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GLOBAL PROJECTS

A Heart for Louisiana —An Interview with Homeland Security— Can we handle the truth? About FEMA, our Faith and the Future of those who lived in the 9th Ward. What happened? Here is a synopsis from the impact of Katrina.

Pamela J. Hudson, Executive Director for Global Projects interviewing Col. Ebbert, the director of Homeland Security as Lt. Lolita Layne looks on. Andre capturing on film the critical dialogue on the discourse of the city and plans to rebuild. Dr. Sabrina Black, Col. Ebbert and Director Pam Hudson share a moment following the interview. The spirit of the man and the office was welcoming and warm. Global Projects so appreciates the time and information gathered. We pray for New Orleans recovery.

Hurricane Katrina of the 2005 Atlantic hurricane season was the costliest hurricane, as well as one of the five deadliest, in the history of the United States. The federal flood protection system in New Orleans failed at more than fifty places. Nearly every levee in metro New Orleans was breached as Hurricane Katrina passed just east of the city limits. Ev ent ually 80% of the city became flooded and also large tracts of neighboring parishes.

The floodwaters lingered for weeks. At least 1,836 people lost their lives in the actual hurricane and in the subsequent floods, making it the deadliest U.S. hurricane since the 1928 Okeechobee Hurricane. The storm is estimated to have been responsible for $81.2 billion dollars in damage, making it the costliest tropical cyclone in U.S. history.

Federal disaster declarations covered 90,000 square miles (233,000 km²) of the United States, an area almost as large as the United Kingdom. The hurricane left an estimated three million people without electricity. On September 3, 2005, Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff described the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina as "probably the worst catastrophe, or set of catastrophes," in the country's history, referring to the hurricane itself plus the flooding of New Orleans. The criticisms of the government's response to Hurricane Katrina primarily consisted of condemnations of mismanagement and lack of leadership in the relief One of the faces of New Orleans. efforts in response to the storm and its aftermath. More specifically, the criticism focused on Homeless, helpless and confused. the delayed response to the flooding of New Orleans, and the subsequent state of chaos in She lost everything, has no birth the Crescent City. (Data taken from the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hurricane_Katrina) certificate and doesn't know where her brother is to this date. So many Looking ahead, we are encouraged by Col Ebbert’s passion for New Orleans as stories of despair. So many more he is planning and preparing to rebuild, renew and hopefully restore the city back to fiscal health, stability and security. people to help!

Profile for Sabrina Black

GPH3 New Orleans Katrina News  

Global Projects begins filming documnetary on the Emotional, Psychological and Spiritual condition of the people one year later after Hurric...

GPH3 New Orleans Katrina News  

Global Projects begins filming documnetary on the Emotional, Psychological and Spiritual condition of the people one year later after Hurric...