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The team’s first goal was to reduce existing loads through simple building envelope upgrades, lighting retrofits, and demand-controlled ventilation. Renewable technologies were the highlight of the winning design, including both an extensive roof-mounted solar PV array as well as a 192kW ground source heat pump system. Solar thermal water heating was proposed to handle the building’s hot water needs. In addition, the proposed design employs a DC microgrid, which will improve on-site electricity generation by 10%. The DC microgrid system provides additional reliability in the case of extreme weather events, as well as a way to provide stored energy from the solar PV system back to the school during peak hours. These solutions reveal how integral renewable energy technologies will be for reaching any future emissions targets that are set out for our cities.

Moreover, multiple renewable energy systems will need to function in tandem to create a holistic solution to a building’s energy requirements, which includes making use of available thermal energy sources. The winning team was awarded the EGP Hackathon Award at the CaGBC – Greater Toronto Chapter Gala and Awards on October 12th. The team also received time in Ryerson University’s Clean Energy Zone, a business incubator and research hub for clean technology. Event organizers would also like to acknowledge Clean Energy Zone for serving as the Hackathon’s Food Sponsor. Keep an eye on cagbctoronto.org for news about upcoming EGP Hackathons.

Kaitlin Carroll is currently pursuing her Masters of Building Science degree at Ryerson University, and is a member of the Emerging Green Professionals Committee. She is passionate about creating lowimpact, resilient, and beautiful cities.

SPRING 2018

Toronto FOCUS 21

Profile for SAB Magazine

Torfocusspring 2018  

Torfocusspring 2018  

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