Vibrante - The Member Magazine of The San Antonio Botanical Garden (January - April 2021)

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THE MEMBER MAGAZINE OF THE SAN ANTONIO BOTANICAL GARDEN

January – April 2021

Wildflowers

in the Garden PL A NT F OCUS:

TEXAS BLUEBONNETS RARE PLANTS OF SOUTH TEXAS FRIDA KAHLO OASIS


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LET TER FROM CEO

THE GARDEN AT CASA AZUL.

THE YEAR 2020 WAS UNLIKE ANY OTHER.

COVID-19 presented new challenges for the San Antonio Botanical Garden. Our classes, programs, and camps were reimagined as online offerings. Events were scaled back. And over 2,300 pounds of fresh produce were donated to people affected by the novel virus. Thousands in our community leaned on this beautiful green space for hope, resiliency, and joy. The Botanical Garden became a place of respite where people of all ages and backgrounds experienced the healing power of nature. With the start of new year comes the opportunity to reemerge and recreate from the challenges we faced in 2020. The Botanical Garden has new and exciting programs, special events, and art installations that will bring to life the important role plants play in our lives. We kick off the year celebrating one of the largest and most diverse plant families in the world—orchids. The vibrant colors and fragrances of these flowering plants will delight all five senses at Orchid Weekend. As we move into springtime, meadows of colorful wildflowers will blanket the grounds. And beginning in March, extended weekday hours are back for your enjoyment of cooler weather in the evening time. You will also have one last chance to catch our latest exhibition, OrigamiintheGarden², before it closes. Opening this May, the Botanical Garden is excited to honor a world-renowned artist whose artwork was deeply inspired by nature, Frida Kahlo. This uniquely curated exhibition, Frida Kahlo Oasis, will give you a glimpse into the connection between Frida’s garden at Casa Azul and her work. We hope that these new offerings will bring much joy to you and your loved ones during these difficult times. One thing remains constant – our gratitude for our members, donors, volunteers, visitors, board, and staff. Thank you for your ongoing support.

CASA AZUL’S GARDEN FEATURES A STEPPED PYRAMID.

MONUMENTAL HUMMINGBIRD.

Sabina Carr

Chief Executive Officer

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GOLDEN BARREL CACTUS (Echinocactus grusonii)


THE MEMBER MAGAZINE OF THE SAN ANTONIO BOTANICAL GARDEN

Frida Kahlo Oasis EXHIBITION

Anton Ivanov/stock.adobe.com

MAY 8 – NOV. 2, 2021

The San Antonio Botanical Garden has embarked on a journey to recreate a one-of-a-kind stylized version of Frida Kahlo’s iconic blue home, Casa Azul, and the lush green sanctuary that profoundly influenced her timeless art. The Frida Kahlo Oasis exhibition will bring to life Kahlo’s deep connection with Mexican native vegetation and the natural world. The exhibition has been customized for the Botanical Garden. Visitors will be transported through a unique environment of shades, scents, sounds, and sights.

will occupy a 2,100 square foot space nestled in the heart of the Botanical Garden, protected by giant oak trees, and overflowing with Mexican native plants, and a mixture of tropical foliage and desert plants, including elephant ears, bougainvillea, agave, and marigolds. Explore the famous landmarks of Kahlo’s garden at Casa Azul such as the pyramid that displayed Diego Rivera’s pre-Hispanic collection, the frogthemed fountain, and Kahlo’s desk and easel. The exhibition will also feature six monumental animals – a dog, monkey, deer, butterfly, parrot, and hummingbird – which often appear in Kahlo’s artworks, as a testimonial to her passion for Mexican Arte Popular. “The exhibition is a natural fit for San Antonio as so many in our community embrace and honor Frida Kahlo’s Mexican heritage and legacy,” said Sabina Carr, Chief Executive Officer, San Antonio Botanical Garden. A member preview of the exhibition is set for Saturday, May 8. The exhibition will be on view from May 8 – Nov. 2, 2021.

FRIDA KAHLO’S PAINTING STUDIO AND WHEELCHAIR.

Zoltan Tarlacz/Dreamstime.com Anton Ivanov/stock.adobe.com

Jose Terrero/Dreamstime.com

CASA AZUL’S GARDEN

BOUGAINVILLEA (Bougainvillea sp.) sabot.org

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BLUEBONNET (Lupinus texensis)

PINK EVENING PRIMROSE (Oenothera speciosa) DRUMMOND PHLOX (Phlox drummondii)

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THE MEMBER MAGAZINE OF THE SAN ANTONIO BOTANICAL GARDEN

Go WILD for

Wildflowers INDIAN BLANKET (Gaillardia pulchella)

CALIFORNIA POPPY (Eschscholzia californica)

Springtime in Texas is the beginning of wildflower season. Across the state, annual flowers paint the open fields and roadsides with an array of color highlighted by the iconic Texas bluebonnet.

celebrates its native wildflowers with plantings throughout Concert Lawn, Hill Country Meadow, Cactus Garden, and the hillsides around Halsell Way. These areas have been covered with bluebonnets, pink evening primroses, basket-flowers, gauras, Indian blankets, California poppies, Drummond phlox, toadflax, and others, forming stunning displays. This spring, the Botanical Garden is bringing back the wildflowers to the Hill Country Meadow. Experience a meadow blooming with a wide range of beautiful, fragrant, and colorful flowering plants. To successfully create a bright floral display requires proper growing conditions, good timing, and most importantly, patience. Take a look at the steps the Botanical Garden took to prepare the Hill Country Meadow for wildflowers. THE SAN ANTONIO BOTANICAL GARDEN

PR E PAR ING THE WILDFLOWER SITE Site selection: The Hill Country Meadow was the perfect site selection providing full sun exposure (eight hours per day), and good drainage, including access to supplemental irrigation. Soil preparation:

Existing vegetation was removed with herbicides, then mowed and raked. The soil was tilled to a shallow depth to improve soil texture and drainage.

Seed selection:

Native wildflowers that are known to grow well in the Hill Country Meadow were selected to seed. These include bluebonnets, Engelmann’s daisies, pink evening primrose, Drummond phlox, winecups, mealy blue sage, Indian blankets, bergamot, and coreopsis.

Seeding:

October is an excellent time to seed wildflowers as it allows the plants to germinate and establish roots ahead of the spring. This past October, we broadcasted seeds on the soil surface with a hand spreader, raked, and pressed the seed to the soil with a roller to obtain great soil contact.

Supplemental irrigation: Timely rainfall is the best recipe for a beautiful wildflower display. Since the weather was dry in the fall of 2020, staff increased irrigation from germination through the first 4 to 6 weeks of growth.

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PLANT FOCUS:

Texas Bluebonnets

BLUEBONNET (Lupinus texensis)

DID YOU KNOW THAT TEXAS HAS SIX STATE FLOWERS? THAT IS CORRECT, there are six species of bluebonnets found in Texas and they are all considered the state flower. THE BEAUTIFUL TEXAS BLUEBONNET

is an iconic regional wildflower and the Texas state flower. It is a lupine in the pea family and has a native range extending from Texas to northern Mexico. Bluebonnets produce beautiful, violet-blue-colored flowers though to a lesser extent, all-white and pink flowers can be found. Additionally, marooncolored bluebonnets have been developed by Texas A&M. In fact, the Texas A&M Agrilife Extension service maintains maroon-colored bluebonnet plots at the San Antonio Botanical Garden’s research area. 6

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Lupinus texensis is the species that most of us are familiar with

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Lupinus subcarnosus is found in sandy soils of South Texas

3-4 Lupinus havardii and Lupinus concinnus are found in West Texas 4 5

Lupinus perennis is found in the Big Thicket in East Texas

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Lupinus plattensis is found in the northwestern panhandle


THE MEMBER MAGAZINE OF THE SAN ANTONIO BOTANICAL GARDEN

H I G H L I G H T: S ACR E D G A R DE N

is one of the Botanical Garden’s oldest areas. The most ancient, domesticated plants can be found in this garden, including those that were mentioned in various religious texts from Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, and others. In this garden, olives, myrtles, laurels, pomegranates, henna, and roses all thrive. The Sacred Garden is a beautiful and serene space with a corkscrew willow (Salix matsudana ‘Tortuosa’) towering in the center, providing dappled shade to the beds below. On the sides of the willow tree are arbors that had been covered with large ‘Black Spanish’ grapevines. The arbors were reconstructed in 2020 with cedar wood and were dedicated to J.E. “Bud” Smothers by his wife, Patricia Smothers. ‘Blanc du Bois’ and ‘Victoria Red’ grapes were also added. In 2021, the Botanical Garden will plant an apricot tree and prune the garden to bring more light to the beds. Next time you’re at the Botanical Garden, add this beautiful green gem to your visit. THE SACRED GARDEN

YOU WILL FIND olives, myrtles, laurels, pomegranates, henna, and roses.

TULIP (Tulipa sp.)

WINTER GARDEN TIPS The mild cool weather during the winter months is the perfect time for landscaping and gardening. Here are a few TIPS that you can do now and in the coming months. • PLANT trees and shrubs now for good root growth.

• ADD fallen leaves to your compost pile or use as mulch.

• PREPARE beds for your cool season annuals by adding compost.

• CUT BACK on your watering. Soils stay moist longer in cooler weather.

• DIG, DIVIDE, AND PLANT your spring/summer blooming perennials.

• PREPARE exposed pipes for freezing temperatures.

• MULCH your beds now to prevent weed growth.

• AFTER YOUR LAST use of mower and power equipment drain gasoline.

• PRUNE trees when they are defoliated. It is the best time to see form and structure. sabot.org

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WALKER’S MANIOT (Manihot walkerae)

PROSTRATE MILKWEED (Asclepias prostrata)

CONSERVING

South Texas’ Rarest Plants Plant conservation is at the heart of the San Antonio Botanical Garden’s mission. A participating institution of the Center for Plant Conservation network, the Botanical Garden aims to conserve South Texas’ rarest plants for future generations.

has 13 plant species under its charge, ranging from the endangered Walker’s maniot (Manihot walkerae) to the increasingly rare prostrate milkweed (Asclepias prostrata). To save these endangered plants, the Botanical Garden’s Director of Plant Conservation & Research, Michael Eason, travels throughout South Texas annually to perform plant surveys and inventories on both private and public lands. While traveling throughout Texas, Eason collects other rare plants found in South, Central, and West Texas. Habitat loss – due to urbanization, commercial development, agriculture, ranching, invasive species such as Buffelgrass (Cenchrus ciliaris), which is native to the African continent and southern Asia – is by the far the greatest threat to the survival of native plants. Climate change, loss of pollinators, poaching, and pollution also imperil native flora. One example of a plant losing its native habitat due to highway expansion and commercial development in South Texas is the rare prostrate milkweed. Their habitat is also THE BOTANICAL GARDEN

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experiencing poaching, ranching (overgrazing causing excess growth of trees and shrubs which alters their habitat), and the ubiquitous buffelgrass, which out-competes this plant and others in South Texas. Texas has approximately 450 rare plants as listed by Texas Parks & Wildlife. Of these 450 species, only 31 are listed as federally endangered or threatened, which leaves about 420 species in need of protection, and this is where the Botanical Garden steps up. By working with private property owners, and a network of knowledgeable local botanists, Eason visits various areas to monitor known populations, search for new occurrences of rare plants, and collect plant material. The plant material is returned to the Botanical Garden where nursery staff propagate the seeds and cuttings. When plants mature, they are placed in the garden for safe-keeping, research activities, and educational purposes. Eventually, some of the mature plants are reintroduced to their native habitat, enhancing wild populations.


THE MEMBER MAGAZINE OF THE SAN ANTONIO BOTANICAL GARDEN

YELLOW IRIS (Iris pseudacorus) CARNATION (Dianthus caryophyllus)

VOLUNTEERS HELP THE GARDEN GROW

Just as a tree is unable to survive without help from pollinators, networks of fungi, and other biological partners, the San Antonio Botanical Garden thrives because of the dedication of its volunteers.

range in age from retirees with decades of knowledge to high school students figuring out how they can help their communities. They come with different backgrounds including veterans, teachers, managers, homemakers, and others. The Botanical Garden staff rely on the many hands to help make things happen, but also to gain the diverse knowledge that each volunteer contributes. Volunteers are essential to educating and enhancing the experience of visitors, maintaining the collection of plants, growing plants for sale, and so much more. The Botanical Garden appreciates the many hours and hard work contributed by the gardening and propagation volunteers, whose efforts help ensure the health and welfare of the plants. The propagation volunteers constantly work alongside staff in the greenhouses and hidden production areas where their unseen efforts may easily be forgotten. Watering and weeding 38 acres is a major task, yet week after week they return. These efforts enable the Botanical Garden to thrive as a community resource to enjoy, relax, and learn about the beauty of the natural world. A heartfelt thank you goes to all the volunteers for giving their time and talent to the Botanical Garden.

THE BOTANICAL GARDEN’S COMMUNITY OF VOLUNTEERS THE BOTANICAL GARDEN’S PROPAGATION GREENHOUSE.

MICHAEL EASON, DIRECTOR OF PLANT CONSERVATION & RESEARCH, PHOTOGRAPHING THE MEXICAN GOLD POPPY IN THE FRANKLIN MOUNTAINS. Photo by Ad Konings.

TO BECOME A VOLUNTEER, VISIT SABOT.ORG/VOLUNTEER

LONG-TIME VOLUNTEERS, STEPHANIE JONES (Left) AND JUDY YAEGER (Right) ASSIST WITH THE CARE AND MAINTENANCE OF PLANTS. sabot.org

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Botanical Garden Helps Fill the Gap FOR SCHOOLS AMID COVID-19

When the worldwide pandemic hit, it drastically changed how students learn. School campuses closed and students went from sitting in a classroom to learning from home. Consequently, the San Antonio Botanical Garden experienced a sudden drop in student visitation.

from schools across Bexar County visit the Botanical Garden. Students learn about ecosystems; the life cycle of plants; the roles of insects and birds in nature; the importance of growing native plants and conserving water; and much more. Students harvest fresh produce from The Zachry Foundation Culinary Garden and prepare and cook healthy meals using the CHEF (Culinary Health Education for Families) curriculum in the Goldsbury/ CHEF Outdoor Teaching Kitchen. These educational programs have been reimagined to offer a hybrid learning model approach with a hands-on component. The CHEF culinary programs were converted to fully online led by a live instructor. Participants pick up prepared ingredient boxes, log in from home, and follow along. New programs like Storytime in the Garden and After School provide a safe outdoor learning environment. To date, more than 1,000 families have enjoyed readings on the Greehey Lawn. Launching this year, the Terrarium Ecosystem Program will be available to educators with access to

ANNUALLY, THOUSANDS OF STUDENTS

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pre-recorded how-to videos and the materials for students to create their own terrarium. “We are intentional in every aspect of our program development from creating high-quality curriculum-based learning to engaging students in a safe way,” said Katie Erickson, Director of Programs. Botanical gardens, zoos, aquariums, and museums across the nation are filling the gap of school learning by serving students and teachers in nontraditional ways. Meeting students and teachers ‘where they are’ means offering a mixture of virtual and in-person learning opportunities. As observed by the American Alliance of Museums, “Always more than a field-trip destination, museums of every shape and size are quickly but quietly mobilizing to meet the emerging national education crisis to help teachers and families.” STUDENTS ENGAGE WITH NATURE THROUGH HANDS-ON EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS.


THE MEMBER MAGAZINE OF THE SAN ANTONIO BOTANICAL GARDEN

STUDENT LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES AT T H E B O TA N I C A L G A R D E N IG = IN GARDEN | DL = DISTANCE LEARNING

After School

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After-school hours STEM-based program filled with fresh air and fun held on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

Homeschool Days

IG

Homeschool and virtual learners explore the fascinating world of plants with hands-on activities and tours held monthly.

CHEF Cooking Workshops

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Botanical Garden educators lead virtual learners through recipes and lessons from CHEF, a TEKSbased culinary and wellness curriculum.

Terrarium Ecosystem Program

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Virtual and hands-on TEKS-based program teaches students what plants need and produce, and students create their own terrarium ecosystem. Includes how-to videos and terrarium ecosystem materials (available for delivery or pickup).

VISIT SABOT.ORG FOR COST, SCHEDULING, AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION.

Financial assistance is available.

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In Appreciation DONATIONS MADE JANUARY 1, 2020 THROUGH DECEMBER 31, 2020

$900,0000+ City of San Antonio Parks & Recreation Department $300,000+ The Ewing Halsell Foundation Betty Stieren Kelso Foundation $100,000+ Circle Bar Foundation Holt Foundation $50,000-$99,999 Claire and John Alexander Capital Group Joan and Herb Kelleher Charitable Foundation Robert J. Kleberg, Jr. and Helen C. Kleberg Foundation Myra Stafford Pryor Charitable Trust Daniel J. Sullivan Family Charitable Foundation $25,000-$49,999 Candace Andrews and Uwe Pontius The Brown Foundation, Inc. Dickson-Allen Foundation The Nordan Trust Scott Petty Family Foundation William and Salomé Scanlan Foundation The Smothers Foundation Gretchen Swanson Family Foundation, Inc. The Wheeler Foundation $10,000-$24,999 3M Foundation American Public Gardens Association Ann G. Ash C.B. and Anita Branch Trust E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation Courtney Collins and Barrett Tuttle Leroy Friedlander Revocable Trust Frost Bank The Greehey Family Foundation Karen and Jim Greenwood H-E-B Brian T. Kelleher Susan and John C. Kerr Marcia and Otto Koehler Foundation Barbara C. Kyse Mays Family Foundation

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V.H. McNutt Memorial Foundation, Inc. The Ann and John Newman Family Fund at Vanguard Charitable Anne and Jeff Rochelle Russell Hill Rogers Fund for the Arts San Antonio Livestock Exposition Lyn and Peter C. Selig Meagan and Adam Shadfan Paula and L. Herbert Stumberg Jr. Mary West and Richard Traylor Valero Energy Foundation Claire and George Vaughan Julie and Warren Wilkinson Ann and Forrest Word Family Foundation Julie and Peter Zacher Mollie Zachry The Zachry Foundation $5,000-$9,999 Alice Ball and Billy Bob Strunk Lauren and John Browning Laura Cadwallader Sabina and Tom Carr Nancy and Charles Cheever Joan Cheever and Dennis Quinn Faye L. and William L. Cowden Charitable Foundation Lou Celia and Don Frost Gunn Family Foundation Hixon Properties Incorporated Palomita Juana E. Hollin-Avery Erika Ivanyi and Matthias Schubnell Jefferson Bank The Richard and Jessie Kardys Charitable Fund Klesse Foundation Martha Mares Lebo Children’s Education Fund of the San Antonio Area Foundation Luther King Capital Management Lorene March Partnership McGuire Family Foundation Amy Shelton McNutt Charitable Trust Mission Advisors Trudy and Ed Moore Nancy Moorman Judy Morton Leslie Negley Pricewaterhousecoopers LLC. Michael Serish Jordan and Albert Shannon Muriel F. Siebert Foundation

Mary Pat Stumberg John S. Troy, Landscape Architect Bette and Jack Vexler Stephanie and Christopher Wilde $1,000-$4,999 Karol Antrim Argonaut Management Services, Inc. Aspireon Wealth Advisors, LLC. Wendy Atwell The Ruth and Edward Austin Foundation The Bank of San Antonio Shelley and John Bass Martha and Carlos Bazan Mary Ann and Mark Beach Tisha and Kyle Beck Sirie Blankenship Kathleen and Jeff Bolner Ruth Bowman-Russell Broadway National Bank Katherine and Walter Brown Jr. Phyllis Browning Company Lauren and Jay Bullock Aida Castro-Snyder and Edward Snyder Center for Plant Conservation Sarah and Jon Cochran Gary W. Cox and Michael Simon Culligan Water Karen and Joseph Dawson Seymour J. Dreyfus Ellie and Chuck Du Val Joel K. Erben Fern Lee “Missy” Finck David Fisher Caroline A. Forgason The Alfred S. Gage Foundation Jana and Jeff Galt Magdalena and Raul Gaona Susan Ghertner Lori Gilbert Toni and Richard Goldsmith The Camille Gong Living Trust Helen K. Groves Linda and Jack Gunter Sharon Hasslen Marty and Steve Hixon Janet and Rob Holliday Pamela and Ryland Howard Robin and Mark Howard Candace and Michael Humphreys James Family Charitable Fund of the San Antonio Area Foundation

John and Sue Jockusch Charitable Fund of the San Antonio Area Foundation Estee and Luke Kellogg Cally and Will Kothmann Catherine and Richard Lange Marline and Clint Lawson Marion Lee and Cameron Munk Elizabeth and Robert Lende Destiny and Sean Maddox Shari Mao and Erik Weitzel Elizabeth and Madison Marceau Melinda B. McFarland and Reid Hartson Jane and Joe McFarlane Vicki L. McLaughlin Toni Mezey John Miranda Laura and Lew Moorman Meredith K. Morrill Morrow Family Foundation Sydney and Gregg E. Muenster Native Plant Society of Texas - Fredericksburg Chapter Jana Orsinger and William Orr III The Palme Family Charitable Fund Pearl Brewery Helen and Henry Perkins Julianne and Michael Posey Mary Quandt River City Hospice The Arch and Stella Rowan Foundation, Inc. San Antonio River Authority Martha Seeligson Stephen Sherman Whitney and Jamie Smith Debi Sovereign Penelope Speier and Edward E. Collins the late Elsie G. Steg Straus Family Charitable Trust Ten Eyck Landscape Architects Donald Test Susan and Larry Todd Up Partnership Rachael and Ben Vaughan Foundation The Vaughan Foundation Franze and Chuck Wall Robin and Jason Warman Phil Weddle Joan and W. Reed Williams Patrick Williamson Thomas Wirth Karen Lee and David Zachry


THE MEMBER MAGAZINE OF THE SAN ANTONIO BOTANICAL GARDEN

A LEGACY GIFT BLOOMS WITH LOVE BY CANDACE ANDREWS BOARD MEMBER AND CENIZO LEGACY CIRCLE CHAMPION

THIS PAST YEAR, MORE THAN EVER, I

have cherished the San Antonio Botanical Garden. I have a long history with the Garden, starting in the early 1990s with serving on the board. Then I joined the staff (1998-2017) and can fondly recall all the activity abuzz below my office in the Carriage House as membership and events grew. What a community treasure we have in this beautiful haven. Now that I am in my early 70s, planned giving is more important than ever. It gives me peace of mind that I have provided for the Garden in my final arrangements. I have a palpable sense of tranquility when I park my vehicle and step onto the grounds of the Garden, knowing that I’m helping to ensure that people will continue to be inspired by the world of plants. The natural world is a big part of my life – and it becomes a part of every visitor’s, too. I have always felt that the Garden is a place where memories are made. I feel an emotional boost when I stroll through the Family Adventure Garden and see youngsters squealing with excitement to be outdoors. It reminds me of my childhood when wading in the creek was my favorite summer pastime. I love to walk the native area, and I beam with pride to see the floral splendor of the new entrance. I love to see what’s growing in the culinary garden. I love taking the curved walkway up to the formal gardens, still graced by the Wisteria Arbor and its beautiful view of this awe-inspiring community gathering space. What can I say? I LOVE the Garden. I hope that you will join me in taking care of the Garden’s future. It is an important symbol of stewardship of our environment – and a remarkable place of beauty. Together, let’s take steps that assure its financial future.

CENIZO LEGACY CIRCLE The San Antonio Botanical Garden is proud to launch the Cenizo Legacy Circle. This planned giving program is an investment in the future of the Botanical Garden. Gifts to the Cenizo Legacy Circle program help ensure that this 38-acre urban oasis of peace, beauty, wellness, and education is here for generations to come. FOR MORE INFORMATION, please contact Director of Development, Katherine Trumble at 210.536.1406 or ktrumble@sabot.org.

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MEMBERSHIP

MEMBERS are

the cornerstone of the San Antonio Botanical Garden. Your membership puts the mission into action through educational, cultural, and environmental programming, including the preservation of the collection of plants.

MEMBER EXCLUSIVE EVENTS More details coming soon to your email inbox. Dates subject to change.

Conservatory and Orchid Greenhouse Tour Jan. 29 | 8 – 9:30 a.m. Valentine’s Day Picnic Baskets Feb. 14 | 11:30 a.m. – 2 p.m. Easter Bunny Pictures and Scavenger Hunt April 3 | 9 – 10:30 a.m. Frida Kahlo Oasis Member Preview May 8 | 9 a.m. – 12 p.m. QUESTIONS? CONTACT MEMBERSHIP MANAGER, ROSIE KIMBALL AT 210.536.1407 OR AT RKIMBALL@SABOT.ORG.

UPCOMING

Happenings To keep guests and staff safe, the Botanical Garden has implemented COVID-19 guidelines and capacity limits across all special events, classes, programs, and exhibitions.

ORCHID WEEKEND

JAN. 29 & 30 | 9 A.M. – 5 P.M. JAN. 31 | 9 A.M. – 4 P.M.

Be dazzled by the bold, vivid, and colorful world of orchids at Orchid Weekend. This exhibit will showcase a variety of rare and unique species from the San Antonio Botanical Garden and the Alamo Orchid Society.

VALENTINE’S DAY DANCE FEB. 13 | 6 – 10 P.M.

MOTH ORCHID (Phalaenopsis sp.)

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Bring your sweetheart for a night of romance to the Valentine’s Day Dance at the San Antonio Botanical Garden. You’ll dance the night away outside on the beautiful patio of The Betty Kelso Center. This event will feature light appetizers, desserts, cash bar and more. Ages 21+.

GALENTINE’S DAY BRUNCH FEB. 14 | 10 A.M. – 1 P.M.

Ladies celebrate the month of love with your closest friends at Galentine’s Day Brunch in the Garden. Start your morning with a tasty, delicious brunch in The Betty Kelso Center paired with complimentary mimosas, coffee, and orange juice. Then stop by the cash bar for another boozy drink and head over to the Valentine’s Day Market for some shopping. Additional food and drinks will be available for purchase.

VALENTINE’S DAY MARKET FEB. 14 | 10 A.M. – 2 P.M.

Love is in the air! Shop at the Valentine’s Day Market with your valentine or galentine surrounded by February blooms at the San Antonio Botanical Garden. The market will showcase local and regional retailers and visiting arts and craft vendors spread throughout the Botanical Garden’s 38 acres. Beer and wine available for purchase (must be 21+). Members enjoy 10% off on Valentine’s Day Market and Garden Gift Shop purchases.

FAMILY FLASHLIGHT NIGHT

FEB. 19 | MEMBER ADMISSION 5:30 P.M. GENERAL ADMISSION 6 – 8:30 P.M.

Explore the Botanical Garden by moonlight, find your way through the light maze, fun tours, hands-on activities, and get a taste of delicious recipes. Drinks, food and DIY s’more kits available for purchase.


THE MEMBER MAGAZINE OF THE SAN ANTONIO BOTANICAL GARDEN

Gratitude Corner

MEMBER BENEFITS

Your experiences inspire the Botanical Garden.

Enjoy exclusive benefits of all the Botanical Garden has to offer.

ALL MEMBER LEVELS BENEFITS INCLUDE: • FREE DAILY ADMISSION FOR ONE YEAR AND EARLY ADMISSION MONDAY – SUNDAY AT 8 A.M.

“ Seeing a bird on the wing, watching nature unfold in early morning quiet are true, daily gifts.”

• M EMBER-ONLY EVENTS AND EXHIBIT PREVIEWS

“ In the times of being stuck indoors, the Garden was a safe haven for outdoor and imaginative play away from screens and plastic.”

• S URPRISE MEMBER PERKS (watch your email for notifications) • M EMBER APPRECIATION WEEK FESTIVITIES • D ISCOUNTS ON CLASSES, CAMPS, BIRTHDAY PARTIES, AND IN THE GARDEN GIFT SHOP • R ECIPROCAL ADMISSION TO 300+ GARDENS, ARBORETA AND CONSERVATORIES IN NORTH AMERICA AND CAYMAN ISLANDS

CONSIDER UPGRADING YOUR MEMBERSHIP BY VISITING SABOT.ORG/MEMBERSHIP

ELECTRIFIED AIR BY SOLI CHAMBER ENSEMBLE FEB. 21 | 7:30 – 9:30 P.M.

This program presents the fresh music of numerous young and emerging composers and features an award-winning electric guitarist as soloist, musical collaborator, and composer of a brand-new work for SOLI.

SPRING BREAK PLANT SALE MARCH 6 – 8 | 9 A.M. – 5 P.M.

Discover a wide variety of native plants, succulents, grasses, and pollinator-friendly plants during the Spring Break Plant Sale. In keeping with physical distancing measures, the Botanical Garden will be restricting the number of shoppers at a time. A ticket reservation will be required to shop per 30-minute time slots.

WILDFLOWERS & COCKTAILS IN THE GARDEN THURSDAYS IN MARCH | 6 – 9 P.M.

“ The Botanical Garden became our go-to place because it was outside, safe, beautiful, and allowed our immune compromised child a chance to run around without the risk of being too close to others during such a difficult season.”

oasis is the perfect place to physically distance, get some fresh air and connect with art and nature. Origami Nights features exhibition tours, origami inspired hands-on activities, and a cash bar to include Japanese inspired cocktails, assorted Japanese beer and food.

ANTIGONE BY SOPHOCLES DIRECTED BY KELLY ROUSH THURSDAYS, FRIDAYS & SUNDAYS APRIL 8 – 18 | 7:30 – 9:30 P.M.

Presented by The Classic Theatre of San Antonio, the play Antigone begins with two brothers fighting for the kinship of Thebes. Both men die in battle. Their successor and uncle, Creon, decides that one brother will be buried but the other brother will be left on the field of battle. Their sister, Antigone, finds herself having to choose between what she believes to be right, burying her brother, or following the laws of man and facing death herself. What happens when we are forced to choose between doing what we feel is right and what the world is telling us is right?

Sip on a cocktail and take a stroll through the San Antonio Botanical Garden’s display of wildflowers this spring at Wildflowers & Cocktails in the Garden. Happening every Thursday in March, Wildflowers & Cocktails in the Garden is the perfect place to capture Instagrammable moments with friends and family surrounded by the beauty of nature. The event will feature cash bar and picnic baskets, sweet treats, and music. Food and drinks will be available for purchase. Must be 21+.

ROSÉ IN THE GARDEN

ORIGAMI NIGHTS

VIVA BOTANICA PLANT SALE

Enjoy OrigamiintheGarden² exhibition during extended Thursday night hours at the San Antonio Botanical Garden. This 38-acre urban

Discover a wide variety of native plants, succulents, grasses and pollinator-friendly plants during the Viva Botanica Plant Sale. In

THURSDAYS IN APRIL | 6 – 9 P.M.

“ The Garden is my happy place. The grounds are impeccably kept, sensory delights abound, and my kids and I feel inspired and alive when we visit.”

APRIL 9 | 6 – 9 P.M.

Spring is rosé season! Indulge yourself with the elegance of a light and refreshing cocktail at Rosé in the Garden. Dress in your favorite spring outfit and grab your friends for an evening that is sure to delight all your senses. Rosé in the Garden will feature craft cocktails, music, games and more. Nine cocktail samples included with ticket. Food will be available for purchase. Must be 21+.

APRIL 17 – 18 | 9 A.M. – 5 P.M.

keeping with physically distancing measures, the Botanical Garden will be restricting the number of shoppers at a time. A ticket reservation will be required to shop per 30-minute time slots.

VIVA BOTANICA

APRIL 17 | 10 A.M. – 2 P.M.

Viva Fiesta! Bring the whole family to Viva Botanica at the San Antonio Botanical Garden. Explore 38 acres of nature play fun during this family-friendly, Fiesta event that includes hands-on activities, culinary tastings, and performances. Drinks and food available for purchase.

STORIES FROM THE VOICES WITHIN BY SOLI CHAMBER ENSEMBLE APRIL 25 | 7:30 – 9:30 P.M.

Rarely are the capable and powerful voices of San Antonio composers performed in their own city. SOLI is proud to present five of these artists on its season, two of which appear on this program along with a visiting Stieren fellow at Trinity University.

BONSAI WEEKEND

MAY 1 – 2 | 9 A.M. – 5 P.M.

Back by popular demand! The San Antonio Botanical Garden in partnership with the San Antonio Bonsai Society is highlighting the complex and beautiful Japanese art of bonsai. This exhibition will showcase a variety of species of bonsai. Members of the San Antonio Bonsai Society will be onsite to demonstrate the art of bonsai and answer questions about the exhibition and bonsai. VISIT SABOT.ORG FOR THE LATEST UPDATES AND TICKET INFORMATION.

Dates subject to change. sabot.org

15


Tuesday – Thursday | 11 A.M. – 9 P.M. Friday and Saturday | 11 A.M. – 10 P.M. Sunday with Brunch Menu | 10 A.M. – 8 P.M. Lunch and Dinner | Reservations recommended, but not required FOR MORE INFORMATION, VISIT SABOT.ORG

CL ASSES JANUARY

FEBRUARY

DREAMWEEK 2021

Sunset Flow with Alamo City Yoga

Inhabiting San Antonio: Exploring the People and Plants of this Place IG

MONDAYS, FEB. 1 – 22 | 6 – 7 P.M.

After School in the Garden

SUNDAY, JAN. 17 | 10 A.M. – 12 P.M.

Sunset Flow with Alamo City Yoga

IG

MONDAY, JAN. 18 & 25 | 6 – 7 P.M.

After School in the Garden

IG

TUESDAYS & THURSDAYS JAN. 19 – 28 | 3:30 – 6 P.M.

Pound Fit with Natalie Reinertsen & Laura Reifenrath IG TUESDAY, JAN. 19 & 26 | 6:30 – 7:30 P.M.

Homeschool Day: Plants in Everyday Life

IG

IG

TUESDAYS & THURSDAYS FEB. 2 – 25 | 3:30 – 6 P.M.

Introduction to Urban Beekeeping

Pound Fit with Natalie Reinertsen & Laura Reifenrath IG

Guided WaterSaver Walking Workshop

TUESDAYS, FEB. 2 – 23 | 6:30 – 7:30 P.M.

Zumba & Sangria

Guided Sustainability Walking Workshop IG

FRIDAY, FEB. 19 | 7 – 8:30 P.M.

FRIDAY, FEB. 5 | 10 – 11:30 A.M.

SATURDAY, FEB. 20 | 9:15 – 11 A.M.

Foodie Cinema: Julie & Julia

Homeschool Day: Art and Nature

DL

IG

THURSDAY, FEB. 25 | 10 – 11:30 A.M.

Date Night: French Bistro

DL

THURSDAY, FEB. 25 | 6:30 – 8:30 P.M.

IG

SATURDAYS, FEB. 6 - 27 | 10 – 11 A.M.

Guided Native Plant Walking Workshop IG

IG

IG

Guided Ethnobotany of Native Plants Walking Workshop IG

SATURDAYS, FEB. 6 - 27 | 9 – 10 A.M.

FRIDAY, JAN. 22 | 6 – 7:30 P.M.

IG

SUNDAY, FEB. 21 | 12 – 2 P.M. WEDNESDAY, FEB. 24 | 9 A.M. – 12 P.M.

Morning Flow with Alamo City Yoga

Talking Transformations: Techniques

IG

Cocktail Scavenger Hunt: Edible Flowers

IG

Perfecting the Board: Cheese, Charcuterie and Wine

Trek and Tone

IG

Guided Texas Bird Walking Workshop

SATURDAYS, FEB. 6, 13 & 20 11 A.M. - 1:30 P.M.

THURSDAY, JAN. 21 | 6:30 – 8:30 P.M.

IG

THURSDAY, FEB. 18 | 10 – 11:30 A.M.

THURSDAY, JAN. 21 | 10 – 11:30 A.M. DL

DL

TUESDAY, FEB. 16 | 6 – 8 P.M.

Healthy Trees and Certified Arborist Preparation Course IG Pop-Up Culinary Demos

IG

IG

SATURDAY, FEB. 13 11 A.M. – 12 P.M. & 12:30 – 1:30 P.M.

FRIDAYS, FEB. 5 – 26 | 9 A.M. – 4 P.M.

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 20 | 9 A.M. – 12 P.M.

WaterSaver Walking Workshop

DIY: Botanical Gin

IG

Foodie Cinema: My Big Fat Greek Wedding IG FRIDAY, FEB. 26 | 6:30 – 9 P.M.

SATURDAY, FEB. 6 | 10 – 11:30 A.M.

FRIDAY, JAN. 22 | 6:30 – 9 P.M.

Morning Flow with Alamo City Yoga

IG

Intriguing Coastal Plants of Texas

SATURDAYS, JAN. 23 & 30 | 9 – 10 A.M.

TUESDAY, FEB. 9 | 6 – 8 P.M.

Trek and Tone

Junior CHEF: Chocolate Fest!

IG

DL

MARCH – APRIL Check SABOT.ORG for March and April classes.

DL

RETURNS! Storytime in the Garden

IG

SATURDAY, JAN. 23 & 30 | 10 – 11 A.M.

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 10 | 6 – 7:30 P.M.

THURSDAYS IN MARCH | 10 – 10:30 A.M.

The Ethnobotany of Native Plants Walking Workshop IG

All You Need is Wine: Kerrville Hills Winery

THURSDAYS IN APRIL | 10 – 10:30 A.M.

THURSDAY, JAN. 28 | 10 – 11:30 A.M.

THURSDAY, FEB. 11 | 6:30 – 8:30 P.M.

Date Night: Taste of Portugal

Foodie Cinema: Chocolat

DL

FRIDAY, JAN. 29 | 6:30 – 8:30 P.M.

IG

IG = IN GARDEN | DL = DISTANCE LEARNING

VISIT SABOT.ORG FOR THE MOST UP-TO-DATE DETAILS. Dates subject to change.

IG

FRIDAY, FEB. 12 | 6:30 – 9 P.M.

555 FUNSTON PLACE

G A R D EN A ND G IF T SHOP HOUR S

SAN ANTONIO, TX 78209

Marc h – Oc t obe r

210.536.1400

9 A.M. – 5 P.M. | Sat urd a y – Sund a y

SABOT.ORG

Nove mbe r – Fe bruary

9 A.M. – 7 P.M. | Mond a y – Fri d a y

9 A.M. – 5 P.M. | Mond a y – Sund a y Hours subject to change for special events

M IS S IO N

T o i nspi re pe opl e t o c onne c t wi t h t he pl ant worl d a nd unde rst and t he i mport anc e of pl ant s i n our l i v es .