Page 1

UP

2

SPEED

An
SAE
International
newsletter
for
Sponsors,
Faculty,
and
Students
@
SJSU


Left
­
FSAE
class
of
 2009.
Randy
 Roque,
Douglas
 Tse,
Gary
Ta,
 David
Sam,
Calvin
 Chin,
Arturo
 Quintero,
and
Ken
 Lau.
 Right
­
FSAE
class
of
 2010
and
beyond.
 Joey
Penniman,
 Ruben
Delgadillo,
 Chris
Lau,
Fortune
 Fresquez,
and
David
 Voth.


x t

June
2009


The 2010 SAE International SJSU Officers Congratulations
to
the
newly
elected
2010
SAE
 International
SJSU
Student
Officers.


 President
–
Randy
Floresca
 Vice
President
–
David
Voth
 Executive
Director
–
Alan
Cheng
 Treasurer
–
Tony
Lee
 Public
Relations/Marketing
–
Marissa
Dayton
 Members/Receptions
–
Jeff
Yan
 Events
Director
–
Anish
Ramrakhyani
 Graphics/Artist
–
Fortune
Fresquez
 


Con GRADUATIONS What
do
you
want
to
be
when
you
grow
up?

Where
do
 you
see
yourself
in
5
years?

10
years?

When
will
you
 be
done?
 A
few
of
our
members
along
with
the
San
Jose
State
 University
Class
of
2009
can
now
answer
these
 questions.

For
some,
this
journey
took
longer
than
 expected.

For
others,
it
only
seemed
like
yesterday
 they
were
just
freshman.

Goals
were
accomplished,
 dreams
became
reality,
and
friendships
were
created
 that
will
continue
for
years
to
come.
 Congratulations
to
the
graduating
class
of
2009.

May
 your
future
endeavors
lead
you
to
prosperous,
 successful,
and
wonderful
lives.
 Special
thanks
and
congratulations
to
our
graduating
 Formula
SAE
team
members.



With
projects
like
Formula
Hybrid,
Formula
 SAE,
Baja
SAE,
and
BE
UNITED
we
have
a
busy
 schedule
ahead
of
us.

Our
SAE
International
 student
chapter
is
looking
forward
to
the
2010
 academic
year
and
can’t
wait
to
make
more
 positive
differences
in
and
around
campus.


 
 For
more
information
please
visit:
 http://www.engr.sjsu.edu/sae


Club
Auto
Sport
allowed
our
team
to
use
their
 facilities
to
set
up
and
test
our
car.

We
were
able
 to
set
up
short
autocross
style
tracks
with
a
series
 of
slaloms,
straights,
hairpins,
and
chicanes.

This
 was
the
perfect
opportunity
to
get
our
drivers
 trained
and
gave
us
the
chance
to
see
how
well
our
 car
could
handle.


 


We
tested
our
car
for
more
than
twelve
hours


Formula SAE Testing Testing
students
by
having
a
finals
week
is
always
fun.

But
 what
can
be
better
than
celebrating
the
end
of
a
semester
by
 a
series
of
tests?

How
about
testing
our
very
own
student
 designed
and
built
formula
style
racecar.

During
finals
 week,
we
didn’t
just
challenge
ourselves
by
studying
for
our
 classes,
we
made
sure
that
our
car
would
be
ready
for
some
 serious
driving.

It
wasn’t
easy.

 




After
more
than
32
hours
of
troubleshooting
electrical


over
a
two‐day
period
at
Club
Auto
Sport.

We
 made
suspension
adjustments,
measured
tire
 pressures,
made
driver
changes,
and
most
 importantly,
we
worked
as
team
to
understand
 how
our
car
handles
and
performs.


 


These
next
few
weeks
we
will
be
fine
tuning
our
 car,
getting
our
drivers
prepared,
and
practicing
 for
the
design,
cost
analysis,
and
business
proposal
 presentations.

 
 Check
out
the
videos
of
our
team
testing
the
car
on
 youtube:
 
 http://www.youtube.com/sjsuformulasae
 








gremlins
we
found
out
that
our
car
wasn’t
running
properly
 due
to
a
pinched
fuel
pump
line.

Once
we
replaced
the
line
our
 FSAE
team
was
able
to
get
valuable
time
testing
our
racecar.

 Initial
testing
was
done
on
campus
at
places
like
the
 engineering
courtyard
and
driveway
behind
room
E123.




 









After
some
discussion,
driving,
and
noise
polluting
it
was
 clear
that
our
car
was
too
fast
and
too
loud
for
these
small
 areas.

So
our
next
stop
was
at
the
top
of
a
parking
garage
that
 was
right
across
the
street.

We
were
able
to
do
a
few
short
 acceleration
and
skid
pad
runs.

This
gave
our
potential
 drivers
a
chance
to
get
a
feel
for
the
car
and
also
made
them
 realize
that
this
was
the
fastest
car
they
have
ever
driven.


 


While
testing
the
car
our
team
noticed
a
few
things:
fasteners
 vibrating
loose,
charging
system
not
charging,
cooling
system
 not
cooling,
and
a
pedal
assembly
that
was
making
more
noise
 than
the
exhaust.

All
these
problems
were
solved
by
simple
 solutions:
replace
the
fasteners
and
use
locknuts,
replace
the
 regulator
rectifier
with
one
from
a
2007
CBR600RR,
and
use
 nuts
and
bolts
to
prevent
the
pedal
assembly
from
rattling.

 Once
these
solutions
were
implemented,
we
were
off
to
the
 Club
Auto
Sport
testing
grounds.




2



'($)*+,-

!"#$%&

./0/* Our
Formula­Hybrid
team
kicks
it
into
a
higher
 gear
and
begins
the
design
phase.


 A
month
of
organization
has
done
a
lot
for
the
Hybrid
 team,
which
is
now
driving
full
speed
into
the
design
 stage.

Members
have
been
organized
into
three
 categories:
Chassis
Team
which
is
responsible
for
 suspension,
frame,
steering
and
braking;
Powertrain
 Team
which
is
responsible
for
drivetrain,
engine,
 transmission,
and
throttle;
and
Electronics
Team
 which
is
responsible
for
all
electrical
circuitry,
servo‐ controls,
and
fusing.


 Now
that
we
are
organized,
we
have
begun
to
tackle
 the
all
important
design
stage.

Our
Chassis
Team
has
 been
running
initial
iterations
of
suspension
design,
 while
the
Electronics
and
Powertrain
Teams
have
 been
discussing
which
motors
to
use.

Meetings
are
 happening
regularly,
so
please
don’t
wait
to
join
the
 team.
 The
team’s
website
is
now
up
and
running
at:
 www.engr.sjsu.edu/sae/formulahybrid.

Check
it
out
 for
the
latest
news,
events,
and
info
surrounding
the
 Formula‐Hybrid@SJSU.
 The
Team
is
taking
a
trip
to
California
Polytechnic
 University
on
Monday,
June
8th.

CalPoly
took
1st
Place
 Overall
among
rookie
entries
at
this
year’s
Formula‐ Hybrid
competition.


During
the
visit
we
will
get
a
feel
 for
the
electrical
circuitry
involved
as
well
as
the
 suspension
involved
in
an
electric
powered
racecar.

 More
info
to
come
soon!


 Joshua
Hogan
 F‐H@SJSU
Team
Captain
 Josh.s.hogan@gmail.com
 (408)
807‐4272


Sponsorship
Packages
 
 Our
San
Jose
State
University
Formula‐Hybrid






 race
team
welcomes
and
appreciates
sponsorship




 in
many
ways.
Direct
funding
will
help
purchase
 materials,
parts,
tools,
and
equipment
to
make






 this
project
a
success.
Contributions
of
parts
or
 services
will
also
aid
in
creating
a
competitive
 vehicle.
All
monetary
donations
are
tax
deductible
 and
greatly
appreciated.

 
 Lithium
Ion
Spartan
Package

















($7,500)
 Lithium
Ion
package
benefits
plus:
 • Access
to
team
member
resumes
 • Additional
logo
on
the
nose
of
vehicle
 • Company
logo
featured
on
all
team
helmets
 Lithium
Ion
Package
































($5,000+)
 Nickel
Metal
Hydride
package
benefits
plus:
 • Upgrade
to
largest
possible
logo
in
highly










 visible
location
on
vehicle
 • Company
mention
in
all
press
releases
and
 newsletters
 • Company
logo
featured
on
team
banners
at
all
public
 events
 Nickel
Metal
Hydride
Package














($2,500+)
 Nickel
Cadmium
package
benefits
plus:
 • Upgrade
to
large
company
logo
featured
on





the
 side
fairing


 • Company
logo
featured
on
all
team
apparel
 Nickel
Cadmium
Package

 















($1,000+)
 Alkaline
package
benefits
plus:
 • Upgrade
to
a
medium
size
company
logo
on






 vehicle
 • Team
photo
with
member’s
signatures
 Alkaline
Package
 
 


















($500+)
 • Small
company
logo
on
vehicle
 • Company
logo
and
link
on
team
website
 • DVD
photo
album
documenting
the
vehicle’s





 design
and
construction
 
 3
 



Tech Talk 
 



Bracketiquette

As
we
close
in
on
finishing
our
first
Formula
SAE
car,
we
 realize
that
along
the
way
we
tend
to
overlook
small
 
 aspects
of
racecar
engineering
that
many
would
deem
 secondary
or
unimportant.

We
take
certain
design
 elements
for
granted
until
it
actually
becomes
time
to
 design
the
parts.

Aspects
like
how
body
panels
are
 fastened
onto
a
chassis,
or
how
the
seat
of
a
race
car
is
 incorporated
into
the
firewall
or
even
something
as
 uninteresting
as
how
teams
incorporate
a
brake
light
 switch
into
the
pedal
assembly
are
design
problems
that
 have
many
solutions
but
many
people
don’t
give
them
a
 second
look.

 Perhaps
even
more
pervasive
is
how
little
attention
is
 given
to
the
bracketry
designed
into
a
racecar.

When
it
 comes
time
to
install
a
perfectly
good
component
into
the
 chassis,
frequent
attention
is
paid
to
where
the
component
 will
go,
but
not
necessarily
how
it
will
be
attached.

It
may
 very
well
end
up
being
bolted
or
riveted
to
an
overly
 heavy,
improperly
loaded,
ill‐“designed”
bracket
that
has
 no
place
on
a
race
car.

In
my
opinion
just
as
much
 attention
should
be
given
to
both
where
and
how
a
 component
is
installed!
 Carroll
Smith
says
in
chapter
4
of
Prepare
to
Win
that
the
 main
reason
why
brackets
fail
(and
the
resulting
race
lost)
 is
due
to
the
fact
that
brackets
are
oftentimes
an
 afterthought.

An
example
of
this
is
when
a
fabricator
 ignores
the
fact
that
any
sort
of
tank
for
fluid
(fuel,
oil
or
 water)
will
be
much
heavier
when
full
and
be
even
heavier
 when
the
car
sees
any
sort
of
g
loading.

 The
difference
between
a
properly
designed
bracket
and
 that
of
the
“home
and
garden”
type
is
usually
fairly
small.
 The
worst
type
of
bracket
is
one
that
loaded
in
the
 direction
most
likely
to
cause
failure
(usually
bending)
and
 is
overly
heavy,
and
almost
always
one
often
compliments
 the
other.

In
order
to
keep
the
bracket
from
failing,
its
 mass
is
increased
so
much
that
it
is
laughable.

Below
are
 two
bracket
designs
meant
to
be
welded
to
a
tube:
 Bracket
A


Bracket
A
shows
a
tangential
tab
with
a
hole
in
it,
 while
Bracket
B
is
also
a
tab,
but
with
triangular
 gusseting
folded
into
it.
 Both
were
designed
in
SolidWorks
to
have
the
same
 length
and
weight
and
then
analyzed
in
Cosmos
as
 4130
chromoly.

Bracket
A
had
a
resulting
thickness
 of
0.125in
while
bracket
B
had
a
thickness
of
0.065,
 about
half
of
bracket
A.

A
50lb
load
was
applied
3
 inches
out
from
the
fixed
end
of
the
brackets.
 Element
size
was
held
constant
for
both
brackets.

 The
corresponding
data
for
the
brackets
can
be
found
 in
table
1.
 Table
1
 

 Weight
(lb)
 Thickness
(in)
 Deflection
at
end
(in)
 FOS
(to
yielding)


Bracket
A
 0.0136
 0.125
 0.0758
 1.3


Bracket
B
 0.0136
 0.065
 0.0035
 4.7



 Although
physical
testing
should
be
done
to
validate
 these
numbers,
the
increase
in
rigidity
and
strength
 by
putting
a
little
extra
thought
into
brackets
is
hard
 to
ignore.

It’s
hard
to
argue
with
a
factor
of
safety
 increase
of
over
3.5
and
an
increase
in
stiffness
of
 over
200
percent.
 The
point
of
all
this
is
that
it’s
not
very
hard
to
design
 a
bracket
that
will
be
light
and
strong
as
long
as
you
 put
a
little
thought
into
it.

I
like
to
think
that
the
 reason
people
glaze
over
bracket
design
so
often
is
 due
to
the
fact
that
when
they
see
a
properly
 designed
bracket,
they
simply
write
it
off.

When
 people
see
something
designed
properly
they
don’t
 analyze
it,
they
simply
think
it
looks
“right”
and
move
 on.

Hopefully
with
a
little
thought
and
ingenuity,
we
 can
make
the
world
a
better
place
one
bracket
at
a
 time.
 Joey
Penniman
 Chief
Engineer
–
SJSU
FSAE
 


Bracket
B


4



Upcoming Events

Baja SAE at SJSU

June
6,
2009
 Engineering
Room
E114B
 Hotel
and
Shirt
payments
due
 
 June
8­9,
2009
 San
Luis
Obispo
 Formula
Hybrid
Collaboration
 
 June
10,
2009
 Engineering
Room
E114B
 2010
Formula
SAE
Kick
Off
Meeting


Several
of
the
Formula
SAE
team
members
managed
to
find
the
 time
to
design
and
complete
a
Baja
vehicle
for
the
2009
Baja
West
 competition
whilst
still
playing
vital
roles
in
Formula
SAE
and
 keeping
up
with
school.

The
2009
Baja
SAE
competition
took
place
 in
Portland
Oregon
and
Washougal
Washington
from
May
6
‐
10th.
 Our
vehicle
featured
4‐link
rear
suspension,
an
extremely
 lightweight
and
comfortable
custom
seat,
and
character
that
can
 only
be
developed
here
at
San
Jose
State
University.

This
year’s
 vehicle
was
also
significantly
lighter
than
the
vehicle
from
last
year.

 


The
highlight
of
the
endurance
was
the
so‐called
“log
drops.”

 These
large
drops
were
separated
by
telephone
poles
across
the
 muddy
track.

Many
teams
rolled
their
vehicles
here
and
some
were
 removed
from
the
competition
for
cracks
in
the
roll
hoops.

We
 talked
with
many
teams
about
their
experiences
in
endurance.

Our
 favorite
teams
were:
Ecole
de
Technologie
Superieure
(ETS),
 Oregon
State,
and
Michigan
Tech.

However,
most
impressive
was
 Nebraska
State’s
team
and
their
first
year
vehicle.

They
made
it
 through
all
but
the
last
ten
minutes
of
endurance
when
a
broken
 axle
put
them
out
of
the
race.

At
the
end
of
the
race,
everyone
 looked
the
same:
completely
covered
in
mud.
 






June
1­3,
2009
 Active
Auto
Body
 Painting
of
our
FSAE
car
 
 June
1­16,
2009
 Engineering
Room
E123
 Preparing
for
FSAE
West



June
16­21,
2009
 Fontana,
CA
 Formula
SAE
West
 
 June
21,
2009

 San
Jose
State
University
 2010
Formula
SAE
Design
Begins
 
 July
3­5
2009

 Volunteering
for
Moto
GP
 Mazda
Laguna
Seca
Raceway


The
competition
also
gave
our
team
a
chance
to
see
firsthand
 which
features
helped
and
hindered
vehicles
in
different
events.

 For
example,
if
a
team
wanted
to
be
competitive
in
the
rock
crawl
 they
would
need
to
have
a
gearbox
with
reverse
and
neutral.
 Cutting
brakes
or
differential
braking
would
also
be
advantageous.
 However,
if
light
weight,
simplicity,
and
reliability
for
endurance
 were
top
priorities
then
a
single‐speed
gearbox
with
a
CVT
might
be
 the
best
choice.

Overall,
participating
in
the
competition
was
very
 motivational.
There
were
many
talented
and
creative
teams
out
 there.
We
have
been
inspired
more
than
ever
to
bring
a
winning
car
 to
competition.
 
 For
more
information
please
visit:
 Newsletter Staff: http://www.engr.sjsu.edu/sae/minibaja/


Editor/Writer: Randy Floresca Writer: Joey Penniman Writer: Johanna Knudsen Writer: Josh Hogan

5



Thank You to our Sponsors

Gold Sponsors 


Silver Sponsors


Bronze Sponsors


Bronze Sponsors


haven

www.spartanracing.net

SR SPARTAN

gp BIKE PARTS

RACING

At San Jose State University

Randy
Floresca
 President
 (510)
206
­
3229
 randyfloresca@gmail.com
 


Baja
SAE
Captain
‐
Darren
Schwald
–
darrenschwald@gmail.com
 Formula
Hybrid
Captain
–
Josh
Hogan
‐
josh.s.hogan@gmail.com
 Formula
SAE
Captain
‐
Ruben
Delgadillo
‐
rubendelgadillo@gmail.com


6


2009_06  
2009_06  

Special
thanks
and
congratulations
to
our
graduating
 Formula
SAE
team
members.

 Left
­
FSAE
class
of
 2009.
Randy
 Roque,
Douglas
 Tse,
Ga...

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