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GOVERNANCE AND URBAN MANAGMENT The City’s urban management function has generated consternation over the years. The function has shifted around in the institution, most recently from Development Planning into its own unit, Citizen Relationship and Urban Management (CRUM), located in the City Manager’s office. Despite the prioritisation of urban management issues at the CoJ, the institution has largely failed to deliver good urban management across Johannesburg. The explanation for this is not clear, but numerous interventions have been launched to try and improve urban management. Certainly, in the inner city the discourse has swung from developing policies for managing the informal sector, to implementing business improvement districts (BIDs), to establishing task forces. However, none of these approaches has had the required outcomes. The relationship between the Corridors and urban management are fairly clear – a policy that is built on more residents living, working and playing in shared space should guarantee good urban management. For property developers, good urban management is critical. The TOD initiative provides an important opportunity to refine urban management methods and to think through approaches that are not limited to a policing function. The COF are a significant statement by the City about the importance of the public realm and public space, supporting the concept of ‘the public city’ by acknowledging the value of functional public space and amenities.21 Unlike the growing trend in private sector developments of masterplanned mega-developments in Johannesburg, the Corridors project is focused on integration, permeability between public and private spaces, and sustainable design. This is a key strength of the project and it has the potential to re-orientate the way in which the City functions as the custodian of urban management. The urban management function is central in three ways: • As an important aspect of creating liveable Corridors; • As an ongoing source of irritation and complaint by private developers and city residents; and • Because city residents deserve good urban management. Winkler, writing on Hillbrow, argues against the City’s regeneration approach and in favour of better management. She contends: “the local state might consider directing its regeneration efforts

to the maintenance of public infrastructure and the provision of public services, since arguably all ‘global’ cities require port-of-entry neighbourhoods” (Winkler 2013: 322). This sentiment applies to many neighbourhoods in Johannesburg where there is frustration at the inability of the City to get ‘the basics right’. There are a number of important areas of intervention in urban management in the City, including: • Approaches to informal trading and special trading zones around transit centres;22 • Policies and plans of municipal-owned entities (MOEs) such as Pikitup, Joburg Water, City Parks and Johannesburg Roads Agency (JRA); and • Arrangements with the private sector and communities to partner in urban management in the development areas. The urban management methodology in the City is an area-based management framework (ABMF), which is reflective of the broader institutional structure. It is defined as follows: “The ABMF is the governance tool through which CRUM Region E will support management and maintenance of public assets and ensure safe quality service provision in the region” (CoJ 2016b: 1). An area-based management

21 M  artin Murray uses the term “public city”, although not in reference to the Corridors (Murray 2015: 506).

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Transit corridors & the private sector

22 It was mentioned during the study that managed informal trading would be offered as part of any viable economic activity on the Corridors.

Transit corridors & the private sector

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Transit Corridors and the Private Sector: Incentives, Regulations and the Property Market  
Transit Corridors and the Private Sector: Incentives, Regulations and the Property Market  

Part of the Spatial Transformation through Transit-Oriented Development in Johannesburg research series. Published by the South African Rese...