Vibrante - The Member Magazine of the San Antonio Botanical Garden (January - April 2022)

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THE MEMBER MAGAZINE OF THE SAN ANTONIO BOTANICAL GARDEN

January – April 2022

orchids STEVE TOBIN, ROOTED E THNOBOTA N Y OF THE

MOUNTAIN CEDAR ORCHID WEEK


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LET TER FROM CEO

AS WE BEGIN THE NEW YEAR,

I want to start with a special toast to you, our members, as we welcome more of you than ever before! In 2021, the Garden celebrated a major milestone by reaching 12,000 membership households for the first time in our 41-year history with a 70% increase since the start of the pandemic. You understand the value of the Garden’s beautiful, transformative outdoor environment and our array of programs and classes that connect you and your family to nature. We hope you will discover many compelling reasons to visit us this spring, which includes the return of Orchid Week, Wildflowers in the Garden, expanded programs during Fiesta, and an exciting new exhibition. January begins the launch of our new five-year strategic plan that provides a smart and thoughtful roadmap for the Botanical Garden’s future growth and vision. During an inclusive planning process, the Garden’s board, leadership, and key community stakeholders identified three major priorities for the organization to achieve success. In this plan, our elevated vision statement commits to being a world-class public garden. Also, we updated our mission statement to enriching lives through plants and nature to get right at the heart of what we do as a botanical garden. The three main strategic priorities identified are: Horticulture, Collections, Conservation; Audience and Community Engagement; and Organizational Sustainability and Excellence. To read the full strategic plan, use the QR code below. This April, I am pleased to introduce you to the impressive world of renowned artist Steve Tobin when we launch the largest showing of his art in a public garden, entitled Steve Tobin Rooted. Made of recycled steel oil pipes – some towering 25’ tall – Tobin is known across the globe for his over-scaled sculpture in the form of tree roots. We hope you will visit and participate in the many “root-themed” events and programs throughout the spring, summer, and fall. With the recent success in the Botanical Garden’s growth, we find ourselves even more rooted in community. Thank you for being part of our garden family, and we look forward to seeing you this spring! Cheers, Sabina Carr

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Chief Executive Officer

THE MEMBER MAGAZINE OF THE SAN ANTONIO BOTANICAL GARDEN Emily Knapp, Director of Marketing | Kelsey Lievsay, Marketing Manager | Gabrielle Everett, Membership Manager


THE MEMBER MAGAZINE OF THE SAN ANTONIO BOTANICAL GARDEN

EXHIBITION APR 16 – OCT 30, 2022

STEVE TOBIN

ROOTED The San Antonio Botanical Garden presents Rooted, a monumental sculpture exhibition by internationally renowned artist Steve Tobin. Opening in spring 2022, the exhibition reveals the mysterious power, grace, and complexity of nature underground. Over the course of the six-month exhibition, the Garden will explore the theme “rooted” through guided tours, family and adult programs, and special events.

FOR MORE THAN THREE DECADES, STEVE TOBIN HAS CREATED TOWERING, NATURE-INSPIRED WORKS. In his early Bronze Roots series, Tobin unearthed

root systems and cast them in bronze, exposing and eternalizing the majestic forces of life. The organic cathedrals balance on narrow, gnarled feet and stretch dramatically toward the sky. Later, his Steelroots series transitioned to smooth, arcing interpretations made from steel. The elegant forms explore negative space and everchanging shadows. Rooted will feature sculptures that are meant to be interacted with, making this exhibition unique. “We are excited to debut new artwork from Tobin in addition to exhibiting beloved pieces,” said Sabina Carr, Chief Executive Officer of the San Antonio Botanical Garden. “The Garden is deeply rooted in the San Antonio community. I hope our guests lay underneath the sculptures and think about their own roots of family, heritage, and history.” Rooted will be on view from Saturday, April 16 – Sunday, October 30, 2022. An exclusive member event is scheduled for Friday, April 22. THANK YOU TO SPONSORS:

DICKSON-ALLEN FOUNDATION GRETCHEN SWANSON FAMILY FOUNDATION RUSSELL HILL ROGERS FUND FOR THE ARTS

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TEXAS CRESTED CORALROOT (Hexalectris warnockii)

SOUTHERN LADY’S SLIPPER ORCHID (Cypripedium kentuckiense)

N AT I V E T E X A S

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THE MEMBER MAGAZINE OF THE SAN ANTONIO BOTANICAL GARDEN

TEXAS NATIVE

The Orchid family boasts approximately 28,000 species worldwide and is one of the largest and most diverse families of flowering plants. Due to unique and often complex flowers, they have captivated humans for millennia. Sadly, because of their beauty, many species are now rare in the wild – collecting (poaching) wild plants and habitat loss are the two primary threats to native orchids.

THERE ARE APPROXIMATELY FIFTY-FOUR SPECIES OF ORCHIDS IN TEXAS, with most

found in the rich woods of East Texas. However, orchids can be found throughout the state, from the mountains of West Texas to the canyon and woodlands of Central Texas and the coastal plains. While orchids reminiscent of the tropics are not found here, there are unusual (some of them quite rare) species along Texas’ borders. These include the saprophytic Coralroots (Corallorhiza), which lack chlorophyll and obtain their nutrients through various soil fungi, the common and humble Nodding Lady’s Tresses Orchid (Spiranthes cernua), and the breathtaking Southern Lady’s Slipper Orchid (Cypripedium kentuckiense) with its 2 ½ inch lower lip. In spring of 2021, San Antonio Botanical Garden Conservation Botanist Michael Eason visited several of these rare orchid sites in East Texas with fellow botanist Adam Black as he was hand-pollinating the Southern Lady’s Slipper Orchid – transferring pollen from one population to another to ensure genetic exchange and seed production. Botanists returned later in the season to collect seed and send to Longwood Gardens in Pennsylvania for propagation and eventual reintroduction in Texas to augment native populations. By Michael Eason, Director of Plant Conservation & Research

MOTH ORCHID (Phalaenopsis sp.)

JOIN THE GARDEN FOR

Orchid JANUARY 2 2 – 30

Week

From educational events, seminars, and the family-friendly event, Celebrate Orchids!, the Garden will celebrate the largest and most diverse family of flowering plants throughout the week.

Orchid Seminar Day SATURDAY, JANUARY 22

KEYNOTE LECTURE Native Orchids of Texas by Michael Eason and Adam Black 9:30 – 11:15 A.M.

ORCHID SESSIONS Growing Vanda Orchids 11:30 A.M. – 12:30 P.M.

Growing Orchids Under Lights 1:00 – 2:00 P.M.

Cypripedium (Lady’s Slipper) Orchids 2:30 – 3:30 P.M.

Concepts in Basic Orchid Growing 4:00 – 5:00 P.M.

Orchid Care Clinics SUNDAYS: JANUARY 23 & 30 10:00 A.M. – 2:00 P.M.

Bring sick and unhappy orchids or a few high-resolution photos and the San Antonio Orchid Society will help identify the issue and suggest treatments or best practices for future orchids.

Ethnobotany of Vanilla and Vanillin TUESDAY, JANUARY 25 6 P.M. – 8 P.M.

The word vanilla may be synonymous with boring, but this workshop and tasting will show that this plant and its history are anything but boring! This workshop includes a lecture, tastings, and a walk to the conservatory to view the vanilla orchid – the only orchid that produces an edible fruit.

Celebrate Orchids! SATURDAY, JANUARY 29 10 A.M. – 2 P.M.

Bring the whole family to be dazzled by the world’s largest family of flowering plants with hands-on activities and more.

DIY: Vanilla Extract SATURDAY, JANUARY 29 11 A.M. – 12 P.M. & 12:30 – 1:30 P.M.

Did you know that vanilla beans come from an orchid? Learn more about the history of vanilla and craft a bottle of vanilla extract. End with a cocktail featuring homemade vanilla extract. Ages 21+.

Visit SABOT.ORG for more information on the week’s events. sabot.org

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E T H N O B O TA N Y O F T HE

Mountain Cedar By Maeve Bassett, Conservation and Volunteer Programs Specialist

TEXAS NATIVE

JUNIPERUS ASHEI SCIENTIFIC NAME:

THE

GOLDEN-CHEEKED WARBLER

THIS STUNNING AND ENDANGERED WARBLER escapes to tropical climates in Mexico and Central America during the winter and flies back to nest within the Ashe juniper and oak woodlands in Central Texas each spring. It is the only bird species whose population nests entirely in the state of Texas. Males return to nesting grounds early, so look and listen for this bird from late March until they quiet down in mid-May. Female golden-cheeked warblers depend on the cedar bark found only on old-growth Ashe juniper trees to build their nests. Golden-cheeked warblers hunt for insects like caterpillars and spiders in the tree canopies and can be spotted by the bright yellow markings on their cheeks and head.

Juniperus ashei OTHER NAMES: Ashe Juniper, Ashe's Juniper, Mountain Cedar, Rock Cedar, Post Cedar, Texas Cedar, Brake Cedar, Mexican Juniper, Blueberry Juniper, Ozark White Cedar, Sabino, Enebro TYPE: Evergreen tree SIZE:

12-36 ft. rarely over 30 ft. tall BLOOM TIME: February LIGHT REQUIREMENTS:

Part Shade SOIL MOISTURE: Dry SOIL DESCRIPTION:

Rocky, well-drained soils. Limestone-based, sandy, sandy loam, medium loam, clay loam, clay WILDLIFE USE: Ashe Juniper “berries” are highly palatable to many species of birds and small mammals. The bark of Ashe Juniper is nesting material by the rare goldencheeked warbler. ATTRACTS: Butterflies LARVAL HOST:

Juniper hairstreak, Olive butterfly

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HUMANS HAVE BEEN RECORDING THE EXTENSIVE USE OF JUNIPER BERRIES

for their medicinal properties and unique pine flavor since at least 1550 BCE. Therefore, when German and Anglo settlers found juniper trees in Central Texas, they readily incorporated them into recipes such as gin and sauerkraut. Among the eight native junipers is one of the most despised plants of Central Texas, the Mountain Cedar. Named after its resemblance to old-world cedars, Juniperus ashei is neither a cedar nor does it grow in the mountains. Aggressive agricultural practices of early settlers significantly depleted the Hill Country’s topsoil creating an ideal environment for the Ashe Juniper to flourish. Since then, the population has continued to grow, resulting in the misconception that it’s an invasive plant. The population was only slightly hindered following the Civil War, when Appalachian groups known as cedar choppers/whackers settled into the abandoned farmlands and supported themselves by cutting the rot resistant old-growth Ashe Junipers into the fence posts, foundation piers, telegraph

poles, roof framing, and railroad ties essential in settling Texas. Most of the malice toward Ashe Juniper is due to the male trees releasing waves of pollen after cold fronts, December through February. Unlike other more aggressive environmental allergens like the urushiol in poison ivy, most people don’t have extreme reactions to Juniper pollen; the cold/flu-like symptoms known as “Cedar Fever” are a result of the immense concentration of pollen overwhelming the immune system. The Hill Country Junipers (including Ashe) are an important species for migrating birds such as warblers and vireos and a source of cedarwood oil for fragrances including, legend has it, the distinct smell of Tide detergent and Irish Spring soap. At ten to twenty years old, female trees begin producing fleshy modified cones which ripen between November and April. The cones/berries of each species have a unique taste - harvest them and the young leaves (excluding Juniperus virginiana which can make you sick) to add unique local flavor to gin, dressing, and other recipes.


THE MEMBER MAGAZINE OF THE SAN ANTONIO BOTANICAL GARDEN MEALY BLUE SAGE (Salvia farinacea)

Ethnobotany

REMEMBERING THE LIFE OF

ETHNOBOTANY: the study of the relationship

BELOVED HORTICULTURIST AND DEDICATED GARDEN VOLUNTEER

between people and plants, is not a common term anymore, even in botanical gardens which serve as consolidated collections of ethnobotany. People have pervasive relationships to plants that they may not realize – from a morning coffee routine to a Texas heat-mitigating cotton wardrobe, and of course, nourishing vegetables (whether beloved or despised). Ethnobotany is the heart of the Garden’s mission – providing new ways for people to view, relate to, and appreciate the importance of plants in their life. Making a connection between native plants and people’s interests is a valuable tool that the Garden uses to promote sustainability, historical understanding, and deeper connection to nature.

Mary Irish “Building a garden is no different than building a life; often the pieces and parts come together without much conscious effort.” THUS BEGAN “A PLACE ALL OUR OWN”, ONE OF ELEVEN

JOIN THE GARDEN FOR UPCOMING

Ethnobotany Programs

Ethnobotany of Native Plants Guided Tour JANUARY 19, FEBRUARY 16, MARCH 16, APRIL 20 10:00 – 11:30 A.M.

This tour will explore the Texas Native Trails and the diverse relationships people have had, and still have, with plants in Texas.

Old Plants/New Ideas: Renewing Interest in San Antonio’s Native Plants THURSDAY, JANUARY 27 | 6:00 – 8:00 P.M.

This DreamWeek workshop will cover the regional history of select native plants and registrants will sample how they have been adapted for modern tastes. Ages 21+.

Ethnobotany of Chocolate and Carob THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10 | 6:00 – 8:00 P.M.

Also known as the ‘Food of the Gods’, chocolate has integrated itself into almost every holiday and social event. In this lecture, learn the history of chocolate and the legume that seeks to mimic it.

Promiscuous Plants Walking Cocktail Tour THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17 | 6:00 – 7:30 P.M. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 19 | 2:30 – 4:00 P.M.

Enjoy a cocktail while learning about the salacious lives of plants. Ages 21+.

Intro to Ethnobotany Guided Tour FRIDAY, MARCH 11 | 10:00 – 11:30 A.M.

Learn what ethnobotany is while exploring the Botanical Garden to learn about the historical impact of some of the most important plants in the Garden.

horticultural books by Mary Kutak Irish, retired director of the San Antonio Botanical Garden’s plant sales, who died at age 72 on August 18, 2021. Mary’s observation mirrors her own multi-faceted professional life, which began with a Bachelor’s in psychology from the University of Texas and Master’s in geography at Texas A&M University. Stints as environmental consultant, radio and public television personality, lecturer, newspaper columnist, garden consultant, and teacher led her to become one of the best-known horticulturists in the Southwest. Throw in mystery book devotee, crossword puzzle master, Russian speaker, ornithologist, and classical piano player; the breadth and depth of the pieces and parts of Mary’s life are kaleidoscopic. In 2011, she left her longtime job at the Desert Botanical Garden in Phoenix with her husband, Gary, a computer mapper, and settled in Castroville. She brought a wry sense of humor and warmth the size of her native Texas with her to the San Antonio Botanical Garden, along with rigorous standards for the plant sales program. “She taught us to use botanical names rather than common plant names to avoid confusion,” recalls veteran plant sales volunteer Stephanie Jones. “She was an explorer of knowledge and, like many explorers, Mary gave us a key to open the door for more.” The program flourished as Mary moved the focus to native plants. Retiring after six years, she wrote what would be her last book on gardening with drought-tolerant plants along the I-35 corridor of Texas. The manuscript went to Texas A&M Press for publication shortly before her death. Mary Irish left a lasting legacy and had a profound impact upon the San Antonio Botanical Garden. Volunteers and staff are grateful for her vast knowledge, friendship, and standards of excellence.

By Mary M. Fisher, Advisory Board Member sabot.org

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Children’s Vegetable Garden

PROGR AM

is an opportunity for children ages 7-16 to grow their own vegetables with the help of educators, horticulturists, and volunteers. Each family or group is allotted a 3.5’ x 28’ garden plot and has fun growing and learning about different types of vegetables. Throughout the program, children take their harvest home to share. In 2021, 60 families participated and more than 12 different types of vegetables were harvested in each season. Registration for the spring 2022 program opened December 10. The program begins Saturday, February 19 and runs weekly each Saturday through June 4 from 8:30 – 10:30 a.m.

THE CHILDREN’S VEGETABLE GARDEN PROGRAM

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THE MEMBER MAGAZINE OF THE SAN ANTONIO BOTANICAL GARDEN

WINTER & SPRING G A R D E N I N G T I P S WHILE GARDENING SLOWS IN THE WINTER MONTHS, there is still planting

and work that can be done to prepare your home garden for a successful bloom or crop. A little preparation in the winter will reap great rewards in the spring and summer. The average last frost is March 15, but be prepared for unexpected dips in the temperature. JANUARY & FE BRUARY SOW SEED for crops such as carrots, beets, radishes, and spinach. PLANT TRANSPLANTS of asparagus (crowns) and shortday onions (sets) in January. PLANT DORMANT TREES. Good fruit crops for this area are pears, plums, blackberries, and grapes. PLANT beets, swiss chard, cauliflower, broccoli, collard greens, kohlrabi, lettuce, and potatoes in February. HERBS, such as parsley, sage, marjoram, and garlic chives, thrive in mild South Texas winters. PRUNE dormant perennial plants including roses. Avoid pruning during rainy periods. Pruning can be extended to March depending on February weather. PROTECT TENDER PLANTS, such as newly planted vegetable crops, from freezing temperatures. Frost can occur through March in this area. • Frost cloth helps plants maintain their temperature as long as the cloth covers the plant all the way to the ground. • For extreme cold on young fruit trees, consider soil banking (mounding soil around the lower 12” of trunk). MARCH PLANT beans, cucumbers, eggplant, squash, watermelon, peppers, and tomatoes. ORNAMENTAL PERENNIAL PLANTS can be planted starting mid-March. APRIL WATCH the mesquite and pecan trees. When they are budding, the area is typically past freezing temperatures. WARM SEASON ANNUAL PLANTS should be planted in April to avoid frost. PLANT okra and tomatillos. sabot.org

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GARDEN SPOTLIGHT

PRIDE OF BARBADOS (Caesalpinia pulcherrima)

PENTAS (Pentas lanceolata)

Mays Family DISPL AY G A RDEN

The Mays Family Display Garden greets guests with bright, energetic color that reflects the spirit and vibrancy of San Antonio. This diverse, ever-changing showcase of color, texture, and fragrance celebrates the rich possibilities of horticulture in South Central Texas. Featuring both native and adapted plants, seasonal plantings illustrate compositions and act as a living curriculum for gardeners. 10

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AGAVE, PRICKLY PEAR CACTUS, AND FAIRY DUSTER PLANTS evoke arid landscapes. Texas

redbud, Mexican plum, and Mexican buckeye display native flowering trees. Almond verbena and sweet osmanthus fill the area with lovely fragrance. The Pride of Barbados, esperanza, firebush, passion vine, fall aster, and a variety of lantana, salvia, and sage explode with flowers that serve as a feast for pollinators and a stunning sight for people. This entry garden was initially planted in the fall of 2017 as part of the Phase One GROW campaign construction. When first planting the site, it was a challenge to work with the deep, thick clay soils. The Garden’s horticulture staff amended the planting area with a compost blend


THE MEMBER MAGAZINE OF THE SAN ANTONIO BOTANICAL GARDEN

THRYALLIS (Galphimia glauca)

FAIRY DUSTER

PL ANTS TO DISCOVER

PASSION VINE

IN THE M AY S F A M I LY D I S PL AY G A R D EN: *Texas native

PRICKLY PEAR (Opuntia spp.)

and continues to amend the beds on an annual basis to maintain good soil structure. A perennial garden can take several years to get to a mature state, and this garden was no different. In year one, the plants were small as they focused on sending roots into the soil. In year two, the plants grew steadily, and by years three and four, they reached maturity. This cycle is often described as “the plants first sleep, then creep, then leap.” In 2021, the Mays Family Display Garden had the most spectacular display yet. Winter Storm Uri left some plants dead at the ground level, but many plants had a healthy root system thanks to the careful attention of Garden staff and volunteers. An outstanding regrowth happened, and the plant displays are looking better than ever.

MYSTIC SPIRES BLUE

Agave

(Agave spp.)

Almond verbena

(Aloysia virgata)

Esperanza or Trumpetbushes

(Tecoma stans)*

Fairy duster

(Calliandra spp.)

Fall aster

(Symphyotrichum oblongifolium)*

Firebush

(Hamelia patens)*

Mealy blue sage

(Salvia farinacea)*

Mexican plum

(Prunus mexicana)*

Mexican buckeye

(Ungnadia speciosa)*

Passion vine

(Passiflora spp.)*

Prickly pear cactus

(Opuntia spp.)*

Pride of Barbados

(Caesalpinia pulcherrima)

Red yucca

(Hesperaloe parviflora)*

Salvia ‘Mystic Spires Blue’

(Salvia longispicata x farinacea ‘Mystic Spires Blue’)

Sweet osmanthus

(Osmanthus fragrans)

Texas redbud (Cercis canadensis var. texensis)* Thryallis

(Galphimia glauca)

Tropical milkweed

(Asclepias curassavica)

Tropical sage

(Salvia coccinea)*

TEXAS REDBUD

FALL ASTER sabot.org

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IN

A P P R E C I AT I O N DONATIONS MADE JANUARY 1, 2021 – OCTOBER 21, 2021

$900,000 City of San Antonio $300,000-$599,999 Betty Stieren Kelso Foundation $100,000-$299,999 Anonymous Holt Family Foundation Kronkosky Charitable Foundation John R. and Greli N. Less Charitable Trust San Antonio River Authority $50,000-$99,999 Paula and Herb Stumberg $25,000-$49,999 Claire and John Alexander Candace Andrews and Uwe Pontius Bank of America The Brown Foundation, Inc. Elizabeth Huth Coates Charitable Foundation of 1992 Tena† and Jim† Gorman H-E-B Robert J. Kleberg, Jr. And Helen C. Kleberg Foundation Scott Petty Family Foundation Hollomon Price Foundation Russell Hill Rogers Fund for the Arts San Antonio Area Foundation William and Salomé Scanlan Foundation The Smothers Foundation The Stumberg Foundation Valero $10,000-$24,999 Anonymous Ann Griffith Ash Delta and Aeromexico DOCUmation Frost Bank Gloria Galt Fund of the San Antonio Area Foundation Jana and Jeff Galt The Greehey Family Foundation Jarritos Barbara C. Kyse Mays Family Foundation McCombs Foundation McGuire Family Foundation Vicki and John V.† McLaughlin Family Cynthia and Forrest Miller Janet Montagne| River City Hospice Laura and Lew Moorman

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Morrow Family Foundation Judy Morton Dacia and Lanham Napier Leslie Negley The Nordan Trust Myra Stafford Pryor Charitable Trust San Antonio-Mexico Friendship Council Heather and Randy Rodgers William Scanlan, Jr. Erika Ivanyi and Matthias Schubnell Lyn and Peter Selig Daniel J. Sullivan Family Charitable Foundation Susan and Larry Todd Bette and Jack Vexler $5,000-$9,999 3M Foundation Anonymous Argent Financial Group Margie and Mote Baird Tina and Sunny Blumenthal | Noah Technologies Corp. Elise and Craig Boyan Dr. Judy H. Branch Capital Group Joan Cheever and Dennis Quinn Nancy and Charles† Cheever Circle Bar Foundation Culligan Water – San Antonio Lou Celia and Don Frost Laura and Burnell Gates Karen and Jim Greenwood Health Texas Mary and William Henrich Juana E. Hollin-Avery Jefferson Bank John Newman Family Charitable Fund of the San Antonio Area Foundation Jessie and Richard Kardys Brian T. Kelleher Estee and Luke Kellogg Kopplow Construction Mr. & Mrs. Robert R. Lende Luther King Capital Management Martha Mares Lebo Children’s Education Fund of the San Antonio Area Foundation The Muriel F. Siebert Foundation Pure Pastures Randolph Brooks Federal Credit Union Anne and Jeff Rochelle Claire and George Vaughan Irene Venegas Weddle Gilmore Architects | Phil Weddle

Chris & Stephanie Wilde Julie and Warren Wilkinson $1,000-$4,999 Ruth and John Agather Molly and Michael Amini Betty Anderson Karol Antrim Catherine Cooke-Atherton and Geary Atherton Audi Dominion Emilie and William Baine Libba Barnes Courtney and John Beauchamp Begum Peláez-Prada PLLC Adriana Blessing Lauren and John Browning Paula and Jim Callaway Daniel and Carla Carlson Caroline and William Carrington Sandra and Albert Cavazos Suzanne and Rick Cavender Center for Plant Conservation Sarah and Jon Cochran Edward Collins and Penelope Speier Anita and John Comander Mary Anne and Tony Crosby Wiede and Jon Cutshall Jaleh Daie J. Patrick and Kathy Deely Jay and Caraline Dewald Eric and Priscilla Dupre | Dupré Financial Group Roberto and Lourdes Espinosa | Avante Wealth Emma and Rene Farret Fern Lee Finck David R. Fisher Burkley and Jonny Fitzsimons Caroline A. Forgason The Alfred S. Gage Foundation Anne and Marco Gamboa Magdalena and Raul Gaona, Jr., M.D. Carrie Gray and Christopher Lefelhocz The Helen K. Groves Fund Marie Halff Tara and Jason Hoelscher Janet and Rob Holliday John and Sue Jockusch Charitable Fund of the San Antonio Area Foundation Jeffrey Johnson King Family Foundation Blakely and Coleman Kneisley Cally and Will Kothmann Marline and Clint Lawson Lee + Associates Rick Liberto

M Capital Advisors Doreen and Michael Magoon Megan Machin and Phil Herndon Shari Mao and Erik Weitzel Elizabeth and Madison Marceau Patti and Mark Mays Celeste and William McEntire Melinda McFarland and Reid Hartson Hannah and Jeff McManus Mewborne Photography Holly and Philip Miller Luz and Luis Montes de Oca Ana Montoya | AnArte Gallery Trudy and Ed Moore Meredith K. Morrill Sydney and Gregg Muenster Linde and Dean Murphy Belinda and Will Nixon The Andrew J. and Katalin S. Novak Foundation Barbie and Toby O’Connor Phyllis Browning Company Liza W. Philpy Allison and Alan Pyle Mary Quandt Rainbow Gardens Tory and Clay Richmond The Arch and Stella Rowan Foundation, Inc. Amy Stieren Smiley Whitney and James Smith Waynette Sorrells Alice Ball Strunk | Devils River Conservancy Shirley and Michael Swanson Ten Eyck Landscape Architects Lloyd and Jennifer Tannenbaum Gail and Ruben Tenorio Texas Cavaliers Charitable Foundation and The Texas Cavaliers Texas Commission on the Arts Jim Thompson Foundation Mr. & Mrs. Richard C. Traylor Alice and John Troy Stephen Turner Jennifer Urbanczyk and Scott Anderson Catharine and Jeff Vexler Robin and Jason Warman Ann B. Watson Bob Webster Susan Wilkins-Geery Thomas Wirth Elizabeth and David Worley Julie and Peter Zacher † Deceased


THE MEMBER MAGAZINE OF THE SAN ANTONIO BOTANICAL GARDEN

Thank you to the Perennials Giving Circle members – donors who demonstrate extraordinary commitment to the Garden’s mission through their generous annual gifts. FOR MORE INFORMATION, ABOUT PERENNIALS, VISIT: SABOT.ORG/SUPPORT/GIVING-CIRCLES

THE PERENNIALS G I V I N G C I R C L E Members as of October 21, 2021

DONOR SPOTLIGHT JOHN R. AND GRELI N. LESS CHARITABLE TRUST THE SAN ANTONIO BOTANICAL GARDEN was

delighted and honored to be among the first to receive a grant from the John R. and Greli N. Less Charitable Trust. The Trust was made possible by the generosity of Greli N. Less, who passed away in June 2019. The Trust’s inaugural gift to the Garden for its Lightscape exhibition brought more than 100,000 visitors to the Garden since Lightscape debuted on November 19, 2021. Melissa Adams, Senior Vice President and Trust Charities Officer at Frost, commented “The Trustees of the Less Charitable Trust were glad to help bring Lightscape to San Antonio and believe that Greli and John Less would applaud the joy it brought to the people and families of San Antonio and South Texas.” The Garden is incredibly grateful to the Less Charitable Trust for believing in the mission and helping to share it with so many.

HIBISCUS CIRCLE Dr. Judy H. Branch Laura and Burnell Gates Erika Ivanyi and Matthias Schubnell Cynthia and Forrest Miller Elizabeth and Barry Roberts

ESPERANZA CIRCLE Kennedy Hatfield Asel and Aaron Asel Ann Griffith Ash Valerie and Andrew Danner Barbara C. Kyse Holly and Philip Miller Susan Wilkins-Geery

LANTANA CIRCLE Claire and John Alexander Susan and Ernie Altgelt Julia and Shannon Anderson Candace Andrews and Uwe Pontius Margie and Mote Baird Katie and Tyson Becker Kathleen and Jeff Bolner Sheila and Jason Bottjen Elise and Craig Boyan Katherine and Walter Brown Lauren and Jay Bullock Laura Cadwallader† Paula and Jim Callaway Cindy and Doug Campbell Sabina Carr Aida Castro-Snyder and Edward Snyder, III Barbara Clark Sarah and Jon Cochran Charlotte A. Creamer

Mary Anne and Tony Crosby Wiede and Jon Cutshall Karen and Joseph Dawson Caraline and Jay Dewald James Drought Ellie and Chuck Du Val Fern Lee Finck Burkley and Jonny Fitzsimons Mercedes and Philip Fletcher Lou Celia and Don Frost Jana and Jeff Galt Magdalena and Raul Gaona, Jr., M.D. Toni and Richard Goldsmith Karen and Jim Greenwood Helen K. Groves Linda and Jack Gunter Marie Halff Sharon Hasslen Karen J. Hixon Marty and Steve Hixon Juana E. Hollin Avery Robin and Mark Howard Jeffrey Johnson Richard and Jessie Kardys Brian T. Kelleher Estee and Luke Kellogg Susan and John Kerr Margaret and Bill Klesse Emily Knapp and James Book Catherine and Richard Lange Jane and Larry Macon Shari Mao and Erik Weitzel Elizabeth and Madison Marceau Celeste and William McEntire Melinda McFarland and Reid Hartson Carol and John McGuire Vicki L. McLaughlin Toni Mezey

Janet Montagne Trudy and Ed Moore Laura and Lew Moorman Nancy Moorman Meredith K. Morrill Susanna Morrow and Ross Olsaver Judy Morton Sydney and Gregg E. Muenster Leslie Negley Ann and John Newman Belinda and William Nixon Nancy Ruth Otto Anne and Chuck Parrish Mary Quandt Anne and Jeff Rochelle Heather and Randy Rodgers William Scanlan, Jr. Martha Seeligson Lyn and Peter C. Selig Jordan Vexler Shannon and Albert Shannon Patricia and John Smothers Debi Sovereign Albert Steg Jennifer and Lloyd Tannenbaum Donald Test Susan and Larry Todd Mary West and Richard Traylor Katherine and Kris Trumble Bette and Jack Vexler Robin and Jason Warman Bob Webster Chris & Stephanie Wilde Julie and Warren Wilkinson Joan and W. Reed Williams Alisa Wilma and Paul Butler Thomas Wirth Ann and Forrest Word Julie and Peter Zacher Laura and John Zachry sabot.org

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MEMBERSHIP SUSAN SHOWN TODD, KAREN GREENWOOD, MAYOR RON NIRENBERG, SABINA CARR

CECE FROST GRIFFIN, KIM BIFFLE, JENNIFER LAMBILLOTTE, LINDE MURPHY, AMY RHODES

E XCLUSIVE

Members Only EVENTS ORCHID TOUR with Andrew Labay, Director of Horticulture JANUARY 26 | 10:00 A.M.

ORCHID TOURS with Andrew Labay, Director of Horticulture

JANUARY 28 | 10:00 A.M. & 2:00 P.M.

CELEBRATE LOVE AND CHOCOLATE CATTLEYA ORCHID (Cattleya spp.)

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FEBRUARY 12 | 8:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M. One free guest per membership for general Garden admission

WILDFLOWER PICTURES with the Easter Bunny APRIL 9 10:00 A.M. & 11:00 A.M. Dates subject to change. Reservations required; watch for exclusive member emails with more details.


THE MEMBER MAGAZINE OF THE SAN ANTONIO BOTANICAL GARDEN

Please

SAVE THE DATE for the

15th Annual Splendor in the Garden 14th Annual THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2022

in the Garden 2021 ON SEPTEMBER 23, 2021, 550 GUESTS in gardeninspired attire enjoyed a beautiful, breezy evening at the annual Splendor in the Garden gala. The wandering affair through the Lucille Halsell Conservatory Courtyard, Greehey Lawn, and The Betty Kelso Center dazzled with live music, butterfly ballet vignettes, nomadic florals, a delicious gourmet menu, and a lively after party. The record-breaking signature fundraising event raised nearly half a million dollars for the Garden.

MADISON AND ELIZABETH MARCEAU, SID GREEHEY, ALEX STRAUS, SID GREEHEY, JR., CAROLINE AND THOMAS MCSWEEN

EXCLUSIVE

MEMBER BENEFITS ALL MEMBER LEVEL BENEFITS INCLUDE: • Free daily admission for one year and early admission at 8 a.m. seven days per week • Members-only special events and exhibit previews • Surprise member perks (watch your email for notifications) • Member appreciation week festivities • Complimentary admission to select events

ROOTED MEMBER CELEBRATION APRIL 22 5:00 – 9:00 P.M.

• One complimentary guest pass during your birthday month • Discounts on classes, camps, birthday parties, and in the Garden Gift Shop • Reciprocal admission to 300+ gardens, arboreta, and conservatories in North America and Cayman Islands

QUESTIONS? CONTACT THE MEMBERSHIP STAFF AT 210.536.1407 OR GEVERETT@SABOT.ORG sabot.org

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Vibrante

UPCOMING

Events WISH: WATER LANTERNS IN THE GARDEN FRIDAY, JANUARY 28 | 6 – 8:30 P.M.

Light up the Garden and send a wish for the year to come. Enjoy live music, luminaria-lit pathways, and food and drinks for purchase.

CELEBRATE ORCHIDS! SATURDAY, JANUARY 29 | 10 A.M. - 2 P.M.

Bring the whole family to be dazzled by the world’s largest family of flowering plants with hands-on activities and more.

CELEBRATE CHOCOLATE! SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 12 | 10 A.M. - 2 P.M.

Explore the world of the tropics during this tasty, family-friendly exploration of chocolate.

VALENTINE’S DAY DANCE SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 12 | 6 – 10 P.M.

Bring your sweetheart for a night of romance to dance the night away outside on the beautiful patio of The Betty Kelso Center. This event will feature light appetizers, desserts, cash bar, and more. Ages 21+.

PALENTINE’S DAY BRUNCH AMERICAN BEAUTYBERRY (Callicarpa americana)

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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 13 | 10 A.M. – 1 P.M.

Start your morning with a tasty, delicious brunch in The Betty Kelso Center paired with mimosas, coffee, and orange juice.

MOVIES BY MOONLIGHT IN THE GARDEN FRIDAYS: MARCH 11 & 18 | 6 – 11 P.M.

Cozy up under the moonlight with family or friends for a special double feature at the San Antonio Botanical Garden. Movies by Moonlight in the Garden will include two family-friendly movies on the lawn. Bring low-riding lawn chairs and blankets. Drinks and food available for purchase.

THIRD THURSDAYS MARCH 17 & APRIL 21 | 6 – 9 P.M.

A new event, Third Thursdays features live performances, beautiful bloom displays, beverages and light bites by Jason Dady Catering. Food and drinks available for purchase. Bring lawn chairs and blankets.

FAMILY FLASHLIGHT NIGHT FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25 | 6 – 8:30 P.M.

Bring your flashlight and find your way through the light maze, fun tours, and hands-on activities.

CELEBRATE WILDFLOWERS! SATURDAY, MARCH 19 | 10 A.M. – 2 P.M.

Springtime in Texas is the beginning of wildflower season. Bring your family and friends to celebrate with garden exploration, activities, and more.

VIVA BOTANICA! SATURDAY, APRIL 2 | 10 A.M. – 2 P.M.

Viva Fiesta! Bring the whole family to explore 38 acres of nature play with hands-on activities, tastings, and performances.


THE MEMBER MAGAZINE OF THE SAN ANTONIO BOTANICAL GARDEN

PROGR AMS

Pop-Up Culinary Demo

Plant Sale

RECURRING PROGR AMS

SELECT SATURDAYS AND SUNDAYS 11 A.M. – 1:30 P.M.

MARCH 5 – 6, APRIL 2 – 3 | 9 A.M. – 4:30 P.M.

A local chef will showcase fresh seasonal produce and herbs in a delectable recipe you can create at home.

A wide variety of native plants, succulents, grasses and pollinator-friendly plants will be available for purchase. Reservations required.

Sustainability and Design Guided Tour

Trek and Tone

Homeschool Days

FRIDAYS: 10 – 11:30 A.M. JANUARY 7, FEBRUARY 4, MARCH 4, APRIL 1

Learn how the Botanical Garden uses infrastructure, architecture, and plants to conserve resources and the importance of building sustainable communities. Native Plant Guided Tour SATURDAYS: 10 – 11:30 A.M. JANUARY 8, FEBRUARY 5, MARCH 5, APRIL 2

Explore the Texas Native Trails to learn all about native plants, how they conserve water, adapt to their environment, and their growing requirements. WaterSaver Guided Tour THURSDAYS: 10 – 11:30 A.M. FEBRUARY 17, MARCH 17, APRIL 21

This tour explores seasonal plants and design tips for creating a beautiful drought tolerant landscape. Bird Watching Guided Tour SATURDAYS: 9:15 – 11 A.M. JANUARY 15, FEBRUARY 19, MARCH 19, APRIL 16

SELECT SATURDAYS | 10 – 11 A.M.

Designed to burn 400-600 calories while building strength and endurance, this class utilizes the Garden’s 38-acres for walk/ run intervals, circuit training, cardio and bodyweight exercises. Finish with core training and stretching. Morning and Sunset Flow with Alamo City Yoga SELECT SATURDAY MORNINGS BEGINNING IN SPRING | 9 – 10 A.M. SELECT MONDAY EVENINGS BEGINNING IN SPRING | 6 – 7 P.M.

Start with a 10-minute meditative walk, followed by a 50-minute intentional flow. The yoga portion of the practice will be a sequence of seated, standing, and balancing postures, syncing breath, and movement.

SELECT WEDNESDAYS | 9:30 A.M. – 12 P.M.

Children ages 6-12 can explore the fascinating world of plants through guided tours and hands-on learning activities. Homeschool and virtual learners are welcome.

JANUARY Foodie Cinema: Eat Pray Love FRIDAY, JANUARY 7 | 6:30 – 9 P.M.

Enjoy dinner with items featured in the movie from around the world: beginning in Italy with bucatini all'amatriciana, next India with chicken korma, and last with Bali with ikan bakar (roasted fish). Ages 21+.

Little Sprouts Hike

Cottage Foods

TUESDAYS BEGINNING IN MARCH 10 – 10:30 A.M.

TUESDAY, JANUARY 11 | 6 – 8 P.M.

Learn about resident and migrant birds, their characteristics, requirements for food, nesting, protection, and the native plants you can use to attract them.

Featuring a different nature-based lesson each week designed to inspire love and appreciation of the natural world. Recommended for ages 5 and under.

Texas Cottage Food laws were created to protect small farms, gardeners, and familyowned small businesses. Learn everything you need to start your cottage foods journey.

Ethnobotany of Native Plants Guided Tour

Storytime in the Garden

Gardening Begins with the Soil

THURSDAYS BEGINNING IN MARCH 10 – 10:30 A.M.

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 12 | 10 A.M. – 12 P.M.

WEDNESDAYS: 10 – 11:30 A.M. JANUARY 19, FEBRUARY 16, MARCH 16, APRIL 20

Explore the Texas Native Trails, discovering the diverse relationships people have had, and still have, with Texas’ plants.

Featuring different nature-themed books each week to stimulate young minds and foster an appreciation for the outdoors. Recommended for ages 5 and under.

Bexar County has four significantly different soils – from beach sand to a thick “gumbo” clay soil. These soils can be amended in a way that maximizes water usage, while minimizing fertilizer and pesticide usage. sabot.org

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PROGR AMS The French Quarter FRIDAY, JANUARY 14 | 6:30 – 8:30 P.M.

Learn about the vibrant New Orleans cuisine with Chef Katrina Flores during this class on creating shrimp etouffee, red beans and andouille sausage, bananas fosters and French 75. Ages 21+. Family Gardening Workshop: Planting Herbs SATURDAY, JANUARY 15 | 10 A.M. – 12 P.M.

In this hands-on workshop, families will learn about planting, maintaining, and harvesting herbs.

DIY: Vanilla Extract

Love Pound Fit & Prosecco

SATURDAY, JANUARY 29 11 A.M. – 12 P.M. & 12:30 – 1:30 P.M.

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 12 | 9:30 – 11 A.M.

Inspired by Orchid Week, participants will learn about the history of vanilla and partake in crafting their own bottle of vanilla extract. End with a cocktail featuring homemade vanilla extract. Ages 21+.

Love-themed Pound Fitness event with RTribe Fitness instructors guiding you through a 45-minute musically driven and cardio intense, full body workout ending with prosecco and small bites created by the Garden’s in-house chef.

Spectra by SOLI Chamber Ensemble

Teas, Tisanes, & Texas Natives

MONDAY, JANUARY 31 | 7 – 9 P.M.

Works by Canadians Jocelyn Morlock and Malcolm Forsyth, Americans Carlos Simon and Brian Bondari, and Mexicans Arturo Marquez and Gabriela Ortiz shape this concert that considers the spectra of music and culture of our continent. Featuring the world premiere of a new work for SOLI by San Antonio composer Brian Bondari.

Bavarian Pretzels and German Beer FRIDAY, JANUARY 21 | 6:30 – 8:30 P.M.

Chef Katrina Flores will teach you the secrets to making pretzels with a yeasted dough, beer cheese, and honey mustard while sipping on a cold German beer. Ages 21+. Trek and Tone New Year’s 5K

FEBRUARY Healthy Trees and Certified Arborist Preparation Course

SATURDAY, JANUARY 22 | 9:30 – 11 A.M.

FRIDAYS: FEBRUARY 4, 11, 18, AND 25 9 A.M. – 4 P.M.

5k run/walk taking you through the beautiful Garden with strength training stations along the way.

Topics include: tree biology, installation, nutrition and fertilization, plant disorders and diseases, and worker safety.

Orchid Seminar Day

Secrets of Indian Cooking

SATURDAY, JANUARY 22 I 9:30 A.M. - 5 P.M.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4 | 6:30 – 8:30 P.M.

Kick off Orchid Week with a keynote lecture followed by four orchid informational sessions.

Chef Katrina Flores will teach you how to use Indian spices and techniques. Learn how to make creamed spinach with fresh cheese, cardamon scented basmati rice, butter chicken, and mango lassis.

Ethnobotany of Vanilla and Vanillin TUESDAY, JANUARY 25 | 6 – 8 P.M.

Inspired by Orchid Week, this workshop and tasting reveals that the vanilla plant and its history are anything but boring.

Family CHEF Workshop: Chocolate SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 5 | 10 A.M. – 12 P.M.

Families will have fun learning to prepare tasty and healthy chocolate-based recipes from the CHEF curriculum. Make dark chocolate nut clusters, chocolate avocado mousse, and dark chocolate bark. Growing and Maintaining Roses WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 9 | 10 A.M. – 12 P.M.

PRICKLY PEAR FRUIT (Opuntia spp.)

Old Plants/New Ideas: Renewing Interest in San Antonio’s Native Plants

Ethnobotany of Chocolate and Carob

THURSDAY, JANUARY 27 | 6 – 8 P.M.

Also known as the ‘Food of the Gods’, chocolate has integrated itself into almost every holiday and social event. Learn the history of chocolate and the legume that seeks to mimic it.

DreamWeek 2022 event to learn the regional history of select native plants and sample how they have been adapted for modern tastes. Ages 21+.

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10 | 6 – 8 P.M.

Learn about teas, tisanes, their history, brewing, and make your own Texas native tisane to take home. Cocktail Scavenger Hunt: Chocolate SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 13 | 12 – 2 P.M.

Find edible gems throughout the Garden for a festive menu of chili chocolate covered potato chips, strawberry fennel salad with cocoa nibs, smoky butternut squash soup with cocoa, Mayan chocolate molten cake, and chocolate bitters cocktail. Ages 21+. Promiscuous Plants Walking Cocktail Tour THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17 | 6 – 7:30 P.M. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 19 | 2:30 – 4 P.M.

Whether in love potions, aphrodisiacs, medicinal treatments, or chocolates on Valentine’s Day, plants have always played an important role in our love lives, as well as having distinctive methods of their own. Ages 21+. Date Night: Szechuan Cuisine FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 18 | 6 – 8:30 P.M.

Learn about the bold, spicy flavors of Szechuan cuisine. Chef Katrina Flores will show you how to make Szechuan smashed cucumbers, mapo tofu with ground pork, and dry fried green beans. Ages 21+. Children’s Vegetable Garden: Spring 2022 SATURDAYS: FEBRUARY 19 – JUNE 4 8:30 – 10:30 A.M.

The Children’s Vegetable Garden Program is an opportunity for children to grow their own vegetables with the help of educators, horticulturists, and volunteers. DIY: Rosé Sangria SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 19 11 A.M. – 12 P.M. & 12:30 – 1:30 P.M.

Participants will learn about the history of Sangria – a mix of fruit and wine – and partake in crafting their own bottle, concluding with a fruity glass of rosé sangria. Ages 21+. Water Conservation Guided Tour FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25 | 10 A.M. – 12 P.M.

Learn about the importance of water conservation through "blue" infrastructure, nature-based systems, and Central Texas geology.

Foodie Cinema: Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire

Foodie Cinema: Willy Wonka FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11 | 6:30 – 9 P.M.

Foodie Cinema: Tortilla Soup

FRIDAY, JANUARY 28 | 6:30 – 9 P.M.

While you enjoy the film, dine on chili chocolate covered potato chips, smoky butternut squash soup with cocoa, chocolate and coffee crusted steak with charred cauliflower, and a Mayan chocolate molten cake. Ages 21+.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25 | 6:30 – 9 P.M.

Dine on sausage rolls, brussels sprouts with bechamel, breaded pork chops, mashed potatoes, Victoria sponge cake, and Butterbeer while enjoying the cinema. Ages 21+.

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Learn how to select roses, the correct way to plant, and how to provide care, including the timing and techniques of proper rose pruning.

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 12 | 2 – 4 P.M.

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While you enjoy the film, dine on grilled nopales salad, achiote fish tacos with grilled vegetables, tortilla soup, apple bread pudding with whipped cream, and sangria! Ages 21+.


THE MEMBER MAGAZINE OF THE SAN ANTONIO BOTANICAL GARDEN

MARCH

Date Night: Taste of Tuscany

Prisms by SOLI Chamber Ensemble

FRIDAY, MARCH 18 | 6 – 8:30 P.M.

MONDAY, APRIL 11 | 7 – 9 P.M.

Family Night Hike

Chef Katrina Flores will show you how to make Moroccan-spiced seared scallops, pine nut couscous, cumin and harissa glazed vegetables, and olive oil polenta cake. Ages 21+.

Featuring the world premiere of a new work by Cuban-American composer Armando Bayolo and works by Jessie Montgomery, Marcos Balter, Yaz Lancaster, and Gabriela Ortiz. Featuring guest artist: Jacquelyn Matava, mezzo-soprano.

FRIDAY, MARCH 4 | 6:30 – 8:30 P.M.

Bring a flashlight and explore the Garden’s creature and plants at night with a trained guide, including identifying bat species with a bat detector. DIY: Wildflower Liqueur SATURDAY, MARCH 5 11 A.M. – 12 P.M. & 12:30 – 1:30 P.M.

Inspired by wildflower season, participants will learn about the history of wildflower liqueurs, partake in crafting their own bottle of wildflower liqueur, and enjoy a refreshing cocktail. Ages 21+. Family Gardening Workshop: Wildflower Wednesday WEDNESDAY, MARCH 9 | 10 A.M. – 12 P.M.

This hands-on Spring Break workshop lets participants make wildflower seed bombs, wildflower seed paper, and explore the Texas Native Trails on a guided tour. Propagation 101 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 9 | 10 A.M. – 12 P.M.

Join the Bexar County Master Gardeners, as they walk you through the process for selecting your mother plants, techniques for propagation, and tips for the growth process. A Doll’s House, Part 2 by Lucas Hnath Directed by Omar Leos SELECT EVENINGS: MARCH 10 – 27 7:30 – 9:30 P.M.

In A Doll’s House, Part 2, many years have passed since Nora’s historic exit. Now, there’s a knock on that same door. Nora has returned, but why? And what will it mean for those she left behind? Performed by The Classic Theatre.

Cocktail Scavenger Hunt: Stop and Smell the Roses SUNDAY, MARCH 20 | 12 – 2 P.M.

Find edible gems in the Garden for a festive menu including sweet and savory strawberry salad with rose reduction and fresh mint, rose petal jam and goat cheese crostini, rose chocolate panna cotta, cardamom rose beignet, and rose sangria. Ages 21+. Foodie Cinema: Mulan FRIDAY, MARCH 25 | 6:30 – 9 P.M.

While you enjoy your film, dine on congee, pork dumplings, Mu Shu chicken lettuce wraps, cherry blossom panna cotta, and a green tea cocktail. Ages 21+. Zumba & Sangria SATURDAY, MARCH 26 | 9:30 – 11 A.M.

45-minute Zumba class, ending with sangria and small bites crafted by the Garden’s in-house chef. Ages 21+. Promoting Pollinators Workshop SATURDAY, MARCH 26 | 10 – 12 A.M.

Learn the importance of making your home garden pollinator friendly and create your own wildflower seed bombs.

APRIL Family Night Hike FRIDAY, APRIL 1 | 6:30 – 8:30 P.M.

Intro to Ethnobotany Guided Tour

Bring a flashlight and explore the garden’s creatures and plants at night with a trained guide, including identifying bat species with a bat detector.

FRIDAY, MARCH 11 | 10 – 11:30 A.M.

Family CHEF Workshop: Fiesta

Discover what ethnobotany is while exploring the Garden to learn about the historical impact of some of the Garden’s most important plants.

FRIDAY, APRIL 8 | 10 A.M. – 12 P.M.

Foodie Cinema: The Hundred-Foot Journey

Families will have fun learning to prepare tasty and healthy Fiesta-inspired recipes from the CHEF curriculum. Participants will make confetti corn, shredded chicken tacos, and agua fresca to enjoy.

FRIDAY, MARCH 11 | 6:30 – 9 P.M.

Foodie Cinema: The Great Gatsby

Enjoy the film while dining on curry hot dogs, haricot verts with walnut, goat cheese and cranberry vinaigrette salad, chicken tikka with Kashmiri basmati rice pilaf, banana cardamom crème brûlée, and a traditional ginger basil mojito. Ages 21+.

FRIDAY, APRIL 8 | 6:30 – 9 P.M.

Spring Break CHEF Camp MONDAY – WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14 – 16 9 A.M. – 1 P.M.

Explore plants and your tastebuds with a half-day camp focusing on kitchen safety, cooking basics, and using healthy ingredients based on the CHEF curriculum. Participants will create hummus, banana kale muffins, tostadas deliciosas, and ratatouille.

While enjoying the film, dine on egg salad with truffle, chive flowers, and caviar on a bed of baby romaine, petite new England style clam chowder with sherry, turkey scaloppini with mushroom cognac cream sauce and wilted spinach, citrus summer pudding with berry anglaise, and a French 75. Ages 21+. DIY: Margarita & Guacamole SATURDAY, APRIL 9 11 A.M. – 12 P.M. & 12:30 – 1:30 P.M.

Participants will learn about the history of margaritas and guacamole and partake in crafting their own. Ages 21+.

RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRD

Pollinator Gardening WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13 | 10 A.M. – 12 P.M.

Bees, butterflies, wasps, and hummingbirds are some of our most important pollinators. Join the Bexar County Master Gardeners as they share how home gardeners can make a difference for pollinators. Date Night: Margaritas & Botanas FRIDAY, APRIL 22 | 6 – 8:30 P.M.

Chef Katrina Flores will teach you all the essentials for crafting traditional Mexican cuisine including shrimp tostadas with herbed mojo de ajo slaw, guacamole with bacon, green onions and roasted tomatillo, empanada picadillo, and pepper watermelon margarita. Ages 21+. Cocktail Scavenger Hunt: Roots SUNDAY, APRIL 24 | 12 – 2 P.M.

Venture into the garden to find edible gems for a festive menu including sweet potato turmeric miso soup, watermelon and jicama salad with jalapeno and lime, crispy rice topped with wasabi crab, glazed ginger blueberry turnovers, and a tarragon carrot spritzer. Ages 21+. Foodie Cinema: Nacho Libre FRIDAY, APRIL 29 | 6:30 – 9 P.M.

While you enjoy your film, dine on the lord‘s chips with fresh ceviche, Mexican street corn, warm chorizo salad, chicken enchiladas in brick red mole, strawberry tres leches, and a refreshing paloma. Ages 21+. Teacher Workshop: Flying WILD SATURDAY, APRIL 30 | 9 A.M. – 4 P.M.

Both classroom and informal educators can use Flying WILD to get kids outdoors, teach them thinking and required curriculum skills, and engage in environmental conservation. Hands-on activities teach basic bird biology, identification, ecology, conservation, and service-learning activities. DIY: Ginger Ceviche SATURDAY, APRIL 30 11 A.M. – 12 P.M. & 12:30 – 1:30 P.M.

Participants will learn about the history of ceviche and ginger and partake in crafting their own.

Dates and times subject to change. Visit SABOT.ORG for the latest updates, pricing, ticket, and registration information. sabot.org

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GRUPO FOLKLORICO DE BENDICIONES DANCERS

VIVA BOTANIC A ! SATURDAY, APRIL 2, 2022 | 10 A.M. – 2 P.M. Viva Fiesta! Bring the whole family to Viva Botanica! at the San Antonio Botanical Garden. Explore 38 acres of nature play fun during this family-friendly Fiesta event that includes hands-on activities, culinary tastings, music, theater, and dance performances. Food and beverages will be available for purchase and guests are encouraged to bring lawn chairs and blankets to settle in and enjoy the fun. Garden Fiesta medals will be available for purchase at the gift shop. This event is included with Garden admission and membership.

555 FUNSTON PL ACE

GARDEN AND GIFT SHOP HOURS

SAN ANTONIO, T X 78209

March – October

210.536.1400 SABOT.ORG

9 A . M . – 7 P. M . | M o n d a y – S u n d a y

November – Februar y 9 A . M . – 5 P. M . | M o n d a y – S u n d a y Hours subject to change for special events

MISSION

Enriching lives through plants and nature.