Page 1

00—10

CH.

PROJECT

werk Selected works of Sadie Williams 2014 — 2018

01

INSTRUCTOR

— —


00—10

CH.

PROJECT

Selected works of Sadie Williams 2014 — 2018

05

INSTRUCTOR

— —


BY

SADIE WILLIAMS 2014—2018

WERK

06

10—53

54—73

74—91

1 2 3 Greta Magazine A feminist publication

TripZip An international travel app

NASA Posters A collaboration with IRG

Art Direction and Design

User Experience

Poster Design


User Interaction

Typography

07

INSTRUCTOR

Matu Donates your change

Modern Apothecary An herbalism handbook

TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S

4 5

CH.

110—123

00—10

92—109


BY

SADIE WILLIAMS 2014—2018

WERK

08

124—139

140—167

168—185

6 7 8 Railway Odyssey A tribute to FF DIN

Eventbrite Illustrations An exploration of style

WOWair Rebranding an airline

Typography

Illustration

Branding


Branding

Composition

09

INSTRUCTOR

Buick Velite A collaboration with General Motors

Handmade Collage Learning through composition

TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S

9 10

CH.

200—219

00—10

186—199


2014—2018

WERK

10 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


01—10

CH. G R E TA M A G A Z I N E

PROJECT

11

INSTRUCTOR

D AV I D J O H N S C OT T

TYPOGRAPHY 02

1 / 10


Objective In Visual Systems 2, we were required to select any problem, and solve it with our choice of any vehicle. I saw that the feminist “brand,” while a successful and empowering community for those who are decidedly a part of it, was worlds away from those who had yet to understand it. A negative reputation that has followed feminism for decades has created a major divide between the those involved and those who are not. My observation was that there was little to no media that bridges that chasm. I wanted to create that invitation through elevated design: a magazine that displays feminism as a sophisticated lifestyle, highlighting women in design and in leadership roles, and covering a different major topic per issue. Research I knew that I wanted writing that covered the basics of feminism in such a way that people could relate to them no matter their experience with feminism, and possibly act as a comfortable gateway to the more complex ideas of gender equality. I decided that one or two pieces of original content might be nice to communicate that for the project, so I posted on Facebook, asking if anyone would be willing to write about any number of topics related to feminism. I was blown away by the response. Friends I hadn’t spoken to in years were reaching out to thank me for what I was working on and others were tagging their friends in the post, making an entire network of interest. Apparently I had struck a nerve! The real purpose of the project began to take shape here: People wanted to talk about feminism, but didn’t feel they had any meaningful place to do it, or any singular topic to direct their thoughts at. This is how I knew the magazine had to be a platform. With 100% original content, Greta Magazine would be a publication written by the people, for the people, all on their own time.

2014—2018

WERK

10

Process Now with over 40 people involved in the project, I knew the magazine had to become more than a student undertaking. I reached out to a dozen female artists whose work would fit the aesthetic of the publication. Without exception, the artists expressed willingness to have their work featured. To create visual cohesion in photography, I decided to use the growing network to orchestrate a photoshoot. The shoot for Issue 01, “The Contemporary Woman” featured a single model and five looks, all meant to communicate strength, elegance, and sophistication to pair with the issue’s featured article about redefining “femininity.” The shoot for Issue 02, “The Body” featured three models of varying body types to highlight the beauty found in variety, and also featured still lifes of fruit, the fruit acting as a visual metaphor for the body. Outcome Greta Magazine is a three-issue, limited-edition publication with the purpose of elevating feminism through design. The three issues are: The Contemporary Woman (a general overview of current feminist thought), The Body (highlighting positive thinking about every kind of body), Maternity (addressing the woman’s role, or choice not to play that role, in motherhood).


01—10

CH. G R E TA M A G A Z I N E

PROJECT

11

INSTRUCTOR

PHIL HAMLETT

VISUAL SYSTEMS 02

1 / 10


2014—2018

WERK

12 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


01—10

CH. G R E TA M A G A Z I N E

PROJECT

13

INSTRUCTOR

PHIL HAMLETT

VISUAL SYSTEMS 02


2014—2018

WERK

14 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


01—10

CH. G R E TA M A G A Z I N E

PROJECT

15

INSTRUCTOR

PHIL HAMLETT

VISUAL SYSTEMS 02


2014—2018

WERK

16 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


01—10

CH. G R E TA M A G A Z I N E

PROJECT

17

INSTRUCTOR

PHIL HAMLETT

VISUAL SYSTEMS 02


2014—2018

WERK

18 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


01—10

CH. G R E TA M A G A Z I N E

PROJECT

19

INSTRUCTOR

PHIL HAMLETT

VISUAL SYSTEMS 02


2014—2018

WERK

20 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


01—10

CH. G R E TA M A G A Z I N E

PROJECT

21

INSTRUCTOR

PHIL HAMLETT

VISUAL SYSTEMS 02


01—10

CH.

G R E TA M A G A Z I N E

PROJECT

Photoshoot 01 Art Direction Sadie Williams Photography Katie Lovecraft Model Sophia Jackson Hair and Makeup Kalyn Slaughter Stylist Michelle Blanco

23

INSTRUCTOR

PHIL HAMLETT VISUAL SYSTEMS 02


2014—2018

WERK

24 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


01—10

CH. G R E TA M A G A Z I N E

PROJECT

25

INSTRUCTOR

PHIL HAMLETT

VISUAL SYSTEMS 02


2014—2018

WERK

32 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


01—10

CH. G R E TA M A G A Z I N E

PROJECT

27

INSTRUCTOR

PHIL HAMLETT

VISUAL SYSTEMS 02


2014—2018

WERK

28 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


01—10

CH. G R E TA M A G A Z I N E

PROJECT

29

INSTRUCTOR

PHIL HAMLETT

VISUAL SYSTEMS 02


2014—2018

WERK

30 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


01—10

CH. G R E TA M A G A Z I N E

PROJECT

31

INSTRUCTOR

PHIL HAMLETT

VISUAL SYSTEMS 02


01—10

CH.

G R E TA M A G A Z I N E

PROJECT

Photoshoot 02 Art Direction Sadie Williams Photography Leo Patrone Models Kaitlyn Fitzpatrick, Adriana LeBaron, Monique Romero Hair and Makeup Monique Mazer Wardrobe Michelle Blanco

39

INSTRUCTOR

PHIL HAMLETT VISUAL SYSTEMS 02


2014—2018

WERK

40 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


01—10

CH. G R E TA M A G A Z I N E

PROJECT

41

INSTRUCTOR

PHIL HAMLETT

VISUAL SYSTEMS 02


2014—2018

WERK

42 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


01—10

CH. G R E TA M A G A Z I N E

PROJECT

43

INSTRUCTOR

PHIL HAMLETT

VISUAL SYSTEMS 02


2014—2018

WERK

44 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


01—10

CH. G R E TA M A G A Z I N E

PROJECT

45

INSTRUCTOR

PHIL HAMLETT

VISUAL SYSTEMS 02


2014—2018

WERK

46 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


01—10

CH. G R E TA M A G A Z I N E

PROJECT

VISUAL SYSTEMS 02


2014—2018

WERK

48 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


01—10

CH. G R E TA M A G A Z I N E

PROJECT

49

INSTRUCTOR

PHIL HAMLETT

VISUAL SYSTEMS 02


2014—2018

WERK

50 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


01—10

CH. G R E TA M A G A Z I N E

PROJECT

51

INSTRUCTOR

PHIL HAMLETT

VISUAL SYSTEMS 02


2014—2018

WERK

52 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


02—10

CH. T R I P Z I P : I N T E R N AT I O N A L T R A V E L A P P

PROJECT

53

INSTRUCTOR

D O L LY J O H N S O N

VISUAL SYSTEMS 01

2 / 10


SADIE WILLIAMS

BY

Objective When I started this project I had just disappointedly canceled a trip to Cuba. I had even bought my plane tickets already, but one piece of information after another kept accidentally falling into my lap that made me wary of following through. The States had placed a travel warning on the little nation. Then the American embassy came home with hearing and brain damage from radar attacks. I needed a visa and to get one I had to either travel with a specific tour group, or do some shady story telling at customs. I got mixed information about immunizations. All of this, and it wasn’t even going to be easy to travel when I got there. My Spanish was weak, and cell service came by the half hour at ten dollars. Same with wifi. Why was I finding all of this out on an individual basis and entirely by chance? Why wasn’t this information all in one place? Is there an app for that? (Answer: No)

52

Research Along with my struggles from a trip that never even happened, I had my experiences with places I did go. In the last year I had struggled to barter in a language I didn’t know, translate costs into my own currency, and try to politely comply with courtesy customs in both Kenya and Istanbul. There was a lot of Googling involved, but again, no singular source of truth, and plenty of mixed messages. I asked other international travelers for their experiences and got several stories that sounded all too familiar. The unintuitive public transit system, quickly realizing you’re not dressed modestly enough for this community, knowing which vendors are legit, knowing whether the water is safe to drink. Most frequently, I hear the sentiment that the travel just wishes they knew everything a local knew. They wanted the insider’s view, not only for safety, but for a more authentic experience.

2014—2018

WERK

Process As I collected lists of information that travelers wanted, some categories started to reveal themselves and certain tools were deemed necessary. How that information was to be organized was revealed in wireframing. Some user testing helped me understand that some information was needed more immediately that others, and some information required notifications. Outcome TripZip, the app for international travel. In “My Flight” you will find up-to-the-minute information on what is required for your trip, whether it be a visa, immunizations, or a passport. It will also inform you of travel warnings and update the status of your legal papers. “Insider Tips” has a carefully curated description of the major city you’re flying to with information on everything from drinking water and appropriate attire to best eats and hidden gems. The thumb menu makes for quick access to a currency calculator, a translator, and your trip schedule. Other tools include weather and filters for finding food and activities.


02—10

CH. T R I P Z I P : I N T E R N AT I O N A L T R A V E L A P P

PROJECT

53

INSTRUCTOR

D O L LY J O H N S O N

VISUAL SYSTEMS 01

2 / 10


2014—2018

WERK

54 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


02—10

CH. T R I P Z I P : I N T E R N AT I O N A L T R A V E L A P P

PROJECT

55

INSTRUCTOR

D O L LY J O H N S O N

VISUAL SYSTEMS 01


2014—2018

WERK

56 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


02—10

CH. T R I P Z I P : I N T E R N AT I O N A L T R A V E L A P P

PROJECT


2014—2018

WERK

58 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


02—10

CH. T R I P Z I P : I N T E R N AT I O N A L T R A V E L A P P

PROJECT

59

INSTRUCTOR

D O L LY J O H N S O N

VISUAL SYSTEMS 01


2014—2018

WERK

60 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


02—10

CH. T R I P Z I P : I N T E R N AT I O N A L T R A V E L A P P

PROJECT

61

INSTRUCTOR

D O L LY J O H N S O N

VISUAL SYSTEMS 01


2014—2018

WERK

Welcome to San Francisco

62 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


02—10

CH. T R I P Z I P : I N T E R N AT I O N A L T R A V E L A P P

PROJECT

63

INSTRUCTOR

D O L LY J O H N S O N

VISUAL SYSTEMS 01


2014—2018

WERK

64 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


02—10

CH. T R I P Z I P : I N T E R N AT I O N A L T R A V E L A P P

PROJECT

65

INSTRUCTOR

D O L LY J O H N S O N

VISUAL SYSTEMS 01


2014—2018

WERK

66 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


02—10

CH. T R I P Z I P : I N T E R N AT I O N A L T R A V E L A P P

PROJECT

67

INSTRUCTOR

D O L LY J O H N S O N

VISUAL SYSTEMS 01


2014—2018

WERK

68 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


02—10

CH. T R I P Z I P : I N T E R N AT I O N A L T R A V E L A P P

PROJECT

69

INSTRUCTOR

D O L LY J O H N S O N

VISUAL SYSTEMS 01


2014—2018

WERK

70 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


03—10

CH. N A S A S P O N S O R E D C O L L A B O R AT I O N

PROJECT

71

INSTRUCTOR

SH I Z U NORI KOBAR A

SPONSORED

3 / 10


SADIE WILLIAMS

BY

Objective Working directly with NASA’s Intelligent Robotics Group, I had the opportunity to develop concept posters that would redefine what “space exploration” means to the public. It was made clear in our first meeting that NASA does not feel that its robotics sector is reaching a broad enough audience. A niche group of individuals who are already interested in robotics follow the work of NASA’s IRG, but they wished to reach their audience through the lens of space exploration. Research Facing a team of people that did not include any designers, I had the pleasure of introducing the client to brand itself, and why I’m so passionate about it. It should exist even in the absence of a logo. Same goes for color palette, or product design. Brand is to me, the perceived personality of a company or service. So how did IRG wish to be perceived? We workshopped the following ideals: “On the cutting edge of exploration and discovery.” “Inviting to audiences across multiple generations.” “Imaginative and future-facing.” and, “A part of NASA’s incredibly valuable brand heritage.”

2014—2018

WERK

70

Process With a patriotic color palette that was simple, strong and rooted in Nasa’s brand heritage, I set about exploring applications that would invite new audience members to get to know IRG better. I thought designing a collection of posters would be a great platform for this, so the first round of iterations ranged from really typographically-driven to just the opposite. The second round of iterations narrowed down the selection and revealed what approach was communicating the most powerfully. These were the more colorful and abstract of the first exploration. Finally, we felt that the set of five posters included here were the most successful in evoking a sense of curiosity in the viewer. Outcome Outer space does not have to be a dark, sinister void. It can be elegant, emotional, and colorful. These illustrative posters, created in Adobe Illustrator feature abstract shapes, which are left open to the interpretation of the viewer. The grainy, out-of-focus style creates a sense of mystery, as the subject is not blatantly displayed, but rather pushed just out of reach, encouraging the viewer to look more closely, and project their own interpretation onto the image. The focus on the visual, as opposed to the typographic, aids in creating a sense of depth that envelopes the viewer, and perhaps makes them feel like their passing through this abstract landscape.


03—10

CH. N A S A S P O N S O R E D C O L L A B O R AT I O N

PROJECT

71

INSTRUCTOR

SH I Z U NORI KOBAR A

SPONSORED

3 / 10


2014—2018

WERK

72 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


03—10

CH. N A S A S P O N S O R E D C O L L A B O R AT I O N

PROJECT

73

INSTRUCTOR

SH I Z U NORI KOBAR A

SPONSORED


2014—2018

WERK

74 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


03—10

CH. N A S A S P O N S O R E D C O L L A B O R AT I O N

PROJECT

75

INSTRUCTOR

SH I Z U NORI KOBAR A

SPONSORED


2014—2018

WERK

76 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


03—10

CH. N A S A S P O N S O R E D C O L L A B O R AT I O N

PROJECT

77

INSTRUCTOR

SH I Z U NORI KOBAR A

SPONSORED


2014—2018

WERK

78 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


03—10

CH. N A S A S P O N S O R E D C O L L A B O R AT I O N

PROJECT

79

INSTRUCTOR

SH I Z U NORI KOBAR A

SPONSORED


2014—2018

WERK

80 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


SADIE WILLIAMS

BY

“ Consider again, that dot. That’s here. That’s home. That’s us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives.

2014—2018

WERK

82

—Carl Sagan


03—10

CH. N A S A S P O N S O R E D C O L L A B O R AT I O N

PROJECT

83

INSTRUCTOR

SH I Z U NORI KOBAR A

SPONSORED


2014—2018

WERK

84 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


03—10

CH. N A S A S P O N S O R E D C O L L A B O R AT I O N

PROJECT

85

INSTRUCTOR

SH I Z U NORI KOBAR A

SPONSORED


2014—2018

WERK

86 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


04—10

CH. MODERN APOTHECARY

PROJECT

87

ARIEL GREY

INSTRUCTOR

TYPOGRAPHY 03

4 / 10


SADIE WILLIAMS

BY

Objective Typography 3 is a class focused on refinement in complex hierarchy as it relates to typography. We were assigned to create a cookbook that was based on a concept of our choosing. I chose herbalism as my topic and made it my goal to “modernize” the image of herbal remedies. Research My target audience was those who are already interested in natural living including healthy, earthy dieting and who wish to expand their knowledge of natural remedies. Herbalism dates back to the Paleolithic age, and about 80% of the population in Asian and African countries still use it. 25% of modern drugs are plant-based. To recognize the lasting relevance of these medicinal practices I decided to use my cookbook as a place to compile information on the use of medicinal herbs, including direction in making tisanes, infusions, decoctions, macerations, tinctures, and some foods. I researched competitors from this field and found that there were many existing books on similar topics, but none elevated herbalism to something of great relevance, or something worthy of elegant design.

2014—2018

WERK

86

Process After outlining my target audience and what content would be available in the book, I constructed a message and tone: herbalism is a relevant practice, and while not a replacement for modern medicine, is worth incorporating into one’s lifestyle for better health. I felt I needed to visually create a successful marriage between the organic, and the modern and clinical. The first step in doing so was selecting a color palette. Earthy, warm tones are inviting to a reader who may already be interested in a natural lifestyle. Delicate secondary graphics and a strong, strict grid create the modernism that bring the practice into this era. Finally, hand-drawn illustrations for the herbal glossary bring an elevated elegance to the book. Thumbnails were sketched to explore the different ways these elements could be flexed. Several rounds of refinement got the layouts ready for digital rendering, and smaller, more delicate details could be added. Outcome Modern Apothecary is a small, elegant handbook to aid the health-conscious in finding natural, plant-based ways to boost their health. With modern design, the user has access to instructions for every form of traditional administration, a detailed list of supplies, and an illustrated glossary of the herbs in use.


04—10

CH. MODERN APOTHECARY

PROJECT

87

ARIEL GREY

INSTRUCTOR

TYPOGRAPHY 03

4 / 10


2014—2018

WERK

88 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


04—10

CH. MODERN APOTHECARY

PROJECT

89

ARIEL GREY

INSTRUCTOR

TYPOGRAPHY 03


2014—2018

WERK

SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


04—10

CH. MODERN APOTHECARY

PROJECT

93

ARIEL GREY

INSTRUCTOR

TYPOGRAPHY 03


2014—2018

WERK

98 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


04—10

CH. MODERN APOTHECARY

PROJECT

99

ARIEL GREY

INSTRUCTOR

TYPOGRAPHY 03


2014—2018

WERK

100 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


04—10

CH. MODERN APOTHECARY

PROJECT

101

ARIEL GREY

INSTRUCTOR

TYPOGRAPHY 03


2014—2018

WERK

102 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


05—10

CH. M AT U : T H E C H A R I T Y A P P

PROJECT

103

INSTRUCTOR

SHADI KASHEFIZADEH

GRAPHIC DESIGN 03

5 / 10


SADIE WILLIAMS

BY

Objective Imagine you’re at the checkout stand at Trader Joe’s, about to make your purchase of $34.62 for your basket of groceries. I’m going to guess that if that purchase was rounded to $35, you probably wouldn’t miss that 38 cents. In fact, if every time you made a purchase that was rounded up by an average of 40 cents, you’d probably never miss it. Plus, just think how tidy your budgeting spreadsheet would look! Better yet, imagine that every time you made a purchase, the change it would take to round your total to the nearest dollar would be automatically donated to a charity of your choosing. That’s the purpose of Matu; to donate a little change for a little change. Research A great deal of research for this product went into understanding purchasing habits and donation habits. Two thirds of all American transactions are made with a credit or debit card. Most people’s only roadblock to donating is that they feel like they don’t have the budget for it. People are more likely to donate to the same charity multiple times because the organization is trusted in their experience. People who donate generally do so on a schedule; during the holidays for example. People are often deterred from donating by technical roadblocks such as poor website design. People are generally interested in the specific ways their money is being used to help others.

2014—2018

WERK

102

Process After user research came wireframing. Detailed sketches of the user interface were made, and were followed by a physical mock up of the app. I trimmed out every button, screen, and function in the app from paper and created a table full of app elements. This allowed me to start user testing. The testing revealed pain points and confusing knots in the user flow, and even parts of the app that the user wasn’t interested in. After refining the wireframes and editing the user flow to reflect the feedback from the user, I was able to put the first screen designs in InVision for a second, and more realistic round of user testing. With the final kinks ironed out of the user flow, I was able to focus on branding and aesthetic design of the app. A color palette, logo, and UI guidelines were made to reflect the interests of the persona. Outcome “Matu is an app that rounds your purchases to the nearest dollar and donates your change to charity.” This is the one-liner the user first sees when creating an account. They are then prompted to select the types of charities they are interested in, and the app returns a curated list of trusted organizations they can choose from. This way, their “portfolio” is already set up, and when a purchase is made, the donation is made automatically and doesn’t require any interaction with the app. In the app, their profile displays a simplified summary of their portfolio. Other pages enable the user to edit their portfolio, see the way their donations have been allocated by each organization, see articles about or by the organizations they donate to, and answer frequently asked questions.


05—10

CH. M AT U : T H E C H A R I T Y A P P

PROJECT

103

INSTRUCTOR

SHADI KASHEFIZADEH

GRAPHIC DESIGN 03

5 / 10


2014—2018

WERK

104


05—10

CH. M AT U : T H E C H A R I T Y A P P

PROJECT


2014—2018

WERK

106 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


05—10

CH. M AT U : T H E C H A R I T Y A P P

PROJECT

107

INSTRUCTOR

SHADI KASHEFIZADEH

GRAPHIC DESIGN 03


2014—2018

WERK

108 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


05—10

CH. M AT U : T H E C H A R I T Y A P P

PROJECT

109

INSTRUCTOR

SHADI KASHEFIZADEH

GRAPHIC DESIGN 03


2014—2018

WERK

110 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


05—10

CH. M AT U : T H E C H A R I T Y A P P

PROJECT

111

INSTRUCTOR

SHADI KASHEFIZADEH

GRAPHIC DESIGN 03


2014—2018

WERK

112 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


05—10

CH. M AT U : T H E C H A R I T Y A P P

PROJECT

113

INSTRUCTOR

SHADI KASHEFIZADEH

GRAPHIC DESIGN 03


2014—2018

WERK

114 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


06—10

CH. R A I L W AY O D Y S S E Y : A T R I B U T E T O F F D I N

PROJECT

115

INSTRUCTOR

D AV I D J O H N S C OT T

TYPOGRAPHY 02

6 / 10


SADIE WILLIAMS

BY

Objective In Typography 2 we were required to create a set of collectible cards that would act as and “ode” to a typeface of our choice. The set could include any number of cards and could explore any aspect of our chosen typeface. I chose FF DIN designed by Albert-Jan Pool because I was fascinated by its adaptability. It seems so successful almost any setting. Research My research included a thorough investigation of the typeface’s background and several explorations of how to visually express my findings. DIN’s history turned out to be a surprisingly long one. In 1905 a set of characters was created by the Royal Prussian Railway in order to unify freight cars. This earliest version of FF DIN was known as “KPEV.” In 1920, a merger of all German state railways made the Prussian railway the reference for all lettering, and in 1923 the D. Stempel AG Foundry released the earliest version of DIN. In 1936, it was adopted by Germany as a country-wide standard. Finally, in 1995 Albert-Jan Pool expanded the typeface into a family of 20 variations and polished it into an acceptable form for digital typesetting.

2014—2018

WERK

114

Process With its strong ties to the railway, I began to explore how the card’s design could give a nod to the typeface’s industrial roots. I came to learn that in the same era, train travel was a new and impressive concept; the idea that something man-made could cut in such a linear fashion through mountains and valleys was still very foreign at the time. Some people even feared it the way people often fear flight. But fear wasn’t what I wanted to highlight in this card set: it was the journey. DIN has been through so many changes and incorporations before it came to the state as we now know it. It’s as though it’s been on a long, arduous journey itself. With this concept in mind, and its roots in train travel, I wanted to illustrate a “railway odyssey.” A linear journey thorough a changing landscape. Outcome These 5x7 cards, backed by walnut veneer and set on cream-colored chip board can be placed one next to the other to create one, panoramic illustration of the natural landscape. This is the beautiful scene you might see out of your window if you were to travel though the countryside by train. The grainy finish, sepia coloring, and depth-offield is reminiscent of an old photograph. To juxtapose the warm, organic nature of the landscape, the strong and industrial typeface FF DIN is featured in front, displaying bites of information such as the typeface’s history, a detailed analysis of FF DIN and DIN Next, and a display of the glyphs included in the set of characters. Each card is noted with the weight and name that is featured in the display. The cards also visually describe typographic anatomy both in character and in typesetting.


06—10

CH. R A I L W AY O D Y S S E Y : A T R I B U T E T O F F D I N

PROJECT

115

INSTRUCTOR

D AV I D J O H N S C OT T

TYPOGRAPHY 02

6 / 10


2014—2018

WERK

116 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


CH. R A I L W AY O D Y S S E Y : A T R I B U T E T O F F D I N

PROJECT

INSTRUCTOR

D AV I D J O H N S C OT T

Taking the scenic route to understanding FF DIN; typeface designed by Albert Jan Pool.

06—10

117

TYPOGRAPHY 02


2014—2018

WERK

118 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


06—10

CH. R A I L W AY O D Y S S E Y : A T R I B U T E T O F F D I N

PROJECT

119

INSTRUCTOR

D AV I D J O H N S C OT T

TYPOGRAPHY 02


2014—2018

WERK

120 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


06—10

CH. R A I L W AY O D Y S S E Y : A T R I B U T E T O F F D I N

PROJECT

121

INSTRUCTOR

D AV I D J O H N S C OT T

TYPOGRAPHY 02


2014—2018

WERK

122 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


06—10

CH. R A I L W AY O D Y S S E Y : A T R I B U T E T O F F D I N

PROJECT

123

INSTRUCTOR

D AV I D J O H N S C OT T

TYPOGRAPHY 02


2014—2018

WERK

124 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


2014—2018

WERK

128 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


07—10

CH. E V E N T B R I T E B R A N D I L L U S T R AT I O N S

PROJECT

129

D AV I D J O H N S C OT T

C R E AT I V E D I R E C T O R

PA I D C O N T R A C T

7 / 10


SADIE WILLIAMS

BY

Objective After the release of their vibrant rebrand in 2016, I had the opportunity to collaborate with Eventbrite’s in-house design team for the development of these “event attendees.” Through friendly colors and playful secondary graphics, Eventbrite’s rebrand successfully expressed the company’s four brand values: inviting, dynamic, radically simple, and trustworthy. Now it was time to add an element of delight to the product, through illustration. Research Eventbrite’s mission is “to bring people together through live experiences,” so the human element of what I developed would be essential. Since the company is a world-wide platform that hosts an enormous variety of events, the characters developed would have to be exciting, diverse and have to represent the brand values.

2014—2018

WERK

128

Process Instead of sticking to “realistic” proportions, the bodies you’ll see here have adjusted proportions and new rules to create a more inviting and playful personality. Tall people with small heads and long, swooping limbs bring the viewer’s attention to the character’s actions and what they’re wearing. This encourages the viewer to focus less on the individual and more on what they represent. When body shape and proportions were established, I was able to be divergent with body types and with what the characters were wearing. It was important to give them clothing that connoted a unique personality, but didn’t corner the attendee into only what type of event. This was especially important for costumed attendees. An attendee may be dressed as a superhero, but there needs to be the flexibility that allows her to be more than one super hero character, and that allows her to attend other events than Comic Con. Outcome The resulting product was a deep well of illustrative assets that the brand and marketing teams could pull from as more and more content was made. Much like paper dolls, the pieces of the illustrations can be swapped around. This way a non-illustrating designer can create the perfect composition for what they are trying to communicate.


07—10

CH. E V E N T B R I T E B R A N D I L L U S T R AT I O N S

PROJECT

129

D AV I D J O H N S C OT T

C R E AT I V E D I R E C T O R

PA I D C O N T R A C T

7 / 10


07—10

CH. E V E N T B R I T E B R A N D I L L U S T R AT I O N S

PROJECT

Threads

Exploring the expression of unique personalities through style

Illustration Sadie Williams

Client Eventbrite

131

D AV I D J O H N S C OT T

C R E AT I V E D I R E C T O R

PA I D C O N T R A C T


2014—2018

WERK

132 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


07—10

CH. E V E N T B R I T E B R A N D I L L U S T R AT I O N S

PROJECT

133

D AV I D J O H N S C OT T

C R E AT I V E D I R E C T O R

PA I D C O N T R A C T


2014—2018

WERK

134 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


07—10

CH. E V E N T B R I T E B R A N D I L L U S T R AT I O N S

PROJECT

135

D AV I D J O H N S C OT T

C R E AT I V E D I R E C T O R

PA I D C O N T R A C T


2014—2018

WERK

136 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


07—10

CH. E V E N T B R I T E B R A N D I L L U S T R AT I O N S

PROJECT

137

D AV I D J O H N S C OT T

C R E AT I V E D I R E C T O R

PA I D C O N T R A C T


2014—2018

WERK

138 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


07—10

CH. E V E N T B R I T E B R A N D I L L U S T R AT I O N S

PROJECT

139

D AV I D J O H N S C OT T

C R E AT I V E D I R E C T O R

PA I D C O N T R A C T


07—10

CH. E V E N T B R I T E B R A N D I L L U S T R AT I O N S

PROJECT

Bodies

Expanding the library of body positions and body types

Illustration Sadie Williams

Client Eventbrite

141

D AV I D J O H N S C OT T

C R E AT I V E D I R E C T O R

PA I D C O N T R A C T


2014—2018

WERK

144 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


07—10

CH. E V E N T B R I T E B R A N D I L L U S T R AT I O N S

PROJECT

145

D AV I D J O H N S C OT T

C R E AT I V E D I R E C T O R

PA I D C O N T R A C T


07—10

CH. E V E N T B R I T E B R A N D I L L U S T R AT I O N S

PROJECT

Costumes

Dressing Eventbrite’s attendees for whichever festivity they’re headed to Illustration Sadie Williams

Client Eventbrite

147

D AV I D J O H N S C OT T

C R E AT I V E D I R E C T O R

PA I D C O N T R A C T


2014—2018

WERK

148 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


07—10

CH. E V E N T B R I T E B R A N D I L L U S T R AT I O N S

PROJECT

149

D AV I D J O H N S C OT T

C R E AT I V E D I R E C T O R

PA I D C O N T R A C T


2014—2018

WERK

150 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


07—10

CH. E V E N T B R I T E B R A N D I L L U S T R AT I O N S

PROJECT

151

D AV I D J O H N S C OT T

C R E AT I V E D I R E C T O R

PA I D C O N T R A C T


2014—2018

WERK

152 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


07—10

CH. E V E N T B R I T E B R A N D I L L U S T R AT I O N S

PROJECT

153

D AV I D J O H N S C OT T

C R E AT I V E D I R E C T O R

PA I D C O N T R A C T


2014—2018

WERK

154 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


08—10

CH. WOW AIR CONCEPT REBRAND

PROJECT

155

INSTRUCTOR

T O M M C N U LT Y

BRANDING 02

8 / 10


SADIE WILLIAMS

BY

Objective Branding 2 is a course focused on the development and application of brand guidelines. In it, we had the option of rebranding either an airline or a taxi cab service. I decided to rebrand WOW Airlines. Research WOW Airlines is known for their wildly affordable flights to and from Reykjavik, where their headquarters is located. They are also known for their devastatingly bad customer service and amenities. What airline could possibly benefit from a rebrand more? Their unapologetic purple aircrafts certainly set them apart on the tarmac, but perhaps not in the way they hoped. This is one of the least likely airlines to deliver the “wow” factor.

2014—2018

WERK

154

Process The first step in creating a beautiful new brand is identifying the target market. Who values cheap flights from North America to Europe and is willing to sacrifice a little luxury for a lot of travel? The young and adventurous millennial, of course. Millennials are known for valuing experiences and relationships over the material, so this is exactly the positioning the new brand manual uses to define its character. It asks, “What makes a good travel partner?” and proceeds to describe WOWair’s three brand values: friendly, trustworthy, and exciting. These three values were the driver in defining the airline’s visual system. The logo was developed from thumbnail sketches and refined into a bold, energetic mark. The secondary graphics were developed next, to reflect the movement of the mark. A color palette was developed with seven cheerful hues all named for the exciting element of travel that inspired their inclusion. A typeface was chosen, and hierarchical rules were carefully outlined for its use. Finally, with foundational elements in place, applications including aircrafts, t-shirts, snacks and an app were developed. Finally, to bring the brand into the public, a ten-poster campaign called “Ten Reasons to Travel” was made, featuring whimsical photographs of millennials abroad, each poster listing a reason to travel such as “...to face your fears.” Outcome From the aircraft itself, to a pack of peanuts, from the second they receive their boarding pass to the moment of touchdown, the customer’s experience is woven together seamlessly by an array of cheerful paraphernalia all of which imply forward movement in bold strokes. The logomark is a whimsical impression of a paper plane, a symbol of our playful spirit and economical pricing. The color palette is a direct reflection of our company’s values and inspires energy and action. The secondary graphics imply the graceful, speedy liftoff of an aircraft.


PROJECT WOW AIR CONCEPT REBRAND

155

INSTRUCTOR

T O M M C N U LT Y

BRANDING 02

8 / 10


2014—2018

WERK

156 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


PROJECT WOW AIR CONCEPT REBRAND

157

INSTRUCTOR

T O M M C N U LT Y

BRANDING 02


2014—2018

WERK

158 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


PROJECT WOW AIR CONCEPT REBRAND

159

INSTRUCTOR

T O M M C N U LT Y

BRANDING 02


Positioning Personality Traits Visual Message Visual System

2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4

Logo & Wordmark Clear Space Rule Breaking Color Palette

2.5 3.0 3.1 3.2

Secondary Graphics Typography Typefaces Text Lockups

4.0 Applications 4.1 Business Paper 4.2 Customer Experience 4.3 Advertising

WERK

Brand Guidlines

2014—2018

BY

SADIE WILLIAMS

1.0 1.1 1.2 2.0

01


BRANDING 02


2014—2018

WERK

SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


BRANDING 02


2014—2018

WERK

166 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


PROJECT WOW AIR CONCEPT REBRAND

167

INSTRUCTOR

T O M M C N U LT Y

BRANDING 02


2014—2018

WERK

168 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


PROJECT WOW AIR CONCEPT REBRAND

169

BRANDING 02


2014—2018

WERK

170 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


09—10

CH. HANDMADE COLLAGES

PROJECT

171

INSTRUCTOR

DORIS HARRISON

GRAPHIC DESIGN 01

9 / 10


SADIE WILLIAMS

BY

172

2014—2018

WERK

Objective In Principles of Graphic Design we focus on the core elements of design, with a heavy focus on composition and what it communicates. Here we are challenged to create compositions from pieces of existing images. Research I found that interesting source material was almost equally as important as the composition itself, so I spent a great deal of time preparing by finding images that captured the texture, energy, and contributed to the aesthetic of the project. Process I came to find I was most drawn to earthy colors, organic textures, and interesting juxtapositions between the natural and the man-made. Most important was the human form, being deeply expressive and with seemingly infinite possible positions.


09—10

CH. HANDMADE COLLAGES

PROJECT

173

INSTRUCTOR

DORIS HARRISON

GRAPHIC DESIGN 01

9 / 10


2014—2018

WERK

174 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


09—10

CH. HANDMADE COLLAGES

PROJECT

175

INSTRUCTOR

DORIS HARRISON

GRAPHIC DESIGN 01


2014—2018

WERK

176 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


09—10

CH. HANDMADE COLLAGES

PROJECT

177

INSTRUCTOR

DORIS HARRISON

GRAPHIC DESIGN 01


2014—2018

WERK

178 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


09—10

CH. HANDMADE COLLAGES

PROJECT

179

INSTRUCTOR

DORIS HARRISON

GRAPHIC DESIGN 01


2014—2018

WERK

180 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


09—10

CH. HANDMADE COLLAGES

PROJECT

181

INSTRUCTOR

DORIS HARRISON

GRAPHIC DESIGN 01


2014—2018

WERK

182 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


09—10

CH. HANDMADE COLLAGES

PROJECT

183

INSTRUCTOR

DORIS HARRISON

GRAPHIC DESIGN 01


2014—2018

WERK

184 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


10—10

CH. B U I C K V E L I T E S P O N S O R E D C O L L A B O R AT I O N

PROJECT

185

INSTRUCTOR

ANTONIO BORJA & PHIL HAMLET T

SPONSORED

10 / 10


SADIE WILLIAMS

BY

Objective Working directly with General Motors executives, I had the opportunity to collaborate with the industrial design department to brand a concept car, subrand to Buick, called the “Velite.” GM representatives expressed concern for the disappearing awareness of the Buick brand as they rate lower in awareness with millennials than the Kia. They reached out to millennials to solve the problem. The industrial design department would produce five car designs for the year 2025 while I and my branding team would create an overarching “Velite” brand and subrands to represent each of the five cars. Research The first week of concepting was entirely for research on the millennial and their values. We conducted real interviews, held parties to gather interest, and collated data. We found that millennials largely value the environment, authenticity, connectivity, experiences, efficiency, and nostalgia. From this research we were able to create a persona that would help guide future decision making. “James Williams” is part of the creative elite. He is a 32-year-old PM at Airbnb. He enjoys nature photography, spending time with his family and dog, and likes trail running on the weekends. James has a detailed portfolio of traits that define him and his generation.

2014—2018

WERK

186

Process With a detailed persona established, the industrial designers were able to begin concepting cars. They were narrowed down to five vehicles that were diverse in their purpose and what they represented: One car was focused on nostalgia, authenticity and Americana. Another was focused on making adventure in the great outdoors more accessible. Another was focused on efficiency and connectivity, especially as it related to other forms of media. The fourth team focused on user experience and developed a subscription service for millennials who did not wish to own a car full-time. The final team focused on creative and flexible interiors; why face forward in a world where the car safely drives itself? The branding team focused on developing a brand promise first. From this was born a logo redesign, a color palette and a typeface choice. Lastly, we were able to break the brand down into subrands for each of the cars, introducing secondary graphics that highlighted each vehicles unique personality. Outcome With the guidance of GM’s executive’s feedback, we were able to develop a new logomark to retain the emblem’s strong recognizability among consumers, while opening the door to a younger persona that values simplicity and minimalism. The color palette is a direct reflection of the brand personality and of the persona’s values. The secondary graphics elegantly reflect the unique purpose of each of the car designs.


10—10

CH. B U I C K V E L I T E S P O N S O R E D C O L L A B O R AT I O N

PROJECT

187

INSTRUCTOR

ANTONIO BORJA & PHIL HAMLET T

SPONSORED

10 / 10


10—10

CH.

B U I C K V E L I T E S P O N S O R E D C O L L A B O R AT I O N

PROJECT

Velite Rebrand Team Lead Sadie Williams Branding Simon Tong & Zhenni Duan Instruction Phil Hamlett & Antonio Borja Client Buick — General Motors

189

INSTRUCTOR

ANTONIO BORJA & PHIL HAMLET T SPONSORED


BY

SADIE WILLIAMS 2014—2018

WERK

190

Mitchell Galick and Kevin Chen design and model the Velite Halcyon


10—10

CH. B U I C K V E L I T E S P O N S O R E D C O L L A B O R AT I O N

PROJECT

191

INSTRUCTOR

ANTONIO BORJA & PHIL HAMLET T

SPONSORED


2014—2018

WERK

192 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


10—10

CH. B U I C K V E L I T E S P O N S O R E D C O L L A B O R AT I O N

PROJECT

193

INSTRUCTOR

ANTONIO BORJA & PHIL HAMLET T

SPONSORED


2014—2018

WERK

194 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


10—10

CH. B U I C K V E L I T E S P O N S O R E D C O L L A B O R AT I O N

PROJECT

195

INSTRUCTOR

ANTONIO BORJA & PHIL HAMLET T

SPONSORED


2014—2018

WERK

196 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


10—10

CH. B U I C K V E L I T E S P O N S O R E D C O L L A B O R AT I O N

PROJECT

197

INSTRUCTOR

ANTONIO BORJA & PHIL HAMLET T

SPONSORED


2014—2018

WERK


2014—2018

SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


10—10

CH. B U I C K V E L I T E S P O N S O R E D C O L L A B O R AT I O N

PROJECT


BY

SADIE WILLIAMS 2014—2018

WERK

202

Vi, the artificial intelligence companion to the Velite fleet.


10—10

CH. B U I C K V E L I T E S P O N S O R E D C O L L A B O R AT I O N

PROJECT

33

INSTRUCTOR

ANTONIO BORJA & PHIL HAMLET T

SPONSORED


2014—2018

WERK

204 SADIE WILLIAMS

BY


10—10

CH.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Acknowledgments Pa For being my greatest advocate as I strove for higher education Andrew For supporting and loving me every second of every day Family For helping me remember the privilege and value of an education, and for helping me reach my full potential. Any future professional success I have will be largely due to these last few years of support and love from you all. I love you all most. Instructors Mary Scott, Phil Hamlett, David Scott, Tom McNulty, Shadi KashefiZadeh, Dolly Johnson, Antonio Borja, John Nettleton, Paul Daddino, Amy Broadbent, Ariel Grey, and Wioleta Kaminska:

205

Thank you for your patience, encouraging words, extra time, faith in my work, and willingness to share your experience. You are inspiring people to learn from.

INSTRUCTOR

— —


Student Sadie Williams 408 691 1439 sadie.wills@gmail.com sadiewills.com School Academy of Art University School of Graphic Design Instructor Mary Scott, Chair Emerita Bindery Blurb Cover Substrate Image wrap

WERK

Text Substrate Proline uncoated #100 Typefaces Sporting Grotesque Basis Grotesque Software Adobe InDesign // Adobe Illustrator // Photoshop 2014—2018

BY

SADIE WILLIAMS

Colophon

© 2018 All rights reserved.


10—10

CH. C O LO P H O N

207

INSTRUCTOR


BY

SADIE WILLIAMS 2014—2018

WERK

210

Selected Works of Sadie Williams 2014 - 2018 graphic designer

sadiewills.com

sadie.wills@gmail.com 1 408 691 1439

Werk  

Selected works of Sadie Williams 2014-2018

Werk  

Selected works of Sadie Williams 2014-2018

Advertisement