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THE SABETHA

WEEKLY RECIPE

Eighth-grade girls’ team wins league title

Cobb Dip FUN&GAMES 8B

SABETHA CITY COMMISSION

Residents voice concerns over proposed cemetery expansion

WEDNESDAY

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SPORTS&RECREATION 3B

Celebrating Christmas Community members enjoy visit with Santa, ‘Home for the Holidays’ concert, open houses

DEC 2016 PRAIRIE HILLS USD NO. 113 BOARD OF EDUCATION

Board okays HVAC system at SMS This little guy isn’t sure what he thinks of Santa Claus at “Breakfast with Santa,” held Saturday, December 10. The event, held at the First United Methodist Church, was sponsored by Angie’s Kids. Krista Wasinger | Herald

KRISTA WASINGER At the Sabetha City Commission meeting Monday, Dec. 12, a large group of Sabetha citizens voiced their concerns over the proposed cemetery expansion land to be located near their residences. Present at the meeting were Mayor Doug Clark, Commissioners Nick Aberle, Maridel Wittmer and Julie Burenheide, City Administrator Doug Allen, Assistant City Administrator Bill Shroyer and City Clerk Steve Compo. Commissioner Norm Schmitt was present via phone conference at the beginning of the meeting, but the connection was lost. More than a year ago, Kent Saylor approached the city about purchasing land for developing housing. The land - known as Chapel Lawn - is located south of Oregon Street, west of the schools and east of the old sewage plant. At that time, since the land was already designated for Sabetha Cemetery expansion, commissioners said they would consider a land exchange with Saylor if he could find a suitable location for cemetery expansion. In August, Saylor proposed a tract exchange of more than 11 acres of his land - known as Saylor West - which is adjacent to Saylor’s farm ground and near his CITY.8A

SINCE 1876

BASKETBALL

Santa Claus holds up his hand for a high five from the Lang family Saturday, December 10. Pictured with Santa are (L-R) Micah, Kim (holding Beckett), Cale and Jackson Lang. Krista Wasinger | Herald

Tyler Simpson performs one of many pieces, while Shane Spangler plays piano, during their “Home for the Holidays” concert on Saturday, December 11. Tim Kellenberger | Herald

See more holiday event photos on Page 8A

Shane Spangler plays the piano while Debi Wong sings “Hallelujah.” Wong is the wife of Tyler Simpson, who with Spangler presented a “Home for the Holidays” concert on Saturday, December 11. Tim Kellenberger | Herald

NEW BUSINESS

AMBER DETERS The Prairie Hills USD No. 113 Board of Education met at 6 p.m. Monday, Dec. 12, at the district office in Sabetha. Board members present included Ed Reznicek, Kent Saylor, Jim Scoby, Leslie Scoby, Kent Kuckelman and Jeff DeMint. Board member Kathy Lippert was absent. Superintendent Todd Evans presented the board with bids for a new HVAC system at Sabetha Middle School. The low bid came in at $287,450 from Piping Contractors of Kansas. The board approved the bid. Evans told board members that both bidders on the project noted that the controls cost from Schneider Electric was much higher than the industry standard, initially coming in at $49,899. After discussions between Piping Contractors and Schneider, Superintendent Evans said, the district should see a $23,469 controls savings off of the approved bid price. Career Cruising Sabetha High School and Wetmore High School counselor Briana Evans presented to the board regarding the Career Cruising product, an interactive career guidance and pathways planning tool. Career Cruising was purchased by the district to help provide each student with an Individual Plan of Study, which will be required for students in grades 7 through 12 beginning with the 2017-18. The 113BOARD.8A

FREE CONCERT

Mobile veterinary practice starts up in Morrill 7eventh Time Down to present concert HEATHER STEWART

Entrepreneurial spirit, God’s guiding hand and a passion for animals was all it took for Aaron and Amy Schaffer to pursue the dream of one day owning their own veterinary practice. After graduating from the College of Veterinary Medicine at Kansas State University in 2015, Aaron and Amy made their dreams a reality and now own the mobile vet practice, Apogee Animal Health, located in Morrill. While growing up on a dairy farm, Aaron was instilled with the passion for agriculture and livestock production. Combining those interests with his motivation to help, teach and serve others is what inspired him to become a veterinarian. Amy also grew up on a farm and decided she wanted to pursue a non-traditional career in veterinary medicine after job shadowing a USDA field veterinarian and realizing this was the perfect way to combine her passions of animals and public service. That quickly changed for Amy, though, when she met Aaron in 2011 at Kansas

FOLLOW US:

HERALD REPORT

Apogee Animal Health owners Aaron and Amy Schaffer stand in front of their truck and cattle at Summit Farms Inc. on Wednesday, December 7. Pictured are (L-R) Amy, Eleanor, Emelia and Aaron. Heather Stewart | Herald

State. “I actually went to veterinary school never wanting to practice veterinary medicine in a traditional sense, let alone own a clinic,” she said. “God, however, had a different plan for my life, which began to reveal itself after meeting Aaron and marrying our third year of vet

school.” Aaron and Amy married in 2014, and in the early spring of 2015 Aaron received a call to work in Morrill at Summit Farms Inc., full time while starting up their own veterinary practice. Following graduation in May 2015, Aaron and Amy started up

their veterinary practice but they needed a name for it. Apogee Animal Health Inc. is what they chose. “Apogee” is a noun describing the highest point in the development of something; the climax or culmination.

WWW.SABETHAHERALD.COM Email sabethaherald@sabethaherald.com

APOGEE.6A

Christmas will be in the air with a free concert by 7eventh Time Down on Sunday, Dec. 18. The concert — “A Merry Lil’ Tour” — will be held at NorthRidge Church in Sabetha. 7eventh Time Down, a Kentucky-based band, focuses on proclaiming who they are in Christ with their music. There are four band members vocalist Mikey Howard, Eric VanZant on guitar, Cliff Williams on bass and Austin Miller on drums. The quartet are best friends who grew up together. When they completed school, they felt a call from God to do music ministry. The band’s third album, “God is on the Move,” was No. 1 on Billboard’s National Christian Airplay Chart for five weeks in a row. ] The band recently appeared on the Newsboys’ sold-out spring and fall “We Believe” tours. Their song, “Just Say Jesus,” remained on the Billboard radio charts for 52 weeks

Volume 140 | Issue 50 2 Sections - 16 Pages

7eventh Time Down will perform at NorthRidge Church Sunday, December 18. Submitted

straight. Since the release of their 2011 BEC Recordings debut album, “Alive in You,” the members of 7eventh Time Down have proven to be skilled at sharing the Gospel through well-crafted songs that combine substantive lyrics with engaging melodies and infectious rock ‘n’ roll attitude. Sunday’s concert will begin at 7 p.m. Doors will open at 6 p.m.

75 ¢


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community record

December 14, 2016  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  sabethaherald.com

SPECIAL SUPPLEMENTS The Sabetha High Spokesman

INSERTS

Garrett Country Mart Orscheln Farm & Home

deadlines&information The Sabetha Herald is the official Newspaper for the cities of Sabetha, Morrill and Fairview and the Prairie Hills USD No. 113 School District. The Herald is published each Wednesday. Circulation for 2015 averaged 2,000 copies per week. The Herald is a member of the following: � Kansas Press Association � National Newspaper Association � Sabetha Chamber of Commerce DEADLINES � News: 10 a.m. Monday for Wednesday newspaper. � Advertising: 10 a.m. Monday for Wednesday newspaper. � Special Holiday Deadlines for News and Advertising are 5 p.m. Thursday for next Wednesday's newspaper unless otherwise noted. If the holiday falls on a Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday, holiday deadlines apply. Holidays include the following: New Year's Day, President's Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Veterans Day, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day.

SUNDAY

MONDAY 11

7:30 p.m., Too Young to Die Narcotics Anonymous, held at Midtown Building, First and Main Streets

2 p.m., Home for the Holidays Concert featuring Tyler Simpson and Shane Spangler, at NorthRidge Church

TUESDAY 12

8 a.m., Brown County Commission 9 a.m., Exercise Class at Sabetha meeting, at Brown County Courthouse Manor. Free to the public.

WEDNESDAY 13

8:30-10 a.m., Coffeehouse at Morrill Community Building

9 a.m., Sabetha Christian Women meeting, at Buzz Cafe

9 a.m., Nemaha County Commission meeting, at Nemaha County Courthouse

9-10 a.m., Coffee Hour, at Sabetha Nutrition Center

9:30 a.m., Coffee Hour at Sabetha Manor

THURSDAY 14

10-10:30 a.m., Rural Mobile Food Pantry Distribution, Sabetha Community Food Pantry at NorthRidge parking lot

Noon to 3 p.m., Game Day, at Sabetha Nutrition Center 6 p.m., VFW Post 7285 Auxiliary meeting, Sabetha VFW Hall 7:30 p.m., VFW Post 7285 meeting, Sabetha VFW Hall

6 p.m., Sabetha City Commission Meeting, at Sabetha City Hall

7:30 p.m., Women’s Bible Study at United Brethren in Christ, 301 S. 12th Street in Sabetha

6 p.m., Prairie Hills USD No. 113 Board of Education meeting 7 p.m., SHS Winter Band/Vocal Concert, at Sabetha Middle School

FRIDAY 15

8:30-10 a.m., Coffeehouse at Morrill Community Building

SATURDAY 16

9 a.m., Exercise Class at Sabetha Manor. Free to the public.

17

Free Throw Contest, following Biddyball Tournament

9-10 a.m., Coffee Hour, at Sabetha Nutrition Center

7 p.m., Christmas Cantata, at New Hope Baptist Church, west of Seneca on Highway 36 7 p.m., SES Fifth Grade Music Program, at Sabetha Middle School

NUTRITION CENTER NUTRITION CENTER NUTRITION CENTER NUTRITION CENTER NUTRITION CENTER

PHOTOS � When submitting news photos, please submit by email or in person. Be sure to provide adequate information naming all persons in the photo and describing in detail what is going on in the picture. � Engagement, Wedding and Anniversary Photos are $25. The photos run two columns wide. � Anniversary Photos are $25 for (1) two-column photo, or (2) one-column photos. The charge is $35 to run (1) twocolumn photo AND (1) one-column photo. � Obituary Photos are $20. The photos run one column wide. � Birthday and Birth Photos are $10. The photos run one column wide.

Menu: Ham Loaf, ww Roll, Menu: Bierock Casserole, Baked Potato, Harvard Beets, Three Bean Salad, Tropical Sprinkled Pears, Cookies Fruit Blend, Chocolate Layer Dessert

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7 p.m., Christmas Concert featuring 7eventh Time Down, at NorthRidge Church in Sabetha. Concert is free. Doors open at 6 p.m. 7:30 p.m., Too Young to Die Narcotics Anonymous, held at Midtown Building, First and Main Streets

9-10 a.m., Coffee Hour, at Sabetha Nutrition Center

21

7:30 p.m., Women’s Bible Study at United Brethren in Christ, 301 S. 12th Street in Sabetha

9 a.m., Nemaha County Commission meeting, at Nemaha County Courthouse

22

8:30-10 a.m., Coffeehouse at Morrill Community Building

Menu: Chicken Tetrazzini, Noodles, ww Bread, Peas and Carrots, Mandarin Oranges, Cookies

23

Christmas Eve

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9 a.m., Exercise Class at Sabetha Manor. Free to the public. 9-10 a.m., Coffee Hour, at Sabetha Nutrition Center 7 p.m., Cancer support group meeting at Morrison Speech Clinic in Hiawatha

9:30 a.m., Coffee Hour at Sabetha Manor

6:30 p.m., NAMI meeting at Hiawatha Community Hospital. Call 785-7423989 for more information

� If event coverage is desired, please notify The Sabetha Herald at least one month before the event is scheduled to take place.

7:30 p.m., Quilt Lovers Guild meeting at Seneca Library

NUTRITION CENTER NUTRITION CENTER NUTRITION CENTER NUTRITION CENTER NUTRITION CENTER

HOW TO SUBMIT NEWS &ADVERTISING

Menu: BBQ Pork Chop, Roll, Augratin Potatoes, Seasoned Cauliflower, Fruit Cup

(1) Stop in our office at 1024 Main Street, Sabetha. (2) Mail the information (typed of printed legibly) to P.O. Box 208, Sabetha, KS 66534. (3) Email the news to news@sabethaherald.com; Email the advertisement to advertising@sabethaherald.com. (4) Fax the information (typed or printed legibly) to 785-284-2320.

eHerald: $27.95/year In-State Print: $41.00/year In-State Print+eHerald: $53.00/year Out-of-State Print: $48.00/year Out-of-State Print+eHerald: $60.00/year (tax included in all prices)

8:30-10 a.m., Coffeehouse at Morrill Community Building

20

Menu: Polish Sausage, Bun, Mashed Potatoes, Sauerkraut, Broccoli, Fruit with Jello

Noon to 1 p.m., Sabetha Hospital Guild meeting (284-1535)

EVENT COVERAGE

SUBSCRIPTION RATES

19

8 a.m., Brown County Commission 9 a.m., Exercise Class at Sabetha meeting, at Brown County Courthouse Manor. Free to the public.

Menu: Glazed Baked Ham, ww Roll, Sweet Potatoes, Green Beans, Cranberry Jello Salad, Pie

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8 a.m., Brown County Commission 9 a.m., Exercise Class at Sabetha meeting, at Brown County Courthouse Manor. Free to the public. 8:30-10 a.m., Coffeehouse at Morrill Community Building

7:30 p.m., Too Young to Die Narcotics Anonymous, held at Midtown Building, First and Main Streets

Menu: Hamburger Beef Soup, Crackers, Kolache, Broccoli and Cauliflower, Salad, Sliced Peaches

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9-10 a.m., Coffee Hour, at Sabetha Nutrition Center

9 a.m., Nemaha County Commission meeting, at Nemaha County Courthouse

Menu: BBQ Meatballs, ww Bread, Scalloped Potatoes, Italian Mixed Vegetables, Fruit Crisp

28

Menu: Chicken Pot Pie, Biscuit, Parsley Sliced Carrots, Strawberries and Bananas

29

Noon to 3 p.m., Game Day, at Sabetha Nutrition Center

8:30-10 a.m., Coffeehouse at Morrill Community Building

7:30 p.m., Women’s Bible Study at United Brethren in Christ, 301 S. 12th Street in Sabetha

9 a.m., Exercise Class at Sabetha Manor. Free to the public.

Closed. No Meals. No Bus.

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New Year’s Eve

31

9-10 a.m., Coffee Hour, at Sabetha Nutrition Center

9:30 a.m., Coffee Hour at Sabetha Manor 6 p.m., Sabetha City Commission Meeting, at Sabetha City Hall

POSTMASTER

NUTRITION CENTER NUTRITION CENTER NUTRITION CENTER NUTRITION CENTER NUTRITION CENTER

� Form 3573 should be sent to: The Sabetha Herald, P.O. Box 208, Sabetha, KS 66534.

SUBSCRIBE TODAY!

Closed. No Meals. No Bus.

JANUARY 1

New Year’s Day

7:30 p.m., Too Young to Die Narcotics Anonymous, held at Midtown Building, First and Main Streets

JANUARY 2

Menu: Meat Loaf, Biscuit, Baked Potato, Seasoned Green Beans, Pineapple Chunks, Cake

JANUARY 3

8 a.m., Brown County Commission 9 a.m., Exercise Class at Sabetha meeting, at Brown County Courthouse Manor. Free to the public. 8:30-10 a.m., Coffeehouse at Morrill Community Building

Menu: Roast Turkey, ww Bread, Baked Sweet Potato, Peas and Onions, Banana Pudding, Vanilla Wafers

JANUARY 4

9-10 a.m., Coffee Hour, at Sabetha Nutrition Center

NAME:

9:30 a.m., Coffee Hour at Sabetha Manor

ADDRESS:

7 p.m., CAPS meeting, basement of Community National Bank

JANUARY 5

8:30-10 a.m., Coffeehouse at Morrill Community Building 9 a.m., Exercise Class at Sabetha Manor. Free to the public.

9 a.m., Nemaha County Commission meeting, at Nemaha County Courthouse

Please cut along this line and return with payment.

Menu: Smothered Steak, ww Roll, Mashed Potatoes, Japanese Mixed Vegetables, Apricots

Menu: Chicken and Rice Soup, Crackers, Raisin Bread, Copper Carrot Penny Salad, Pear and Apples with Jello

JANUARY 6

5:30 to 7 p.m., Pre-Game Meal sponsored by Prairie Hills FFA Alumni, at Sabetha High School

JANUARY 7

9-10 a.m., Coffee Hour, at Sabetha Nutrition Center

9:30 a.m., Soil Health Workshop and Lunch, at Nemaha County Community Building in Seneca, register by Dec. 30 to 785-336-2186 ext. 110.

CITY/STATE:

7:30 p.m., American Legion Post 126 Meeting, at Sabetha Community Building

PHONE #: EMAIL: LOCAL SUBSCRIPTIONS ❏Newspaper ONLY: $41.00 ❏Newspaper & Digital All Access: $53.00 ❏Digital All Access ONLY: $27.95

OUT-OF-STATE SUBSCRIPTIONS ❏Newspaper ONLY: $48.00 ❏Newspaper & Digital All Access: $60.00 ❏Digital All Access ONLY: $27.95

Please mark your selection and be sure your address is complete and correct.

MAIL TO: The Sabetha Herald P.O. Box 208 Sabetha, KS 66534

JANUARY 8

7:30 p.m., Too Young to Die Narcotics Anonymous, held at Midtown Building, First and Main Streets

JANUARY 9

JANUARY 10

8 a.m., Brown County Commission 9 a.m., Exercise Class at Sabetha meeting, at Brown County Courthouse Manor. Free to the public. 8:30-10 a.m., Coffeehouse at Morrill Community Building

9 a.m., Sabetha Christian Women meeting, at Buzz Cafe

9 a.m., Nemaha County Commission meeting, at Nemaha County Courthouse

9-10 a.m., Coffee Hour, at Sabetha Nutrition Center

9:30 a.m., Coffee Hour at Sabetha Manor 6 p.m., Sabetha City Commission Meeting, at Sabetha City Hall 6 p.m., Prairie Hills USD No. 113 Board of Education meeting, at Wetmore Academic Center

JANUARY 11

10-10:30 a.m., Rural Mobile Food Pantry Distribution, Sabetha Community Food Pantry at NorthRidge parking lot

Noon to 3 p.m., Game Day, at Sabetha Nutrition Center 6 p.m., VFW Post 7285 Auxiliary meeting, Sabetha VFW Hall 7:30 p.m., VFW Post 7285 meeting, Sabetha VFW Hall 7:30 p.m., Women’s Bible Study at United Brethren in Christ, 301 S. 12th Street in Sabetha

JANUARY 12

8:30-10 a.m., Coffeehouse at Morrill Community Building 9 a.m., Exercise Class at Sabetha Manor. Free to the public. 9-10 a.m., Coffee Hour, at Sabetha Nutrition Center

Noon, Sabetha Chamber of Commerce Meeting, at Sabetha City Hall

6 to 8 p.m., Women in Agriculture conference, at Nemaha County Community Building in Seneca 6:30 p.m., Alzheimer’s Support Group, at Sabetha Community Building

JANUARY 13

JANUARY 14

7 a.m., Morrill Men’s Community Breakfast sponsored by Morrill churches, Old Community Center in Morrill

8 a.m., Sabetha Lions Club Paper Pick-up. Place newspapers by the curb, tied or in paper bags. No plastic bags, please


community record Obituaries OUT OF STATE Mary Ellen Frazee

Obituaries printed in The Sabetha Herald are printed for free up to 250 words. For anything beyond that, the charge is $.50 per word. A photo can be added for $20. For more information, contact us at 785-284-3300 or news@sabethaherald.com.

Mary Ellen Frazee

Mary Ellen Frazee, 81, died on Tuesday, Dec. 6, 2016, at Pawnee County Hospital after a long battle with Addison’s and Multiple Myeloma. She was born to Sterling and Jesse North Loch on Feb. 26, 1935, in Pawnee City, Neb. She was raised on a farm northeast of Summerfield, with her parents and her older brother, Bob. She attended country school and graduated from Summerfield High School in 1952. She married Robert Frazee on Jan. 18, 1953, at the Presbyterian Church in Summerfield, and they set up housekeeping on a dairy farm north of town. Mary Ellen was a busy farm wife and mother of five children three boys and two girls. Her days were filled with raising and selling chickens and eggs, milking cows and caring for baby calves, tending a large garden, and playing softball for many years. The activities of five kids kept her very involved in 4-H, school activities and sporting events. Along with enjoying her 14 grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren, she loved hosting family dinners and playing cards. Her hobbies included quilting and crafting, making taffy and decorating wedding and birthday cakes, socializing with numerous women’s clubs and traveling. She was proceeded in death by her parents; her brother, Bob Loch; parents-in-law, Willard and Hattie Frazee; brothers-in-law, Don and Dick Frazee, Bill Lantz, Jack Koch and Sam McKee; sister-in-law, Mary Ann Koch; grandchildren, Chad Frazee, Nicole Schlueter and Spencer Barr. She is survived by her husband, Robert Frazee; sons, Bruce (Cherie) Frazee of Summerfield, Dennis (Linda) Frazee of Sabetha, and Doug (Gay) Frazee of Summerfield; daughters, Karen (Randy) Schlueter of Beatrice, Neb., and Lori (Skip) Barr of Liberty, Neb.; grandchildren, Jasper (Gina) Frazee, Miranda (Brian) Lehman, Haley (Ben) Scheer, Regan (Jessica) Barr, Megan Frazee, Lee (Heather) Barr, Cody (Angie) Frazee, Blake Frazee, Abby (Brent) Cole, Ethan (Gabriel) Schlueter and Lucas Barr; great grandchildren, Andrew, Tyse and Jack Frazee, Eli and Kiley Lehmann, Ava Scheer, Carson, Olivia, Brooklyn and Logan Barr, Kylee and Braden Frazee, Kennedy Cole, and Joziah Schlueter. Visitation was held Thursday, Dec. 8, 2016, at the Wherry Mortuary, in Pawnee City, Neb. Celebration of life service was held Friday, Dec. 9, at the Presbyterian Church in Summerfield. Pastor Herb Schrader officiated. Burial followed in the Summerfield Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorials will be designated at a later date to family’s choice. Online condolences may be left at www.wherrymortuary.com. The Sabetha Herald 12/14/2016

MEMORIES

Esther Middendorf

Esther L. Middendorf, 93, of Hiawatha, died Wednesday, Dec. 7, 2016, at Hiawatha Community Hospital. She was born on a farm south of Troy on Dec. 6, 1923, the eighth of nine children born to Charles and Martha Kiehnhoff Ruhnke, and lived in northeast Kansas her entire life. She attended rural schools K-8 near Troy. She worked as a nanny, hospital switch board operator and caregiver for an elderly lady before she married at age 24. Esther worked for 33 years as a secretary for Hiawatha Elementary School before retiring. Esther was married to Clarence Middendorf on June 6, 1948. He survives. Also surviving are two daughters, Karen McNamee (Jim Keyser) of Portland, Ore., and Judy Middendorf of Ft. Collins, Colo.; a son David (Lela) Middendorf of Hiawatha; a sister, Helen Schmidt of Stanton, Neb.; sister-in-law, Emma Middendorf of Sabetha; granddaughters, Jessica (Jeff) Young, Katie (Chris) Knoll; step-grandchildren, Brandon (Laura) Smith and Jenna Smith; great grandchildren: Haley Young, Mitchell Smith, Ava Knoll, Meredith Smith and Liam Knoll. Esther was preceded in death by her parents; daughter-in-law, Nancy Middendorf; brothers, Harold, Herbert, Raymond and Charles Ruhnke; sisters, Edna Benitz, Dorothy Bode and Marguerite Damm. A celebration of Esther’s life is planned for 11 a.m. Tuesday, Dec. 13, at Zion Lutheran Church in Hiawatha, with Pastor Mike Dunaway officiating. Cremation will follow service with private inurnment at a later date at Mt. Hope Cemetery. Memorials: Zion Lutheran Church or Missy Newell Memorial Fund, c/o Chapel Oaks Funeral Home, 124 S 7th St., 66434. The Sabetha Herald 12/14/2016

Barbara Jean Rockey

Barbara Jean Rockey, 90, of Hiawatha, died Wednesday, Dec. 7, 2016, at Maple Heights Nursing Home. She was born June 28, 1926, in Columbus, Neb., and grew up in the northeast Kansas area, where she attended schools in Hiawatha and Fairview. She met and married the love of her life, Wilbert Rockey. They were blessed with six children. Wilbert and Barbara moved from the farm to town in 1956 and lived there until she moved to Maple Heights, where she spent the last 12 years. She was a longtime member of First United Methodist Church of Hiawatha. Survivors include three daughters, Irena Lyon and Ruth (Tom) Black, both of Hiawatha, and Christian (Dale) Buckingham of Warrensburg, Mo.; two sons, Paul (Nancy) Rockey and Phil (Jacqueline) Rockey, both of Hiawatha; brother, James Bashamp; sister, Lorena Martin; 14 grandchildren; 27 great grandchildren; and five great great grandchildren. Barbara was preceded in death by her parents; husband, Wilbert, in 2015; son, Kenneth (Butch) Rockey; sister, Mary Ayers; and granddaughter, Amy Buckingham. Funeral services are planned for 2 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 11, at Chapel Oaks Funeral Home in Hiawatha, with the Rev. Jacob Cloud officiating. Private family interment will be at Mt. Hope Cemetery in Hiawatha. Friends may call at the funeral home after 10 a.m. Sunday. Memorial contributions are suggested to Maple Heights Nursing Home, which may be sent in care of the funeral home, 124 S. 7th St., Hiawatha, KS 66434.

BIRTHDAY Pauline Wisdom Announcements printed in The Sabetha Herald are printed for free up to 250 words. For anything beyond that, the charge is $.50 per word. Photos can be added for an additional charge. For more information on photo charges, visit our website at http://sabethaherald.com/about/submit-anannouncement/ or contact us.

Birthday

Pauline Wisdom

Pauline Wisdom will turn 100 years old on Dec. 22, 2016. She was born Dec. 22, 1916. An open house celebration is planned for Sunday, Dec. 18, from 1 to 3 p.m., at the Community National Bank Community Room, 15 Main Street in Sabetha. Cards may be sent to Pauline at 302 Cedar, Sabetha, KS 66534. The Sabetha Herald 12/14/2016

Thank You

The Prairie Hills FFA Alumni would like to offer a Holiday Thank You to all who patronized our Christmas Country Store Fundraiser during the Sabetha Window Opening on November 25th. A special thank you goes to all Alumni Members who donated items for the store and to United Bank and Trust for the use of their Community Meeting Room! Wishing all a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

Prairie Hills FFA Alumni

Interested in the private life of Jesus, Mary, Joseph and the Apostles?

The Sabetha Herald 12/14/2016

Compiled by Laura Edelman from past issues of The Sabetha Herald

125 YEARS AGO

Friday, December 11, 1891 Of course editors, as a rule, are kind-hearted men. An exchange tells of a subscriber who died and left fourteen years’ subscription unpaid. The editor was at the grave and as the lid was screwed on for the last time, put in a linen duster, a thermometer, a palm leaf fan, and a receipt for making ice. The front of the new school building is a work of art. Everyone is surprised at its beauty. The Board of Education say the new water heating apparatus will be in January 1, 1892, and heat the entire building, both the new main part and the older wing. After spending forty minutes in Tempe we pull out for Phoenix, the capital of the territory. The dust, which is the greatest detriment to the country, is just horrible. Though the weather is warm, we dare not open the car window for fear of being entombed in the dust. At some places the dust is so bad that we cannot see forty feet from the cars, and is indeed enough to disgust the most enthusiastic. Two loads from a double-barreled shotgun were fired into a window of the east-bound Chicago, Kansas and Nebraska passenger train a short distance east of Wathena last Tuesday evening. The loads lodged in a car seat and barely missed several passengers.

100 YEARS AGO

Thursday, December 14, 1916 You have read stories written in the first person singular where the writer is merely the chronicler displaying the hero. But the writer is the one you long remember, as admiringly as the hero of the book. Such a book is Cawford’s “The Roman Singer”. Another is W. J. Locke’s “Jaffery”. Paper soaked in water makes one of the best and cheapest fuels that can be obtained, according to scientists. By a simple and easy process, which anyone can undertake, an accumulation of old papers, newspapers or bags, wrapping paper, can be converted into fuel for the stove, fireplace or furnace. $100 Reward, $100—The readers of this paper will be pleased to learn that there is at least one dreaded disease that science has been able to cure in all its stages, and that is catarrh. Catarrh being greatly influenced by constitutional conditions requires constitutional treatment. The proprietors have so much faith in the curative powers of Hall’s Catarrh Cure that they offer One Hundred Dollars for any case that it fails to cure. Hunting Rules—If you insist upon going out to shoot and kill, at least observe the following rules and teach such caution to your son. Don’t point firearms at any human being or domestic animal. Keep the muzzle toward the ground or in the air. Don’t set firearm down without unloading. Don’t jump or climb a fence stream without unloading. Don’t shoot without knowing what you are shooting at.

75 YEARS AGO

3A

This Week’s Announcements

This Week’s Obituaries HIAWATHA Esther Middendorf Barbara Rockey

sabethaherald.com  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  December 14, 2016

Wednesday, December 17, 1941 One of the immediate effects in Sabetha this week as a result of the outbreak of war between the United States and the Axis powers is the organization of the Sabetha Local Council of Defense. This group of persons, not to exceed 40 in number, has been appointed by Mayor S. M. Hibbard and the city commissioners, to coordinate Sabetha’s defense efforts. At a meeting of Nemaha county food dealers in Seneca the last of the week, Milt Poland of Sabetha was named as chairman of the organization. The food dealers of the county have organized for the purpose of considering the food stamp plan for the county. Mr. Poland said the food distributors in Kansas should be vitally concerned about this new program. Kansas is an agricultural state and should welcome a universal stamp plan program. Nemaha County has 361 relief clients. Joanne Beyer, eleven year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joe Beyer who live on old Highway 36 a mile and a half west of Sabetha, is a patient in Bell Memorial hospital at Kansas City where she is suffering from a virulent form of sarcoma. Little hope is held for her recovery. She is a pupil in the sixth grade, in Miss Rose Petr’s room. She was taken to the hospital about ten days ago. Melvin Grimm, contrary to rumors that he was injured in the Pearl Harbor attack on December 7, is safe and well, according to word received in Sabetha by his mother, Mrs. Nora Grimm. I know you are wondering about all of us out here in the “War Zone” and how we are getting along since Dec. 7th, when we were stunned by the radio broadcast of the Japanese attack off Pearl Harbor and Honolulu. Our citizens all over the Pacific coast were reminded of the sinking of the battleship Maine in 1898 and the indignation of the United States. To me, that seemed mild as I remember it, to this dastardly attack on Sunday, December 7. – an American soldier

50 YEARS AGO

Thursday, December 15, 1966 The coaches plan on the adult male gym classes beginning Monday, Jan. 9 at the Sabetha High School. Coaches Clark and Baldridge have again agreed to coach an adult male gym class as in the years past if they can get about 20 or more members. The cost is $6 total. Two Kayettes have really been working hard. They were in charge of the Thanksgiving all-school assembly held on Nov. 23, at which the Rev. Jones spoke. An offering was collected for Meals for Millions. A Twirp Dance after the first basketball game was sponsored by the girls. The high school youth and young adults of the Methodist Church will present a living crèche, depicting the Nativity Scene, on the south lawn of the church the following evenings of next week, and on Sunday morning, the 18th. This morning scene will be from 9:00 to 9:30 as the children arrive for Church school Sunday.

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25 YEARS AGO

Wednesday, December 11, 1991 Sabethans welcomed “Indian Winter” this week as temperatures were mild and skies sunny. Temperatures climbed to over the 60 degree mark Monday and nice weather was expected to continue Tuesday. Rain is a possibility later this week. Jimmy Graves, eight-year-old Sabetha second grader, is shown as he somersaults his way down Main Street following school Monday. By 4 p.m. Jimmy had reached over 700 flips in an effort to surpass the Guinness Book of Records mark of 8,341. Among those serving as cheerleaders and statistician were his sister, Anna Graves, Vikkie Strahm and Erica, Sarah, and Samantha Rice. Bulletin—Jimmy had to quit after 2,511 due to an injury—his head had a large bump! The St. Jude’s Children’s Hospital was the beneficiary in a fund-raising bike-a-thon participated in by Sabetha elementary students. A total of 25 youngsters traveled up to 18 miles during the event. Despite opposition from neighboring property owners, the Sabetha City Commission voted 4-1 Monday night to rezone land one-half mile south of Sabetha High School for a mobile home park. A week earlier, a group of residents presented the commission with a petition from nine owners of property within 200 feet of the proposed mobile home park. The property owners objected to Ray Prestwood’s plan to establish a mobile home park in their neighborhood.

10 YEARS AGO

Wednesday, December 13, 2006 Douglas Whittaker, O.D., and his wife, Susanna Whittaker, O.D., moved from Dallas, Texas, to Sabetha in July to join the optometry practice of Dr. Doug’s father, James Whittaker, O.D., who is currently practicing in Sabetha and Seneca. SES addition—After additional discussion, the Board voted to move forward with the 4,700 square foot base plan with the changes discussed, including an addition to square off the back side of the addition, adding approximately 300 square feet. The addition will add three classrooms, as well as two smaller teacher workrooms. Children from Sabetha Community Preschool sang and provided actions for several holiday songs for the crowd at the Open House at United Bank and Trust and SBS Insurance in Sabetha last Friday, Dec. 8. The bank and insurance staffs showed their appreciation to their clients with a holiday buffet, homemade cookies prepared by the staff, coffee and punch.

Annual

Christmas Cantata Thursday, December 15 at 7:00 p.m.

The community is invited to attend. Refreshments provided following the concert. No cost.

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December 14, 2016  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  sabethaherald.com

opinion EDITORIAL Amazing Grace I was blessed last week with the opportunity to travel to New York City with my mother and sister-in-law. We went to see the sights and the Christmas lights, but the experiences that will stick with me had nothing to do with any specific landmarks. One of those experiences happened completely by accident on our part, though maybe not truly by chance. As we took a quick walk through a corner of Central Park – on one of many winding paths – we literally had no idea where we were going. We could hear the sound of singing — no instruments, just voices. At first, we couldn’t pick out what song was being sung but as we were drawn closer we realized it was, “O Holy Night.” We continued walking toward the sound until we found its source — a handful of singers standing underneath a stone terrace. After doing a little digging a few days later, I found out that this group of gospel singers gathers at the Bethesda Terrace every day from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. to sing spiritual music for passers-by, or for those who specifically come to see them. We weren’t out on our stroll until about 3:30 p.m., so we were truly blessed to find them still singing at that time. We arrived at the tail-end of the familiar Christmas melody but hoped they would sing another. And they did, and I was so glad to get to hear them sing one of my favorite hymns — “Amazing Grace.” Amazing Grace is one of those songs that speaks to many people, some of course more than others. Even as a teenager, Amazing Grace has had that kind of “Just close your eyes and take it in” kind of effect on me. “Amazing grace! How sweet the sound/That saved a wretch like me!/I once was lost, but now am found/Was blind, but now I see. ’Twas grace that taught my heart to fear/And grace my fears relieved/ How precious did that grace appear/The hour I first believed. Through many dangers, toils and snares/I have already come/’Tis grace hath brought me safe thus far/And grace will lead me home. The Lord has promised good to me/His Word my hope secures/He will my Shield and Portion be/As long as life endures. Yea, when this flesh and heart shall fail/And mortal life shall cease/I shall possess, within the veil/A life of joy and peace. The earth shall soon dissolve like snow/The sun forbear to shine/ But God, who called me here below/Will be forever mine.” A later addition by another writer added the verse: “When we’ve been there ten thousand years/Bright shining as the sun/We’ve no less days to sing God’s praise/Than when we’d first begun.” Its words evoke a sense of peace. The story behind the song shows us why that is. Amazing Grace was written by John Newton in the late mid to late 1700s. Newton was an admitted sinner, writing that he went out of his way to tempt and seduce others, until his mid-20s. He made his living aboard numerous slave trading ships. On a homeward journey in the midst of an enormous storm, Newton converted to Christianity. Later in life, Newton served as a minister and denounced the slave trade. In the early 1770s, Newton wrote the words to “Amazing Grace.” The words were put to melody in the 1800s. Standing in the park that day, it felt as though those singers had been kept there to sing that song just for me. What a special reminder of what that very first Christmas brought to us all. Amber Deters Co-Editor The Sabetha Herald

Tell us! What song is your favorite at Christmas time, and why?

Respond by 10 a.m. Monday, December 19! We will publish your responses in next week’s newspaper! SEND TO: news@sabethaherald.com BRING TO: 1024 Main Street, Sabetha

LETTERS POLICY WRITE: Letters to the Editor, The Sabetha Herald, P.O. Box 208, Sabetha, KS 66534. EMAIL: news@sabethaherald.com We welcome letters of general interest to the community and reserve the right to edit for clarification or length. Letters should be fewer than 400 words, and writers are limited to one letter every other week. Letters are due by 10 a.m. on Monday before publication and must be signed with the writer's name, address and phone number for verification purposes. Only the name and hometown will be included in the printed letter. We do not publish anonymous letters or letters printed elsewhere.

DISCLAIMER The opinions expressed in editorial, columns or letters to the editor do not necessarily reflect those of The Sabetha Herald or its staff.

COLUMNS

So close and yet so far away!

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his homily was first published in The Sabetha Herald a few years ago, but I thought it is worth re-doing. In Matthew 2, we have the story of the Magi, Babylonian Wise Men, who traveled to Israel in search of the long awaited Messiah. They had first learned of Israel’s Messiah seven centuries previously from the Old testament prophet Daniel. One particular aspect of this story has intrigued me for years. And I believe the application of the truth of verses two and eight is just as relevant today as it was 20 centuries ago. We read in verse two, “When King Herod heard this [the inquiry as to the whereabouts of the Christ Child] he was disturbed, and all of Jerusalem with him.” The Messiah had been prophesied and expected for many centuries. And when He arrived Herod and the religious community were dumb-founded and at a loss to answer the questions of the Magi.

“The chief priests and teachers of the law,” however, correctly told the Magi that Bethlehem was the prophesied birth place of the Christ. Now Bethlehem was just five miles south and west of Jerusalem. So the Magi dismissed themselve s f rom Minister Herod’s court and made the Speaks short journey BY: DUANE TRAMP to Bethlehem. WOODLAWN Look closely BAPTIST CHURCH at verse eight. It says, (Herod speaking) “Go and make a careful search for the Child. As soon as you find Him, report to me, so that I too may go and worship Him.” And so the Magi went to Bethlehem by themselves. Neither Herod nor any of the religious types went along to see for themselves the Christ Child. As something so very important for Israel as the Messiah they could not make the brief journey

to meet the Messiah and witness for themselves His arrival. I can understand why God the Father did not allow Herod to go with the Magi because he (Herod) did not want to worship the Christ; rather he wanted to kill the Baby, who he considered a threat to his throne. But the hypocritical Pharisees and Saducees stayed at home in comfort, not willing to exert themselves for the appearance of God’s very own Son! Amazing! So close and yet so far away! As for the application of this truth for today, consider how many people have heard about the Christ and yet have never personally met Jesus and invited Him into their hearts as their personal Lord and Savior. Some folks consider them-

Estate planning tips for blended families

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ost of us need to do some type of estate planning, but it’s especially important if you are part of a “blended” family. And the best time to start is now – before these plans need to be implemented. Estate planning can be complex, so you will need help from a qualified legal professional. But here are a few general suggestions that can be suitable for blended families: Update beneficiary designations – and think about multiple beneficiaries. Update the beneficiary designations on your retirement accounts and insurance policies to reflect the reality of your blended family. These designations can supersede the instructions you provided in your will. So if your will states that your current spouse should inherit your assets, but you had named your former spouse, or a child, as the primary beneficiary of an IRA, then your former spouse or your child – not your present-day spouse – will indeed receive the IRA. To ensure that “everyone gets

something,” you could name your current spouse as primary beneficiary and your children from a previous marriage as equal c o n t i n g e n t Edward beneficiaries. But the prima- Jones ry beneficiary will receive all Financial the assets and Focus is free to do whatever he or BY: JEFF RUSSELL she wants with the money. To enact your wishes, you can name multiple primary beneficiaries and designate the percentage of the asset each beneficiary will receive. Create a living trust – and consider a professional trustee. A living trust can help you avoid the time-consuming and costly process of probate, while giving you great freedom to determine how, and when, you want your assets distributed. After you pass away, the trust, if structured properly, can provide your surviving spouse with

income for life; then, after your spouse dies, your children from an earlier marriage would receive the remainder of the trust. So far, so good. However, issues can arise if you name your surviving spouse or one of your children as the “successor tr ustee” who will take charge of the trust upon your passing. Your spouse, acting as successor trustee, could choose to invest only in bonds for income, but if he or she lives another 20 or so years, the value of the investments within the trust will probably have diminished considerably – leaving your children with very little. Conversely, if you name one of your children as trustee, the child could invest strictly in growthoriented investments, leaving your surviving spouse with greatly reduced income.

selves to be “Christians” if they go to church, or teach a Sunday School class, or hold an office in the church. To be a genuine Child of God you must make a personal commitment to Jesus Christ as the Savior of your sinful soul and your blessed Redeemer, who purchased your salvation by His very own blood shed on the cross of Calvary! Dear reader, there is a substantial number of Bible-believing, Bible-teaching churches in Sabetha and the surrounding communities. You have more than a few choices as to where you can attend. And make your attendance there regular and faithful. Personally meet Jesus Christ and dedicate your life to Him and “Grow in grace and knowledge of Him!” Your eternal future depends entirely upon your decision to accept Christ as your Lord and Savior.

To be fair to everyone, you may want to engage a professional third-party trustee. This individual, or company, is not a beneficiary of the trust, is not entitled to share in the assets of the trust, and, ideally, should have no “rooting interest” in how proceeds of the trust are distributed. Consider a prenuptial agreement. When it’s time to settle an estate, a prenuptial agreement can help avoid disputes among members of a blended family. If you and your new spouse have agreed to keep your assets separate so that each of you can pass an inheritance to your own children, you need to spell out that separation in your “prenup,” your will, your living trust and any other relevant estate-planning arrangements. Above all else, share your estate-planning intentions with members of your blended family. You may not be able to satisfy everyone, but through open communications, you can help prevent bad feelings – and unpleasant surprises.


opinion

sabethaherald.com  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  December 14, 2016

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COLUMNS

Holiday preparations

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is the season, for holiday preparation. As usual, I’m doing the majority of the shopping, cooking, decorating and what not. After 30 some years of marriage, we still don’t have all the bugs worked out. For instance, after Keith had some more pipe fence installed, he thought “we” should paint it. By “we” he meant “me.” I guess he ended up helping one afternoon. The best part - he announced that we were having a “painting party” to the family, and they went MIA pretty fast. The party was to begin at 2 p.m. to try and get it done before dark and before the weather got colder. Funny thing was, Keith didn’t show until after 4 p.m., when the paint was gone and the painting done. So much for the party, but I can remind him of that when the house needs vacuumed. With all this busyness, I still

Fenceline BY: JODY HOLTHAUS MEADOWLARK EXTENSION DISTRICT AGENT

stop and make supper. But that has been easier these days. I went to one of Chef Ali’s freezer meal sessions. It was part of a training for linking consumers to food, sponsored by the Farm Bureau. It was great to see all of the teachers there, so they can teach their students about agriculture. In less than an hour, I had four meals made up to freeze for later use. Gosh, are they good - we might get used to this! Get used to the changes coming for the Veterinary Feed Directive.

As I was sitting at the last meeting we had in Seneca, I was mistakenly thinking, “won’t affect me until I can’t buy CTC in the mineral.” Then it dawns on me, that medicated milk replacer is one of the VFD changes. I will have to have a written directive from the veterinarian in order to purchase this. If we happen to have an orphaned calf, or one that needs a bit more to supplement them, I’m going to need milk replacer. If you are in this situation, get on the phone and get your written directive, now. With my luck, we’d need the replacer on a weekend, after the clinic closes! Which brings to mind, my gift ideas for the beef producer. I’ve always thought of making up a calving kit for Keith for Christmas. I would include the calving ob straps, the nylon kind that don’t hurt the calf as bad. Those

What’s that shrub?

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ush Honeysuckle. Road ditches are full of it. Wooded areas are being invaded by it. The bright red berries and still green foliage sure make it stand out. Unfortunately, for as much fall/ winter color as the berries provide, bush honeysuckle species – Amur or Tartarian for us in eastern Kansas – are actually invasive, and have fast become a real nuisance for landowners. The very noticeable berries are clustered around the stem and until this last cold snap, the leaves have kept a bright green color. Growing anywhere from six to more than 20 feet in height, the one-time landscape shrub has become a serious understory invader from here to Ohio. In fact, some states have even included it

on their noxious weed lists! We have some native honeysuckles, so what’s the problem? While the native honeysuckles are vining (think Japanese honeysuckle), the bush structure of these invasive honeysuckles makes them more competitive. Add to that the fact that their extended growing season (they tend to leaf out much earlier than other trees and shrubs and stay green well in to the fall) gives them a huge competitive advantage over native species. Because of their vigorous growth, they can take over a woodland understory, reducing the number of native woodland wildflowers and other shrubs. The bottom line is this: if you want to promote native species on your property, then controlling bush

Car seat safety reminders

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ar seat safety is of the utmost importance for protecting your child during even the shortest of travels. However, knowing how to safely secure your growing child can be difficult. Being a first time grandparent, our family has revisited this topic. Here are common mistakes made with car seats and how to prevent them. Buying a used car seat without knowing about it. If you can afford it, avoid used car seats. However, considering the reality of the expense of having a child, some people may choose a used car seat. If you do, make sure the car seat comes with instructions and a label showing the manufacture date and model number. Make sure it has not been recalled by checking the model and date at http://www-odi.nhtsa.dot. gov/recalls/childseat.cfm. Also, make sure it is not expired or more than six years old, has no visible damage, has all of its parts, and has never been in a crash. If you don’t know the car seat’s history, don’t use it! Placing the car seat in the wrong spot. The safest place for your child’s car seat is the back seat, away from active air bags.

Family Life BY: NANCY NELSON MEADOWLARK EXTENSION DISTRICT

Please note that this is a different place to put a child than many of us grew up with. Always put your child in the back seat, away from the airbags in the front. Check your car manufacturer’s recommendations for placing your child in the back seat. Some recommend placing her in the middle, and some recommend placing her behind either the driver’s or passenger’s seat. Using the car seat as a replacement crib. A car seat is to designed to protect your child during travel. Do not let your child sleep or relax in the car seat for long periods of time out of the car, as this is unhealthy for him. Some research has indicated that sitting upright in a car seat might compress a newborn’s chest and lead to lower levels of oxygen. Even mild airway obstruction can impair a child’s development.

Holiday driving tips Be Aware BY: BROWN COUNTY SHERIFF JOHN MERCHANT

I

f you plan on traveling during the holidays or at any time during the winter months, check your entire vehicle routinely to make sure everything is in good working order. The most neglected parts on the vehicle are the windshield wipers and the wiper fluid. This is one of the most important items to check on your vehicle to make sure you have a clear field of vision while driving. Always try to keep your gas tank at least half full at all times during the winter months. Create an emergency kit to carry in your vehicle. Some things it should consist of are a battery-powered radio, blanket, jumper cables, small fire extinguisher, first aid kit, bottled water, non-perishable food items, maps, tire repair kit, road flares or reflectors, matches, candles and kitty litter. It is very important to listen to weather forecasts and road conditions before traveling. If needed, take alternate routes and stay on well traveled roads.

It is imperative that you contact friends or relatives and let them know the route you are taking and the approximate time you expect to arrive at your location. Become familiar with your route and know where the turn offs and exits are at. In this day and age, we rely a lot on the modern technology of cell phones. The down side to this is that many areas do not have service or we forget to bring along a charger. If this happens, we have to rely to what we have on hand so it is always best to hope for the best and prepare for the worst. We are also asking motorists to drive defensively. With the added holiday traffic, people are in more of a hurry to get places and they are more likely to make mistakes while driving. Always be on the lookout for the other person. Also allow plenty of time to get to your location and take breaks often to stay refreshed and alert. Always buckle up. By simply using your seat belt, you are reducing the chance of fatal injuries should you be involved in a crash by more than 45 percent, and it is one of the easiest ways to increase road safety. Seatbelt usage is a state law, and receiving a citation for not wearing your seat belt is no fun, especially during the holidays. We know everyone likes to enjoy the holiday festivities, but if you are consuming alcohol it is

Crops & Soils BY: DAVID HALLAUER MEADOWLARK EXTENSION DISTRICT

honeysuckles is needed. Multiple control options are available. They aren’t that deep rooted, so honeysuckle seedlings can be readily hand pulled when soil is damp. Once they get much size or if infestations are large, chemical control might be a necessity. Foliar applications of glyphosate (i.e., Roundup) in late summer and fall work well as do applications of Crossbow (2,4-D + triclopyr).

were a big demand item after our last calving school. Since Dr. Dave Rethorst is presenting this school on Dec. 15, I should probably get some more on hand. If you’d like to attend the calving school at 6:30 p.m. at the Jackson County fair building, give me a call. Space is limited. The kit could also have in it - besides the ear tags and tagger - the bander, with lots of new bands, ob lube if you need to help a bit, towels, latex gloves, a flashlight, iodine for the navel and whatever else I can think of. Of course, flashlights are going to be obsolete at our house. Keith and the electrician have gone crazy, with the new LED space lights. We can now “light up to the tree line,” like that is a good thing. NASA has probably seen our place show up in the last few weeks.

If you do try controlling by cutting, be sure and treat the stumps (cutting alone results in lots of resprouting). Treat cut stump areas with Tordon RTU (picloram), or concentrated (20 percent - 50 percent) glyphosate. Several studies have shown basal spraying with triclopyr (Garlon) not to be effective, while basal applications with 2,4-D or picloram products work well, using an oil carrier to penetrate the bark. Cut stump and basal treatments can be done when the areas to be sprayed are dry and not frozen. Always follow all label instructions when using pesticides.

Compost pile

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ompost piles should be turned about once per month even during the winter months. This will ensure the composting process continues and that all materials are equally composted. A compost pile is “turned” when uncomposted material is moved from the sides and tops of the pile to the center where it provides “fuel” for the microorganisms that break it down. Water may need to be added if the material you move to the center is dry. Check the moisture content by squeezing a fistful in your hand. It should feel moist but no excess water should drip out. Compress the material in the pile as best you can as excess air can slow the composting process. Poor drainage in garden areas Winter is often a good time to fix areas in the garden where water sits and does not drain properly. Such areas often harm plant roots due to poor oxygen levels in the soil. Consider adding good topsoil so water doesn’t sit. Be sure to till or spade the area to mix the new topsoil and the underlying existing soil. Plant roots do not like to cross distinct barriers caused by one type of soil sitting on top of another. Internal drainage can be improved by adding organic matter such as peat moss, rotted hay, cotton burrs, rotted silage or compost. This can be done by adding a 2- to 4- inch layer of organic matter to the surface of the soil and tilling or spading in as deeply as possible. Firewood Not all firewood is created equal. Some species of trees are able to produce much more heat per cord of wood. A cord is the

On the Extension Line BY: MATT YOUNG BROWN COUNTY EXTENSION

amount of wood in a well-stacked woodpile measuring 4 feet wide by 8 feet long by 4 feet high. Following are heat values (in million BTUs) per cord for various species of tree. The higher values represent a higher quality firewood. Ash, Green

22.8

Cottonwood

15.9

Elm, American

19.8

Elm, Siberian

20.9

Hackberry

21.0

Honeylocust

25.6

Locust, Black

28.3

Maple, Sugar

24.0

Maple, Silver

18.9

Mulberry

25.3

Oak, Red

24.0

Oak, Bur

24.9

Oak, Post

25.6

Osage Orange

32.6

Sycamore

19.5

Walnut, Black

21.8

Difficult to Split

Difficult to Split

Difficult to Split

Sparks, do not use in open fireplace

Difficult to Split

Remember to obtain firewood locally. Emerald Ash Borer is now in northeast Kansas and can be spread by transporting firewood.

Sitting in a car seat for lengthy periods can also contribute to the development of a flat spot on the back of your baby’s head and worsen gastroesophageal reflux disease. Incorrectly installing the car seat or buckling up your child. When you install a car seat, read both the manufacturer’s instructions, and the vehicle owner’s manual car seat recommendations. Make sure that it is facing the correct direction for the size of your child. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that children should be rear-facing until they outweigh the manufacturer’s guidelines for their model of car seat. Dressing your child in bulky outerwear. Harness straps might not provide enough protection over a baby’s bulky outerwear. If it’s cold, put your baby or young child in a lightweight jacket and hat. Buckle the harness snugly and then tuck a warm blanket around him. Saving the bulky outerwear for outdoors is not only safer for car seats, but your child will be warmer when she puts on that extra layer before going into the cold.

always advisable to have a designated driver. During the holidays, DUIs and alcohol-related accidents skyrocket and by using a designated CI102-KS-77250-HIAW0-NONE-NONE-NONE.PDF, CI102, Nobody understands the risks...., KS, driver this decreases accidents and promotes traffic safety. 7.7250 x 4.5, PDF, APEMM23UUD

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December 14, 2016  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  sabethaherald.com

local&area BLOOD DRIVES

KANSAS LIVESTOCK ASSOCIATION

It can’t be wrapped or placed under a tree, but the perfect gift can help save patient lives this holiday season. The American Red Cross urges eligible donors to give the lifesaving gift of a blood donation in December, a time when donations decline but the needs of patients remain steady. An upcoming blood donation opportunity is available from 7:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Friday, Dec. 16, at the Nemaha County Community Building in Seneca. Barbara Coger will never forget the donors that gave the blood that her husband received during the holidays. “I have been donating blood for some time, but really started encouraging others to do so after my husband received a donation on Christmas Eve,” she said. “He had not been doing well and would not survive much longer, but with that extra boost, he was able to share a big smile with me on Christmas morning, something I will always cherish.” Donors of all blood types are needed this holiday season to help ensure a sufficient supply for hospital patients. To encourage donations, all those who come to donate Dec. 22, through Jan. 8, 2017, will receive a long-sleeved Red Cross t-shirt, while supplies last. To make an appointment to give blood, download the Red Cross Blood Donor App, visit redcrossblood.org or call 1-800RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767). Donors are encouraged to make appointments and complete the RapidPass online health history questionnaire at redcrossblood. org/rapidpass to save time when donating.

Area men Chance Steele of Sabetha and Andy Bloom of Wetmore were among 20 Kansas Livestock Association (KLA) members from across the state to graduate from the KLA Young Stockmen’s Academy (YSA). Merck Animal Health partnered with KLA to host members in their 20s for a series of four seminars throughout 2016. This class brings the total number of YSA graduates to 220. Attending the KLA Convention was the final session for this year’s class and provided these young producers the opportunity to interact with KLA members from across the state and gain more industry knowledge. YSA members got a firsthand look at the inner workings of the association by attending the KLA Chairmen’s Circle meeting. The group also took part in the policy-making process by attending committee and council meetings where members discussed issues affecting their business interests, including noxious weeds, livestock price reporting, water appropriation and motor vehicle regulations. Immediately prior to the convention, the YSA class received their Masters of Beef Advocacy degrees, following an in-depth spokesperson training session with National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) Senior Executive Director of Communications Daren Williams. During their first session in Topeka last February, attendees were exposed to advocacy training, the legislative process and services provided by KLA and NCBA. The second installment took the group to Kansas City in May, where they learned about the agribusiness and retail beef industries. YSA members visited central and western Kansas in September to tour beef and dairy operations representing various segments of each industry. KLA is a trade organization rep-

COURT UPDATES

Red Cross Local men graduate from urges blood Young Stockmen’s Academy donation as holiday gift

Creamer scheduled for sentencing HEATHER STEWART Joseph Creamer, 18, of Humboldt Neb., entered a plea of no contest to one count of aggravated battery on Thursday, Dec. 8. The other three charges of aggravated robbery, conspiracy to commit aggravated battery and conspiracy to commit aggravated robbery were dismissed . These charges resulted from an incident, which occurred at approximately 11:30 p.m. on Aug.

CAR ACCIDENT

Merck Representative Dave Worrell, left, presents member Kansas Livestock Association’s Young Stockmen’s Academy Chance Steele with his YSA alumnus pen. Submitted

“When we were looking for a name that would describe what we wanted our business to be about, we came across apogee in the thesaurus and it just seemed to fit,” Aaron said. “Our goal is to provide the apogee of animal health and service to our clients.” Amy said although she didn’t like it at first, the name began to grow on her. “At first I didn’t like the name because I thought it was an odd word that nobody would understand or be able to pronounce,” she said. “While that is often the case, it gives us an opportunity to describe who we are and the kind of business we’re striving to create. ‘Apogee’ grew on me after a while, and we’ve stuck with it ever since.” Apogee Animal Health, Inc. is a mobile practice, which differs slightly from a mobile clinic. The Schaffers make house calls and farm visits, but they do not have a mobile van/bus or trailer where they conduct appointments and perform surgeries. “We mostly work out of our pick-up, but have an office in our home, which is now registered as a veterinary premise,” Aaron said. “This distinction gives us added flexibility in running our business.” Currently, Aaron and Amy are open to seeing all types of animals, but their primary focus is food animals. “We feel that we could be good at most things or great at a few things,” Aaron said. “Based on our experience, interest and the needs of the area, we desire to focus on food animal medicine at this time.” Since the Schaffer’s main focus is food animals, they offer a variety of services that include but are not limited to on-farm pregnancy diagnosis via ultrasound or rectal palpation; breeding soundness exams on bulls, rams and bucks; Bang’s vaccination for heifers; veterinary feed directive (VFD) authorizations; and herd health management. They are still able to perform house calls to provide general pet wellness exams, vaccinations, and other minor treatments, but as they grow they plan to add to the services they provide. With Apogee Animal Health, Inc. currently being a small growing business, the Schaffers are able to determine exactly what their customers need, and can tailor the services they provide to their customers. “We offer the option to ship medicines and supplies directly

HERALD REPORT

resenting the business interests of members at both the state and federal levels. Voluntary dues dollars paid by producers are used for programs that benefit KLA members

in the areas of legislative representation, regulatory assistance, legal troubleshooting, communications and the advancement of youth.

Heather Stewart | Herald

animals, food animals, equine, exotics, medicine, surgery, food safety, public health, and so much more” Amy said. “For us, it’s a way we can serve the livestock industry and hopefully be a light to those we interact with.” Being a small start-up business, the Schaffers say that business so far has been good but it has had its ups and downs. “We have really enjoyed working with the clients that have given us the opportunity to serve them so far” Aaron said. “Without their support, we probably wouldn’t still be here.” “Since moving to Morrill, we have enjoyed getting to know the area communities better and meeting more people,” Amy said. Aaron and Amy said that their tip for others wanting to start their own business is that it requires patience and endurance. “We often pause to remind ourselves that even though we’re not where we hope to be, yet, the business is growing, and we just need to keep going,” Aaron said. “We’ve made mistakes along the way, but we try to learn from them so that we can serve our clients better each day.” ABOUT AARON AND AMY Aaron grew up the third oldest of 12 children on a 100-cow dairy farm in central Illinois. During his undergraduate studies, he was employed as a herd manager on a 70head dairy goat farm and creamery that produced artisan cheeses, and was then accepted to the College of Veterinary Medicine at Kansas State University. While studying to earn his DVM, he also completed a Master of Science. Amy grew up in McPherson where she was active in 4-H, FFA

truck’s trailer that was still blocking the eastbound lanes. Two children in the van – Gavin Steckler, 11, and Jamison Steckler, 14 – were killed. Toby Steckler, 43, Pam Steckler, 43, and Mason Steckler, 10, all of Audubon, Iowa, were hospitalized. Shayne Sanborn, 41, of Papillion, Neb., a youth coach with the Omaha AAA Hockey Club – who was a passenger in the Doggetts’ SUV — also was killed. Also riding in the SUV were Tyler Sanborn, 14, of Bellevue, Neb., and Haden Rast, 14, of Cedar Rapids, Iowa. They also were hospitalized. Engram was not injured. According to D. Hicks, D. Doggett and H. Doggett have since been released from the hospital. As of Monday, Dec. 12, K. Doggett remains in the hospital but has been released from intensive care.

Submitted

and church. After graduating from high school, she moved to Manhattan and received a bachelor’s degree in animal sciences and industry with a minor in international agriculture. While she was in vet school, she also completed a master’s of public health. Since the couple married in 2014, they have been blessed with two daughters — Emelia, 1-1/2, and Eleanor, 3 months. In Aaron’s free time, he enjoys spending time with his family, woodworking and gardening. Amy stays home fulfilling her more important roles as a wife and a mother but stays professionally Aaron Schaffer – owner of Apogee Animal Health – kneels with a involved by doing small amounts goat at Summit Farms Inc. on Wednesday, December 7. of contract research from home. to clients next-day at a competitive price,” Aaron said. “In addition, due to our background in research, we have an interest in data management so for those clients that would like to look at their production data, we can help identify trends and areas where they can increase profit. Furthermore, I have a reasonably strong background in small ruminant production and really enjoy working with sheep and goats.” So far, in order to let the public know about the services they provide, the Schaffers have relied heavily on word of mouth, as well as promoting their business by passing out business cards. They have also started to become more active in the Sabetha Chamber of Commerce and other community events. Even though they are promoting their business through events and handing out business cards, they said it is still difficult to promote themselves when they do not know what the need of the area is. “I think that the most difficult aspect of my job has been trying to determine what our niche is in the market and to develop that client base,” Aaron said. “Neither of us is particularly gifted at marketing and sales, so trying to ascertain how to promote our business to an unknown client base has been challenging,” Amy said. Despite the challenges, the Schaffers said they really enjoy working with the livestock producers and animals, as well as the different opportunities their job provides. “I love the variety of opportunities that exists within the field of veterinary medicine. The options are nearly endless — companion

Family with local ties injured in car accident

Kim Doggett, 47, and her husband Daniel Doggett, 50, and Haden Doggett, 14, all of Gretna, Neb., were injured and taken to the hospital following a car accident on I-80 west of Anita, Iowa, on Saturday morning, Dec. 12. K. Doggett is the daughter of Diane and Don Hicks of Sabetha and Ed and Dee Milne of North Platte, Neb. Dan is the son of Jim and Judy Doggett of Lincoln, Neb. The three-vehicle accident, which killed three people – including two children – and injured eight occurred when a westbound semi – driven by Marcella Engram of Savannah, Ga., – crossed the median and hit an eastbound van just after 9 a.m. The impact sent Merck Representative Troy Warnken, left, presents Kansas both vehicles off the road. The Livestock Association’s Young Stockmen’s Academy attendee eastbound SUV – driven by D. Andy Bloom with his YSA alumnus pen. Doggett – then crashed into the

Apogee Animal Health Inc., offers different types of services APOGEE.1A

10, near 208th and F Road in Nemaha County. The Nemaha County Sheriff ’s Office says a victim reported being struck in the head with a baseball bat and having items in his possession taken from him. The investigation led to search warrants, and those searches produced evidence implicating Creamer. Creamer is scheduled to be sentenced at 9:30 a.m. Thursday, Jan. 12, 2017.

CONTACT For questions about Apogee Animal Health, Inc. you can contact Aaron and Amy Schaffer by mail at Apogee Animal Health, Inc., 302 Green St., Morrill, KS 66515; by email at apogeeanimalhealth@ gmail.com; or by phone at the office at 785-459-2888, Aaron’s cell at 785-285-8239, or Amy’s cell at 785-285-8242.

NEMAHA COUNTY CONSERVATION DISTRICT

Soil Health/Cover Crop Workshop to be held Submitted by Dana Schmelzle Nemaha County Conservation District will sponsor a Soil Health/ Cover Crop Workshop on Thursday, Jan. 5, 2017, at the Nemaha County Community Building, 1500 Community Drive in Seneca. Registration for the Soil Health Workshop begins at 9 a.m. At 9:30 a.m., Shawn Tiffany will be presenting “Grazing Cover Crops for Livestock and Soil Health.” Tiffany has owned and operated Tiffany Cattle Company with his brother Shane and their families since 2007. Tiffany Cattle Company is a custom cattle feeding and grazing business that also has extensive farming operations. The focus of the farm is to raise as much of the feed for the cattle feeding operation as possible while at the same time managing both owned and leased acres with methods that ensure sustainability well into the future. Grazed and mechanically harvested cover crops have become an important part of this philosophy over the last seven growing seasons. Cover crops, manure application, grazing programs and a no-till motivation have led to better productivity and improved soil health in addition to allowing the business avenues to better serve their customers. Dusty Schwandt, a rangeland management specialist with the Natural Resources Conservation Service, will give a presentation about “Grazing Cover Crops.” Schwandt will explain the goals

and considerations to think about when planning for cover crops. He will discuss the different blends he has used for his cattle operation as well as how to calculate stocking rates. Our guest speakers will then be rounded out by Jaymelynn Farney, the beef systems specialist at Kansas State University’s Southeast Area in Parsons. Farney’s presentation is entitled, “Integration of Livestock and Cropping Systems.” She grew up in Fort Sumner, N.M., where her family had a cowcalf operation. She completed her associate’s of science degree in agriculture at Butler Community College, where she was a member of the livestock judging team. Farney continued her education at KSU in animal science and then went on to Oklahoma State University to complete her master’s of science in ruminant nutrition with an emphasis on receiving calf management. She returned to KSU to complete her PhD in ruminant nutrition, using the dairy cow as the model for how inflammation impacts production. Lunch will be served at 11:30 a.m., catered by Home Cookin’ of Seneca. There will be booths set up from our local businesses to visit about cover crops and answer product questions. In order to know how much food to prepare for the Soil Health Workshop, please contact the Conservation District office at 785-336-2186 ext. 110 no later than Dec. 30.

Published in The Sabetha Herald on Wednesday, Dec. 14, 2016

LEGAL NOTICE

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local&area

sabethaherald.com  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  December 14, 2016

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GOVERNING BODY

Sabetha City Commission KRISTA WASINGER

Glacial Hills Resource Conservation and Development and the Sabetha Chamber of Commerce celebrate the ribbon cutting at the Business Resource Center in Sabetha. Pictured are (L-R) David Key, Nancy Gafford, Melissa Detweiler, Carol Hughes, Gary Satter, Cindy Alderfer, Jennifer Huber, Julie Burenheide, Dayra Menold and Gina Murchison. Tim Kellenberger | Herald

Ribbon cutting held for Glacial Hills Business Resource Center NEMAHA COUNTY DISTRICT COURT LIMITED CASES FINISHED Sabetha Community Hospital, Inc. vs. Daniel and Brook Brubeck of Sabetha, judgment for plaintiff in the amount of $1,951.02 plus costs and interest. Pawnee County Memorial Hospital vs. Randall and Stephanie Kaster of Bern, judgment for plaintiff in the amount of $423.25 plus costs and interest. SMALL CLAIMS FINISHED Amanda Adams vs. Adam Wiltz, judgment for the plaintiff in the amount of $1,000. Aberle Ford vs. Sterling Jackson, judgment for the plaintiff in the amount of $833.71 plus fees and costs. Shane R. Schuette vs. Paul Mills, judgment for the plaintiff in the amount of $110.92 plus fees and costs. Sabetha Community Hospital vs. Kelly Hill, judgment for plaintiff in the amount of $777.55 plus fees and costs. Sabetha Community Hospital vs. Gary McGuire et al, judgment for plaintiff in the amount of $466.73 plus fees and costs.

Sabetha Community Hospital vs. Skylar and Delora Fish, judgment for plaintiff in the amount of $1,927.34 plus fees and costs. Sabetha Emergency Services vs. Shawn Campbell, judgment for plaintiff in the amount of $572.67 plus fees and costs. TRAFFIC Melba Stoval of Enid, Okla., speeding 85/65, $213 fines and fees. Tracy Myers of Centralia, failure to stop at stop sign, $183 fines and fees. Matthew Gifford of Seneca, found guilty of driving while declared a habitual violator, sentenced to 90 days in Nemaha County Jail, suspended to 12 months supervised probation; ordered to pay $463 fines, fees and costs. TRAFFIC DIVERSIONS Douglas Schmelzle of Seneca, speeding 76/55, $372 fines, fees and costs. Kimberly Wagner of Sabetha, driving under the influence, $1,158 fines, fees and costs.

Published in The Sabetha Herald on Wednesday, Dec. 14, 2016.

LEGAL NOTICE RESOLUTION 2016-32 A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF SABETHA, KANSAS GRANTING CERTAIN TAX EXEMPTIONS AND INCENTIVES FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT TO WEMGER MANUFACTURING, INC. IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CITY’S POLICY AND PROCEDURES FOR TAX EXEMPTIONS AND INCENTIVES FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT. WHEREAS, the City of Sabetha, Kansas (CITY) has authority to grant tax exemptions and incentives for economic development pursuant to Section 13, Article 11 of the Kansas Constitution and, WHEREAS, in furtherance of such authority the City has heretofore adopted A Statement of Policy and Procedures–Tax Exemptions and Incentives for Economic Development by Resolution 1994-12 passed and approved by the City Commission on the 1st day of August, 1994; and, WHEREAS, Wenger Manufacturing Inc. has submitted an application for such exemptions, which has been reviewed by the City Clerk and the Administrative Review Committee and the City Commission and determined to be complete and worthy of further consideration; and, WHEREAS, THE City Commission has this date conducted a public hearing on the issue of adoption of the requested exemptions after having first published notice of such hearing; and, WHEREAS, the City Commission, after hearing all comments and persons appearing at such hearing, reviewing the application and being duly advised in the premises has determined that such exemption should be granted. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE GOVERNING BODY OF THE CITY OF SABETHA, KANSAS as follows: 1. That the City of Sabetha, Kansas hereby grants exemptions and incentives to Wenger Manufacturing Inc. as more specifically set out and detailed on Schedule A, attached hereto and incorporated herein by reference. 2. That this Resolution shall take effect and be in force from and after its adoption and publication once in the official City newspaper. PASSED AND ADOPTED BY THE GOVERNING BODY OF THE CITY OF SABETHA, KANSAS this 28th day of November, 2016. CITY OF SABETHA, KANSAS. By: Doug Clark, Mayor Attest: Steve Compo, City Clerk SCHEDULE A That the following land, buildings, and equipment owned by Wenger Manufacturing Inc., having been determined to be used exclusively for the manufacture of articles or commerce, or the conduction of research and development, or storing goods or commodities, which are sold or traded in interstate commerce, which were necessary to facilitate the construction of the expansion of Wenger Manufacturing, Inc. manufacturing facility, whereby new employment was created, to wit: Construction of a new building located in Industrial Park, Sabetha, Block A, Lot 1 & 2, Acres 1.5, Less R/W. The new building attached to the east side of the existing facility is a 24,330 square foot facility which will provide office space for the entire Wenger operation so previous office space can be used for research and engineering activities, is hereby made exempt from ad valorem taxation for a period of ten (10) years from the date that the new facility was put into use in November, 2016. The ad valorem exemption from taxation shall be effective beginning on January 1, 2017 through December 31, 2026. 50-1t

The Sabetha City Commission met at 6 p.m. Monday, Dec. 12. Present were Mayor Doug Clark, Commissioners Nick Aberle, Maridel Wittmer and Julie Burenheide, City Administrator Doug Allen, Assistant City Administrator Bill Shroyer and City Clerk Steve Compo. Commissioner Norm Schmitt was present via conference call for a portion of the meeting, but the connection was lost at some point during the meeting. Also present were members of the Webelo Cub Scout Pack 77 and Leader Jason Lang. The pack was present to learn about government meetings. The pack led the crowd in the Pledge of Allegiance. A number of other guests were present - most of them residents of the Rolling Hills Subdivisions in regard to a proposed cemetery near their properties. See story beginning on Page 1A. Hearings Two public hearings were held. The first was regarding the state budget. No public comments were given. The amended state budget was approved later in the meeting. The second hearing was in regard to a blight property – 304 Grant Street. A resolution to condemn the property was on the agenda. However, commissioners did not approve this resolution. 304 Grant Street Property Neighbors voiced their concern over the condition of 304 Grant Street. The house and outbuildings are owned by Chris Baumgartner. Doug and Traci Aberle, whose residence is located near the property, were mostly concerned about the condition of the outbuildings. “These are unoccupied buildings that are randomly assembled,” D. Aberle said. “What if someone wants to sell

a neighboring property, but no one wants to buy it because of the blight property?” T. Aberle said. Following the Aberles’ comments, the public hearing was closed. Later in the meeting, commissioners discussed the property. For more than a year, city officials have been working with Baumgartner, outlining what needs to be done in order for the property to not be considered as a blight to the neighborhood. In October 2015, city administration provided Baumgartner with a list of improvements that needed to be made to the property. Since that time, City Administrator Allen said Baumgartner had been attempting to make the improvements. Allen presented commissioners with “before and after” photos of the property. “It does look better,” Mayor Doug Clark said. “But does it look good enough?” Police Chief Robert Wahwasuck was present at the meeting and recommended commissioners take a look at the property themselves. “It is not so much a ‘health and welfare’ issue as it was in the beginning,” Wahwasuck said. “It’s more of a beautification issue now.” Baumgartner asked for blight to be defined. “It is the way the property looks when compared to other properties,” Wahwasuck said. “It’s just a vicious cycle of random buildings,” T. Aberle said. Baumgartner asked who he had to satisfy by cleaning up the property - the neighbors or the city. Allen told commissioners that Baumgartner had completed about 90 percent of the things that he was asked to clean up. “I understand where you are coming from, Chris,” Commissioner Burenheide said. “It hurts feelings when someone comments

on your house.” “It’s not about the house,” T. Aberle said. “It’s all the structures that make it look bad. We don’t live in a fancy house either. We are not trying to hurt anyone’s feelings, but this has been going on for years.” Commissioners discussed waiting to look at the property for a few months. Commissioner Aberle said he didn’t feel it was fair for anybody for the commission to wait to make a decision. He also said it was his opinion that Baumgartner and his neighbors needed to figure out how to work this out together. He then made a motion for the commission to not approve the resolution to condemn Baumgartner property. The motion carried and the resolution was not passed. Clark said the commission may revisit this issue at a later date if necessary. Ordinances and Resolutions Commissioners approved the following resolutions: • No. 2016-35, a conditional use permit allowing Lori and Darwin Hoppe to reside in a downtown building with a business in the front of the building. The Hoppes plan to have a master bedroom and kitchen in the back of the building and construct an upper level for the remaining part of their living quarters, as well as a garage behind the building. After some discussion, commissioners approved the resolution, 3-1, with Wittmer opposed. “I just think it will start a precedent of having living quarters downstairs in other downtown buildings,” she said. The city’s attorney Martin Mishler was present and he said that currently, it is permissible to have upstairs living quarters in downtown buildings, as many buildings do, but not downstairs

living quarters. Mishler said requests like these would have to be handled on a case-by-case basis as interested parties would need to apply to the Planning Commission and approving this request did not necessarily set a precedent. • No. 2016-36 for a lease agreement for the city’s new transformer. • No. 2016-37 approving annual employee wages, as amended. The commissioners met for a brief executive session to discuss wage increases. Following this executive session, the commissioners approved the resolution, amending it to raise Allen’s and Shroyer’s wages from a 3 percent increase to a 5 percent increase. Commissioners also approved, 3-1, the commissioners’ pay from $180 per month to $360 per month. Aberle was opposed. Additionally, commissioners approved the following: • Holiday plans and bonuses for non-essential city employees. Nonessential city employees will be off at noon on Friday, Dec. 23, and off Monday, Dec. 26. • Minutes from the Nov. 28 meeting. • Cereal Malt Beverage Licenses for the following establishments: All Star Store, Smoke’s Tavern (for consumption on premises), Smoke’s Tavern (carry out), Garrett Country Mart, Sabetha Bowl (for consumption on premises) and Sabetha Bowl (carry out); and a Class B Club license for Smoke’s Tavern. • Fire department application. Upcoming workshop and meeting Commissioners will meet at noon Friday, Dec. 16, for a working budget workshop. The next regularly scheduled meeting will be held at 6 p.m. Monday, Jan. 9, 2017.

GOVERNING BODY

Nemaha County Commission The Board of Nemaha County Commissioners met in regular session on Monday, Dec. 5, in the Commissioner’s Room of the Nemaha County Courthouse. The meeting was called to order by Chairman Gary Scoby leading the flag salute. Present also were Commissioners Tim Burdiek and Dennis Henry, Road and Bridge/ Solid Waste Supervisor Dennis Ronnebaum, Office Manager Kathy Haverkamp and County Clerk Mary Kay Schultejans recording the minutes. Department Reports Ronnebaum advised the board that the beams for Bridge L-2 in Capioma Township came in last week and crews were able to get the beams set. A representative from BG Consultants wanted to speak with commissioners about the replacement of Bridge P-41, which is in

Granada Township on the Nemaha-Brown County line. Ronnebaum received an email from a county resident, who voiced concerns about the maintenance of county roads in Nemaha County. Haverkamp received a federal funds check for Nemaha County from the State of Kansas in the amount of $93,884.15. Sheriff Rich Vernon advised the board that the Nemaha County Jail currently is holding seven inmates. They booked five individuals into the jail this past week. District Court Clerk Amy Boeckman requested the purchase of conversion software to convert the old ledger system in the District Court Office. She presented a quote from Jayhawk Software in the amount of $13,898 for the purchase of such software and the accessories required. Commissioners advised Boeckman to move for-

GOVERNING BODY

Brown County Commission

The Board of Brown County Commissioners met Monday, Dec. 5, in regular session with the following members present: Chairman Warren Ploeger, Steve Roberts and Keith Olsen. Also present were County Clerk Melissa Gormley and Deputy County Clerk Dawn Boyles. County Attorney Kevin Hill was present for a portion of the meeting. Department Reports Brown County Sheriff John Merchant reported there are 18 inmates – 11 males and seven females – currently at the Brown County Jail. Brown County Landfill will be closed Saturday, Dec. 24, and Saturday, Dec. 31. Minutes from the Nov. 30 meeting were approved. Minutes of the canvass from Nov. 30 also were approved. Tax Change Order Nos. 2016-24 and 2016-25 were signed and approved. Commissioners entered into a

10-minute executive session on non-elected personnel with the Gormley and Boyles. No binding was action taken. District Conservationist Matt Sprick met with the commissioners in regard to the Notice of Grant and Agreement Award. It was approved for Gormley to be designated signor. The grant and agreement award was approved. It was approved to issue a check to Water Resources in an amount not to exceed $600. Glacial Hills Executive Director Gary Satter updated commissioners and requested funding on various projects. Funding of $2,500 was approved. Monie El-Aasar of BG Consultants, updated the commissioners on various projects. The commissioners met again Monday, Dec. 12. Those minutes were not available at The Herald’s press time.

GOVERNING BODY

ward with this conversion process. Senior Services/Public Transit Director Diane Yunghans came before the board to let commissioners know that she has hired Jim Henry as an additional relief driver in the Transportation Department. J. Henry began work for the county on Dec. 5, at a rate of pay of $12.75 per hour. Yunghans asked commissioners about her department getting a credit card to use at the car wash when washing the department’s vehicles and about setting up a separate bank account for donations to the Meals on Wheels Program. Yunghans said she will see what she finds out from the county auditor on this before proceeding. County Attorney Brad Lippert spoke to commissioners about a letter the county received from Galloway, Wiegers and Brinegar, P.A., demanding payment to Kins-

ley Mortuary for autopsy repair of a Marshall County resident. Commissioners spoke to Lippert about the public hearing to be held at next week’s meeting concerning the construction and operation of a wind farm in Nemaha County. Chairman Scoby signed add/ abate orders as presented. The board reviewed and approved the minutes from the Nov. 28 meeting, with corrections noted. The board reviewed vouchers submitted by the different departments that were paid at the end of November. Commissioners approved the warrants and vouchers for November as presented. Commissioners met Monday, Dec. 12. Those minutes were not available at The Herald’s press time.

NEMAHA COUNTY SHERIFF ARRESTS Crystal Anderson, 45, was released to the custody of Jackson County Sheriff ’s Office on Dec. 2. Rita D. Grier, 29, of Hiawatha was booked into the Nemaha County Jail on Dec. 5, on a Nemaha County Bench Warrant for probation violation. She remains in custody with bond set at $5,000. Brayton L. Enneking, 19, of Seneca was arrested on Dec. 8, by the Seneca Police Department for the offenses of indecent liberties with a child, electronic solicitation, sexual exploitation of a child and possession of drug paraphernalia. Enneking remains in custody and bond has not been set. ACCIDENTS At 11:20 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 6, Paul J. Kieffer, 63, of Frankfort was traveling westbound on U.S. High-

way 36 just west of M Road when he struck a deer. He was driving a 2004 Saturn Ion. Damage was estimated at more than $1,000. REPORTED CRIMES / INCIDENT RESPONSES Sometime between Sunday, Nov. 27, and Saturday, Dec. 3, an unknown person stole 50 hedge posts from a field approximately 1/2 mile west of U.S. Highway 75 on 224th Road. Loss was estimated at $500. On Tuesday, Nov. 29, the Nemaha County Sheriff ’s Office took a theft report for a Bobcat Skid loader from 214 Kansas Highway 62. Loss was estimated at $10,000. On Wednesday, Nov. 30, a package containing a Dell Laptop was removed from the porch of 505 Oak Street in Centralia. Loss was estimated at $200.

BROWN COUNTY SHERIFF On Dec. 7, Lisa Buchanan, 36, of Hiawatha was arrested on a Brown County drug possession warrant. On Dec. 5, based on a traffic stop, Albert Cadue, 26, of Horton

was arrested on a charge of possession of marijuana. On Dec. 4, Joshawa Pentlin, 22, of Willis was arrested on a charge of domestic battery.

Morrill City Council Submitted by Linda Hill City Clerk Council met in regular session on Nov. 21, with members Todd Gruber, Dan Halstead, Robert Wahwasuck, Mary Meyer and Miles Ploeger present. Mayor Roger Price presided. Superintendent Lee Wymer also was present. Minutes and vouchers were approved. A copy of the ordinances was provided to Ashley Martinez.

Council asked Martinez to attend the second meeting of each month to determine if she should look at any properties for violations Council approved a contract with P & J Solid Waste. Council reviewed the delinquent account list, finding no services that need to be shut off due to nonpayment. Council approved Wymer’s request to repair the street in front of the elevator.

Schumann Financials, CLU, MBA Different types of life insurance, annuities and new combinations with long term care.

Schumann 1012 Main Street • Sabetha, KS Financials (785) 284-2107 or 1-800-281-2107


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local&area

December 14, 2016  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  sabethaherald.com

HOLIDAY EVENTS

Community members enjoy holiday events

Proposed cemetery neighbors voice concerns to commission CITY.1A

The Sabetha High School Odyssey sings Christmas songs during the Community National Bank open house on Thursday, December 8. Pictured are FRONT ROW (L-R) Ellie Meyer, Mackenzie Garber, Ashton Buser, Grace Kuenzi and Lauren Herbster; BACK ROW (L-R) Joe Gruber (hidden), Seth Burdick, Riley Herrmann, Keegan Cox and Henry Glynn. Heather Stewart | Herald

Patrons enjoy food and fellowship at the Morrill and Janes/Saylor Insurance Holiday Open House Friday, December 9. Krista Wasinger | Herald

Local patrons enjoy lunch during the Community National Bank Open House on Thursday, December 8. Heather Stewart | Herald

Patrons enjoy a variety of sweet treats at the Morrill and Janes/ Saylor Insurance Holiday Open House Friday, December 9. Krista Wasinger | Herald

The Sabetha High School Infinity choir performs holiday music at the Morrill and Janes Bank/ Saylor Insurance Holiday Open House held Friday, December 9. Krista Wasinger | Herald

Michelle and Aaron Georg enjoy breakfast with their daughter Eve at “Breakfast with Santa” held Saturday, December 10. Submitted

Mrs. Claus enjoys snuggling Patrick Georg at “Breakfast Pictured are (L-R) Alivia, Aidan and Autumn Lang enjoying donuts W i t h S a n t a ” S a t u r d a y, and juice at “Breakfast with Santa” Saturday, December 10. The December 10. Submitted event was sponsored by Angie’s Kids. Submitted

residence on Sunset Drive. In addition to the land exchange, Saylor proposed that he would provide two 60-foot street rights-of-way for access to the Saylor West tract, with a curb and guttered street. The initial proposal had the access on Oregon Street. In November, that access street was changed to Timberlane Drive, just off the covered bridge with a connection to Oregon Street added at some future date. At Monday’s meeting, citizens who live in the Rolling Hills Subdivisions voiced their concerns over the proposed cemetery expansion land being close to their residences and the location of the access street. Saylor was not present. Steve Buser lives on Timberlane Drive, just off the covered bridge and nearest to the proposed road. He said he knew nothing about the proposed cemetery location nor the road until Thanksgiving. Buser said the property owners had real concerns about the cemetery road going through a residential area. “The road is not made for through traffic,” he said. “Why would you even entertain this idea?” Dr. Allan Ross agreed that the road was not made to accommodate funeral processions. Mayor Clark said the land exchange was in the interest of making more affordable housing that was located close to the schools. “Does the city not own land where they could do this?” Buser said. “Would you want a cemetery in your backyard?” Dave Herbster asked if the city had looked at expanding the Albany Cemetery. Clark said they had, but there was no interest from landowners adjacent to the Albany Cemetery at this time. Buser said there also was concern about the value of properties decreasing because of their proximity to a cemetery. Buser questioned zoning laws. Attorney Martin Mishler said there

were no issues with zoning in this situation. Residents also presented concerns over flooding in the area as there are already some flooding issues in that area. Additionally, there was concern over water contamination. Clark said there were no restrictions for cemeteries located next to city water supplies. Clark said the commission had given Saylor the go-ahead to proceed with the cemetery proposal, and now there is a lot of concern being voiced. “I am not speaking for Kent. He needs to be here. We told him he could proceed with this, but we have not signed anything,” Clark said. “We were under the impression that you had been talked to,” Burenheide said to the residents. Burenheide said she felt like the commission had “dropped the ball” by not talking to surrounding landowners. “We just listened to Kent. I’m not saying he is right or wrong, but I feel like I dropped the ball. I apologize for that. We will look into this,” Burenheide said. “I think we need to have a meeting with Kent here,” Clark said. “The issue is the overall benefit for the city as a whole. If we can, we want to do what is best for everybody, but that is not always possible.” “Kent is a good citizen of Sabetha, and I think he relayed he didn’t get any objection,” Wittmer said. “I feel that when he realizes there is apparently this much objection, he will rethink his position. I don’t think we need to pick a fight when there is not a fight to be had. We need to readdress this, but it is his property and his backyard.” Mayor Clark encouraged those present to talk with Saylor about their concerns. He also said this issue would be put on the agenda again and that the city would notify residents when a meeting date is set.

School Board holds regular meeting 113BOARD.1A district has begun implementing the program with high school students, B. Evans said. Six students — Laura Edelman, senior at SHS; Kesair Brubeck, junior at SHS; Alyssa Davis, sophomore at WHS; Ashley Flowers, freshman at WHS; Cody Meyer, freshman at SHS; and Ainsley Smith, freshman at SHS — presented their progress with Career Cruising to the board. Many of the students commented that this tool is helpful in showing them their learning style, as well to keep track of information for future scholarships and resumes. “I can already see this helping students to make the connection between what they are doing in high school and their post-secondary and career goals,” B. Evans said. Axtell Public School Principal Larry Geist also presented to the board on Axtell’s plans for integrating Individual Plans of Study into APS. FFA Greenhouse SHS FFA sponsor Chris Bauerle reported to the board on the progress of the FFA Greenhouse. So far, the FFA has raised $37,852.50 in donations for the project, including the following: $10,000, SHS FFA; $10,000, FFA Alumni; $10,000 Frontier Farm Credit; $5,000, Sabetha PTO; $1,000, anonymous donor; and most recently, $1,852.50 from the Give to Grow Match Day event. Bauerle said they also have received word that Midwest Concrete will be donating enough concrete for the entire project. Bauerle asked if the district would be willing to donate $10,000 for a vinyl privacy fence to surround the Greenhouse. The board will consider this request at a future meeting. Also at the meeting: The board approved the agenda as amended. The board entered into executive session to discuss non-elected personnel, with Wetmore Academic Center Principal Janelle Boden present. The board approved the consent

agenda, including Nov. 14 meeting minutes, payment of December bills for $652,995.79, payment of November payroll for $289,579.79, three contracts and one termination. Contracts included the following: Melissa Bradbury, head secretary at SMS; Alice Sperfslage, secretary at SMS; and Edward Ebner, bus driver at WAC. Linda Newman, bus driver at WAC, was terminated. The board heard from Anna Cochenaur, representative of the SHS Student Council, regarding the group’s recent and upcoming activities. The board received written administrative reports from principals Sheri Harmer, Matt Garber, Sara Toedman, Boden and Geist. Axtell FFA Sponsor Kristin Strathman presented to the board about the FFA program and the trip four students made to the FFA National Convention in October. Director of Student Learning Jennifer Gatz gave the board a short update on the mentoring program. Superintendent Evans reported to the board the Year-to-Date Expense Comparison. To date compared to the same timeframe last year, the district has spent $44,342.13 more in the general and supplemental general funds and $119,799.16 more in capital outlay. Superintendent Evans said he attributes the capital outlay difference to roof replacements and HVAC at Sabetha Elementary School. Superintendent Evans also reported to the board that he had authorized installation of an insulated garage door for the bus barn at Sabetha. He also presented a capital outlay projection for the 2017-18 school year, prepared by Saylor. The board approved a donation of $14,272.62 for the SHS baseball program, from Stan and Donna Keim through the USD No. 113 Foundation. The board was presented with Kansas Association of School Boards recommended policy updates for first read. The policy

updates will be considered for approval at the board’s January meeting. The board was presented with graduation requirements, beginning with the Class of 2018, for first read. The main change is a removal of a technology requirement. The graduation requirements will be considered for approval at the board’s January meeting. The board approved a request to adopt the Marshall County Neighborhood Revitalization program, which is similar to the revitalization programs in Brown and Nemaha counties. The next regular board meeting will be held at 6 p.m. Monday, Jan. 9, 2017, at Wetmore Academic Center.

In Search of the

Lord’s Way Local Ch. 2: Sunday - 4 pm Repeated: Wednesdays - 12 pm Dish Network - Ch. 239 Sunday - 6 am Direct TV - Ch. 307 Sunday - 6 am

December Topics Dec. 4: Lifted Up Dec. 11: Pleasing God Dec. 18: Where is God Dec. 25: Fixing Our Eyes

Church of Christ Third and Oregon • Sabetha

Sunday, December 18 at 7 pm NORTHRIDGE CHURCH FREE! Doors open at 6 pm


1B

December 14, 2016  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  sabethaherald.com

sports SHS WRESTLING

STANDINGS

Jay grapplers capture dual tournament championship

BOYS’ B-BALL Big 7 League

126

132

Wisdom Nellis Wisdom T. Meyer T. Meyer

145

B. Brownlee

152

160

170

182

The 2016-17 Sabetha High Wrestling Team wins the Sabetha Wrestling Dual Invitational on Saturday, December 10. Pictured are FRONT ROW (L-R) Walker Lowdermilk, Trenton Meyer, Payton Strahm, Corbin Halls, Seth Harrell, Ryley Wisdom, Braden Mitchell and Vernon Nellis; BACK ROW (L-R) Assistant Coach Kyle Allen, Brandon Brownlee, Cole Oehm, Elliott Strahm, Carson Ukele, Kamden Brownlee, Matt Meyer, Cauy Rokey, Cory Geist, Head Coach Ricky Creek, Brendan Rokey, Brayden Becker and Tanner Ukele. Submitted

TIM KELLENBERGER The Sabetha High School Bluejay wrestling squad captured the first tournament championship under the leadership of Head Coach Ricky Creek on Saturday, Dec. 10. “This is our first team championship since I took over here,” said Head Coach Ricky Creek. “This was a total team effort. We needed the maximum effort from each

wrestler to give us every possible point and that is exactly what we got. I am extremely proud of each wrestler.” The Jays hosted five area teams — Auburn, Humboldt-Table Rock-Steinauer, Pleasant Ridge, Riley County and Wamego. The Jays defeated HTRS, 53-18; Pleasant Ridge, 54-14; Auburn, 44-31; Riley County, 59-18; and Wamego, 53-15. On the way to the tournament

championship, the Jays crowned four champions. Senior 126-pound Seth Harrell, senior 152-pound Matt Meyer, sophomore 182-pound Cauy Rokey, and freshman 195-pound Carson Ukele all were undefeated on the day. In addition to the team title and the individual championships, Harrell was named co-wrestler of the tourney, along with Johnny Gill of Auburn. Harrell was named

the wrestler of the tournament last year as well. “Winning the award means more to me than just the plaque in my hand. It is the end result of working hard and wrestling a good tournament,” Harrell said. “There has been a lot of hard work and dedication go into this, and I really wanted to win this award for the second time. Not everyone gets to win this award and I have been blessed to win it twice so I

Harrell

195

220

285

M.Meyer

K.Brownlee

Becker

C. Rokey

C. Ukele

P. Strahm

E. Strahm

Open Open Aldana McPhillany Lee Hunzeker Open Keller Open Wahlmeier Wilhelm Oatney Ford Lindell Siebert

HTRS PR Aub RC Wam HTRS PR Aub RC Wam HTRS PR Aub RC Wam

WIN/ LOSE W W L L L W W W W W L L L L L

Watson

HTRS

W

Fall

Open PR Ligouri Aub Barnes RC Garcia Wam Otto HTRS Gwartney PR Davenport Aub McCoy RC Simonssen Wam Novak HTRS Open PR Gill Aub Neilson RC Gonzales Wam Flynn HTRS Bridges PR Jones Aub Open RC Wanklin Wam Crowley HTRS Open PR Open Aub Rignell RC Open Wam Davis HTRS Open PR Open Aub Open RC Open Wam

W L W W W W W W W L W L W W W L W W W W W W W W W W W W W

Forfeit 8-1 19-1 Fall Fall Fall Fall Fall Fall Fall Forfeit Fall Fall Fall Fall 5-1 Fall Forfeit Fall Fall Forfeit Forfeit Fall Forfeit Fall Forfeit Forfeit Forfeit Forfeit

OPPONENT TEAM

SCORE Forfeit Forfeit Fall Fall Fall Fall Forfeit Fall Forfeit 15-0 Fall Fall 9-0 Fall Fall

Open

PR

W

Forfeit

Open Open Open

Aub RC Wam

W W W

Forfeit Forfeit Forfeit

Vaughn

HTRS

W

Fall

Stiver Liles Brown Bovak

PR Aub RC Wam

L W W W

Fall 4-3 Fall Fall

will cherish this for a long time but there is a lot of work ahead of me.” The Jays’ next action will begin at 5 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 15, in Holton.

Jay grapplers defeat Auburn, Rockport

Tim Kellenberger | Herald

WEIGHT CLASS 106 113 120 126 132 138 145 152 160 170 182 195 220 285

Nemaha Central

2

1

2

1

2

Holton

2

1

2

1

3

Perry Lecompton

2

1

2

1

4

Royal Valley

2

1

2

1

5

Sabetha

2

1

2

2

6

Jefferson West

1

1

1

2

7

Hiawatha

1

1

1

1

8

ACCHS

0

2

0

3

9

Riverside

0

3

0

3

Twin Valley League

OPPONENT

Open Open Mithcell Harrell Wisdom Halls B. Brownless Meyer K. Brownlee T. Ukele Rokey C. Ukele Open E. Strahm

Open Open Open Green Open Open Jones Open Stoner Open Makings Oswald Brake Open

WIN/ SCORE LOSE

W W W W W W W W W L L W

Forfeit Fall Forfeit Forfeit 13-5 Forfeit Fall Forfeit Fall 6-5 Forfeit Forfeit

WEIGHT CLASS 106 113 120 126 132 138 145 152 160 170 182 195 220 285

INDIVIDUAL RESULTS

NAME

OPPONENT

Open Open Mithcell Harrell Wisdom Halls B. Brownless Meyer K. Brownlee T. Ukele Rokey C. Ukele Open E. Strahm

Open Open Aldana Keller Ford Open Ligouri Open Gill Jones Open Open Open Liles

WIN/ SCORE LOSE

L W L W L W L W W W

Fall Fall 11-2 Forfeit 7-6 Forfeit Fall Fall Forfeit Forfeit

W

Fall

WEIGHT NAME CLASS 126 Nellis 132

145

160

285

T. Meyer

Lowdermilk

Oehm

Geist

League

Overall

W

W

School L

L

1

Centralia

2

0

3

0

2

Valley Heights

2

0

3

0

3

Troy

2

0

2

0

4

Washington Cty

1

0

4

0

5

Linn

1

0

2

0

6

Doniphan West

1

1

1

2

7

Hanover

1

1

1

2

8

Blue Valley

0

1

0

3

9

Clifton-Clyde

0

1

1

3

10

Axtell

0

2

0

4

11

Wetmore

0

2

0

3

12

Frankfort

0

2

1

3

13

Onaga

0

0

1

2

Northeast Kansas League League

Overall

School W

L

W

L

1

Jeff Cty North

3

0

3

0

2

Horton

2

1

2

1

3

MH-MA

2

1

2

1

4

Valley Falls

1

1

1

2

5

Jackson Heights

1

1

1

1

6

Pleasant Ridge

1

1

2

1

7

Oskaloosa

1

2

1

2

8

Immaculata

1

2

1

2

9

McLouth

0

3

0

3

Rank

Big 7 League

WIN/ SCORE LOSE Mann SH W 5-2 Groefsema GE L 1-9 Sutton WAM L Fall Gilliland HOL L Fall Allen AC L Fall Tripp GE W Fall Stutzman GE W 4-1 Millbern LOU W Fall Pressley SH W Fall Chindavong GE W Fall Pinedo ABI L Fall Davis ABI W Fall Didonato SH W Fall Myrick SFT W Fall OPPONENT TEAM

League

Overall

School W

L

W

L

1

Sabetha

3

0

4

0

2

Nemaha Central

3

0

3

0

3

Hiawatha

2

0

2

0

4

Holton

2

1

2

1

5

Jefferson West

1

1

2

1

6

Perry Lecompton

1

2

1

2

7

ACCHS

0

2

0

3

8

Royal Valley

0

3

0

3

9

Riverside

0

3

0

3

Rank

Twin Valley League League

Overall

School W

L

W

L

1

Centralia

2

0

3

0

2

Hanover

2

0

3

0

3

Washington Cty

1

0

4

0

4

Linn

1

0

2

0

5

Clifton-Clyde

1

0

3

1

6

Valley Heights

1

1

1

2

7

Troy

1

1

1

1

8

Frankfort

1

1

2

2 2

9

Blue Valley

0

1

0

10

Axtell

0

2

0

4

11

Wetmore

0

2

1

2

12

Doniphan West

0

2

1

2

13

Onaga

0

0

0

3

Northeast Kansas League

JV Santa Fe Trail Mixer, 12.9.2016

INDIVIDUAL RESULTS

NAME

L

1

Rank

INDIVIDUAL RESULTS

W

GIRLS’ B-BALL

The Sabetha High School Bluejay wrestling squad opened up their home campaign for the 201617 season with two wins during double dual action on Thursday, Dec. 8. The Rockport Bluejays and the Auburn Tigers came to town, and the Jays defeated the Bluejays 58-9 and the Tigers 42-19. “I was very pleased with our wrestling tonight and last weekend as well,” said Head Coach Ricky Creek. “Our endurance and conditioning at this point of the season is so much further ahead compared to this time last year. The guys just have a better grasp of what we need to do technically and it has really shown up so far.” Senior 126-pound Seth Harrell continued his fast start to the season with two more wins by fall. Junior 145-pound Brandon Brownlee got his first action of the season and responded with an impressive 13-5 win over Tyler Jones of Rockport. “I am not cutting as much weight this year, and I feel like I am stronger because of that,” Brownlee said. “I have to wrestle with Seth [Harrell] each day in practice and that really pushes me and I know it will make me a better wrestler. My goal is to improve on my performance at the state tournament this year and get up on that podium.” Senior 126-pound Seth Harrell dominates this Auburn opponent during their bout on Thursday, December 8. Sabetha vs. Auburn, 12.8.2016

Overall

L

School

TIM KELLENBERGER

Sabetha vs. Rockport, 12.8.2016

League W

Rank

WEIGHT NAME CLASS 120 Mitchell

Rank

INDIVIDUAL RESULTS

Rank

Sabetha Tournament, 12.10.2016

League

Overall

W

L

W

L

School

1

Jeff Cty North

3

0

3

0

2

Valley Falls

2

0

2

1

3

Horton

2

1

2

1

4

MH-MA

2

1

2

1

5

Pleasant Ridge

1

1

2

1

6

Jackson Heights

1

1

1

1

7

McLouth

1

2

1

2

8

Immaculata

0

3

0

3

9

Oskaloosa

0

3

0

3

SCORES GIRLS’ BASKETBALL

Junior 145-pound Brandon Brownlee controls his Rockport opponent during Brownlee’s first action of the year on Thursday, December 8. Tim Kellenberger | Herald

Senior 132-pound Ryley Wisdom makes the first move off the bottom during his match with this Auburn opponent on Thursday, December 8. Tim Kellenberger | Herald

Date

Teams

12/9

WHS Girls vs. Linn

Score 50-51

12/8

Sabetha 8A vs. Holton (Final Record: 14-0, Back-toback undefeated League Champions)

47-32

12/8

Sabetha 8B vs. Holton (Final Record: 5-9)

29-28

12/6

WHS Girls vs. Centralia

31-61

12/6

Sabetha 8A vs. Perry

41-9

12/6

Sabetha 8B vs. Perry

24-10

Scores can be submitted to us at news@sabethaherald. com. Please include sport type, date of game/match, team names, and final scores. Scores should be submitted no more than three days following the contest.


2B

sports&recreation

December 14, 2016  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  sabethaherald.com

Get Out

& ROOT for your Hometown Team! Basketball vs. Jeff West Tuesday, December 20 @ 4:30 p.m.

BLUEJAY WEEK AT A GLANCE 12/15 Wrestling @ Holton

6:00 p.m.

12/20 Basketball vs. Jeff West 4:30 p.m.

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sports&recreation

sabethaherald.com  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  December 14, 2016

SHS GIRLS’ BASKETBALL

The Sabetha Herald’s

Athlete of the Week

Sabetha Lady Jays tally another win PETE SCHUETZ | CONTRIBUTOR The Sabetha High School Lady Jays hosted the Perry Lecompton Lady Kaws for their second game in a two-game home stand on Tuesday, Dec. 6. The Kaws were routed by Holton in their season opener, and they were looking to pick up their first win on the young season in their first road contest. Sabetha jumped on them early and refused to give up the lead to go on and win their third game in a row, beating the Kaws, 44-31. Perry was first to put points on the board, and even jumped out to a 6-2 bump before the Jays sank their talons in on defense and shut down the Kaw offense. The Jays would go on a 13-0 run with a little more than six minutes

to play in the first quarter, led by Hillary Krebs with a pair of triples and free throws to lead her team with 8 points. Grace Kuenzi pumped in 5 points to help give Sabetha a 15-6 lead at the end of one. “We moved the ball really well against Perry’s zone to get some good shots for our team,” said Head Coach Alex McAfee. The Lady Jays dominated the boards as well as kept the ball out of their opponent’s hands. “We played good defense and rebounded the ball on both ends really well,” Coach McAfee said. At the intermission, Sabetha would take a 22-8 lead into the locker room. Perry made a run to start the

second half and outscored their hosts 13-12 in the third quarter. Lauren Huber led her team in the frame with 5 points, with Kuenzi marking 3 points. Skylar McAfee and Ellie Meyer chipped in 2 each in the quarter and with one frame left to play, Sabetha led 32-21. “I thought we handled our late game situation better tonight,” Coach McAfee said. Huber and Krebs ruffled the nylon with the three ball, but the Kaws answered with a pair treys of their own to attempt climb back into the game. But both teams matched bucket for bucket, and Sabetha would cruise to the 4431 victory to stay 2-0. The Kaws dropped to 0-2 in the Big Seven. “This was a good win for our ball

club,” Coach McAfee said. “We improved from our last game and our last practice, and that quite simply comes down to our focus.” Krebs led her team in scoring with 13 points. Huber had 10 points and nine rebounds, and Kuenzi finished the night with 10 points.

Sabetha 44, Perry 31

3B

T

F

10 2-3 2-5 0-0 9 3 2 3 Lauren Huber 4 1-2 0-6 2-2 2 1 4 4 Skylar McAfee 2 1-3 0-0 0-0 3 2 0 5 Trista Argabright 13 0-2 3-8 4-4 5 3 2 2 Hillary Krebs 3 0-0 1-2 0-1 2 2 2 1 Maggi Hughes 2 1-7 0-0 0-0 3 0 0 0 Ellie Meyer 10 4-9 0-0 2-3 6 0 0 1 Grace Kuenzi 0 0-0 0-1 0-0 0 1 0 0 Kinley Schuette 0 0-1 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 0 Morgan Schuette SABETHA TOTALS 9-27 | 6-22 | 8-10 | 30 | 12 | 10 | 16 | 10 | 44 PERRY LECOMPTON TOTALS 7-17 | 4-14 | 5-6 | 17 | 6 | 9 | 21 | 13 | 31

TP

2FG

3FG

FT

R

A S

2 2 1 3 1 1 0 0 0

Seth Harrell Wrestling Sabetha High School

Senior 126-pound Seth Harrell was named outstanding wrestler of the Sabetha Dual Invitational Wrestling Tounament for the second year in a row. Harrell went undefeated in the tournament and is off to a great start for the 2016-17 season.

Athlete of the Week selection will be awarded with an “Athlete of the Week” t-shirt at the end of the fall sports season. Please contact The Sabetha Herald to provide sizing information.

The ones that got away

N

Senior Grace Kuenzi jumps up for the rebound during the varsity girls’ basketball game versus Perry Lecompton on Tuesday, December 6. Heather Stewart | Herald

Senior Ellie Meyer puts the ball back up after rebounding it during the varsity girls’ basketball game versus Perry Lecompton on Tuesday, December 6. Heather Stewart | Herald

Lady Jays remain undefeated on the season PETE SCHUETZ | CONTRIBUTOR Sabetha’ High School’s Lady Jays hit the road Friday, Dec. 9, to take on the 0-2 ACCHS Lady Tigers in a Big Seven match-up. Buckets in the first half were hard to come by for both teams, with defenses shutting off the lane. Halftime scores looked more like a low scoring football game or a high scoring soccer match. But Sabetha breathed life into their offense and pulled away in the second half taking the “W” in this one, 32-18. The Lady Jays trailed after the first quarter of play with Ellie Meyer accounting for all of her team’s points in the period. Meyer had two buckets, and the Tigers led 5-4 at the end of one. “We were getting good shots, but

they just would not fall,” said Head Coach Alex McAfee. The rim was unforgiving for both teams in the second stanza as well, with ACCHS being held to just a deuce and Hillary Krebs accounting for all of her team’s 4 points. Defenses were stingy. “When you play good defense and rebound the basketball, you will be in every game,” Coach McAfee said. With those fundamentals covered, Sabetha led 8-7 at halftime. Sabetha found some holes in the Tiger defense and worked the outside-in game, which led to outscoring their hosts 12-3 in the third quarter. Lauren Huber led her team with

5 points with Krebs dropping her second triple of the night. Meyer and Skylar McAfee each added a bucket. The Lady Jays led 20-10, headed into the final quarter. Shots were hard to come by in the closing frame but with a battle for possession, the Tigers sent the Bluejays to the line to shoot free throws 17 times. S. McAfee was seven of 11 from the stripe to aid the effort. “Free throw shooting was a big factor in the game,” Coach McAfee said. Sabetha would escape Effingham with a 32-18 win as they remain unbeaten on the season boasting a 4-0 record, 3-0 in the Big Seven. “We were proud of our girls’ effort all night,” Coach McAfee

said. “In the second half, we stayed within ourselves and played to our strengths to find a way to come away with the win.” Krebs, S. McAfee and Meyer each came away with 7 points on the night, with Huber contributing 5. Sabetha hosted the 3-0 Nemaha Central Thunder on Tuesday, Dec. 13. The results were not available at The Herald’s press time. Sabetha 32, ACCHS 18

TP

2FG

3FG

FT

R

A S

5 2-3 0-3 1-1 1 2 Lauren Huber 9 1-4 0-3 7-11 4 2 Skylar McAfee 2 1-3 0-0 0-0 3 1 Trista Argabright 7 0-1 2-7 1-2 5 0 Hillary Krebs 0 0-1 0-1 0-0 2 0 Maggi Hughes 7 3-6 0-0 1-6 2 1 Ellie Meyer 2 1-5 0-0 0-2 8 0 Grace Kuenzi 0 0-1 0-1 0-0 1 0 Morgan Schuette SABETHA TOTALS 8-24 | 2-15 | 10-22 | 26 | 6 | 11 | 12 | 13 | ACCHS TOTALS 4-19 | 3-20 | 2-5 | 15 | 6 | 4 | 14 | 18 | 18

1 4 1 2 1 1 0 1

T

F

2 3 2 2 0 3 0 0

3 3 1 1 1 2 2 0

32

The Sabetha Middle School eighth-grade girls’ basketball team wins the League Championship for the second year in a row. Pictured are FRONT ROW (L-R) Khalea Bergman, Ellen Glynn and Irish Rokey; SECOND ROW (L-R) Abbi Russell, Jordie Geist, manager Summer Bechtelheimer, Ayiana Blacksmith-Juarez and Kenzie Meyer; ROW THREE (L-R) Kayla Devore, Briana White, Megan Kostiuk, Camryn Wessel, Bailey Hoffman and Katelyn Lierz; BACK ROW (L-R) Coach Brent Hayden, Hattie Lukert, Melinna Schumann, Nicole Stallbaumer, Leah Renyer, Lauren Gatz and Coach Kay Duncan. Submitted

SMS eigth-grade girls capture second league championship

ot too long ago I was gan to move. I was set up on a nice writing about what balmy fall evening in a stand that makes a good shot. I sat on the edge of a creek. A really was relating my rifle shooting nice buck moved in from behind success to what transpired in my me to a position about 50 yards off early shooting sessions as a youth to my right. I picked up my grunt with an old .22 with iron sights. call and gave a couple of grunts. Since I wrote that column, I That buck popped his head up and have had quite a few people come stopped dead in his tracks and up to me and tell me similar sto- stared in my direction. ries. Shooting success is someWe stared at each other for thing I don’t what seemed believe that just like an eternity comes naturally and then he to anyone. Yes, began to move some people toward me on a are just born to trail that would shoot and they cross 12 yards shoot well, but in front of me. prac t ice is The buck came what makes the on and then shooter a dead stopped right BY: TIM KELLENBERGER eye. out in front of I say t his me. He was 12 about rifle hunting but it also yards from me standing broadholds true for shotgunning and side. This is a shot that I have shot bow hunting as well. I would hate a thousand times. I pulled the to have to give an estimate of how string back and let the arrow fly. many “practice rounds” I have The deer wheeled at the shot shot through a rifle, shotgun or and disappeared in the blink of bow. No matter how many prac- an eye. I could see the arrow sticktice rounds you let loose there will ing in the ground. There was no always be a time when you just flat blood on it. I had just shot right out miss what you are aiming for! underneath a monster of a whiteSo often you read about the suc- tail buck! I just sat there in that cessful hunts in which a perfect stand and stared at the arrow. I or good shot has been executed. could not believe at what had just Every now and then I have come transpired. across a story about a “miss” but To this day, I can still see that not very often. I have had my share buck standing broadside to me. of successful hunts over the years, How I missed him, I do not know! but I have also had my share of Over the years, I have shot a lot of misses as well. Some of those turkeys. I have also missed several misses still come up in my mind at point blank range. How does and cause me some level of pain. that happen? I really don’t know! Years ago, I was doing a lot of A couple of years ago, I had a nice bow hunting. I really don’t know tom that I had called in out of a how I had enough time to pull it huge flock of hens. He had a great off but I was getting it done some- beard and a big body. He was defihow. I was in the shift of going nitely a trophy bird. He came in from using a compound bow to on a trot and at a distance of about using a recurve bow. I had a bow 15 yards I pulled the trigger. That custom made for me by a bowyer bird ran off in the blink of an eye. up in Montana. It was and is a I missed him! How I missed that beautiful bow and fit me perfectly. bird I will never know! The list I practiced and practiced with that could go on and on. bow until I could shoot it very acThere have been clean misses curately out to 35 to 40 yards. I am on everything from pheasants to most comfortable shooting a bow geese and ducks to larger animals at about 20 yards, so that is how like turkeys and deer. No matter I always set my stands up. I had how many good shots a hunter done my scouting and had found pulls off, there will always be an area that had a lot of sign. I set those misses that keep the hunter my stand up and began the vigil humble. Thank goodness for the that is familiar to everyone who ones that getaway! It makes one has ever bow hunted. appreciate those true shots that The rutting season rolled much more. around and the bucks really be-

WILD TIMES

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4B

sports&recreation

December 14, 2016  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  sabethaherald.com

SHS BOYS’ BASKETBALL

Bluejays drop heartbreaker to Perry PETE SCHUETZ | CONTRIBUTOR After suffering their first loss of the season against Marysville, the Sabetha High School Bluejays were looking to right the ship and get back on the winning side of things when they played host to the Perry Lecompton Kaws on Tuesday, Dec. 6. Perry was riding the momentum of winning their season opening, a Big Seven victory over Holton on the Kaws’ home court. The contest was a slugfest, and it came down to the final possession with the Kaws coming out on top of the Jays, 29-27. Perry has an explosive offense with some leapers on the starting roster, which gave the Bluejay defense a potent test. “I thought we played a great defensive game,” Coach Scott Burger said of his team holding the Kaws to under 30 points. Kyle Grimm used his power under the basket to put up 7 points in the opening eight minutes, with Eric Renyer registering a double and Joseph Gruber chipping in a free throw. The first quarter saw one tie and five lead changes, and at the end of it the Jays would trail by a point, 10-11. Both teams stumbled and stuttered on offense in the second quarter with the uncontested shot or an offensive rebound be-

ing as rare as a penguin sighting in Florida. Perry was held to a single field goal in the quarter, and the Jays managed only five points on a triple from Christian Meyer and a layup by Keegan Cox. “We executed our offense much better tonight, but we missed too many shots under the basket,” Coach Burger said. Sabetha held a narrow 15-13 advantage at the break. Perry’s defense nearly blanked the Bluejays in the third quarter, allowing only two points to start the second half. The Kaws were patient on offense and found the rim a little friendlier at their end of the court, and they would outscore Sabetha 8-2 in the third and led 21-17 headed into the closer. The Jays came soaring back in a hurry in the fourth when Meyer swished his second trey of the night, and Renyer found the layin on two occasions to help their team gain the 24-21 lead. Perry Sabetha 27, Perry 29

TP

2FG

9 0-0 Christian Meyer 0-1 Brett Stallbaumer 0 2 1-3 Keegan Cox 0 0-0 Noah Garber 0 0-1 Trae Snyder 3 1-6 Joe Gruber 9 3-9 Kyle Grimm 4 2-10 Eric Renyer SABETHA TOTALS 7-30 | 3-12 | 4-11 | 30 | 8 | PERRY LECOMPTON TOTALS 7-27 | 3-10 | 6-8 | 26 | 3 | 0

3FG

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3-6 0-1 0-1 0-0 0-3 0-1 0-0 0-0

0-2 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 1-4 3-5 0-0

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0 2 4 0

A S

1 1 2 1 2 0 3 1 6 2 13 0

0 0 2 0 0 3 0 2

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1 2 0 0 2 3 3 2

regained the lead with a little more than two minutes to play, and clock control was the Kaws’ game plan, with maintaining possession the goal. Perry built a three point advantage, 27-24, headed into the final 20 seconds, but Meyer pulled up on a deep three-ball and found the bottom of the net to tie the game with nine ticks left on the clock.

Jays bring home a win After a quick Kaw timeout, Perry’s Canaan Daniels pushed the ball up the court, wove through traffic and launched an eight footer with one second left on the clock. The shot danced around on top of the rim, teasing fans, before it fell through the net for the buzzer beater 29-27. With the loss, Sabetha fell to 1-2 on the season, the Kaws improved to 2-0.

7 | 14 | 13 | 27 | 5 | 14 | 29

PETE SCHUETZ | CONTRIBUTOR Defenses were stingy at Effingham last Friday, Dec. 9, as the Sabetha High School Bluejays traveled to ACCHS to take on the 0-2 Tigers in a road match-up. The Tigers opened the season with losses to Atchison and Nemaha Central and Sabetha was coming off of a two-game skid after dropping a heartbreaker to Perry on a buzzer beater Tuesday night, Dec. 6. The Bluejays held a narrow lead at the half and tightened the noose in the final two quarters to bring home the win 35-23. Eric Renyer powered his way around the post throughout the game but registered his entire team’s offensive output in the first frame when he dumped in 6 points. But the Tigers took the early lead after one quarter of play by a margin of 7-6. ACCHS played a clock control, patient offensive strategy while Sabetha’s man defense forced some turnovers and dominated the boards early to limit the second chance opportunity. “I was happy with the way we handled their delay offense,” said Head Coach Scott Burger. Christian Meyer hit a trey, Renyer and Kyle Grimm each had a bucket in the paint, and Keegan Cox had a steal and a layup in the period. At the intermission, Sabetha led 16-13. Both teams struggled offensively in the second half. “We didn’t give up the easy shots or backdoor cuts,” Burger said,

as the Tigers were held to just 7 points in the third quarter. Grimm led all scorers in the period with 6 points followed by Meyer with 2. Jays led 24-20 headed into the final stanza. ACCHS was held to just 3 points in the fourth quarter. They led the stat of offensive rebounds in the period but could not get the ball to fall against Sabetha’s defense. The Jays made just one field goal in the last eight minutes but hit their free throws down the stretch. Meyer was five of eight from the stripe, and as a team the Bluejays were nine of 16 with their freebies. “I thought we executed better on offense, and we made our free throws in the second half,” Coach Burger said. Sabetha went on to win 35-23, shooting just 33 percent from the field and narrowly winning the battle of the boards 36-31. Grimm finished the night with a doubledouble with 10 points and 10 rebounds, with Meyer kicking in 10 points and Renyer with 8. The Jays hosted the 2-1 Nemaha Central Thunder on Tuesday, Dec. 13. The results were not available at The Herald’s press time. Sabetha 35, ACCHS 23

A S

T

F

10 1-1 1-4 5-9 2 1 2 Christian Meyer 0-1 0-2 0-0 5 0 0 Brett Stallbaumer 0 4 1-3 0-1 2-4 4 1 1 Keegan Cox 0 0-0 0-1 0-0 1 1 0 Trae Snyder 3 1-2 0-1 1-6 10 3 0 Joe Gruber 10 2-5 0-0 6-8 10 0 1 Kyle Grimm 8 4-9 0-0 0-0 4 0 1 Eric Renyer SABETHA TOTALS 9-21 | 1-9 | 14-27 | 36 | 6 | 5 | 10 | 19 | 35 ACCHS TOTALS 7-31 | 1-14 | 6-20 | 31 | 5 | 0 | 4 | 19 | 23

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2 0 1 0 4 3 0

1 2 2 2 4 3 5

WHS BASKETBALL

Cardinals fall to Bulldogs HEATHER STEWART

Senior Eric Renyer takes this jumpshot during the varsity boys’ basketball game versus Perry Lecompton on Tuesday, December 6. Heather Stewart | Herald

Senior Keegan Cox goes in for the layup during the varsity boys’ basketball game versus Perry Lecompton on Tuesday, December 6. Heather Stewart | Herald

The Wetmore High School Cardinals welcomed the Linn Bulldogs to town on Friday, Dec. 9. After a tough loss to Centralia last Tuesday, the Cardinals were looking for their first win of the season. After getting outscored 42-14 in the paint, the Cardinals took the loss 39-60. Junior Ethan Osterhaus led the Cardinals in scoring with 12 points total, sinking seven of eight free throws. Linn held Wetmore to only scoring single digits during the first and second quarters. At the end of the first half, the score was 30-13 with Linn on top. Junior Kyle Grimm shoots for two during the varsity boys’ Linn kept up the pace during the basketball game versus Perry Lecompton on Tuesday, December 6. second half of the game, scoring 19 Heather Stewart | Herald points in the third and 11 points in the fourth. Wetmore posted 13 points in both the third and fourth quarters. The Bulldogs brought home the win, 60-39. Head Coach David Martin said the team will have to practice hard in order to prepare for Friday’s

game. “I thought we came out flat,” he said. “We settled for outside shots, and that’s been our problem for the first three games. We aren’t getting to the rim and basically shooting ourselves out of ball games from deep.” “We played very soft on defense and we turned the ball over 24 times. We also got beat on the glass all night,” Coach Martin said. We have to come better prepared to play, and we have to get tougher as a team. We need a great week of practice to be ready for Washington County on Friday.” The Cardinals will travel to Washington on Friday, Dec. 16, to take on the Tigers. Wetmore 39, Linn 60

TP

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R A S

2 1 0 0-0 0 Aaron Achten 10 2 1 3-6 0 Kyle Bloom 12 1 1 7-8 0 Ethan Osterhaus 8 2 0 4-7 0 Joel Hutfles 2 1 0 0-0 0 Alex Potter 3 1 0 1-2 0 Chanler Morfitt 2 1 0 0-0 0 Curtis Bloom WETMORE TOTALS 9-0 | 2-0 | 15-23 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 19 | 39 LINN TOTALS 25-0 | 0-0 | 12-16 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 21 | 60

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

T

F

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

1 3 5 3 4 1 2

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Freshman Nikole Kuenzi shoots for a three pointer during the freshmen girls’ basketball game versus Perry Lecompton on Tuesday, December 6. Heather Stewart | Herald

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Sophomore Mason Engelken goes in for the basket during the junior varsity boys’ basketball game versus Perry Lecompton on Tuesday, December 6. Heather Stewart | Herald

Sabetha freshmen and junior varsity basketball teams hit the hardwoods

Location/Directions: From Silver Lake go north 6 miles on Hoch Rd, property on west side Property Description: 187 acres with 133 acres of terraced crop ground with mostly Class II & III Pawnee clay loam soils, very nice 3 acre pond, small amount of brome grass hay ground, excellent wildlife habitat from tree covered draw with flowing water and grain fields on both sides, established interior field roads gives easy access to pond and to the west side of the farm. This versatile property would make a wonderful weekend getaway or a great setting for your new home plus farm income and recreational hunting and fishing.

Sophomore Jessica Payne aims for the basket during the junior varsity girls’ basketball game versus Perry Lecompton on Tuesday, December 6. Heather Stewart | Herald

Freshman Andrew Frazee takes this jumpshot during the freshmen boys’ basketball game versus Perry Lecompton on Tuesday, December 6. Heather Stewart | Herald

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sabethaherald.com  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  December 14, 2016

school&youth

5B

4-H CLUB

Woodlawn Meadowlarks

Students in kindergarten through fifth grades perform together during the Wetmore Elementary School music program held Monday, December 5. Submitted | Janelle Boden The Woodlawn Meadowlarks 4-H Club members pose for a photo. Submitted

Submitted by Isabelle Walker Club Reporter The December meeting of the Woodlawn Meadowlarks 4-H Club took place Sunday, Dec. 11. Gwendolyn Walker led the club in singing, “Rockin’ Around the Christmas Tree.” The piñatas were finished and looked fantastic. The wreath and ornament piñatas were for the club’s recreation. Everyone got a chance to try to break the piñatas. The club decided to send the Santa to Nemaha County Training Center and share the clover leaf with Oneida youth. More refresh- Club member Ella Sourk takes ments were brought by all club her turn at the pinata. Submitted members to celebrate Christmas.

Kindergarten students sing and do actions during the Wetmore Elementary School music program held Monday, December 5. Submitted | Janelle Boden

The fifth grade band performs during the Wetmore Elementary School music program held Monday, December 5. Submitted | Janelle Boden

CONTEST

Art contest to highlight beauty of aviation State and federal aviation officials are encouraging young artists take their talents to new heights by participating in the 2017 International Aviation Art Contest, “Beyond the Clouds.” The contest, for which there is no entry fee, is for artists ages 6 to 17 years of age and is intended to “celebrate the adventures and excitement only available in that special place beyond the clouds.” It is sponsored by the Kansas Department of Transportation, the National Association of State Aviation Officials, the Federal Aviation Administration and other organizations. Artists will compete in age groups: • Those born between Jan. 1, 2007 and Dec. 31, 2010; • Those born between Jan. 1, 2003 and Dec. 31, 2006; • Those born between Jan. 1,

Fifth grade students sing during the Wetmore Elementary School music program held Monday, December 5. Submitted | Janelle Boden

1999, and Dec. 31, 2002. The top three state winners from each age group will have their work entered in the national competition. The three winners in each group at the national level will then have their entries considered in international competition. State winners will receive a certificate and state recognition; national winners will receive certificates, ribbons and a framed reproduction of their artwork; and international winners will receive certificates and medals. The deadline for entries – which cannot be computer-generated and must be submitted in 11-3/4 by 161/2-inch format – is Jan. 20, 2017. For more information and contest rules, visit http://www.nasao. org/education/nasao-center-foraviation-research-and-education/ international-aviation-art-contest/.

UNIVERSITY HONORS

Kansas State University The College of Human Ecology at Kansas State University honored 15 graduating seniors for excellence in engagement, leadership or research and creative activities at the college’s annual awards ceremony on Friday, Dec. 9. Ashley Schmelzle of Sabetha is a recipient of an outstanding senior award. Schmelzle is majoring in communication sciences and disorders with a minor in conflict analysis and trauma studies. She is receiving the Outstand-

ing Student Engagement Award. She has served as an anatomy lab instructor, a member of the Child Language Research Lab, recruitment chair for the Conflict Analysis and Trauma Studies Association, and as an author with the Down Syndrome Research Team. She has volunteered with Catholic Ministries, the Red Cross, Flint Hills Volunteer Center and both the K-State and Kansas chapters of the Speech-Language-Hearing Association.

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Free-Throw Contest 9-14 Boys and Girls (as of Jan. 1, 2017)

Saturday, Dec. 17 @ SHS Gym (after Biddyball tournament) Sponsored by Knights of Columbus

First- and second-grade students perform during the Wetmore Elementary School music program held Monday, December 5. Submitted | Janelle Boden

Third grade students sing during the Wetmore Elementary Fourth grade students perform during the Wetmore Elementary School music program held Monday, December 5. School music program held Monday, December 5. Submitted | Janelle Boden Submitted | Janelle Boden

Wetmore students perform Christmas programs UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIPS

Kansas State University Students at Kansas State University have earned nearly 14,200 academic scholarships for the 2016-2017 academic year — 500 more than in 2015-2016 and 2,000 more than in 2014-2015. Overall, Kansas State University students have earned more than $33.28 million in scholarships for the current academic year. Nearly 6,500 in-state students received $24.45 million, 1,456 out-of-state students received $8.29 million and 227 international students received more than $548,000 in scholarship funding. Most of the scholarships are made possible through donations and gifts to the Kansas State University Foundation. Information on the university’s student financial assistance is available at http:// www.k-state.edu/sfa. The following area Kansas State University students have received scholarships: Bern: Mitchell Baumgartner, Charles P. Setterquist and Doris M. Setterquist Scholarship, Foundation Plus Scholarship, Franco Hammel Sjogren Memorial Scholarship; Claire Meyer, Achievement Award, Dr. Dennis and Georgiana Dettmer Scholarship in Human Ecology; Darren Meyer, Foundation for Engineering at Kansas

State University Fund; Eric Meyer, Achievement Award, David G. and Robert K. Page Memorial Scholarship in Milling Technology, Raymond and Geneva Dobbins Scholarship in Agriculture; Isaac Meyer, Eula M. Neal McCauley Memorial Scholarship, Medallion Scholarship, Pearl M. Maus Memorial Scholarship; Micah Meyer, Putnam Scholarship; Fairview: Carissa Tummons, Alberta Stuewe Parsons Memorial Scholarship in Dietetics, Medallion Scholarship; Sabetha: Lillian Brownlee, Achievement Award; Nicholas Meyer, Vanier Family Scholarship at Kansas State Polytechnic; Cody Wilhelm, Foundation for Engineering at Kansas State University Fund; Michael Baumgartner, Achievement Award; Trenton Cox, Foundation for Engineering at Kansas State University Fund, R. D. and Mary C. Andersen Scholarship; Tyler Edelman, Elvon G. and Lydia E. Skeen Education Fund; Katelyn Guengerich, June Milliard Hall Memorial Scholarship; Tyler Hackney, Foundation Scholarship; Billy Hatfield, Rosamond P. Haeberle Music Education Scholarship; Samuel Hughes, Foundation Scholarship; Nolan Keim, Angus/ Kramer Scholarship, BKD Wealth

Advisors LLC Financial Planning Endowed Scholarship; Anthony Martin, Achievement Award, Lee and Wanda Parr Memorial Scholarship; Brandi McCoy, Allen D. Millen Elite Agriculture Scholarship, Jon and Janice Isch Agriculture Scholarship; Elsie McCoy, Timothy R. Donoghue Graduate Scholarship; Ellie Montgomery, Kendell Aileen Sobering Memorial Scholarship, Leadership Scholarship, Stephan Konz Scholarship; Jonah Montgomery, Medallion Scholarship; Robert Nagely, Max C. and Autumn F. Farrar Memorial Scholarship; Lauren Payne, Memorial Scholarship; Megan Plattner, Foundation Plus Scholarship, K-State Alumni Association Scholarship, Richard and Jane Thiessen Business Administration Scholarship; Sarah Plum, Bachelor Controls Inc. Engineering Scholarship, Dave and Pamela Beardmore Chemical Engineering Scholarship, Leadership Scholarship; Ashley Schmelzle, Achievement Award, Carol Sitz-Pelser Memorial Scholarship in Human Ecology, Vivian St. Clair Scholarship in Human Ecology; Kelli Stallbaumer, Darlene J. Meisner Peniston Memorial Scholarship, Foundation Plus Scholarship, R.C. and Eva Finley Center on Aging Scholar-

ship; Kirsten Steinlage, Jon Levin K-State Student Union General Scholarship; Caleb Strahm, Vanier Family Leadership Scholarship at Kansas State Polytechnic, Vanier Family Scholarship at Kansas State Polytechnic; Joshua Strahm, Coonrod Memorial Architectural Engineering Scholarship, Foundation Plus Scholarship; Mariah Strahm, Achievement Award, Business Administration Dean’s Scholarship, Executive Mentorship Program Scholarship, Lincoln W. and Dorothy I. Deihl Scholarship; Michaela Strahm, College of Education Alumni Scholarship, Gary J. and Carol L. Lazarus Scholarship in Education; Ryan Strahm, Foundation Scholarship, William and Kay Lewis Mechanical Engineering Scholarship; Anna Sunderland, Della Drollinger Glunt Memorial Scholarship, Elizabeth and William Henry Hinshaw Memorial Scholarship in Human Ecology, K-State Blue Key Scholarship, Leadership Scholarship; Camden Wenger, Fairchild Scholarship, John Henry Haeberle Memorial Scholarship in Mechanical Engineering; Wetmore: Jena Winkler, Leadership Scholarship.

SCHOLARSHIP ESSAY CONTEST

Kansas financial agencies partner to award scholarships Two state financial agencies are partnering for the third year to award up to nine scholarships to Kansas high school seniors for personal finance essays. Kansas high school seniors have the opportunity to win one of nine scholarships, with the grand prize amount totaling $2,500, to help cover the cost of tuition at a Kansas school of higher education by entering the Kansas Financial Scholars Essay Scholarship Contest. The contest is jointly sponsored by the Office of the Kansas Securities Commissioner (KSC) and

the Office of the State Bank Commissioner (OSBC). Scholarships will be awarded in the amounts of $2,500, $2,000, $1,500, $1,000, $500, and up to four $250 honorable mention awards to eligible seniors. Students who choose to participate in the competition will be asked to write a two-part essay. The first section requires the students to pick one of three financial challenges and write a one- to twopage essay incorporating lessons they have learned about personal finance and money management.

Then, in a three- to six-page essay, students are to provide an analysis showing how they will apply what they have learned to their life as they prepare for higher education. To be eligible, students must be a Kansas public, private, or homeschooled high school senior, planning to attend a Kansas technical school, college or university. They also must have enrolled in and completed at least one KSC or OSBC sponsored program (EverFi Financial Literacy, The Stock Market Game, Personal Finance Challenge, or Life$marts) during

their high school career. Successful completion of a sponsored course by April 20 is required. Teachers, parents or students may contact the KSC to sign up today for one of the free prerequisite programs by calling 913-6529164 to speak with Shannon Stone, the Director of Investor Education for the KSC. Essays will be accepted through April 3, 2017. To learn more about participating in the contest, visit ksc.ks.gov/scholarship, www. osbckansas.org, or send an email to Shannon.Stone@ks.gov.


6B

December 14, 2016  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  sabethaherald.com

classifieds EMPLOYMENT

SENIOR SOFTWARE TEST ENGINEER

AgJunction is seeking a dynamic individual to provide leadership in the specification and development of processes and tools to enable comprehensive product verification for the company’s machine control, engineering and guidance systems. Works closely with the software designers during the design specification phase and will carry out final product verification for software elements of the product. The position is based at the company’s Hiawatha office and involves in field testing of the company’s products on tractors.

Multiple Positions Available BERN LOCATION: position that will include office manager

and veterinary assistant duties, including, but not limited to, working with QuickBooks and veterinary software, answering the phone, assisting with large and small animals, and general cleaning duties. 32-40 hours per week. Employee will be required to work one Saturday morning per month in the Sabetha office. Applicants must provide a resume and fill-out a job application (available at both locations)

SABETHA LOCATION: veterinary assistant position. Duties will include working with large and small animals, answering phones, cleaning and boarding kennel duties. 24-36 hours per week. Employee will be required to work one Saturday morning per month. Applicants must provide a resume and fill-out a job application (available at both locations) SABETHA LOCATION: two positions available for general

kennel assistant. Employees must be able to- work weekdays between 3:30-5:30 PM, approximately 2 weekends per month (Saturday mornings from 8-12PM, Saturday evenings, twice on Sundays) and holiday breaks. Duties will include caring for boarding animals (walking, feeding, cleaning kennels) and general cleaning in the main clinic. Interested applicants can fill-out an application at either location.

BERN-SABETHA VETERINARY CLINIC 216 S. West St. | Bern (785) 336-6151

1014 Main St. | Sabetha (785) 284-2103

ESSENTIAL DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES • Embedded software development, PID control loops, database, GUI Ensure product compliance to design specifications. • Development of verification test methods and capabilities. • Development and implementation of Product Verification Test Plans in lab and field environments. • Analyze product test coverage through the design cycle. • Provide risk assessment against test coverage. • Failure mode analysis. • Product reliability and performance assessment and testing. • Qualify OEM assemblies for incorporation into company products. • Analyze and present relevant issues in a clear, concise and logical manner. • Conduct and/or supervise testing by other Test Engineers • Operate a variety of computer automated and manual test equipment including GPS and GNSS systems, precision Ag systems and simulators. • Oversee several test project simultaneously and provide scheduling support to operations • Write test reports • Day to day management and mentoring of onsite junior team members. • Ability to maintain excellence and accuracy in a dynamic, fast-paced, multi-disciplinary environment. • Ongoing commitment to advance knowledge in the field of GNSS, GPS, embedded systems testing, and standards compliance. • Sourcing, obtaining quotations, and selecting required lab supplies and materials to conduct tests

EDUCATION & EXPERIENCE • Technical Degree or Advanced Diploma (or equivalent) in Engineering and/or software systems • 5+ years of experience in product design and test • Experience in developing system verification strategies and plans with large OEM customers • Experience in the development of test tools and automated test cases using scripting languages

Lewis Impl. Co. Bookkeeper, full time with benefits, 5 days a week, Humboldt, Neb.

402-862-2331 Ask for Gary

Prairie Hills USD 113 is accepting applications for the

FULL-TIME OFFICE/ ADMINISTRATIVE POSITION

at Sabetha Elementary School. This is the daytime position and could start immediately. If interested please call the Board of Education office for more information or an application.

Main duties include posting receipts, data and load entry, shipment status updates and possible switchboard operator. Offering excellent pay and benefits.

Deadline for submitting applications is until the position is filled.

Please send resume to : PO Box 226, Sabetha, KS 66534 (or) ruth@keimts.com

Full-Time Night RN

Come join the Nutrition and Food Services team at HCH! Immediate full-time cook position available for a self-motivated, ambitious individual. 1-2 years cooking experience preferred. Short-order cook experience a plus!

Help Wanted

EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

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Sabetha Community Hospital is currently looking for a

CAFÉ COOK/ROOM SERVICE

Call 402-463-7622

TO APPLY, PLEASE VISIT WWW.CORP.AGJUNCTION.COM – EMPLOYMENT – CURRENT OPPORTUNITIES

USD 113 IS AN EQUAL EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER.

HIAWATHA COMMUNITY HOSPITAL HCH is accepting applications for the following positions:

2 hours per night Monday - Saturday $13/hour

OTHER SKILLS AND ABILITIES • A current open driver’s license and their own vehicle • GNSS, particularly for applications on aircraft and/or ground vehicles preferred • Proficient skill level in Microsoft Office Suite – Word, Outlook, PowerPoint and Excel • Internet search processes and research abilities • Demonstrated ability to conduct software testing at all levels using testing programs and reporting tools • Knowledge of software design processes • Knowledge of regulatory and safety standards for industrial products • Knowledge of statistical processes as related to measurements and quality control • Knowledge of test methodologies and equipment for benchmarking complex equipment • Experiences in agriculture and machine control environments is desired • Experience with farm equipment is desired • Willingness to travel • Proficient skill level in Microsoft Office Suite – Word, Outlook, PowerPoint and Excel. • Internet search processes and research abilities. • Use of scripting languages. • C/C++ programming experience desirable.

Head Custodial Position

JANITORIAL HELP WANTED

Shifts are 12 hrs. with 36 hrs. per week as FT. Approximately every 3rd weekend is required. Facility is 90% lift free. Supportive medical staff consists of five Family Practice Physicians. An excellent base salary is offered with a competitive shift differential. Additional benefits include vacation, holiday, sick time, group health insurance, pension plan and numerous other benefits. If interested apply online at www.sabethahospital.com or call Julie Holthaus, Human Resource Director at 785-284-1584.

CNAS - ALL SHIFTS Excellent opportunity to join our friendly compassionate staff. We offer competitive wages, excellent benefits, and shift differential for evening and night shifts. Apostolic Christian Home | 511 Paramount, Sabetha, KS 66534 Call Human Resources at (785) 284-3471, stop in to pick up an application, or apply on our website at achome@apostolicsabetha.com. ALL INQUIRIES WILL BE KEPT CONFIDENTIAL.

Drivers: Jingle all the way to the bank! Bonuses, Vacation, 401K! OTR, Regional. CDL-A universetruck. com 866-958-7825

Entry Level Heavy Equipment Operator Career. Get Trained - Get Certified - Get Hired! Bulldozers, Backhoes and Excavators. Immediate Lifetime Job Placement. VA Benefits. 1-866-362-6497

MISCELLANEOUS

Responsibilities include, but not limited to; preparation and service of hot food items for room service meals prepared for patients and hot food items for our café. HCH offers competitive pay and an excellent benefit package. For further details or to apply, please visit the Careers section of our website at www.hch-ks.org. Resumes and general questions may be submitted to HR@hch-ks.org or by calling Human Resources at 785-742-6579. HCH IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

CONSTRUCTION PROJECT MANAGER AHRS Construction is seeking an experienced commercial project manager to join our team!

The position would be based out of our office in Bern Kansas. No overnight travel required. We are looking for someone that shares AHRS’s small town values and work ethic, enjoys managing the construction process from start to finish and the sense of accomplishment by completing first-class facilities in our local communities. DUTIES TO INCLUDE: • • • • • • • •

Overall management of commercial projects from start to finish Participation in pre-construction & business development Draft owner contracts, subcontracts Develop and manage schedules Coordinate with on-site superintendants, subcontractors and suppliers Coordinate self perform work and monitor quality control Process submittals, RFI’s, change orders, pay applications Run onsite progress meetings

If you are interested please contact by phone at 785-336-6118 or email erics@ahrs-inc.com. Please visit www.ahrs-inc.com for more information on our company.

AHRS CONSTRUCTION INC. BERN, KANSAS

BROWN COUNTY HUMANE SOCIETY

Pet of the Week Jinx Jinx is a very sweet dog. She is a young adult, LOVES everyone and likes to play. She has been at the shelter for a couple of months and is really wanting to get out. She would really make a nice pet! She has been spayed, is current on her vaccinations and H/W negative. She is medium size, weighing about 35 pounds. Her adoption fee is $125

Please contact the Brown County Humane Society at 785-742-1976 for more information.


classifieds

sabethaherald.com  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  December 14, 2016

REAL ESTATE

Heritage

BUSINESS FOR SALE

For Sale!

Real Estate

UNDER CONTRACT

217 Jilson St.- Bern

$89,500

3 bdrm, 3 bath, all brick ranch home, new carpet, paint, newer roof & HVAC, all appliances stay, turn key property, priced to sell!

PRICE FURTHER REDUCED!

UNDER CONTRACT

2754 N Road, Bern

$275,000

1920s Four Square style with 3,500 square feet of living space. Five bedrooms, very charming, country living, new large metal building, many items new or remodeled. Erik Ganstrom (785) 336-1847 Kathy Ganstrom (785) 336-1848 Lori Burdiek (785) 294-1681 www.HeritageSuccess.com

LOTS FOR SALE

New Home, under construction

1781 Rachel Lane

(Located at the south end of Sabetha City Limits)

REALTY & AUCTIONS LISTING AND SELLING RESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL & LAND

Jim Faunce, Realtor 785-224-3773

Cheryl Lippold, Realtor 785-741-2381

Hiawatha, KS 66434

www.heartland-realty.com

UNDER CONTRACT

MAXIMUM REALTY 505 N. 1st - Hiawatha, KS ROGER HARTTER Auctioneer & Salesperson 785-284-2590 or 284-2643

2205 116th Road, Sabetha 6 BR, 4 acres, 3 BA, full basement

1014 Main St., Sabetha

Retail/Office commercial property, 2000+ sq ft.

FOR SALE

300’ frontage on Old Hwy 75 S., call for details

SOLD

Steve Aeschliman | Broker/Owner 2566 T Road - Sabetha, KS (785) 284-2417 or (785) 547-5034 www.ashrealtyandauctions.com

MOTIVATED SELLER!

708 Roanoke, Seneca

PRICE REDUCED $50,000 203 Hanson, Morrill

Coming Soon! N & N Storage | Sabetha, Kansas

10 x 10, 10 x 15, 10 x 20 -- Reserve yours now!

2346 240th Road, Sabetha Exclusive Listing! Country Home 3 Bedrooms, 4 Acres, Full Basement

205 S. 8th St. | 785-284-3774 Dan Kellenberger, Broker

FOR SALE

Brown County will be taking sealed bids on a 1991 FORD F450, 12 ft Flatbed with hoist, 460 5-speed, approximately 200680 miles (exceeds mechanical limits). The truck may be seen at the District 3 shop in Fairview. Bids must be submitted in the Clerk’s Office by 9 AM January 3rd, to be opened at the Commissioners’ meeting.

For Sale

LAND FOR SALE

CALL 785-285-1562

21 +/- Acres; 10 miles south of Sabetha, on Brown/Nemaha county line.

Phone 785.284-3300 Fax 785.284.2320 advertising@sabethaherald.com ELECTRICAL

FOR SALE

220 Virginia Street, Sabetha 3-5 Bedrooms, Corner Lot

Contact Us Today to Reserve Your Place in Business Services

CATTLE

Contact Scott McGuire at 785-547-5598

V-8 304 engine and transmission, new tires, new soft top, new brakes, new seat covers and carpet, pin striping, excellent condition.

Business Services DENTIST

McGuire’s Wrecker Service

1979 CJ5 Jeep

SABETHA REALTY To review our listings, go to: www.sabetharealty.com

For Sale

Brown County reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids.

Commercial Lot, Sabetha 709 Dakota, Sabetha

Price reduced to $145,000

Call Steve at 785-294-1208

Call Todd at 785-548-5104 for details!

Like us on Facebook!

Sheila Schwalm, Broker 785-741-1773 Office: 785-742-3618 720 Oregon Street

Large walkout lots located on Rachel Lane. South city limits of Sabetha.

Buy Now, and Pick Your Own Colors & Finishes

Ash

7B

Advertise your business in our Business Services section for as low as $5.75 per week.

HEALTH

LEGAL

PEST CONTROL

1309 S. Old Highway 75 | Sabetha, KS

Dental Care That Never Quits! Services Provided:

-Dental Implant Placement -Advanced Bone & Soft Tissue Grafting -Removal of Impacted 3rd Molars (Wisdom Teeth) -Advanced Cosmetic Reconstruction -Routine Dentistry -IV Sedation for Surgical and Advanced Reconstruction Cases

MISCELLANEOUS

Dr. Terry Whitten (785) 284-3911 or (888) 589-8100 www.dentalimplantsnek.com

ENTERTAINMENT

EQUIPMENT

TRUCKING

STORAGE

AUTOMOTIVE

T&K TRUCKING Sabetha, Kansas

785-260-1180

For all your hauling needs! - GRAIN, FEED, ROCK & LIME -

Need extra storage space? 24 hour access various sizes

Call for prices and availability. 284-3205

Sabetha Mini Storage

DISH TV – BEST DEAL EVER! Only $39.99/mo. Plus $14.99/ mo Internet (where avail.) FREE Streaming. FREE Install (up to 6 rooms.) FREE HD-DVR. 1-800676-6809

LENDERS OFFERING $0 DOWN FOR LAND OWNERS Roll your New Home and Land Improvements into One Package. Discount National Pricing on Breeze II Doublewide and our 60th Anniversary Singlewide. Trade-ins Welcome!! 866-858-6862

advertising details&deadlines CONTACT US

POLICY

DISPLAY ADVERTISING

Contact The Sabetha Herald for additional advertising details!

� All material published or inserted in The Sabetha Herald is subject to final acceptance of the publisher. � The Sabetha Herald reserves the right to accept or reject any advertisements for any reason at any time and to, if necessary, print the word “advertisement” in any display advertisements. � The Sabetha Herald is not responsible for errors submitted for advertisements. � The Sabetha Herald is not responsible for more than one incorrect insertion. No adjustment can be made if error does not alter the value of the ad.

� The local display advertising rate is $5.25 per column inch. This rate is non-commissionable. � The annual commissionable display advertising rate is $6.25 per column inch.

SUBMISSIONS (1) Bring the information to our office, 1024 Main Street in Sabetha, between 8 a.m. and 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. (2) Mail to P.O. Box 208, Sabetha, KS 66534. (3) Email advertising@sabethaherald.com. (4) Fax to 785-284-2320. (5) Call us at 785-284-3300 or 866-502-3300.

PROOFS & TEARSHEETS � If requested, proofs of advertisements will be delivered prior to publication by fax or by e-mail, providing all copy is submitted by the deadline. � Electronic Tearsheets will be provided upon request through The Sabetha Herald DropBox folder.

PAYMENTS � The Sabetha Herald requires prepayment on all ads unless you or your business has an established account with us. Even with an established account, we require prepayment for all ads under $20. Payments are due by the end of the month. � Late payment penalty is $3 per $100 per month. � A $30 charge will be added to advertising bills paid with an insufficient funds check.

ADDITIONAL CHARGES & FEES � A design fee of $35 per hour will be charged for any advertisement requested and designed, but not placed. � A late fee of $2 per column inch will be charged for advertisements requested after deadline.

DEADLINES � 10 a.m. Monday for Wednesday newspaper � Special Holiday Deadlines are 5 p.m. Thursday for next Wednesday's newspaper, unless otherwise noted. If the holiday falls on a Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday, holiday deadlines apply. Holidays include the following: New Year's Day, Presidents' Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Veterans Day, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day. � Changes to ad copy must be submitted no later than Monday at 5 p.m. � Because space is limited, The Sabetha Herald staff must be notified of full color advertisements two weeks in advance. Placement is first come first serve. � If an advertiser would like an ad placed on a specific page of the paper, Herald staff requires notification one week in advance. Not all requests can be granted.

LEGAL & PUBLIC NOTICES � The local rate for legal and public notices is $5.50 per column inch per issue.

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING � The local classified advertising rate is $5.75 per column inch. This rate is non-commissionable. � The national commissionable classified display advertising rate is $6.75 per column inch. � The Herald does not run line classifieds.

INSERTS � The non-commissionable insert rate is 10 cents a piece for pre-prints, 12 tab pages or less. The non-commissionable insert rate is 11 cents a piece for pre-prints 12 to 24 tab pages. The insert rate for brown paper sacks/bags is 12 cents a piece.

SUPPLEMENTAL ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS � This year, we are offering businesses the opportunity to participate in a number of campaigns aimed at boosting your business. Select from themed campaigns such as Valentine's Day, Mother's Day and Father's Day, or contact our staff and request that we design a campaign specifically for you!

SUPPLEMENTAL SECTION SPONSORSHIP � We offer a number of opportunities for area businesses to sponsor our Special Supplements. We create a number of supplements each year, with topics varying from Veterans to Soil Conservation.


8B

fun&games

December 14, 2016  |  The Sabetha Herald  |  sabethaherald.com

from the kitchen of Annie Deters

8 oz cream cheese, softened 1 c sour cream 1 pkg Ranch Dip Mix 1 c chopped Romaine 1 Tomato, chopped 1/2 c shredded cheddar cheese 1/2 c grilled corn 1/4 c bacon, cooked and crumbled 1/4 c blue cheese crumbles

H E C R O S S W O R D S A L D

INSTRUCTIONS

Cobb Dip

INGREDIENTS

WEEKLY RECIPE

Combine cream cheese, sour cream and Ranch Dip mix and mix until smooth. Spread into the bottom of a 9-inch pie plate or similarly sized pan. Top with lettuce, tomatoes, cheddar cheese, corn, bacon, and blue cheese.

Sudoku

Fun By The Numbers Here’s How It Works: Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the number will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle.

AFRICA BIRTH BLESSING CANDLES CELEBRATION CORN DREIDEL EIGHT EVE FAITHFUL GELT HALLEL HANUKKIYAH HARAMBEE IMANI KISLEV KUJICHAGULIA KUUMBA KWANZAA LATKES LIGHTS MACCABEE MENORAH MIRACLE NIA OIL PARTY REDEDICATION RELIGION RESOLUTION SHAMASH SUFGANIYOT TEMPLE UJIMA UMOJA YULE

CLUES ACROSS 1. Large primate 4. Annualized percentage rate 7. Frictional horsepower 8. Alternate name 10. Incursion 12. Metrical feet 13. Musician Ingram 14. Swiss river 16. Text speak for annoying 17. Squelch 19. Will Ferrell played one 20. Close violently 21. Arrogant 25. Goddess of the dawn 26. Today (Spanish) 27. Ethiopian town 29. Speed 30. Kids take it to school 31. Bowling ball's adversary 32. 1988 NFL MVP 39. Volcanic crater 41. Curved shape 42. Discover by investigation 43. Up in the air (abbr.) 44. A son who shares his dad's name 45. Assist in wrongdoing 46. Actress Lathan 48. Nonsense (slang) 49. Sharp and forthright 50. Midway between northeast and east 51. NAACP cofounder Wells 52. Soviet Socialist Republic

CLUES DOWN 1. Again 2. Erectile organs 3. Concluding speech 4. Pie _ __ mode 5. With pustules 6. Muslim calendar month 8. Need it to live 9. Thailand 11. Container to serve food 14. Boxing great 15. Woolen blankets 18. Expresses surprise 19. Emergency medical services 20. Inflamed swelling of the eyelid 22. Reporter 23. Arrived extinct 24. Ad __ 27. Academic bill of rights 28. A pair 29. Pumpkin and apple are examples 31. China 32. Made illegal 33. Be mistaken 34. Stephen King's “Pennywise” 35. Semite 36. Martens with short tails 37. Large bodies of water 38. Lower in position 39. Dough used in Latin American cuisine 40. Calculating tools 44. Boxers do this 47. Macaw

12 14 2016  
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