Page 1

d

el Don

/SANTA ANA COLLEGE / eldononline.org

THE POLL: Will the current tuition changes affect you? eldononline.org

NOVEMBER 22, 2010 / Vol. 88 / No.5

Fall Into Fashion

David Dayfallah / el Don

STYLE / 14 Getting the hottest look for the season can be affordable

NEWS/TUITION INCREASE/ 3 • SPORTS/AKEELIE RETURNS/ 7 • VIEWS/GIVING BACK/ 11


el Don /SANTA ANA COLLEGE • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2010/eldononline.org

el Don /SANTA ANA COLLEGE • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2010/eldononline.org

The Editor’s Desk

2

This year in the  newsroom, not only  did we change our  format, but for the  fi rst time since its  inception, el Don  has a new, fresh  staff  with only a few  returning members.  We struggled to cram about a year of journalism training into one summer in order to be  triumphant. What we thought would be a  handicap, became a success. This year el Don  won 25 Gold Circle Awards from the Columbia  Scholastic Press Association, its 14th National  Newspaper Pacemaker, considered the  Pulitzer Prize in college journalism, and Best  of Show from the Associated Collegiate Press.  We are considered the nation’s top community  college newspaper and for good reason. If it  sounds like we’re bragging, that is because we  have earned it. / Felipa Penaloza / Views Editor

d

SANTA ANA COLLEGE

Editor in Chief Blanca Valdivia eldoneditor@sac.edu Adviser Prof. C.W. Little Jr. little_charles@sac.edu Business Manager Allene Symons symons_allene@sac.edu

News Editor Mike Organistko eldonnews@sac.edu Sports Editor Dan Espinosa eldonsports@sac.edu Style Editors Ana Paz Jessica Ruelas Jerry Rodriguez style_eldon@sac.edu Views Editor Felipa Penaloza eldonviews@sac.edu Photo Editor Daniel Hubert dan@danhubert.com Web Editor Josephine Gan ocwebgal@yahoo.com

How to contact us

el Don encourages the expression of all views. Letters should  be no longer than 150 words, signed and include a contact  phone number, major and e-mailed to eldonviews@sac.edu or  mailed to SAC el Don, 17th at Bristol St., Santa Ana, CA 92706.  el Don reserves the right to refuse advertising and does not  necessarily subscribe to the views of the advertisers. For advertising rates and information, contact Allene Symons: (714)  564-5617, fax (714) 564-0821 or e-mail eldonbusiness@sac.edu

SPORTS 7

d

INSIDE

DOns DOminate / Defensive lineman Joseph Taufete’e helps take down Orange Coast’s David Doll. / Blanca Valdivia / el Don

CONTROVERSIAL DRINK NEWS 5 / The Federal Drug Administration warned four beverage companies,  including  the  makers  of  the  stimulant-spiked  Four  Loko, that their products pose a danger to public health. As a result,  Phusion Products are removing caff eine from its brew.

12 THINGS TO KNOW AT 22 VIEWS 12 / As we go through life we face experiences that make  us  the  people  we  are  today.  When  we  refl ect  on  the  choices  we  have made, there are certain teachings we have learned that we  wish we would have known sooner.

VEGAN THANKSGIVING STYLE 13 / Instead  of  going  for  a  calorie-busting,  traditional  deep-fried turkey meal with the equally waist-busting trimmings,  fi nd  out  how  you  can  make  an  alternative,  healthy,  fi lling  and  guilt-free holiday dinner. Start with our recipe guide.  


el Don /SANTA ANA COLLEGE • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2010/eldononline.org

NEWS

distinguished faculty

WRIGHT RECOUNTS SECRET SERVICE DAYS

David DeRidder / el Don

against the machine / Students, faculty and staff turned out at University of California, Berkeley’s Sproul Plaza Wednesday to protest tuition fee increases by the UC Board of Regents. / Doug Oakley / MCT

REGENTS APPROVE 8 PERCENT HIKE

TUITION RISES AGAIN

O

By FELIPA PENALOZA / el Don

AROUND CAMPUS

One-of-a-kind pieces for sale

Mike Organistko / el Don

Students, faculty and alumni from the art department will sell their work at the Annual Holiday Sale in the Main Gallery from Nov. 30 through Dec. 2. “It’s a good way for students to get a feel of what it’s like to be a real working artist,” said fine arts major Dalia Tanner. Pieces will include drawings, paintings, photos, sculptures, crafts, clothes, jewelry, glass and ceramics. Artists must bring their work to the gallery Nov. 29. / Mike Organistko

nly a few months after raising fees by more than 30 percent, California’s higher education officials plan to increase tuition again because of lack of funding. “It’s going to make it tougher to afford the UCs and CSUs,” said Peter Hardash, vice chancellor of business operations and fiscal services. “It will end up turning away a good number of students.” The continuous rise in tuition makes it hard for students to take the classes they need to finish college or obtain a certificate and begin a career.

“I want to finish school already, but because it’s so expensive it kind of puts me in a predicament,” said communications major Charissa Fontillas, who plans to attend Cal State University, Fullerton in the fall. “If you want to save money, you take less classes, but it’ll take you longer.” About 300 people protested Wednesday in San Francisco, where the UC Board of Regents met to discuss the fee hikes. The protest turned

violent and led to the arrest of 13 people, 10 of whom are UC students. For undergraduate students attending a CSU, winter/spring 2011 tuition will increase 5 percent, or $105 per semester, and for the 201112 school year tuition will increase another $444 per year. Undergraduate fees at the UCs will rise 8 percent to $11,124 annually next year. Because of increasing university costs, “we will see more people

wanting to get into the community colleges,” said Vice President of Academic Affairs Norman Fujimoto. About $121.5 million will be raised in revenue for CSUs, to ensure students have sufficient class offerings and services. The UC fee hikes are expected to produce about $180 million in annual revenue, with about $64 million of that to be used for financial aid. “I don’t qualify for financial aid,” said Lyana Guzman, human services major. “But I have two jobs and I’m going to school full time, so we’ll see.” She plans to transfer to CSUF. The number of full-time equivalent students enrolled determines the funding an institution receives. An FTES is a student who takes 12 units or more a semester. “We get a set amount per FTES. The state figures out how much we get, then figure out the tuition, and then they figure out the difference and keep that,” Fujimoto said. “The college gets nothing from tuition.”

el Don /SANTA ANA COLLEGE • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2010/eldononline.org

A Secret Service agent must know the features of the presidential limousine, how to respond when an object is thrown at the head of state and how to move the him safely to another location — and all this without the protection of a bulletproof vest. Former agent and current chair of the SAC criminal justice department George Wright has been trained for this. “I’ve been in or around law enforcement for half of a century,” Wright said. He received the Distinguished Faculty Award on Nov 16. / Mike Organistko Full story at eldononline.org

3


el Don /SANTA ANA COLLEGE • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2010/eldononline.org

NEWS

COMMUNITY PROFILE

foundation offers hope

Steve ‘Turkey’ Guzman’s personal struggle with MS spurred him to start a non-profit that aids awareness of the disease By Ana Paz / el Don

S OMETHING TO S MILE A BOUT

FREE DENTAL

4

West Cost University Dental Hygiene Clinic

Disneyland

WC U

S ANAHEIM BLVD

1477 S. Manchester Ave Anaheim, CA 92802 Open Monday - Friday

S HARBOR BLVD

el Don /SANTA ANA COLLEGE • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2010/eldononline.org

Free Dental Hygiene Care is Available to Orange County Residents at West Coast University in Anaheim

HYGIENE SERVICES

Dental hygiene care is provided under the supervision of licensed dentists and registered dental hygienists. Students working toward their Bachelor’s Degree in Dental Hygiene will deliver patient services such as: TEETH CLEANING DIGITAL AND TRADITIONAL X-RAYS CARE OF PARTIAL AND FULL DENTURES APPLICATION OF SEALANTS ORAL HYGIENE EDUCATION, INSTRUCTION AND MORE!

Call today for an appointment: 877-928-2546

D I S N E Y WAY W K AT E L L A AV E

Educational partners for life

Learn more about the clinic online: www.westcoastuniversity.edu/WCUClinic

He has a smile on his face before his first cup of coffee. His cell phone is constantly blowing up with text messages and calls. The number of friends on his Facebook page keeps rising, and he is always the first to RSVP. Steve ‘Turkey’ Guzman exerts a positive, calm and relaxed energy for a man who is always busy, involved in his community, co-founder of an independent production company and battling with multiple sclerosis. “Being diagnosed with MS in 2005 really opened my eyes and made me realize I can make a difference and take action in my life, “ said Guzman, who founded Turkey and Friends. The organization was founded to raise funds and awareness about multiple sclerosis, a neurological disease that attacks the central nervous system. Since then it has helped many worthy causes. TNF has participated in events to benefit the Children’s Hospital of Orange County, the American Cancer Society, Light the Night Walk, Relay for Life and the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. Fifteen members have now grown to over 100, who volunteer at different events. Guzman even discovered a way to have fun, get involved, and do something great for his community, while enjoying the company of friends and family. Their benefits range from a simple car wash, bake sale or garage sale to larger events like music concerts, art shows, fashion shows and film festivals. Every member of TNF has a pas-

Being diagnosed with MS in 2005 really opened my eyes and made me realize I can make a difference and take action in my life. Steve Guzman -Founder Turkey and Friends

sion for the arts. “We figured it would be a great way to spread our love for the arts and raise money for great charities while doing so,” Guzman said. Many businesses across Orange County have also noticed Guzman’s activism and his efforts for the community. TNF has worked with big companies such as Obey, Banana Republic, Paul Frank, Hurley, Stussy, Carlton Hair and Pinkberry. TNF recently opened its first office in the city of Huntington Beach and has filed articles of incorporation as a non-profit in the state of California. It’s hard to believe that at one point Steve Guzman’s disease made him blind, numb on his left side, unable to taste food and maintain his balance. Now this man stands straight with a broad smile on his face. He savors every moment with friends and family and takes great pride in seeing how the work he’s done has helped thousands.


el Don /SANTA ANA COLLEGE • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2010/eldononline.org

NEWS

FDA forces formula change Alcoholic energy drinks remove caffeine By Cervante Pope / el Don

The company that brews Four Loko, an alcoholic beverage popular with college students, buckled under regulatory pressure and will remove caffeine and two other ingredients from its product. Facing impending scrutiny from the Federal Drug Administration, Illinoisbased Phusion Projects will pull the potent combination of alcohol and energy drink off the shelves. The company decided this, according to a statement released on its website, “after trying — unsuccessfully — to navigate a difficult and politicallycharged regulatory environment at both the state and federal levels.” Amid reports that the drink has sickened young people, and has been blamed for at least one death, government regulators warned Phusion and three other companies, including the makers of Joose and Moonshot, that

adding caffeine is an unsafe food additive when combined with malt liquor. Since then, some college campuses and four states, including Utah, Washington, Oklahoma and Michigan have banned the sale of the controversial brew. New York’s beer distributors will stop delivering the stimulant-laced liquor by Dec. 10. It is however, still legal in California. Sold in colorful cans with graffiti-like artwork, and in different flavors such as watermelon, blue raspberry and fruit punch, the 23.5-ounce Four Loko cans contain about 12 percent alcohol and a cup of coffee’s worth of caffeine. Consuming a whole can is equal to drinking four regular beers. Doctors and other health workers have said the mixture is dangerous because the stimulants mask the effects of alcohol. “People believe that the combination of caffeine and alcohol balance each other out, but they don’t,” said Katherine Bowden, health center RN. The FDA officials threatened to seize the drinks from store shelves if the companies did not remove the stimulants, and reportedly intended to ask a judge to halt the sale of a beverage with “an illegal substance.” The warning, according to an official letter on the FDA website, added that drinking the mix “could lead to hazardous and lifethreatening situations.” Some of Four Loko’s street nicknames include “liquid cocaine” and “blackout in a can” Santa Ana College student Dulce Garcia says it’s about time the dangerous drinks are banned. “Those drinks are gross and have way too much alcohol and energy mixed in it.” But 22-year-old Luis Mascareno disagrees. Drinking a tall can of Loko makes him feel warm, and he is able to sustain what he calls a good buzz for the entire evening. “Besides, it’s not like I can’t mix vodka and Red Bull, which I think is a more potent drunk,” Mascareno said. The Federal Trade Commission also warned the companies that their tactics might violate the law, because the drink’s packaging and its sweet, fruity flavors are targeted toward minors.

el Don /SANTA ANA COLLEGE • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2010/eldononline.org

BANNED / The makers of the caffeine-laced malt liquor Four Loko has promised to remove several ingredients that act as a stimulant. / David DeRidder / el Don

5


el Don /SANTA ANA COLLEGE • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2010/eldononline.org

NEWS

courts OK IN-STATE TUITION FOR ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS

Paying lower tuition fees By Dulce Castellanos / el Don

el Don /SANTA ANA COLLEGE • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2010/eldononline.org

dream / Moises Rivera protests at the office 10999_4_125x7:Layout 1 9/2/10 9:34 of AM Sen. Diane Feinstein. / Glenn Koenig / MCT

6

After recent hikes in the cost of a college education, some students are getting a break. Illegal immigrants and returning students to the state of California may continue to pay the in-state tuition rate at state colleges and universities rather than the higher out-of state tuition. The California Supreme Court ruling Nov. 15 upheld the law known as AB 540, which stipulates that a student must attend a California high school for at least three years and graduate in order to be exempt from paying non-resident fees. Benefitting not only undocumented students, it also helps those who left California and want to return to Page 1 study at a state college or university.

Complete Your Bachelor’s Degree with APU

One of the more conservative members of the state Supreme Court, Justice Ming W. Chin, said the law does not conflict with the current federal prohibition on giving illegal immigrants educational benefits based on residency. A group against illegal immigration had challenged the law, claiming it conflicted with the federal prohibition and failed to benefit U.S. citizens from other states. “They’re using money as a barrier to keep those students from getting an education,” said Brenda Frias, a first year psychology student from Santa Ana College. Compared with the cost for a resident, annual non-resident tuition and fees cost about $22,000 more at a UC and around $11,000 more at a Cal State. At a community college

nonresidents pay $180 more per unit. “UCs and Cal States are looking for more foreign and out-of-state fees,” said Norman Fujimoto, vice president of academic affairs. “They are offsetting from the outside.” California is one of 10 states to allow illegal immigrants to pay lower tuition fees. Currently 25,000 illegal immigrants pay in-state tuition in California, but are not eligible to receive government financial aid. “Our role at RSCCD is to support all of our students in assisting them to reach their higher educational goals,” said Peter Hardash, vice chancellor of business operations and fiscal services at SAC. “AB 540 is the law in California. I don’t understand how anyone would oppose the law and the success of our students.”

Earn your degree in education in 12–18 months at APU.

Choose from accredited degrees online or on campus. LIBERAL STUDIES

LEADERSHIP

The B.A. in Human Development (HDEV) can prepare you for a career in education. In less than two years, you could be on your way to teaching in your own classroom.

The versatile B.S. in Organizational Leadership (BSOL) makes it easy to take the next step in your career. You’ll learn relevant business strategies that can empower you to become an effective leader.

With more than 36 credential and master’s degree opportunities, we’re confident we have a program for you. APU offers: • Convenient classes at 8 Southern California locations and online. • Programs in teaching, counseling, physical education, and administration.

ABOUT THE PROGRAMS

• NCATE-accredited programs recognized by all 50 states and internationally.

• Complete your degree in less than two years. • Choose to earn your degree online, or attend class one night a week at a location near you. • Applicants for the HDEV program must be at least 22 years old; BSOL program applicants must be at least 25.

• Resources that make transferring to APU a seamless process.

Find out about the next HDEV or BSOL program start date. Contact us today!

Classes start five times throughout the year. Contact us today!

-CALL

AZUSA MURRIETA

|

|

HIGH DESERT

ORANGE COUNTY

|

|

INLAND EMPIRE

SAN DIEGO

(800) 825-5278

Call Click Email

(626) 815-5301 www.apu.edu/explore/caps aps@apu.edu

CLICK EMAIL

|

|

AZUSA

LOS ANGELES

VENTURA COUNTY

|

ONLINE

10999

www.apu.edu/explore/education graduatecenter@apu.edu

|

HIGH DESERT

ORANGE COUNTY

|

|

INLAND EMPIRE

SAN DIEGO

|

|

LOS ANGELES

VENTURA COUNTY

| |

MURRIETA ONLINE 11209


el Don /SANTA ANA COLLEGE • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2010/eldononline.org

SPORTS

women’s SOCCER

THE DONS PLAY A COMEBACK GAME

Daniel Hubert / el Don

Women’s BASKETBALL

ALVAREZ LEADS SAC TO home win

Daniel Hubert / el Don

Led by a strong defense in the last minutes, the Dons Women’s Basketball team won their home opener 73-67 against San Diego City College on Nov. 12. Anna Nguyen and Becky Alvarez led the offense with Nguyen converting five of eight free throws. Alvarez scored on six of 11 attempts, outshooting the closest San Diego player, 54 percent to 50 percent. The Dons women play in the SAC/OCC Tournament this weekend. / Dan Espinosa

DEAD STOP / Runningback Akeelie Mustafa (23) bolts past Pirates’ defensive back Bryan Pali as offensive lineman Samuel Fruean (71) lowers his shoulder for the block. Mustafa returned after a two game absence and led the Dons (8-2) to the victory. / Blanca Valdivia / el Don

RUNNINGBACK piles up 337 TOTAL YARDS IN 41-20 win over OCC

akeelie runs wild

A

By Tim Randall / el Don

fter missing the last two games, runningback Akeelie Mustafa blazed past Orange Coast College leading the visiting Dons to a 41-20 victory in their last game of the season Nov. 13. Mustafa played like a man with something to prove. The freshman from Cypress High School had two touchdowns with 337 total yards. “He had 18 touches for 330 yards or something like that. He’s a pretty electric kid, I mean when you get him the ball,” Head Coach Geoff Jones said. The Dons started off slow, not scoring until early in the second quarter when Mustafa returned a 74-yard kick for a touchdown. Quarterback Andrew McDonald also had a great game, rushing for one touchdown and passing for four. He completed 68 percent of his passes for a total of 329 yards. “The last three quarters were great,”

said Jones. “We had some costly turnovers in the first, then Mustafa ran his kickoff return for a touchdown and we were off from there.” With 6:55 left in the second quarter McDonald scored on a 4-yard run to tie the game. There were two instances in the game where the Dons made a touchdown with less than a minute left on

the clock. The game was tied 13-13 with 13 seconds left in the first half when McDonald completed an 8-yard pass to Buddy Guastella. The Dons would not score again until the end of the third quarter when McDonald completed a 70yard pass to Mustafa. The runningback returned at the right time. He has had 1,558 total yards this year and 12 touchdowns. Although this was the best of Jones’ career at Santa Ana College with a record of 8-2, he feels it could have been better. There were a lot of very good players that didn’t get to play because of injuries, Jones said. With their victory, the Dons captured the inaugural Victory Flag, which commemorates the 60th meeting between the two schools, and cut OCC’s series lead to 30-29-1.

el Don /SANTA ANA COLLEGE • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2010/eldononline.org

Defender Marisol Pedroza scored a penalty kick in the 54th minute, leading Santa Ana College past Fullerton 1-0 in the final game of the season, an Orange Empire Conference match. Dons defensive forward Gabriella Rivera was injured as both teams played recklessly, leading to several yellow cards being issued. “We played aggressive. I guess you could say too aggressive because it got to a point where it shouldn’t have,” goalie Yvette Isais said. Isais and Pedroza struggled but suceeded to block the Hornets’ final shot in the 90th minute creating the most intense play of the game. / Mike Organistko

7


el Don /SANTA ANA COLLEGE • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2010/eldononline.org

Sophomore Midfi elder RONALD YBARRA leads the Dons to 17th conference title

FAMILY GUY A

el Don /SANTA ANA COLLEGE • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2010/eldononline.org

STORy By Tim RAnDAll / PHOTO By DAViD DERiDDER

8

fter stretching, the sophomore midfielder and a teammate kick around a new black and white ball. Back and forth they pass it, getting lost in preparation for a scrimmage. As Ronald Ybarra steps onto the playing field he shines among his teammates, his brothers. “Without him, we’re half of a team,” said Head Soccer Coach Jose Vasquez. “The kid works hard on the field. He’s a true leader. He’s our motor on our team. Without him I don’t think we function the same.” Ybarra led the Dons to their 17th consecutive Orange Coast Conference title. He was second in goals scored and led the conference in assists. Last year Ybarra had no goals and only one assist. He has scored 19 goals and made 15 assists this season. This improvement is the product of hard work. “The guy was just focused and dedicated, he got stronger, he got faster,” said Vasquez. “And a whole year of experience last year really helped out.” Ybarra was only 6 years old when his mother Raquel introduced him to the game that would one day become his passion, and change his life.

If he isn’t studying, playing soccer, or working, chances are he’s spending time with his family. “Family always comes first for me. I would do anything for them, and I am sure that they would do anything for me,” said Ybarra. “Family is the most important thing.” Although sports are important, Ybarra places more importance on academics. “He’s a great person, and a good student as well,” Vasquez said. “And the guy keeps up his grades, which is really impressive.” Ybarra is an inspiration to his teammates. “The way he concentrates before a game, and how he works hard every day makes me want to do the same,” said midfielder Orlando Alcaraz. He looks up to Vasquez as more than a coach. He is Ybarra’s role model. “Vasquez taught me so many things,” Ybarra said. “He taught me how to be a better person and soccer-wise, he has just developed me.” Ybarra is being recruited by several four-year universities, including UCLA and Cal State Dominguez Hills. While he dreams of playing soccer professionally, his goal in life is to be the best person, son and brother to his family.


el Don /SANTA ANA COLLEGE • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2010/eldononline.org

SPORTS

9


el Don /SANTA ANA COLLEGE • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2010/eldononline.org

SPORTS

el Don /SANTA ANA COLLEGE • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2010/eldononline.org

Defending California State Champions Dons struggle at the end of the season, but coach sees opportunity for individual success

10

HAMMER TIME / SAC wrestler Kyle Chene won the first points of the match over Palomar College’s Jacob Dunning. / Courtesy of Jason Kehler

Young team struggles

“We’re taking some hits this year,” said Silva. “We’ve got some young guys on the team, true t has been a dismal season for the 2009 freshman that we weren’t expecting to be put State Wrestling Champion Dons, who in the lineup this year.” finished the regular season with a 5-6 Despite the rough season, he says that sevrecord. Last year’s team had a perfect eral of his wrestlers have a chance of finishing season, not losing a single meet, and the season strong at regionals and winning the state championship for both the possibly qualify for the state championships team and dual formats. as individuals. Although the Dons got off to a good start Silva said sophomore Jason Arreola at 133 this season by winning four of their first five pounds and freshman Kyle Chene at 141 meets in a dominant fashion, they were not pounds, who are ranked No.1 and No. 2 in the able to maintain that momentum, losing six of state, respectively, and freshman Aaron Lopez their last eight meets. at 165 have been major assets. “We are struggling, but we are making gains “I feel good about regionals,” said heavyby leaps and bounds,” said Head Coach Vince weight freshman Barry Gee. “I feel like we’re Silva. He thinks the team’s struggles are due in definitely going to place most of our team if part to the lack of returning players, and the not all of it.” fact that the team is made up mostly of inexThe Dons will be hosting the South State perienced freshmen. Regional Championships Dec. 4.

By TIM RANDALL / el Don

I

DONS WRESTLING

By the numbers

1

State ranking for SAC’s Jason Arreola in the 133 pounds weight class

2

State ranking for SAC’s Kyle Chene in the 141 pounds weight class

9

State ranking for Dons


el Don /SANTA ANA COLLEGE • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2010/eldononline.org

VIEWS

CAMPUS BULLIES

I WAS AMBUSHED BY TREE HUGGERS

Danny Morales / el Don

GIVE A LITTLE LOVE STAFF EDITORIAL

Take a look around and you may be surprised by all you have and all that you can contribute.

Bustling from school, work, the occasional party, dinner or to family outings to home leaves no room for us to stop and really interact with those around us. Our lives are spent travelling back and forth to these places and we rush around so much that the rest of the world becomes lost in a colorful, blurry background. As we enter the holiday season, there is a donation center or some sort of drive everywhere we look that puts us in the mood to give back. But in times like these, it is not easy. When we spend most days scraping change out of the couch to buy lunch, carving out a little extra for charity seems counterintuitive. Maybe, when money is hard to come by and generosity seems scarce, our problem is that we do not understand what we have. Whether we have just enough to get by or an abundance of wealth, we have something and are richer for sharing it. Every action we make gives us the power to make a difference. Time is worth sharing, whether volunteering

at a food shelter or helping wash the dishes at home. Spend an hour with a friend who needs to vent about life, or an extra ten seconds to hold the door open for someone. If time cannot be spared, we can still give courtesy, patience and even attention to the people around us. Even if in a hurry to get somewhere always remember the pleases and thank yous we were taught as children, and that a simple smile or joke can improve anyone’s day. We are humans, capable of kindness, humor and gratitude and we need to share this humanity. We usually wait until Thanksgiving to appreciate all that we have, but we always have something to give. Don’t just wait until the third week of November to be considerate — do it all year long. Instead of spending the holidays devouring food and pitying life because the slumping economy has limited job opportunities and education costs more than a house, we can use that time to focus on what we do have and how we can pay it forward.

Greenpeace is a non-profit organization whose stated purpose is to save the planet from environmental degradation. Though it’s a great cause to fight for, the way Greenpeace representatives show their passion is annoying. On campus this past week, Greenpeace reps saw SAC students as their prey. Swooping in with the intent to feast on our environmental ignorance, Greenpeace proceeded to display examples of the torment being inflicted on the world, insisting that our monthly contributions would put a stop to this calamity. In fact one Greenpeace rep refused to let me pass unless I made a donation. Excuse me, but that’s harassment. Their used-car salesman approach to saving the planet is the wrong way to get people to care. After some research, I learned that it isn’t commission on donations that motivates these tree huggers. They make about $12 an hour, so incentive lies deeper than those greenbacks. Their love for the Earth may by the reason they’re in this business, but the problem lies with the way they’re trained. Instead of being the Billy Mays of the planet’s salvation and shouting about how we must change our ways, they should take a more laid-back approach. Greenpeace will gain more supporters with empathy than it will obnoxious sales pitches. If we care about the Earth, all of us can initiate change through simple, thoughtful acts. Recycling and not littering are just a couple of things everyday people can do without joining the Greenpeace cult. / Cervante Pope

el Don /SANTA ANA COLLEGE • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2010/eldononline.org

Laurie McAdam / MCT

11


el Don /SANTA ANA COLLEGE • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2010/eldononline.org

VIEWS

THE 12 TO KNOW BY 22

H

ere is a list of the top things I’ve learned in my 22 years. They may not be as sophisticated and in depth as I would like to think, but I still have more heartaches, embarrassing moments, laughs and tears to experience. I know my 22 years of wisdom can help you everyday. BY ANA PAZ / el Don

“If it ain’t broke don’t...” Lets face it. When things are good, we want them better. So I say, if it ain’t broke don’t fix it. Enjoy it! Until its broken and/or one of you isn’t happy. But if its good, it will get better on its own. Don’t rush or force anything.

el Don /SANTA ANA COLLEGE • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2010/eldononline.org

“Keep it real.”

12

Be real to yourself, like having to admit you were wrong. People make mistakes get over it. Don’t make excuses for yourself or others.

“Focus on your future.” It’s easy to get caught up on the party happening this weekend and forget all about applying to a four-year or studying for the exam that will determine your grade in class. Plan ahead and have a Plan C for your Plan B.

“Befriend strangers.” Some of the most interesting people I’ve met have been strangers next to me at Starbucks. You never know how cool or how creepy the guy next to you might be.

“You may think you’re getting your point across by rolling your eyes. YOU’RE NOT.” If someone asks “What’s wrong?” do not reply with “nothing” when you’re upset. Say what’s on your mind. It’s a lot easier to speak up than give yourself an ulcer

“Assuming makes an ASS out of U and ME.” Teachers say all the time and it sounds cliché, “If you have any questions, just ask.” Don’t worry about sounding stupid. Don’t assume. Ask. Find out.

“Find someone who loves you, not someone to love.”

“Don’t bite off more than you can chew.”

My ex’s mom told me this when her two-timing son did me wrong. What it comes down to is to love yourself and appreciate those who are willing to go above and beyond for you.

Being a jack of all trades is great, but doing many things at once limits the effort you put into each thing. So take your time and put forth 100 percent into everything.

“Hair is the best temporary but significant change you can make to feel better instantly.” A perfect set of bangs can make someone feel like Kim Kardashian. Although looks aren’t everything, it’s about the way you feel. “Pick your battles.” There are times where you’re going to have to count to 10, bite your tongue, and tap your third eye 21 times and let go. Even if you’re down on the scoreboard, it’s not about winning. “Don’t take other peoples differences as faults.” Just because they don’t agree with you doesn’t make them wrong. Hoping we are all adults by now, we have to keep in mind other people’s social structure. Be open-minded and step out of your shoes.

Enjoy your family. It’s those that tolerate your horrible singing and call you out when “you look fat in that dress” that will forever be there for you.


el Don /SANTA ANA COLLEGE • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2010/eldononline.org

STYLE

A vegan holiday dinner

T

hanksgiving is right around the corner and the traditional turkey dinner is what the majority of us will enjoy that day. But for those of us who care too much for animals to consume one, what options do we have? This three-course meal will be a delicious alternative to your run of the mill holiday feast. By cervante pope / el Don

Taste just like turkey / When you have the right ingredients, there is no way that tofurkey can end up on your “never again” list. / Charles Bertram / MCT

Ingredients: 5-12 ounce blocks extra firm tofu 1/3 cup chopped sage, rosemary and basil mixed 2 1/2 teaspoons vegan poultry seasoning 1 tablespoon vegetable stock powder Salt and pepper to taste For marinade, combine: 1/3 cup red wine 1/4 cup balsamic vinegar 1 teaspoon mustard 1 tablespoon of vegetable stock powder mixed in with a few teaspoons of hot water with salt and pepper to taste 1/4 chopped herbs used in tofurkey Directions: 1. Blend tofu. Then mix in a large bowl with herb mixture, seasoning, stock powder, salt and pepper. 2. Line a medium-size colander with a dish towel and place blended tofu inside. Place another dish towel on top and set a heavy weight on it to drain tofu for at least 2 hours. 3. Scoop out some of the tofu and place stuffing in the cavity you just created. Put the tofu you scooped out back in the colander. Set the weight on again and press firmly. 4. Flip the tofurkey onto an oiled cookie sheet. Brush whole tofurkey with marinade. 5. Place in oven for 1 1/2 to 2 hours at 350 degrees, adding marinade every 15 minutes or so. Serves seven.

Shroom GRAVY: Ingredients: 3 tablespoons of vegan margarine 1/2 diced red onion 2 diced garlic cloves 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast 2 tablespoons flour 2 cups vegetable broth 1/2 cup plain unsweetened soymilk 1 teaspoon Bragg’s Amino Acids 6 ounces Portobello mushrooms, chopped 1 tablespoon cornstarch 2 tablespoons cold water Salt and pepper to taste Directions: 1. Melt margarine in a pan on medium high heat. Add onion

and sauté until tender. 2. Add garlic and sauté another minute. Quickly add in nutritional yeast and flour until a thick paste is formed. 3. Slowly add vegetable broth in small amounts while whisking until thick. Whisk in milk, amino acids and mushrooms and bring to a boil. Lower heat to a simmer allowing mushrooms to cook. 4. Add a mixture of the cornstarch and cold water to the gravy and whisk until thick. 5. Turn off and let gravy sit for about 5 minutes. 6. Pour over your potatoes and enjoy!

VeggiE Gravy / Mushrooms have a distinguished taste, but mixed the right way the perfect gravy will be ready for dinner.

All the way in / A turkey with an empty stomach can only be stuffed with the right veggies.

Veggie STUFFING: Ingredients: 2 tablespoons of vegan margarine 1 diced medium sized onion 2 peeled and thinly sliced large carrots 3 sliced celery stalks 6 cups diced vegan bread 1/4 teaspoon each thyme, sage and rosemary 1/4 cup freshly chopped parsley 1/4 cup water chestnuts 1/4 cup walnuts 3 tablespoons raisins 1 1/2 cup vegetable stock Salt and pepper to taste Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. 2. Heat margarine in a sauce pan and sauté onions, carrots and celery until onion is tender. 3. Place bread in a large baking pan and bake for 15 minutes. 4. Remove bread from oven and mix in herbs, nuts, raisins, onion mixture and salt. 5. Drizzle stuffing with vegetable stock and gently toss. 6. Bake for another 25 minutes.

el Don /SANTA ANA COLLEGE • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2010/eldononline.org

Tofurkey:

13


el Don /SANTA ANA COLLEGE • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2010/eldononline.org

look nice fall fashions on a student budget

el Don /SANTA ANA COLLEGE • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2010/eldononline.org

photoS By david dayfallah / el Don

14

STYLE


STYLE

Dress to impress for a low price Clothing is an open door that gives everyone an inside look at a person’s creativity. Show optimism, be creative and send the exact vibe you want others to see.

Outfit for HER

Outfit for HIM

To get a flawless fall look, you cannot afford to miss out on inexpensive accessories that will have everyone turning their heads in your direction.

Have a clear thought of what you want to wear then arrange and play around. Set the trend and be a fashion icon.

DRESS This knitted winter dress shows some leg but still keeps you looking classy for $10.

BLAZER Bring back the ‘70s with a brown blazer that will grab plenty of attention for $59.99.

SCARF Keep warm in a ruffled scarf with a vintage feel for $12.95.

SCARF Add some class with accessories and wear a multicolored scarf for $12.95.

BOOTS You can never go wrong with nude colored boots to compliment your fall outfits for $30.

PANTS Wearing slacks doesn’t have to be uncool. Go skinny and get the fitted look for $29.99.

PURSE Don’t forget the handbag, the finishing touch, for $34.95.

SHIRT It’s said and done with one word: SIMPLICITY. Add a T-shirt for $9.99

Fashionistas / H&M dressed Jennifer Ruelas and Andrew Carrillo in a natural but classy fall look simple enough to be worn for lunch or a night out around town. Make up done by Jerry Avila, hair done by Victor Mendoza, both professional stylists at Salon Le Rouge. Story By jerry Rodriguez & jessica ruelas / el Don

el Don /SANTA ANA COLLEGE • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2010/eldononline.org

el Don /SANTA ANA COLLEGE • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2010/eldononline.org

15


el Don /SANTA ANA COLLEGE • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2010/eldononline.org

STYLE

local GRUB

high-class roach coach

Food trucks create a following for those craving delicious combinations of foreign cuisine

el Don /SANTA ANA COLLEGE • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2010/eldononline.org

By JASON TRUONG / el Don

16

By Tuesday night’s end, hundreds of hungry and curious diners, from devout groupies to adventurous thrill seekers, will swarm on a gravel crusted parking lot nestled between Sycamore and 3rd Streets, close to the Santa Ana Courthouse. The attraction didn’t make sense, at least not at first. Parked on the lot were a collection of roach coaches, whose cultural claim to fame comes from the insider knowledge of what not to order — the burrito will give you an intimate moment with the commode, those quesadillas will have you and a bucket bonding, face-toface, overnight. But that won’t happen tonight, not with the kind of meals these food trucks are serving. “Dinner at the Ghetto” may not sound all that inviting, doubly so by the appearance of aluminum-bound, mobile kitchen trucks cooking up different cuisine lining up the lot. The smell was intoxicating and inviting. I was drawn to Dos Chinos, a truck serving a fusion of Vietnamese and Southeast Asian recipes cooked and served Mexican style. Owned by the enterprising duo of Santa Ana native Hop Phan and his partner, Echo Park transplant Joey Mills, Dos Chinos, translated to “Chinese Duo” in English, has jumped apron-first in the food truck revolution sweeping across Orange County. Their business plan is simple: whip up good food using fresh ingredients while keeping the price reasonable. Quality shouldn’t suffer the cost. “We’re not trying to start more trucks, or expand our business. We just want to do well enough to keep us going,” Phan says as he wraps what looks like a sinful breakfast burrito, the Dos Chinos Breakfast, made of eggs, chorizo, fried rice and filet mignon finished off with Laotian Guacamole. The finished

TASTY / Javier Guangorena enjoys mouth-watering tacos from the Dos Chinos food truck on his lunch break. / Jerry Rodriguez / el Don

flavorFUL / With a blend of Mexican and Korean cuisines many come out to get a taste of these unique tacos and desserts. / Courtesy of doschinosfood.com

product looked like it weighed about a pound. The flour tortilla was bursting at the sides, mercilessly stuffed with greasy goodness. I forked over $3. It’s a messy meal — and that’s a good thing. As I bit on the shell, the yolk broke, covering the filling with a delicious yellow goo that assaulted my taste buds. The perfect marriage of salty

and savory flavors was nirvana. Or salvation. One or the other, or both together. The truck parks across different Orange County lots during lunch and dinner seven times a week. Mills and Phan do not advertise, but by their clever use of social media sites such as Twitter, Facebook and Tumblr, they have built a devoted

base of customers while spreading their brand of affordable gourmet food — all for free. Instead, Hop and Mills, a former student at Santa Ana College, organize food truck meet ups such as the “Ghetto,” where their Latin Asian fusion parks beside Filipino, sandwich, and dessert trucks, as well as the classic Mexican coach, minus the roach. They don’t need to pay for servers, busboys, decorations and printed menus. The ambiance is organic, coming from the sights, smells and sounds of the street. Here, the food is the star. Phan and Mills are so close to their clientele that they have an option called “Making it a Selene,” named after a loyal customer who demanded shrimp on anything she orders. Now, everything on the item can be ordered, Selene style. Among its more intriguing items are the Hollywood Chicken, made with Thai curry and a tamarind sour cream sauce, a subtle marriage of intense flavors, and the baffling Sriracha and Tapatio cheesecake. Slightly spicy, as Phan and Mills use two southern California classics — the ethnic inspired but locally made Asian and Mexican hot sauce. The most expensive dish, at $7, is the sinful set of tacos made with rib-eye steak, four Mexican cheeses and Laotian Guacamole, called Papas Fritas Con Carne. Irvine Valley College sophomore Evan Cathey was relishing his carne asada and roast pork tacos. “I wish there were places like this around Irvine. There are way too many chains down here,” Cathey said. As the after-drinking set crowds in, Phan wipes sweat from his brow. Business was about to get busy. “I hate it when the lines are long. It gives us no time to talk to our customers. We’re in this to have a good time with our diners,” Phan said.

el Don - November 22, 2010  

Fall 2010 - Issue 5 - Volume 88 - 5