simple Action For the Environment (SAFE) SAFE aims to reduce the vulnerability of low-income households in northern Bangladesh to environmental hazards such as flooding and strong winds. This is achieved through the promotion of improved housing techniques by offering ‘building for safety’ workshops within the district and construction of demonstration houses in collaboration with the community. Contact: Email / Tel.: Website: Address:

Azit Roy azit_sorkar@yahoo.com / +88 (0) 1726007343 www.safebangladesh.wordpress.com Sundarban Village, PO: Ramdubihat, Upazila: Sadar Dinajpur, Bangladesh

Bangladesh Rural Improvement Foundation (BRIF) BRIF aims to establish human rights, equal dignity and quality of life and livelihoods. The organisation focuses on the most vulnerable segment of society, through implementing innovative participatory approaches and introducing community based institution building as well as providing pragmatic and procedural assistance. Contact: Email / Tel.: Website: Address:

Shah Ahsan Habib info@brif.org / +88 (0) 552673015 www.brif.org Natun Babupara, Upazila: Saidpur, Nilphamari, Bangladesh

Chetonar Dak / Call For Consciousness (CFC) CFC focuses on various activities within Sundarban.The education programme includes preschools, which support children from the ages of 4 to 6 prior to primary school. Coaching classes continue this support outside of school hours. The healthcare programme involves outreach clinics throughout the area particularly with regard to maternal and child health, alongside health promotion classes. In addition to these services the organisation runs a small sewing training centre. Contact: Email: Website: Address:

Tiverton Sundarban Support Group tssginfo@tivertonsundarban.org.uk www.tivertonsundarban.org.uk/page5.html Sundarban Village, PO: Ramdubihat, Upazila: Sadar Dinajpur, Bangladesh

SEPTEMBER 2012 INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP

[2]


BANGLADESH Bordered by India, Myanmar and the Bay of Bengal, Bangladesh is one of the world’s most densely populated countries.The low-lying nature of the terrain (with a large percentage of the land less than 12m above sea level) means that Bangladesh is vulnerable to flooding and is now widely recognised as one of the countries most at risk from climate change.A recent report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) states that a 1m rise in sea level will engulf approximately 13% of the landmass in the southern belt, displacing 1520 million people by 2050.

JBM Slum

Sundarban Village

Six major floods were recorded in Bangladesh during the 19th century, with figures rising to 18 in the 20th century. Catastrophic consequences were experienced in 1987, 1988, 1998, 2004, 2007 and 2009. In 2004 for example, the monsoon arrived early adding to the heavy rainfall already experienced since June of that year. River levels continued to rise and on July 8th widespread flooding devastated the country, including urban areas such as the capital Dhaka, which was unprepared for such an onslaught. In contrast to rising river levels, Cyclone Sidr hit Bangladesh in 2007 and in turn triggered a tidal wave, which struck the coastline resulting in over 3,300 deaths, injuring approximately 34,500 individuals and forcing the evacuation of nearly one million. In terms of infrastructure and livelihoods, the devastation was extensive. In recent years Bangladesh has witnessed a wide range of disasters, including Cyclone Aila in 2009, floods and landslides throughout 2010 and 2011. The poorest section of society is commonly the most vulnerable to the effects of natural disasters (rising water levels, river bed erosion, environmental degradation, the spread of infectious disease, building/ infrastructure damage, disruption to livelihoods, civil conflicts...). Bangladesh’s growing population means that an ever increasing number of people are under threat and with nearly half the population living on less than a $1 a day, this is a critical issue.

INDIA

BANGLADESH

INDIA

DINAJPUR DISTRICT Dinajpur District, in northwest Bangladesh suffers from localised flooding and strong winds during September and October, which regularly cause damage to houses and infrastructure. Dinajpur also lies in one of the highest earthquake risk zones in Bangladesh. The local population depends largely on agriculture and the region is widely acknowledged for its rice production, with 40% of its population landless labourers.

BAY OF BENGAL Dinajpur Division Dinajpur District

The construction programme for this year’s workshop will be conducted across two sites within the region; Jorgen Babur Mart slum and Sundarban village. COUNTRY MAP [3]

SAFE BUILDING IN BANGLADESH

MYANMAR


BAMBOO HOUSE

JORGEN BABUR MART SLUM, DINAJPUR DISTRICT

CONSTRUCTION PROCESS SEPTEMBER 2012 INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP

[4]


JORGEN BABUR MART SLUM Area Jorgen Babur Mart is an area of informal housing situated approximately 2km from the centre of Dinajpur town. Originally the land belonged to a Hindu landowner who emigrated to India during the partition of India and the former East Pakistan. Over 500 families currently live on this land, and although they do not possess formal title deeds, the land is considered in private ownership, with many of the residents having built permanent or ‘paaka’ buildings. Before it became a residential area the land was waterlogged and uninhabitable. Seven years ago the non-governmental organisation CARE, reclaimed the land and worked with the community to divide the area into individual plots. The land was primarily used to resettle families who had previously been evicted from a nearby slum area that belonged to the Bangladesh Railways. Community The residents are predominantly Hindu and Muslim, originating from many different backgrounds and moving to Dinajpur for a variety of social and economic reasons.They are involved in many different occupations from TV repairmen and day labourers, to rickshaw pullers, earning between 100 - 250BDT per day. Although some women work outside the area, most stay at home generating extra income through home based activities such as poppadom rolling and handicraft production.

SITE PLAN [5]

/ NOT TO SCALE

SAFE BUILDING IN BANGLADESH


CLIENT The Family Father: Mother: Eldest son: Youngest son:

Masud Rana Morgina Rana Shagor Rana Ridoy Rana

Typical Daily Activities - Morgina prepares breakfast on an external cook stove at approximately 9am. - Both sons attend school during the day. - Morgina undertakes a variety of activities including sewing, preparation of lunch and dinner. - Morgina occasionally rolls poppadoms, to be dried on the street. For this she earns 40BDT (£0.31) per day. Other members of the community frequently use the living space for this work. - Masud works as a rickshaw driver in the evening but supplements his salary during the day by undertaking construction work where available or helping out with day-to-day tasks such as D.I.Y. - Masud’s rickshaw shift begins at 6pm and lasts until 12/2am. For this he typically earns between 150 - 250BDT (£1.18 - £1.97).

INTERNAL VIEW OF EXISTING RESIDENCE - TOWARDS STREET ACCESS

THE FAMILY SEPTEMBER 2012 INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP

[6]


EXISTING CONDITIONS Existing Site Analysis - The site is small and narrow (2700mm x 6470mm) facing onto a communal street (1970mm wide). - The building adjoins residences at either side, and the ‘back yard’ is further bordered by another plot. - External drainage is towards the rear of the site. Existing Building Analysis - The existing single-storey structure is constructed with bamboo, corrugated iron sheeting and additional materials on a compacted earth plinth (raised 200 - 300mm). Space Analysis - The ‘one room shelter’ (ORS) is used for a variety of activities throughout the day including dining, living, working and sleeping. - Jorgen Babur Mart is a particularly communal area, with neighbours visiting on a daily basis to watch television, drink tea and discuss events. - At present, both cooking and washing are undertaken in the ‘back yard’, which includes a cook stove and ground water pump. This area also offers external storage and is used to dry clothes. - The main space contains various storage facilities (clothes, blankets, cooking equipment, general household items) both at ground level and overhead, as well as desk space for decoration, a television and additional seating (two chairs). - Two double beds are located at either end of the room, each with a mosquito net for the evening time. - The family enjoys looking after animals. At present they own four pigeons, two quails, one shaling and one duck within six cages. They are hoping to purchase another duck and a rabbit. - There is a small guava tree at the front of the house, which will be replanted in the new design. - There is no toilet or shower within the house as the family use communal facilities within Jorgen Babur Mart.

INTERNAL VIEW OF EXISTING RESIDENCE - TOWARDS REAR OF PROPERTY

STREET FACADE - EXISTING [7]

SAFE BUILDING IN BANGLADESH


NEEDS & EXPECTATIONS - The family is looking for a new bamboo house to improve living conditions (light, ventilation, heating/cooling, access, circulation) and increase space. When asked about current comfort levels, the family perceived the existing house to be dark and particularly uncomfortable during the hot season. - As the site is constrained on all sides, the solution will be a double-storey building. - Drainage of the whole site is poor with potential for flooding, particularly during the monsoon season. A 1ft (304mm) compacted earth plinth with stabilised topping will be provided. - Strong winds do occasionally affect the area (although on a much smaller scale than in the south of Bangladesh). The potential for uplift will be addressed. - The current location of the cooking and washing facilities towards the rear of the plot will be retained, with approximately 4ft (1219mm) of space provided externally. - The main living space is to be located at ground level, with one double bed (with mosquito net), two chairs, various storage and hanging facilities.This space will contain a central ceiling fan and feature a staircase (not ladder as seen in previous designs) to the floor above. - The main entrance will be off the communal street, but set back approximately 3ft (914mm) to accommodate a homestead garden and veranda above. - The first floor will offer increased space and will contain the second double bed for the children. Additional storage is an option and the room will contain a desk fan. - The birdcages and future rabbit cage are to be located on the veranda, with the possibility of coherent storage from floor to ceiling. FRONT STEP AND RAISED PLINTH CONDITIONS - EXISTING

EXTERNAL STORAGE FACILITIES - EXISTING

ADDITIONAL STORAGE UNDER BED - EXISTING SEPTEMBER 2012 INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP

[8]


1 - DOUBLE BED 2 - CABINET 3 - TELEVISION 4 - CLOTHES HORSE 5 - KITCHEN UTILITIES STORAGE 6 - OVERHEAD STORAGE

7 - BIRDCAGES ABOVE 8 - BIRDCAGES 9 - CABINET/SHELVES 10 - CHAIR 11 - STOVE 12 - GROUND WATERPUMP

NEIGHBOURING RESIDENCE

2

6

3

5

4

11

DRAIN

1

COMMUNAL STREET 10

10 1 9

7

7

8

NEIGHBOURING RESIDENCE

EXISTING HOUSE FLOOR PLAN / SCALE 1:40 [9]

SAFE BUILDING IN BANGLADESH

12


NEIGHBOURING RESIDENCE

DRAIN

HOMESTEAD GARDEN

COMMUNAL STREET

NEIGHBOURING RESIDENCE

NEW PROPOSAL GROUND FLOOR PLAN / SCALE 1:40 SEPTEMBER 2012 INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP

[10]


BIRDCAGES

VERANDA

NEW PROPOSAL FIRST FLOOR PLAN / SCALE 1:40 [11]

SAFE BUILDING IN BANGLADESH


COMMUNAL STREET

DRAIN

NEW PROPOSAL SECTION A-A / SCALE 1:40 SEPTEMBER 2012 INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP

[12]


DRAIN

NEW PROPOSAL SECTION B-B / SCALE 1:40 [13]

SAFE BUILDING IN BANGLADESH

COMMUNAL STREET


NEW PROPOSAL SECTION C-C & STREET FACADE ELEVATION

/ SCALE 1:40

SEPTEMBER 2012 INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP

[14]


NEW PROPOSAL SECTION D-D & REAR FACADE ELEVATION / SCALE 1:40 [15]

SAFE BUILDING IN BANGLADESH


STABILISED SOIL BLOCK OFFICE SUNDARBAN VILLAGE, DINAJPUR DISTRICT

CONSTRUCTION PROCESS SEPTEMBER 2012 INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP

[16]


SUNDARBAN VILLAGE Area Sundarban village is the largest of 14 villages located in Sundarban Union (sub-district of Dinajpur District). Typically in such rural areas, families own the land their homestead is built upon (even the functionally landless who have little or no agricultural land assets).The village consists of over 100 hamlets or ‘paras’ (25 or so homesteads grouped together) with no central focus other than Benkali market/junction and blending into neighbouring residential areas. Community The population of Sundarban village is predominantly Hindu and Muslim. With agriculture the main source of income, farming is a key occupation (rice, jute, sugarcane...). Other occupations include fishing (as the community is located close to Atrai river), rickshaw driving, basket weaving and handicraft production. Homesteads are arranged around a courtyard, with the main house often south-facing. Some households feature a separate kitchen, cow house and/or other buildings associated with farming. The courtyard layout allows daily activities such as husking of cereals and drying of clothes, with the permanent buildings reserved for sleeping and shelter.

PATHWAY THROUGH HARI PARA N

RANIBANDAR To Saidpur

Sundarban Village

RAMDUBIHAT

To Dinajpur

SUNDARBAN VILLAGE LOCATION [17]

SAFE BUILDING IN BANGLADESH


CLIENT Simple Action For the Environment (SAFE) Permanent staff Executive Director: Azit Roy Project Manager: Pulin Roy Accountant: Porimol Roy Current collaborators John Arnold / Jo Ashbridge / Robert Hodgson / Marianne Keating / Jen Stables Background Simple Action For the Environment (SAFE), founded in 2009, is a small NGO based in the Dinajpur District of northwest Bangladesh. The organisation operates with three full time staff, employing local builders, farmers and contractors on a project-to-project basis and working with international volunteers. SAFE aims to reduce the vulnerability of low-income households to environmental hazards. The organisation endeavours to increase community self-reliance by creating skilled and informed local homeowners, farmers, craftsmen and builders. SAFE promotes tried and tested techniques that build on successful existing practices. For adoption of ideas, people must choose to spend their money on improved techniques. To do this they need to be affordable and available. Similarly, the community must understand how the techniques work and their benefits.

SAFE ACTIVITIES

The Theory Two elements underpin activities; using appropriate methods and communicating these methods in a suitable way so that they may be replicated. SAFE promotes methods that are affordable for low-income households; use readily available materials and relevant techniques.To this end the innovations and design improvements are based on both academic research and local experience. Rather than using techniques to produce a single standard, solution to be indiscriminately copied SAFE presents options, which can be replicated to suit individuals and circumstance. The organisation understands that people have different aspirations, family sizes, occupations and budgets and as such require a diverse range of support. When communicating these techniques, SAFE believes in ‘learning through doing’. The NGO partners with individuals, households and local workers within a diverse range of participatory approaches. These approaches focus on the process rather than simply the product, offering advice and hands-on explanation as to why these techniques are successful and how they might be applied. SAFE encourages community driven design, which will ensure appropriate solutions, ownership and the potential for the ideas to spread further afield. SEPTEMBER 2012 INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP

[18]


SAFE BAMBOO

Bamboo preservation

SAFE promotes a wide range of improved construction techniques. Knowledge dissemination techniques currently employed include hands-on workshops where local inhabitants are invited to participate in demonstrations, financial exercises and participatory design engagement.

Treated bamboos must not be burned; the gases of such a fire are toxic. Bury them in the ground, away from wells (for example, in a pit latrine, because these are always at a safe distance from wells). Figure 1: Open tank method

One of SAFE’s key technologies is the treatment of bamboo against insect attack using environmentally friendly methods.Treated bamboo is currently not available for purchase in Dinajpur and for the majority of families living in crowded Bangladeshi slums, treating the bamboo themselves is not possible/desired. For previous works, including the construction of ten demonstration houses within Jorgen Babur Mart slum, SAFE has been treating bamboo as required at the home of the organisation’s Executive Director. However this is both impractical with regard to space and for future growth. SAFE aspires to embark on a commercial enterprise, treating and selling bamboo (SAFE Bamboo). SAFE Bamboo will aim to provide financially competitive treated bamboo and thus help Bangladeshi’s build stronger and longer lasting houses. Bamboo will be treated primarily using Borax and Boric Acid.This process has been proven to significantly increase the durability of bamboo. Life expectancy of bamboo increases from a few years for untreated bamboo to upwards of 15years with Borax/Boric acid protection. It is envisioned that, should the first phase be successful, the commercial arm of SAFE’s activities could expand to include other building materials appropriate to SAFE’s core ethos. Such materials may include sand-cement roofing tiles, rammed-earth blocks and experimental bamboo treatment techniques. It is hoped a partnership will be formed with local bamboo farmers to promote sustainable and ecologically aware bamboo cultivation practices (Bamboo Growers scheme). SAFE Bamboo’s initial target market will be low-income Bangladeshi families building in or near SAFE’s current operations areas of Jorgen Babur Mart, Dinajpur and Sundarban village (Rangpur, Bangladesh). This intended market is expected to expand to include all low-income households with a need to build within reasonable transportation distance from SAFE Bamboo’s yard. SAFE (NGO) is expected to be SAFE Bamboo’s initial main customer for use in various construction projects across the district.

[19]

SAFE BUILDING IN BANGLADESH

Practical Action

A. Cross section of a trough a. b. c. d. e. f.

Trough with bamboos Stones to keep the through upright Level of preservation Large stones, to keep the bamboo down Plastic cover against rain Stones to keep e in place

B. Draining the bamboo g. Sticks h. Dripping preservative ‘BAMBOO PRESERVATION’ - PRACTICAL ACTION TECHNICAL BRIEF

Butt treatment method The freshly cut culms should immediately be put bottom ends first into a drum containing preservative. The leaves, still in their place, act as a pump, because of the process of transpiration. After one or two weeks the preservative reaches the top; watch the change in colour of the leaves. Place the bamboos in an empty drum to regain the surplus preservative from the culms. This method can be used instead of the Boucherie when only a few culms are to be treated. Boucherie method This method must be applied on fresh bamboo, the very day the bamboos are cut (or they can be kept under water). Pressure is needed to press the preservative into the bamboo, and can be created by an airpump, or a tower. In this last case a drum containing preservative is put on a tower of 4 to 6m high and connected by tubes to theTREATMENT end of theTANK bamboos (see WATER PRESENTATION TO COMMUNITY Figure 2) using cuffs (see Figure 3). At first, sap will drip from the low end with hardly any preservative. As the process continues the concentration of preservative in this sap will steadily increase.


EXISTING CONDITIONS Existing Site Analysis - The site is located between SAFE’S current office and Benkali market. - Located on the southern side of the raised road, the site is approximately 10 decimals (approx. 400m2). - Sand from the nearby Atrai river has been used to bring the site above flood level and a retaining wall separates the land from padi fields and sugarcane plantations.

CURRENT OFFICE HEADQUARTERS AND TESTING SITE

Bamboo Water Treatment Tank - The open tank method has been chosen as the primary means to treat bamboo. - Bamboo are cut to useable length (23ft) and holes drilled between culms to facilitate the absorption process. - The solution (2.5% borax, 2.5% boric acid, 95% water) is added to the tank along with the bamboo and left for 21 days. - Following soaking the bamboo are removed and left to drain back into the trough for several hours. - The final drying process lasts seven days. The treated bamboo are elevated above ground, and protected from the sun and rain.

NEEDS & EXPECTATIONS - SAFE are looking to develop an incremental phasing plan for future activities. The primary goal is to support the new initiative during the set-up phase. - Phase one (international workshop construction) will offer a new office space to conduct activities, hold meetings with potential clients, offer accommodation for local NGOs and an improved space for use during ‘building for safety’ workshops. - This will be a double storey scheme, with stabilised soil block construction at ground level and bamboo at first floor level. - Typically SAFE uses their own construction as part of their research and to act as demonstration builds within the community.This scheme will be no exception.There are no such composite examples in Sundarban Union and for many of the local building staff this is a new prospect. Further experimental aspects will include alternative designs for arched windows, bamboo cantilevers at all sides, new jointing techniques and bamboo post setting within the walls to prevent uplift. - Provisionally phase two will include a new bamboo staircase, extensions to create an l-shaped plan (allowing for guesthouse provision and kitchen facilities) and upper floor construction/infill (offering meeting rooms and external breakout space).

SAFE BAMBOO SITE SEPTEMBER 2012 INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP

[20]


ROOF OVERHANG

PADI FIELD

SAFE TREE PLANTING INITIATIVE

FUTURE EXPANSION

FUTURE EXPANSION

PHASE ONE GROUND FLOOR PLAN / SCALE 1:40 [21]

SAFE BUILDING IN BANGLADESH


ROOF OVERHANG

PRIMARY BEAMS, SECONDARY BEAMS AND BAMBOO SLAT LAYOUT WITHIN STABILISED EARTH FLOOR

PHASE ONE FIRST FLOOR PLAN / SCALE 1:40 SEPTEMBER 2012 INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP

[22]


FRONT FACADE

PHASE ONE SECTION A-A / SCALE 1:40 [23]

SAFE BUILDING IN BANGLADESH

REAR FACADE


WALLS TO BE BUILT IN PHASE TWO (BAMBOO)

STAIRCASE TO BE BUILT IN PHASE TWO (BAMBOO / EARTH)

TO PADI FIELD

PHASE ONE SECTION B-B / SCALE 1:40 SEPTEMBER 2012 INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP

[24]


SAFE BUILDING IN BANGLADESH APPENDIX

BAMBOO DETAILING


19.30

19.00

18.30

18.00

17.30

17.00

16.30

16.00

15.30

15.00

14.30

14.00

13.30

13.00

12.30

12.00

11.30

11.00

10.30

10.00

9.30

9.00

8.30

8.00

7.30

7.00

TIME

Dinner in Dhaka ����

Lunch in Dhaka ����

Dinner at BRIF ����

Packed lunch ����

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Participants travel up north ����

Jen arrives in Dhaka

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Breakfast in Dhaka ����

Participants check into hotel ����

MONDAY 10TH

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09/09/2012 - 12/09/2012

Participants arrive in Dhaka ����

SUNDAY 9TH

ITINERARY ITINERARY:

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Daily debriefing at BRIF Dinner at BRIF�����

Dinner at BRIF�����

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Participants return to BRIF ����

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Breaktime in Dinajpur�����

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Breaktime in Sundarban�����

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Construction work in Dinajpur

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Construction work in Sundarban

Lunch in Dinajpur�����

Lunch in Sundarban ����

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Breaktime in Dinajpur ����

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Construction work in Sundarban

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Construction work in Dinajpur

Groups 1 + 2 travel to Sundarban

Daily debriefing at BRIF

Sightseeing around the local area

Lunch at BRIF ����

Opening ceremony at BRIF

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SAFE introduction in Dinajpur

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Participants travel to Dinajpur ����

Breakfast at BRIF�����

WEDNESDAY 12TH

BRIF introduction at BRIF

Breakfast at BRIF ����

TUESDAY 11TH

INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP ��������������


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Construction work in Sundarban ������������������������ ������������������������ Construction work in Dinajpur ������������������������ ������������������������

9.30

Daily debriefing at BRIF Dinner at BRIF�����

Dinner at BRIF�����

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Daily debriefing at BRIF

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19.30

Participants return to BRIF ���� ������������������������������

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Breaktime in Dinajpur�����

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Breaktime in Dinajpur�����

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Construction work in Dinajpur

Construction work in Dinajpur

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Breaktime in Sundarban�����

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Breaktime in Sundarban ����

Construction work in Sundarban

Construction work in Sundarban

Lunch in Dinajpur�����

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Lunch in Sundarban�����

Breaktime in Dinajpur�����

Breaktime in Dinajpur ����

Lunch in Dinajpur�����

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Lunch in Sundarban�����

Breaktime in Sundarban�����

Breaktime in Sundarban ����

Groups 3 + 4 travel to Sundarban

19.00

18.30

18.00

17.30

17.00

16.30

16.00

15.30

15.00

14.30

14.00

13.30

13.00

12.30

12.00

11.30

11.00

10.30

10.00

Construction work in Sundarban

Groups 1 + 2 travel to Sundarban

9.00

Groups 1 + 2 travel to Dinajpur

Groups 3 + 4 travel to Dinajpur

8.30

Breakfast at BRIF�����

FRIDAY 14TH

Breakfast at BRIF ����

THURSDAY 13TH

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13/09/2012 - 16/09/2012

8.00

7.30

7.00

TIME

ITINERARY ITINERARY:

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Dinner in Sundarban ����

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Participants leave with families

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Homestay welcome in Sundarban

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Groups 1 + 2 return to Sundarban

Groups 3 + 4 remain in Sundarban

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Construction work in Dinajpur

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Construction work in Sundarban

Lunch in Dinajpur�����

Lunch in Sundarban ����

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Breaktime in Dinajpur�����

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Breaktime in Sundarban ����

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Dinner at BRIF�����

Daily debriefing at BRIF

Packed lunch from BRIF ����

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Full day sightseeing

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Breakfast in Sundarban�����

SUNDAY 16TH

Construction work in Dinajpur

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Construction work in Sundarban

Groups 1 + 2 travel to Dinajpur

Groups 3 + 4 travel to Sundarban

Breakfast at BRIF�����

SATURDAY 15TH

INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP ��������������


- Group 3: Construction - Group 4: Construction

- Group 3: Construction - Group 4: Construction

Daily debriefing at BRIF Dinner at BRIF (21)

Dinner at BRIF (21) 19.30

- Groups 3 + 4 from Dinajpur

- Groups 3 + 4 from Dinajpur

Daily debriefing at BRIF

- Groups 1 + 2 from Sundarban

- Groups 1 + 2 from Sundarban

- Tea and biscuits

- Tea and biscuits

Participants return to BRIF (21)

Breaktime in Dinajpur (20) Participants return to BRIF (21)

- Tea and biscuits Breaktime in Dinajpur (20)

- Tea and biscuits

Breaktime in Sundarban (20)

Construction work in Dinajpur

Construction work in Dinajpur

Breaktime in Sundarban (20)

- Group 2: Construction

- Group 2: Construction

19.00

18.30

18.00

17.30

17.00

16.30

16.00

15.30

15.00

14.30

- Group 1: Construction

- Group 1: Construction

3

- From Dinajpur

- From Sundarban Dinner at BRIF (21)

Dinner at BRIF (21)

Daily debriefing at BRIF

- From Sundarban Daily debriefing at BRIF

Participants return to BRIF (21)

Participants return to BRIF (21)

- Ceremony and certificates

- Feedback

- Songteam performance

Closing ceremony in Sundarban

Groups 1 + 2 return to Sundarban - Songteam performance Football match starts

Groups 3 + 4 remain in Sundarban - Welcome address

- Group 2: Construction

- Group 1: Construction

Construction work in Dinajpur

- Group 4: Construction

- Group 3: Construction

Construction work in Sundarban

Lunch in Dinajpur (20)

Lunch in Sundarban (20)

- Tea and biscuits

Breaktime in Dinajpur (20)

- Tea and biscuits

Breaktime in Sundarban (20)

- Group 2: Construction

- Group 1: Construction

Construction work in Dinajpur

- Group 4: Construction

- Group 3: Construction

Construction work in Sundarban

Groups 3 + 4 travel to Sundarban

Groups 1 + 2 travel to Dinajpur

Breakfast at BRIF (21)

THURSDAY 20TH

Football match welcome

Visit SAFE projects

- From Dinajpur

Groups 1 + 2 return to Sundarban

Groups 3 + 4 remain in Sundarban

Construction work in Sundarban

Construction work in Sundarban

14.00

Lunch in Dinajpur (20)

- Tea and biscuits

Breaktime in Dinajpur (20)

- Tea and biscuits

Breaktime in Sundarban (20)

- Group 2: Construction

- Group 1: Construction

Construction work in Dinajpur

- Group 4: Visit CFC projects

- Group 3: Construction

Construction work in Sundarban

Groups 1 + 2 travel to Dinajpur

Groups 3 + 4 travel to Sundarban

Breakfast at BRIF (21)

WEDNESDAY 19TH

INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP SEPTEMBER 2012

Lunch in Sundarban (20)

Lunch in Dinajpur (20)

- Tea and biscuits

- Tea and biscuits

Lunch in Sundarban (20)

Breaktime in Dinajpur (20)

Breaktime in Dinajpur (20)

Lunch in Dinajpur (20)

- Tea and biscuits

Lunch in Sundarban (20)

Breaktime in Sundarban (20)

- Tea and biscuits

- Group 4: Construction

- Group 4: Construction

Breaktime in Sundarban (20)

- Group 3: Construction

- Group 3: Construction

- Group 2: Visit CFC projects

- Group 2: Construction Construction work in Dinajpur

- Group 1: Construction

Construction work in Dinajpur

Construction work in Sundarban

- Group 1: Visit CFC projects

Groups 3 + 4 travel to Dinajpur

Construction work in Sundarban

Groups 1 + 2 travel to Sundarban

Groups 3 + 4 travel to Dinajpur

Breakfast at BRIF (21)

TUESDAY 18TH

Groups 1 + 2 travel to Sundarban

Breakfast at BRIF (21)

MONDAY 17TH

17/09/2012 - 20/09/2012

13.30

13.00

12.30

12.00

11.30

11.00

10.30

10.00

9.30

9.00

8.30

8.00

7.30

7.00

TIME

ITINERARY

ITINERARY:


19.30

19.00

18.30

18.00

17.30

17.00

16.30

16.00

15.30

15.00

14.30

14.00

13.30

13.00

12.30

12.00

11.30

11.00

10.30

10.00

9.30

9.00

8.30

8.00

7.30

7.00

TIME

Participants fly home

Dinner in Dhaka ����

Packed lunch from BRIF ����

Jo and Jen travel to Sundarban

Sightseeing in Dhaka

�����������������������������

Breakfast in Dhaka ����

SATURDAY 22ND

��

21/09/2012 - 22/09/2012

Participants travel to Dhaka ����

Breakfast at BRIF ����

FRIDAY 21ST

ITINERARY

ITINERARY: INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP ��������������


������������������������������ Masud ������������ Masud ������������ Masud ������������ Masud ������������ Masud ������������ Masud

����������� Friday ������������� Saturday ������������� Sunday ������������� Monday ������������� Tuesday ������������� Wednesday

������������������� Jo / Pulin / 7 local labourers (5 unskilled, 1 skilled, Masud)

������������� Saturday

- Participants arrive on site at 10am - Construction from 10 - 11am - Breaktime from 11 - 11.30am - Construction from 11.30am - 1pm - Lunch from 1 - 2pm - Construction from 2 - 5pm - Breaktime from 5 - 5.30pm - Participants return to BRIF at 5.30pm - Participants arrive on site at 9.30am - Construction from 9.30 - 11am - Breaktime from 11 - 11.30am - Construction from 11.30am - 1pm - Lunch from 1 - 2pm - Construction from 2 - 5pm - Breaktime from 5 - 5.30pm - Participants return to BRIF at 5.30pm - Participants arrive on site at 9.30am

�������������� ������������������������������ Wednesday Jo / Pulin / 6 local labourers (4 unskilled, 1 skilled, Masud) / 9 international participants / 5 local participants

�������������� ���������������������������������� Thursday Jo / Pulin / 6 local labourers (4 unskilled, 1 skilled, Masud) / 9 international participants / 5 local participants

�������������� ����������������������������������

Group 4 - Bamboo frame construction: posts / beams / cross-bracing / bamboo slats Group 3 - Windows / doors

Group 3 - Bamboo frame construction: posts / beams / cross-bracing / bamboo slats Group 4 - Windows / doors

- Construction starts at 9am - Construction finishes at 5pm

�������������� ������������������������� Jo / Pulin / 4 local labourers (2 unskilled, 1 skilled, Masud) Tuesday Bamboo beams / cutting to size

- Construction starts at 9am - Construction finishes at 5pm

- Construction starts at 9am - Construction finishes at 5pm

Primary bamboo posts / beam connection / cutting to size

������������������������� Jo / Pulin / 7 local labourers (5 unskilled, 1 skilled, Masud)

- Construction starts at 9am - Construction finishes at 5pm

- Construction starts at 9am - Construction finishes at 5pm

- 2 times daily

- 2 times daily

- 2 times daily

- 2 times daily

- 2 times daily

- 2 times daily

- 2 times daily

- Construction starts at 9am - Construction finishes at 5pm

- Construction starts at 9am - Construction finishes at 5pm

�������

SEPTEMBER 2012

BAMBOO HOUSE ����������������������

�������������� ������������������������� Jo / Pulin / 7 local labourers (5 unskilled, 1 skilled, Masud) Monday Bamboo beams / cutting to size

������������� Sunday

���������������������������������

������������� Friday

Katla setting / earth fill

���������������� Jo / 2 local labourers (1 skilled, Masud)

��������

������������� Thursday

���������������������������� Masud

������������ Masud

Pouring katla / rebaring

������������������ Jo / Porimol / 2 local labourers (1 skilled, Masud)

Pouring katla / rebaring

������������������ Jo / Porimol / 2 local labourers (1 skilled, Masud)

����������� Thursday

����������� Wednesday

����������� Tuesday

����

BAMBOO HOUSE - JORGEN BABUR MART SLUM

CONSTRUCTION SCHEDULE: ��������������������������������


Group 1 - Bamboo frame construction: posts / beams / cross-bracing / bamboo slats Group 2 - Windows / doors / staircase

Jo / Pulin / 6 local labourers (4 unskilled, 1 skilled, Masud) / 9 international participants / 5 local participants

- Participants arrive on site at 9am - Construction from 9 - 11am - Breaktime from 11 - 11.30am - Construction from 11.30am - 1pm - Lunch from 1 - 2pm - Participants return to Sundarban at 2pm

�������������� ���������������������������������� Wednesday Jo / Pulin / 6 local labourers (4 unskilled, 1 skilled, Masud) / 9 international participants / 5 local participants

�������������� ��������������������������������� Friday

Garden: compost layers / tree planting

Group 2 - First floor construction: bamboo slats / stabilised earth Group 1 - Back wall construction: bamboo slats / bamboo weave / CI sheets / earth wall

�������������� ���������������������������������� Thursday Jo / Pulin / 6 local labourers (4 unskilled, 1 skilled, Masud) / 9 international participants / 5 local participants

Garden: compost layers / tree planting

Group 1 - First floor construction: bamboo slats / stabilised earth Group 2 - Back wall construction: bamboo slats / bamboo weave / CI sheets / earth wall

Group 4 - Roof construction: CI sheet Group 3 - Front wall construction: bamboo slats / bamboo weave / CI sheets / earth wall

- Participants arrive on site at 9.30am - Construction from 9.30 - 11.00am - Breaktime from 11.00 - 11.30am - Construction from 11.30am - 1pm - Lunch from 1 - 2pm - Construction from 2 - 3.30pm - Participants return to Sundarban at 3.30pm

- Participants arrive on site at 9am - Construction from 9 - 11am - Breaktime from 11 - 11.30am - Construction from 11.30am - 1pm - Lunch from 1 - 2pm - Construction from 2 - 5pm - Breaktime from 5 - 5.30pm - Participants return to BRIF at 5.30pm

�������������� ���������������������������������� Tuesday Jo / Pulin / 6 local labourers (4 unskilled, 1 skilled, Masud) / 9 international participants / 5 local participants

Retaining wall: excavation / bricklaying

Group 3 - Roof construction: frame Group 4 - Front wall construction: bamboo slats / bamboo weave / CI sheets / earth wall

- Participants arrive on site at 9am - Construction from 9 - 11am - Breaktime from 11 - 11.30am - Construction from 11.30am - 1pm - Lunch from 1 - 2pm - Construction from 2 - 5pm - Breaktime from 5 - 5.30pm - Participants return to BRIF at 5.30pm

�������������� ���������������������������������� Monday Jo / Pulin / 6 local labourers (4 unskilled, 1 skilled, Masud) / 9 international participants / 5 local participants

�������������� ������������������������������������ Sunday

Group 2 - Bamboo frame construction: posts / beams / cross-bracing / bamboo slats Group 1 - Windows / doors / staircase

- Participants arrive on site at 9am - Construction from 9 - 11am - Breaktime from 11 - 11.30am - Construction from 11.30am - 1pm - Lunch from 1 - 2pm - Construction from 2 - 4pm - Participants return to Sundarban at 4pm

- Construction from 9.30 - 11am - Breaktime from 11 - 11.30am - Construction from 11.30am - 1pm - Lunch from 1 - 2pm - Construction from 2 - 5pm - Breaktime from 5 - 5.30pm - Participants return to BRIF at 5.30pm

SEPTEMBER 2012

BAMBOO HOUSE ����������������������

�������������� ���������������������������������� Saturday Jo / Pulin / 6 local labourers (4 unskilled, 1 skilled, Masud) / 9 international participants / 5 local participants

Friday

BAMBOO HOUSE - JORGEN BABUR MART SLUM

CONSTRUCTION SCHEDULE (cont.): ��������������������������������


������������� Thursday

������������� Wednesday

������������� Tuesday

������������� Monday

������������� Sunday

������������� Saturday

����������� Friday

����������� Thursday

����������� Wednesday

����������� Tuesday

����������� Monday

����������� Sunday

����

��������

SSB OFFICE

Mud crushing / sieving / mixing / pressing - 60 blocks per day

������������ 6 local labourers (6 unskilled)

Bamboo cutting to size / fixing bamboo beams

������������������������ Jo / Porimol / 3 local labourers (2 unskilled, 1 skilled)

Mud crushing / sieving / mixing / pressing - 60 blocks per day

������������ 6 local labourers (6 unskilled)

Bamboo cutting to size / fixing bamboo beams

������������������������ Jo / Porimol / 3 local labourers (2 unskilled, 1 skilled)

Mud crushing / sieving / mixing / pressing - 60 blocks per day

������������ 6 local labourers (6 unskilled)

Bamboo cutting to size / fixing primary bamboo beams

������������������������ Jo / Porimol / 3 local labourers (2 unskilled, 1 skilled)

Mud crushing / sieving / mixing / pressing - 60 blocks per day

������������ 6 local labourers (6 unskilled)

Bamboo cutting to size / fixing metals brackets in foundation / fixing primary bamboo posts

������������������������ Jo / Porimol / 3 local labourers (2 unskilled, 1 skilled)

Mud crushing / sieving / mixing / pressing - 60 blocks per day

������������ 6 local labourers (6 unskilled)

Mud crushing / sieving / mixing / pressing - 60 blocks per day

������������ 6 local labourers (6 unskilled)

Mud crushing / sieving / mixing / pressing - 60 blocks per day

������������ 6 local labourers (6 unskilled)

Mud crushing / sieving / mixing / pressing - 60 blocks per day

������������ 6 local labourers (6 unskilled)

Mud crushing / sieving / mixing / pressing - 60 blocks per day

������������ 6 local labourers (6 unskilled)

Mud crushing / sieving / mixing / pressing - 60 blocks per day

������������ 6 local labourers (6 unskilled)

Mud crushing / sieving / mixing / pressing - 60 blocks per day

������������ 6 local labourers (6 unskilled)

Mud crushing / sieving / mixing / pressing - 60 blocks per day

������������ 6 local labourers (6 unskilled)

CEMENT MUDBLOCK BUILDING - SUNDARBAN VILLAGE

CONSTRUCTION SCHEDULE: ������������������������

- Construction starts at 9am - Construction finishes at 5pm

- Construction starts at 9am - Construction finishes at 5pm

- Construction starts at 9am - Construction finishes at 5pm

- Construction starts at 9am - Construction finishes at 5pm

- Construction starts at 9am - Construction finishes at 5pm

- Construction starts at 9am - Construction finishes at 5pm

- Construction starts at 9am - Construction finishes at 5pm

- Construction starts at 9am - Construction finishes at 5pm

- Construction starts at 9am - Construction finishes at 5pm

- Construction starts at 9am - Construction finishes at 5pm

- Construction starts at 9am - Construction finishes at 5pm

- Construction starts at 9am - Construction finishes at 5pm

�������

���������������������� SEPTEMBER 2012


Laying bricks / bamboo ringbeams

���������������������������������������������������������������� 3 local labourers (2 unskilled, 1 skilled)

Mud crushing / sieving / mixing / pressing - 60 blocks per day

������������ 6 local labourers (6 unskilled)

Laying bricks / bamboo ringbeams

���������������������������������������������������������������� 3 local labourers (2 unskilled, 1 skilled)

Mud crushing / sieving / mixing / pressing - 60 blocks per day

������������ Pulin / 6 local labourers (6 unskilled)

Laying bricks / bamboo ringbeams

���������������������������������������������������������������� 3 local labourers (2 unskilled, 1 skilled)

Mud crushing / sieving / mixing / pressing - 60 blocks per day

������������ 6 local labourers (6 unskilled)

Participants arrive on site at 9.30am Construction from 9.30 - 11am Breaktime from 11 - 11.30am Construction from 11.30am - 1pm Lunch from 1 - 2pm Construction from 2 - 5pm Breaktime from 5 - 5.30pm Participants return to BRIF at 5.30pm Participants arrive on site at 9.30am Construction from 9.30 - 11am Breaktime from 11 - 11.30am Construction from 11.30am - 1pm Lunch from 1 - 2pm Construction from 2 - 5pm Breaktime from 5 - 5.30pm Participants return to BRIF at 5.30pm

�������������� ���������������������������������� Thursday Jen / Porimol / 8 local labourers (6 unskilled, 2 skilled) / 9 international participants / 5 local participants

�������������� ���������������������������������� Friday Jen / Porimol / 8 local labourers (6 unskilled, 2 skilled) / 9 international participants / 5 local participants

Group 3 - Block making: mud crushing / sieving / mixing / pressing - 60 blocks per day Group 4a - Wall construction: laying bricks / bamboo ringbeams / bamboo ventilation pieces Group 4b - Bamboo construction: cutting to size / windows / doors

Group 1a - Block making: mud crushing / sieving / mixing / pressing - 60 blocks per day Group 1b - Wall construction: laying bricks / bamboo ringbeams / bamboo ventilation pieces Group 2 - Bamboo construction: cutting to size / windows / doors

Group 1 - Block making: mud crushing / sieving / mixing / pressing - 60 blocks per day Group 2a - Wall construction: laying bricks / bamboo ringbeams / bamboo ventilation pieces Group 2b - Bamboo construction: cutting to size / windows / doors

Participants arrive on site at 10.30am Construction from 10.30am - 1pm Lunch from 1 - 2pm Construction from 2 - 5pm Breaktime from 5 - 5.30pm Participants return to BRIF at 5.30pm

- Construction starts at 9am - Construction finishes at 5pm

- Construction starts at 9am - Construction finishes at 5pm

- Construction starts at 9am - Construction finishes at 5pm

- Construction starts at 9am - Construction finishes at 5pm

- Construction starts at 9am - Construction finishes at 5pm

SEPTEMBER 2012

SSB OFFICE ����������������������

�������������� ������������������������������ Wednesday Jen / Porimol / 8 local labourers (6 unskilled, 2 skilled) / 9 international participants / 5 local participants

Laying bricks / bamboo ringbeams

���������������������������������������������������������������� 3 local labourers (2 unskilled, 1 skilled)

Mud crushing / sieving / mixing / pressing - 60 blocks per day

�������������� ������������ Tuesday 6 local labourers (6 unskilled)

Laying bricks / bamboo ringbeams

���������������������������������������������������������������� 3 local labourers (2 unskilled, 1 skilled)

Mud crushing / sieving / mixing / pressing - 60 blocks per day

�������������� ������������ Monday 6 local labourers (6 unskilled)

������������� Sunday

������������� Saturday

������������� Friday

Laying bricks / bamboo ringbeams

���������������������������������������������������������������� 3 local labourers (2 unskilled, 1 skilled)

CEMENT MUDBLOCK BUILDING - SUNDARBAN VILLAGE

CONSTRUCTION SCHEDULE (cont.): ������������������������


�������������� ��������������������������������� Friday

Group 3 - Plastering: walls (ground and upper stabilised earth floors, if time allows) Group 4 - Roof construction: CI sheet

�������������� ���������������������������������� Thursday Jen / Porimol / 7 local labourers (6 unskilled, 1 skilled) / 9 international participants / 5 local participants

Group 3 - Roof construction: frame Group 4 - Plastering: walls (ground and upper stabilised earth floors, if time allows)

�������������� ���������������������������������� Wednesday Jen / Porimol / 7 local labourers (6 unskilled, 1 skilled) / 9 international participants / 5 local participants

Group 1 - Plastering: walls (ground and upper stabilised earth floors, if time allows) Group 2 - Upper floor construction: cutting to size / structure

�������������� ���������������������������������� Tuesday Jen / Porimol / 7 local labourers (6 unskilled, 1 skilled) / 9 international participants / 5 local participants

Group 1 - Upper floor construction: cutting to size / structure Group 2 - Inserting windows and doors

�������������� ���������������������������������� Monday Jen / Porimol / 7 local labourers (6 unskilled, 1 skilled) / 9 international participants / 5 local participants

�������������� ������������������������������������ Sunday

Group 3 - Wall construction: laying bricks / bamboo ringbeams / bamboo ventilation pieces Group 4 - Bamboo construction: cutting to size / windows / doors

Participants arrive on site at 9.30am Construction from 9.30 - 11am Breaktime from 11 - 11.30am Construction from 11.30am - 1pm Lunch from 1 - 2pm Construction from 2 - 4pm Participants remain in Sundarban for ceremony

(Group 4 visit CFC projects during the morning)

Participants arrive on site at 8.30am Construction from 8.30 - 11am Breaktime from 11 - 11.30am Construction from 11.30am - 1.30pm Lunch from 1.30 - 2.30pm Participants remain in Sundarban for SAFE visits

(Group 2 visit CFC projects during the morning)

Participants arrive on site at 8.30am Construction from 8.30 - 11am Breaktime from 11 - 11.30am Construction from 11.30am - 1pm Lunch from 1 - 2pm Construction from 2 - 5pm Breaktime from 5 - 5.30pm Participants return to BRIF at 5.30pm

(Group 1 visit CFC projects during the morning)

Participants arrive on site at 8.30am Construction from 8.30 - 11am Breaktime from 11 - 11.30am Construction from 11.30am - 1pm Lunch from 1 - 2pm Construction from 2 - 5pm Breaktime from 5 - 5.30pm Participants return to BRIF at 5.30pm

(Group 3 visit CFC projects during the morning)

Participants arrive on site at 8.30am Construction from 8.30 - 11am Breaktime from 11 - 11.30am Construction from 11.30am - 1pm Lunch from 1 - 2pm Construction from 2 - 4.30pm Participants stay in Sundarban for homestays

SEPTEMBER 2012

SSB OFFICE ����������������������

�������������� ���������������������������������� Saturday Jen / Porimol / 8 local labourers (6 unskilled, 2 skilled) / 9 international participants / 5 local participants

CEMENT MUDBLOCK BUILDING - SUNDARBAN VILLAGE

CONSTRUCTION SCHEDULE (cont.): ������������������������


Author: Jo Ashbridge EWB-UK Placement 2012

SAFE Building in Bangladesh - 2012  

(October 2012 / J. Ashbridge) A review of the 2012 international workshop held in Dinajpur, Bangladesh in partnership with RedR UK, SAFE, BR...