Page 1

SAANICHNEWS Ram named B.C. MVP

Furtado, Foster in finale

Province’s top player leads Mount Doug into biggest game of the season. Sports, Page A20

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Mount Doug high school’s 80th anniversary party came to a close with singing competition Saturday. News, Page A3

Wednesday, November 23, 2011

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Saanich in talks to join major crime unit Ryan Flaherty News staff

Don Denton/News staff

Mayor Frank Leonard celebrates his re-election after arriving at his campaign headquarters Saturday night. Story Page A7.

FRANK MESSAGE FROM VOTERS NEW FACES AMONG TRUSTEES

QUIET LEADER MOVES ON PAGE Wayne Hunter leaves council to become a trustee A5

John Young among incumbents to lose a spot on school board

How we voted: COUNCIL

For council (eight elected):

The number of votes each candidate received

■ Susan Brice ■ Judy Brownoff ■ Vic Derman ■ Vicki Sanders ■ Dean Murdock ■ Leif Wergeland ■ Paul Gerrard ■ Nichola Wade

13,547 13,208 12,427 12,358 11,899 11,740 10,681 9,437

■ Rob Wickson ■ Jesse McClinton ■ Harald Wolf ■ Ingrid Ip

7,801 4,935 4,865 3,999

For mayor:

■ Frank Leonard

11,151

■ David Cubberley ■ David Shebib

9,526 173

25.4%

of eligible voters cast a ballot

COUNCIL HAS FAMILIAR LOOK

PAGE A6

Nichola Wade returns as only new face on council

Greater Victoria Board of Education For trustee (nine elected): ■ Orcherton, Peg ■ Leonard, Elaine ■ Horsman, Bev ■ Nohr, Deborah ■ McNally, Diane ■ Alpha, Catherine ■ McEvoy, Michael ■ Ferris, Tom ■ Loring-Kuhanga, E.

15,613 14,742 13,795 13,445 12,977 12,965 12,642 12,600 11,264

■ Pitre, David ■ Holland, Jim ■ Young, John ■ Bratzer, David ■ Paynter, Rob ■ Rand, David ■ Stern, Richard

PAGE A7

11,201 11,122 10,685 10,275 8,137 5,363 5,182

Saanich Board of Education For trustee (two elected): ■ Hunter, Wayne ■ Parker, Helen

2,951 2,446

■ Steinemann, K.A. 800

The largest municipality in Greater Victoria is moving closer to joining the Island’s major crimes investigation team. Saanich police are in talks to join the Vancouver Island Integrated Major Crime Unit, Sgt. Dean Jantzen told the News last week. “We’re in discussions, and they’re positive. Our intention is to move forward with a view to join in the near future,” Jantzen said. Details of the agreement have yet to be ironed out, and the final say rests in the hands of the Saanich police board. Considerations include how many officers Saanich would contribute to the squad and what kind of financial commitment they would make. It’s a shift in outlook for the department, which has to this point chosen to handle homicide investigations in Saanich on its own, but Jantzen said it’s more of an evolution than anything. “There’s been no dramatic change in philosophy ... We’ve reviewed this on a yearly basis since (the unit’s) inception,” he said. “We now believe the factors exist where there is a net benefit to our community.” PLEASE SEE: Regional force unlikely, Page A13

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SAANICH NEWS NEWS -- Wednesday, Wednesday, November 23, 2011 SAANICH November 23, 2011 

Foster, Furtado judge Idol finale An acting student/indie rocker brought down the sold-out house and was named Mount Doug Idol during the finale of the secondary school’s 80th anniversary celebrations at the University of Victoria’s Farquhar Auditorium Nov. 19. Kale Penny, a UVic acting student and frontman of local band Sunday Buckets, won the final round of the singing competition judged by Mount Douglas secondary school alumni Nelly Furtado and David Foster, as well as his songwriter daughter Amy Foster. More than 100 vocalists with past and current connections to Mount Doug entered the competition. That number was whittled down to five finalists prior to the finale. Penny, 22, wowed judges with a slowed-down cover of Michael Jackson’s “Billy Jean,” before he took the mic for a victory performance of Foster’s “St. Elmo’s Fire (Man in Motion),” with the Hitman himself. Beyond the title, the Idol winner went home with a trip for two to anywhere in North America. Penny was up against Victoria-based singer/songwriter Justin Hewitt, Amanda Wood, Christine Seeber and Joni Anderson. Foster remained at the piano bench while Furtado closed the show with two of her most popular singles, “Try” and “I’m Like a Bird.” The evening was in support of Mount Doug’s alumni association, of which Foster is honorary president, and included renditions of some of his biggest hits performed by the Morry Stearns Band. nnorth@saanichnews.com

Mount Doug high school grad and big Nelly Furtado fan, Fern Thomas, left, has her picture taken with Furtado at the University Centre during the finale of Mount Doug Idol, part of the school’s 80th anniversary celebrations on Saturday. Furtado, the world-reknowned recording artist, and David Foster, above, superstar producer and musician, are both alumni of the school. Sharon Tiffin/News staff

Oak Bay Village hosts light-up this Sunday Laura Lavin News staff

Sharon Tiffin/News staff

Jordan Rathwell from Sheffield Electrical puts up a wreath in preparation for the Christmas light-up Nov. 27.

Oak Bay is the place to be for Christmas with events and special Christmas activities taking place throughout the season. Kicking off the celebration on Nov. 27 is the 11th annual Oak Bay Christmas Festival light-up. Thousands of LED lights, decorations and giant wreaths adorn buildings, trees and lamp posts along Oak Bay Avenue. The lights come on Sunday, Nov. 27 with family entertainment, giant games and magical fun. “It’s gone through a few evolutions,” said Heather Leary, project manager. “It started with a variety show and grew bigger, so we hired a band to play, then it grew in scope again. It’s been really good – the community loves the event. One year we had to

the Christmas Festival officially underway. After, you can get a photo with Santa at Athlone travel, by donation to next year’s Tour de Rock team or enjoy a snack of roasted chestnuts. Musical selections will be lively, ranging from Southern spiritual to bluegrass to banjo and fiddle solos. There will also be a selection of Christmas favourites including the 12 Days of Christmas with onstage host Bill Murphy-Dyson. This upbeat concert features a range of music including, banjo and fiddle, and favourite Christmas tunes. The entertainment gets started at 3 p.m. with the light-up countdown just before 5 p.m. at the stage on Oak Bay Avenue and Hampshire Road. The lights and festivities will shine on until the first week of January. For more information go to visitoakbayvillage.ca. editor@oakbaynews.com

postpone because of snow and people could not wait.” Leary said attendance has grown in recent years as more and more families are moving into the area. Musical entertainment includes Daniel Lapp, Oliver Swain and Celtic guitarist Quinn Bachand with an old-time Appalachian Christmas concert, the Joy of Life Choir and the B.C. Fiddle Orchestra. Visitors can get an up-close and personal look at Galey Farms’ 80-foot long parade float and don’t forget to bring your Christmas wish list as Canada Post will be there with its decorated van collecting letters to Santa. Lights come on at 5 p.m. to start the Christmas festival and Santa arrives shortly after on an Oak Bay fire truck to welcome one and all and share a Christmas greeting. Then Oak Bay’s town crier will pronounce

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A4 A4 •• www.saanichnews.com www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, Wednesday,November November23, 23,2011 2011 --SAANICH SAANICH NEWS NEWS

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www.saanichnews.com •• A5 A5 www.saanichnews.com

SAANICH NEWS NEWS -- Wednesday, Wednesday, November November 23, 23, 2011 2011  SAANICH

Goodbye, Wayne

SAANICH

NEWS NOTICE OF WATERMAIN FLUSHING

Wayne Hunter reflects on his two terms with council and his decision to leave

In order to maintain satisfactory water quality throughout the distribution system, water main flushing is scheduled to start October 3 to December 2, 2011.

Natalie North News staff

Wayne Hunter wouldn’t change much if he could go back and serve his two terms on Saanich council over again -- but he might speak up a little more. “I’d probably be more outspoken about my perspective on moving slowly even when we’re under pressure to move more quickly than our staff can attend to and we can afford,” said Hunter, explaining his perspective on maintaining a fiscally-responsible approach to infrastructure. It’s one that he’ll admit isn’t always observed when councillors are adding items to their wish lists. His philosophy: let the mayor provide the leadership. When he did speak, he said, he felt he was representing a view that was in line with the district’s policies and not merely his own personal opinion. That approach helped earn the respect of his council colleagues. “Some people, when you speak, they listen,” said Coun. Leif Wergeland. “Other people that are talking all of the time, you almost turn them off. There is wisdom in knowing when to share your wisdom and when to pull back and just listen … Wayne isn’t shy as far as addressing issues, but he’s also one who listens to what others have to say, too.” Hunter came to Saanich council after having served as a Central Saanich councillor and mayor. He initially sought public office because he wanted help his community overcome difficulties which he saw first hand in his work as an educator. In his final year as mayor, he was appointed principal of North Saanich middle school and chose to focus on that job rather than seek re-election. In the years that followed, Hunter became a resident of Saanich. When he did, Mayor Frank Leonard invited Hunter to sit on the Saanich Police Board. That introduction to Saanich politics led directly to his successful campaign to join council in 2005. “He had a depth of experience and helped all of us deal with issues and make decisions,” Leonard said. Leonard is quick to tout all of the skills Hunter brought to council. “He’s in incredible shape. When we had the (Victoria Hospitals Foundation) street hockey tournament, he was twice the age of the competitors and was the best player on any of the teams.” Leonard also recognized the once-international hockey coach’s roots in education. Hunter, he said, often took the time to speak with the children at public events rather than the adults. For Coun. Susan Brice, Hunter was a straight shooter and an enormous pleasure to work with. “He has a firm, but very gentle style and wonderful people skills,” said Brice. “It’s easy to see why the students and the professionals that worked with him in the school district thought of him as a real asset.”

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Wayne Hunter is switching jobs, from Saanich councillor to Saanich school board trustee. During his first term on Saanich council, when “money wasn’t as scarce,” he said, Hunter played a key role in developing the district’s infrastructure. Since that time, discussions have shifted more toward green initiatives, on which councillors tend to share similar views, due largely in part to staff work prior to items arriving at council, he explained. “There usually isn’t a lot of difference between something that’s good that has come forward and something that can be made a little better,” Hunter said. At 67, and with a daughter in Grade 1, Hunter has decided to return to his roots in education in hopes of repairing a failing system, as a board of education trustee in the Saanich School District. “(In) stereotypical politics, sometimes people start at school board, run for council and then for mayor,” Leonard said. “Wayne’s gone from mayor to council to school trustee, and it’s because of his love of education and children.” Hunter, a self-professed big-picture guy, isn’t into laying blame about who has contributed to the cracks in the school system he’s so eager to rejoin. Likewise, Hunter’s outlook on his time in council chambers is just as positive. “I can come out of the box and make some very blunt statements when I need to, but I see Saanich as such a well-balanced municipality and basically it’s a matter of tweaking the issues and not making gigantic changes,” Hunter said. “I think it would be wrong for people to present the opinion to the world that the sky is falling in Saanich because Saanich has more than most municipalities in British Columbia. We are very fortunate to have a municipality like Saanich to live in.” nnorth@saanichnews.com

Business and other customers who wish advance notification of flushing in their immediate area are requested to call Waterworks at 250-475-5481 between 8:00 am and 4:30 pm, Monday to Friday. Any discolouration is temporary and users are asked to minimize consumption if a change in water appearance is noticed. The District of Saanich accepts no liability for inconvenience or damages cause by water use during its flushing program. Your cooperation and understanding are appreciated.

THE CORPORATION OF THE DISTRICT OF SAANICH

SAANICH COUNCIL APPOINTMENTS TO REGIONAL WATER SUPPLY COMMISSION On December 5, 2011 Saanich Council will consider the appointment of five of its members to the Regional Water Supply Commission. In accordance with Commission regulations, Saanich residents are invited to advise Council on the appointments. You may advise Council by letter, fax, e-mail or by attending the Committee of the Whole Meeting that evening. The meeting will be held in the Saanich Municipal Hall Council Chambers, 770 Vernon Avenue commencing at 7:30 pm. Please submit your written advice by 4:00 pm, December 5, 2011 to the Mayor and Councillors at District of Saanich, 770 Vernon Avenue, Victoria, BC, V8X 2W7, faxed to 250-475-5440 or e-mailed to clerksec@saanich.ca For additional information please contact the Legislative Division at 250-475-1775.

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Wednesday, Wednesday,November November23, 23,2011 2011 - -SAANICH SAANICHNEWS NEWS

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“I think before we do a lot of those things our primary focus needs to be on building relationships,” LoringKuhanga said. “We can’t sit down at a table and negotiate a bargain without building healthy relationships.” After Pitre, two other incumbents failed to win re-election: Jim Holland, the founder of Island Parent Magazine, and 90-year-old John Young, who said he’s surprised his 20-year run on the board has ended. “But in a way I shouldn’t be because I didn’t spend one penny on the election,” he said. “I just depended on my being well known as a trustee to carry me forward for another term, but it didn’t work out that way.” Young, whose background includes 60 years in the education system, is best known for his legal efforts to eliminate school fees. He now intends to continue that work by taking on all boards of education across Canada. “Now that I’m no longer a trustee I can aim all of my time at that issue,” Young said, adding: “You can’t deny a child an education because they ain’t got no money.” nnorth@saanichnews.com

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SAANICH SAANICH NEWS NEWS -- Wednesday, Wednesday, November November 23, 23, 2011 2011 

Voters opt for status quo on Saanich council Make that six straight wins for Frank Leonard. Though his support dwindled slightly from the 2008 civic election, Saanich’s longtime mayor will hold the municipality’s top spot for another three years. “I’m humbled by (this win). I’m determined to live up to your expectations. We’re making Saanich just a wonderful community … and we’re going to continue with that kind of success,” Leonard said in his victory speech Saturday night after beating David Cubberley in a hard-fought mayoral race. Leonard received 53.5 per cent of the vote, while Cubberley – a former councillor and Saanich Don Denton/News staff South MLA – earned 45.7 per cent. David Cubberley greets A third candidate, David Shebib, supporters after arriving at received 0.8 per cent. his election headquarters in After receiving 72-per-cent sup- the University Centre on the port in 2008 (11,972), Leonard University of Victoria campus. received about 800 fewer votes tackle is next year’s budget. The this time around (11,151). “Every ballot is blank when it’s new council won’t have much handed to you. You don’t transfer time to catch their breath before ballots from a previous election – the new year arrives with the 2012 but in our case, with all the incum- budget,” the mayor said. He said he didn’t make a lot of bents being re-elected, it speaks well to the work we’re doing,” promises during the election campaign because he is Leonard said. aware of the “budget On council, Nichpinch” that municiola Wade joins the palities are in. seven incumbents Cubberley on – Susan Brice, Judy Monday said he’s Brownoff, Vic Derlooking at the elecman, Vicki Sanders, tion results in a posiDean Murdock, Leif tive light. Wergeland and Paul “There is an appeGerrard. Wade previtite for change – we ously sat on Saanich council from 2002- Coun. Susan Brice just fell a couple of 2005. watches the numbers per cents short, in “I’m thrilled that come in on election terms of stimulating the folks of Saanich night. Brice topped new voters to get it would like to send the polls with 13,547 done this time,” he said. “The mayor me back to coun- votes. didn’t hold his votcil,” Wade said. “I’m thrilled to be working with this ing level from the previous electeam. There’s enough diversity tion campaign. All of the new vot(among the councillors) that we’re ing that (the election) managed going to get some great perspec- to stimulate came to me, and so I think that showed there’s trementives on issues.” Leonard says his top priority dous potential to get disengaged looking ahead at the next three people if you have a good contest for mayor.” years will be fiscal responsibility. Cubberley says he won’t spend “Certainly the biggest file to

SAANICH

Re-elected Saanich Mayor Frank Leonard and wife Jackie arrive at campaign headquarters Saturday night. Don Denton News staff

the next three years being Leonard’s conscience, but he does want to make sure the mayor delivers on the platform on which he ran. “He has, in effect, put himself in several boxes because he believed in certain things and agreed to certain things that require him to change some of the ways he’s been governing,” Cubberley said, pointing to such things as transportation planning and the dumping of infill on farmland. On the council side of things, Rob Wickson, Jesse McClinton, Harald Wolf and Ingrid Ip fell short. Wickson earned 800 more votes than he did when he first ran for council in 2008, while Wolf – who ran for mayor in ‘08 – earned 200 more votes as a council candidate this time around. Voter turnout in the municipality also rose, from 20.6 per cent in 2008 to about 25.4 per cent on Saturday. “The good news is we did get voter turnout up some, but it’s still not as good as it should be,” Wade said. “That means three out of four people did not vote.” Leonard, Brice, Brownoff, Derman and Wergeland will be Saanich’s representatives at the Capital Regional District. Coun. Wayne Hunter stepped down from council to run for a spot on the Saanich board of education. He was elected alongside Helen Parker to sit on the School District 63 board.

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The Greater Victoria board of education elected six incumbent trustees – Elaine Leonard, Peg Orcherton, Bev Horsman, Michael McEvoy and Catherine Alpha – and will welcome Deborah Nohr, Diane McNally and Edith LoringKuhanga to the table. Saanich’s deputy chief elections officer, Carrie MacPhee, says about 1,000 people registered at the polling station before casting a ballot. That number, once confirmed, will be added to the number of registered voters to determine the final percentage of voter turnout. A total of 815 spoiled ballots were collected. kslavin@saanichnews.com

Hard to spoil The electronic voting machines automatically spit back a spoiled ballot, giving the voter the opportunity to fix the spoiled vote. If a voter does not want a replacement ballot, the voting machine can override a spoiled ballot and accept it. Only the valid votes on that particular ballot are counted.

Who is Nichola Wade? Though Wade is not an incumbent, she is a former Saanich councillor who worked with many of the current councillors during her 2001-05 term. “People on the doorstep seemed to say things like, ‘I remember that you seemed quite balanced when you were on council,’” Wade said. She pointed to such issues as affordable housing and climate change as her pet projects during her first term. She wants to continue with successes on creating more affordable housing and implementing Saanich’s climate action plans over the next three years.

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A8 • www.saanichnews.com

SAANICHNEWS

Wednesday, November 23, 2011 - SAANICH

EDITORIAL

NEWS

Penny Sakamoto Group Publisher Kevin Laird Editorial Director Jim Zeeben Editor Oliver Sommer Advertising Director

The Saanich News is published by Black Press Ltd. | 818 Broughton St., Victoria, B.C. V8W 1E4 | Phone: 250-920-2090 • Fax: 250-386-2624 • Web: www.saanichnews.com

OUR VIEW

Council gets new mandate The end result of Saturday’s civic election confirms what many observers have said about Saanich. All in all, things are pretty good here. Crime is low, taxes are not as bad as they could be and most municipal services seem reasonably well-run. At least that’s the general consensus of those people who either voted for more of the same or decided to skip the polls all together because nothing compelled them to demand a change. Voter turnout was up five per cent, but that still only represents about one in four eligible voters. Does this Watchdogs play that, as vital role in keeping mean a community, council accountable we’re disengaging from the democratic process? Probably not. Those three out of four voters who didn’t vote remain something of a sleeping gorilla. Looking back at the lead up to the election there were plenty of indications that no real effort was being made to rile citizens into anything resembling revolutionary fervour. At all-candidates meetings, the main message that came out of what initially promised to be an exciting mayoral race was that both Frank Leonard and David Cubberley really like it here. And while most of us who live here feel the same, the real challenge for Saanich is to avoid complacency. Fortunately, we’re also home to many passionate individuals who truly feel there’s room for improvement. Which is why we salute Rob Wickson, Jesse McClinton, Harald Wolf and Ingrid Ip. Though they weren’t elected, we hope they’ll continue to take an active interest in council’s affairs. With development pressure, traffic problems and huge budget items looming, council needs to be mindful their mandate also means they must stay accountable. What do you think? Give us your comments by e-mail: editor@saanichnews.com or fax 250-386-2624. All letters must have a name and a telephone number for verification. The Saanich News is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org.

Chilly climate for carbon plan B.C. Agriculture Council told the B.C.’s carbon emission trading committee’s Chilliwack hearing. plan died last week at the age of “This has cost us, to date, with the four. No service was announced. last increase, $45 million a year. The end came as the B.C. With the increase that’s anticipated capital hosted politicians from in 2012, that’ll be $65 neighbouring U.S. states million. Keep in mind that and western provinces the agriculture industry for their annual economic last year had a cumulative conference. Washington, net loss of $80 million.” Oregon, Montana, Utah, B.C.’s biggest Arizona and New Mexico greenhouse gas emitters followed through with are the petroleum and plans to withdraw from cement manufacturing the Western Climate industries. They only Initiative, leaving pay the tax on fuel while California, B.C. and significant process theoretically Manitoba, Tom Fletcher emissions are taxOntario and Quebec to B.C. Views exempt. But even that come up with a trading is stimulating demand system to put further costs on greenhouse gas emissions. for cement imported from outside B.C. This not only hurts domestic Fossil fuel kingpins Alberta and producers, it adds emissions via Saskatchewan wanted nothing trucking or rail shipping. to do with the initiative from the Then there is B.C.’s “carbonbeginning, when it set a goal of neutral public sector,” where 15-per-cent reduction in emissions provincial and local governments by 2020. are forced to buy carbon offsets. This leaves B.C. as the only The Pacific Carbon Trust then funds jurisdiction in North America with emission-reduction projects for big a carbon tax, and an emission emitters such as gas plants in the reduction target twice as ambitious northeast. – 33 per cent by 2020. Because of So five years on, that’s the upshot that tax, all of B.C.’s border states of Gordon Campbell’s lofty goal to and provinces have an economic lead the world in climate action. advantage for emitting industries. We’re hurting our own agriculture And with natural gas development and manufacturing, and transferring booming and population growing, scarce funds from hospitals, B.C.’s emissions continue upward. senior care homes and schools Industry representatives gave to subsidize profitable energy the legislature finance committee corporations. And emissions are the view from ground level. Take still rising. farming. It’s no wonder the finance “None of our competitors have committee has recommended a carbon tax,” Garnet Etsell of the

major changes to Finance Minister Kevin Falcon. He should cap the carbon tax at the 2012 rate. He should “address the inequity for B.C. cement producers,” and also “consider immediate carbon tax exclusions for agriculture, including the greenhouse sector, and public institutions.” Falcon allowed last week that B.C.’s competitive position must be considered, now that U.S. President Barack Obama has reversed himself on the need for an emission trading system that would have levelled the North American playing field. Look for changes when Falcon tables his first budget in February. Does this mean B.C.’s climate strategy is dead? No. Delegates from U.S. states and Alberta gathered in front of the legislature to kick the tires on B.C.’s newest weapon, natural gas-powered vehicles. Garbage trucks, school buses and milk-truck fleets have switched from diesel to natural gas, and thanks to its abundance and low price, they’re saving 50 per cent on fuel bills. The trucks and buses eliminate particulate pollution and reduce carbon emissions by 30 per cent compared to gasoline or diesel. Transportation Minister Blair Lekstrom says natural gas is being considered for B.C. Ferries, the largest public-sector emissions source of all, which is exempt from the carbon neutrality rule. Tom Fletcher is legislative reporter and columnist for Black Press and BCLocalnews.com tfletcher@blackpress.ca

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www.saanichnews.com • A9

SAANICH NEWS - Wednesday, November 23, 2011 

LETTERS School report cards not only method of communication for teachers, parents Re: Teachers leaving parents in the dark (Don Descoteau, Nov. 4) Mr. Descoteau describes the key importance of feedback from teachers to parents regarding student progress. We couldn’t agree more. However, there are many ways to communicate progress and report cards are often not the most complete, timely or effective means. Victoria teachers are

committed to providing parents with information on student progress during our job action. For any child who is behind or needing extra support, teachers, as they always do, will not wait for report card time but will contact parents early to ensure early intervention with any learning difficulties. All parents are invited to contact teachers if they do

not feel they have enough information already about student progress. We have asked the superintendent to include contact information on the blank report cards so that every parent knows how to reach the teacher. Thorough and regular communication between parents and teachers is critical. That is why teachers are continuing to

communicate during our job action. It is also why we are seeking more preparation time at the bargaining table – to enable us to better work with parents and students for individualized planning and assessment, and the time to meet and discuss student needs. Tara Ehrcke President, Greater Victoria Teachers’ Association

Letters to the Editor The News welcomes your opinions and comments. To put readers on equal footing, and to be sure that all opinions are heard, please keep letters to fewer than 300 words. The News reserves the right to edit letters for style, legality, length and taste. The News will not print anonymous letters. Please enclose your phone number for verification of your letter’s authenticity or to discuss using your letter as a guest column. Phone numbers are not printed. Send your letters to: ■ Mail: Letters to the Editor, Saanich News, 818 Broughton St., Victoria, B.C., V8W 1E4 ■ Fax: 386-2624 ■ Email: editor@saanichnews.com

Readers respond: deer cull, crime bill, Halloween, driving skills, waterfront museum

Harper’s tough on crime bill isn’t what I voted for I’m beginning to sweat about this national crime bill. It’s not because I’m a hardened criminal about to spend the rest of my days behind bars; it’s not because I’m a minor offender looking at what will become the first of many mandatory sentences; and it’s not because I’m suffering from mental illness, addiction or poverty and have turned to petty crimes as a last resort. It’s because I voted for Stephen Harper. I didn’t pay attention to this part of his platform. I cast my vote for our prime minister

Halloween mentality is a glass-half-full way of thinking Re: Halloween mentality relates to Occupy protests (Letters, Nov. 9) Reading this letter made me feel that people look at the world like it’s a glass that is half empty. The arguments made against Halloween could just as easily be applied to Christmas, Easter and birthdays. You forgot to mention that Halloween is also promoting junk food. Why doesn’t anyone look at the glass half full? Every time a child came to my door on Halloween, the excitement on their faces or the shyness brought me back to my childhood full of great memories. Great memories of deciding which costume to wear, carving the pumpkin and designing

the jack-o’-lantern with my older siblings. It reminded me of running house to house and coming home proud of the candy I collected. My greatest memory of all remains the thought that on this special day millions of complete strangers are willing to give of themselves, expecting nothing in return, to bring a little joy to the lives of children everywhere. I, too, wish Halloween was every day if we all kept this beautiful principle in mind. I consider it a pleasure to hand out candy to the young children as a thank you for the joy that complete strangers provided me during my childhood. Peter Hansen Saanich

Drivers of all ages need to pay more attention to the road I am always amazed at how the media gets on the bandwagon about a two-cent increase in gas prices, but rarely brings attention to the terrible driving habits of B.C. drivers. A majority of drivers have no idea that when you come to a four-way stop you’re supposed to take turns. Most people I see never stop, but do a roll to the right manoeuvre. Going through a school zone, look for the back of the small sign on the left of the road, which tells you to resume the posted speed limit. It’s no wonder accidents happen to small children leaving schools – it’s because we have very poor drivers. The roundabout at Lochside and McTavish will work if the idiots that enter

realize that you have to slow down. Drivers in the circle have the right of way. Better signage would help, but I really doubt that many drivers take the time to read anything. That is why careless drivers cost taxpayers millions every year. No matter where one drives these days, everyone seems to be in such a hurry. Don’t put all the blame on young people. I have had close calls with some pretty cranky seniors who feel they can do as they please. Eileen Natrass Saanich

Maritime museum best bet for CPR building tenancy Greater Victoria Harbour Authority’s proposal for the CPR Steamship Terminal building is a travesty in the making. There is a distinction between tourist services and tourist attractions. Another restaurant and more shops will not bring tourists to this city. Victoria needs a keynote cultural attraction. We should celebrate Victoria’s heritage with a maritime museum in this beautiful building. GVHA’s vision, mandate and guiding principles all promote this concept. Their vision statement reads, “We envision a harbour where people live, learn, work, and play; a spectacular gateway into Victoria’s past and into its future.” The Maritime Museum of B.C.’s proposal clearly embraces this vision. Ed Lien Oak Bay

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I just finished reading a very enlightening book called The Bond: Our Kinship with Animals, Our Call to Defend Them by Wayne Pacelle. In his book, Pacelle discusses the use of a vaccine (known as PZP) that has been developed to control mammal populations. It has been used as an alternative to culling, and to limit the growth of deer populations on Fire Island in New York and Fripp Island in South Carolina. I certainly hope that this humane alternative to killing will be considered locally. We are so fortunate to be surrounded by such beautiful creatures and must learn to coexist with them. Laurie Allen Saanich

because he put jobs first in a time when young people like me, like those in the occupy movement, like those that could soon be facing the brunt of the Omnibus Crime Bill, just can’t find the work we need. Tough on crime is fine, but even the Texans say we’re going way too far. When the president of the Canadian Bar Association says the bill, “through its overreach and overreaction to imaginary problems,” could easily make the state of affairs worse in our country, and when all the facts start to point the other way, that is when I start to sweat. I want to have kids some day, and what am I supposed to tell them? Dad voted for Harper, but he voted for this. Samuel Stumborg Saanich

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Humane deer management should come before culling


www.saanichnews.com A10 • www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, November 23, 2011 - SAANICH

NEWS

Donations target lung disease For more than 100 years, the Lung Association, Canada’s oldest charity, has been using holiday-themed seals on their mail in order to both raise awareness of and funds for lung disease. In the early days, the association battled tuberculosis. Today the mission of the B.C. Lung Association is to promote lung health and clean air and support the growing number of British Columbians struggling with breathing problems including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, lung cancer and sleep apnea. “Christmas Seals are a very visible way of showing that people care about the continuing fight against lung disease,” said Mike Ellis, B.C. Lung Association volunteer director for the Victoria region.

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“Our fundraising target for the 2011 campaign is $1 million,” said Ellis. “We’re urging people to give as much as they can to help us maintain the important lung health research and community education and patient support programs we deliver year round.” The money raised through donations to Christmas Seals is put to careful use funding medical research into the treatment and prevention of lung disease, patient support programs and services in communities across British Columbia, and helping children choose a smoke-free lifestyle. Those wishing to make a donation can do so by calling 1-800665-5864 or visiting www.bc.lung. ca. editor@saanichnews.com

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A12 • www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, November 23, 2011 - SAANICH

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Oak Bay police are also involved in the discussions, as they currently have an agreement in place which sees Saanich cops investigating major crimes in that municipality. Eighteen officers currently make up the integrated unit. Six come from Victoria, two from the West Shore RCMP, and the remaining 10 are from various Island RCMP detachments. Jantzen added that the decision doesn’t have any connection to talk of a regional police force, something which Victoria police are advocating in a strategic plan unveiled last week, and to which Saanich remains opposed. “It’s not linked to any one incident, or any initiative on behalf of government or any other organization,” he said. “We review integrated opportunities as they come up all the time. We consider them at face value.” There is no timeline for when the potential partnership could be formalized, but “discussions are fruitful and we’re working towards it sooner rather than later,” Jantzen added. editor@saanichnews.com

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Deer hunting season is in full swing on the South Island. But along with the legal hunters comes a rise in the number of poachers firing weapons close to urban areas. Saanich police and the B.C. Conservation Officer Service are investigating four recent incidents in the municipality -- two in the Prospect Lake area, and two near Mount Douglas Park. In one instance, a resident in the 1500-block of Ash Rd. discovered two arrows at the rear of his property, including one arrow embedded in a tree. On all four occasions it appears a crossbow was used. “The crossbow appears to be the poacher’s weapon of choice,” said conservation officer Peter Pauwels. “It’s quiet, and it’s easily hidden.” There are a few reasons why someone might risk breaking the law to bag their prize, despite there being plenty of legal hunting areas within a short drive of Saanich. “There are a lot of large bucks in the

ros pect Lake R d

News staff

excuse.” For police, the main issue is one of public safety. “These are highvelocity weapons,” Jantzen said. “You’re not always going to hit what you’re aiming for.” Due to the difficulty in catching suspected File photo poachers, police and Sgt. Dean Jantzen with a crossbow confiscated during conservation officers are asking for any an investigation into poaching last fall. help the public can urban areas, and they’re easier to find provide. Things to look for include people here than in wilderness areas,” Pauwels dressed in camouflage gear or carrying unusual equipment or cases, particularly said. He added that a “large concentration if they are in urban areas. Anyone with of healthy deer” that lives in and around information about possible poachers is the Mount Doug/Blenkinsop Valley area is encouraged to contact police right away. According to Jantzen, last year “about likely an attraction for would-be hunters. And now that hunting season is under- six to eight” similar cases were investiway it’s easier for poachers to get away gated by police. Although a pair of arrests with the crime unless they’re caught in were made, no charges were laid due to insufficient evidence. the act. The District of Saanich has a bylaw spe“This type of poaching is done under the guise of legitimate hunting,” said cifically prohibiting bow and arrow use Saanich police Sgt. Dean Jantzen. “If you except for recreational purposes such as have an animal when you’re stopped, target shooting. editor@saanichnews.com it’s hunting season. You’ve got a built-in

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A14 • www.saanichnews.com A14 • www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, November 23, 2011 - SAANICH NEWS Wednesday, November 23, 2011 - SAANICH NEWS

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A candlelight vigil to commemorate the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women will be held in Victoria on Dec. 6. The vigil will be held on the grounds of the B.C. Legislature from 5 to 6 p.m. The event is open to anyone who wishes to attend. Organizers will be collecting donations of things such as socks, towels, toiletries, journals, children’s games and toys and small household appliances, which will be given to various women’s organizations in Greater

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Breaking News All of Victoria’s breaking news online at vicnews.com oakbaynews.com saanichnews.com goldstreamgazette.com

Those looking to get a little messy are invited down to St. Luke’s Hall for the final Fantastic Friday event of the year. “Messy Church” is a chance for people of all ages to try a wide variety of arts and crafts activities including finger paints, clay sculpture, theatre sports and woodwork. Dinner is provided. Bring your family and share in the fun, stories and songs. The event goes next Friday, Dec. 2 at St. Luke’s Hall, 3821 Cedar Hill X-Rd. Call 250-4776741 or visit www. stlukesvictoria.ca for more info.

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www.saanichnews.com • A15 www.oakbaynews.com • A17

SAANICH NEWS - Wednesday, November 23, 2011  OAK BAY NEWS - Wednesday, November 23, 2011

THE ARTS

Strung together New Orford String Quartet makes its B.C. debut in Victoria Arts, next page

A young take on old classics Edward Hill News staff

The region’s top young musicians will illuminate the complex but timeless scores of Bach and Beethoven this Sunday, opening the 26th season of the Greater Victoria Youth Orchestra. Considered one of the best youth orchestras in Canada, musicians as young as 11 up to those pushing their late-20s will tackle up-tempo but technically demanding pieces for their first of three concerts – Bach’s Orchestral Suite No. 3 in D, Beethoven’s Symphony No. 6 and Holst’s “A Somerset Rhapsody.” “The youth orchestra is primarily a training orchestra,” said musical director Yariv Aloni. “I’ve chosen pieces that are universal for every major symphony. Playing Bach or Beethoven, the demands are the exact same as a professional orchestra.”

About half of this year’s crop of 65 budding musicians are new to the GVYO, which is typical – Aloni described the orchestra as a phoenix that rebuilds itself each season. “Every fall there’s new people. This year half the orchestra is completely new,” said Aloni, a University of Victoria music instructor who has been with the youth orchestra since 2002. “But I’m glad to see in 10 years the level of skill hasn’t changed. I was worried I’d have to make things easier, but that’s not the case. I can always program more complex pieces.” Aloni usually offsets one highly technical score with a few that are slightly less difficult, but he admits the three pieces selected for Sunday’s concert would keep a professional orchestra on its toes. Not that he tells the young musicians one score is more demanding than another – “if they are told it’s hard,

Members of the Greater Victoria Youth Orchestra are held to the same standards as adult orchestras, the group’s musical director says. The GVYO plays at UVic on Sunday (Nov. 27). Submitted photo

“I’m always amazed at the level of skill. Usually you can’t tell it’s not a professional orchestra.” – Yariv Aloni

they think it’s hard.” “If they believe they can play it, they will play it,” he said. “I’m always amazed at the level of skill. Usually you can’t tell it’s not a professional orchestra. Sometimes it’s not exact, but most people wouldn’t know. “For younger musicians, (musical scores) are like seeing a movie for the first time, it’s extremely exciting. The level of energy they bring is wonderful.” Bach and Beethoven are cornerstone pieces for any symphony orchestra, but the Orchestral

Suite No. 3 in particular is dear to the heart of the GVYO – it was the first piece it played in its first season in 1986. All the pieces are energized, a necessity for an orchestra mainly made up of high school students. “You have to figure out music that will appeal to that age. If you pick a piece that is brooding and very slow, young people will get bored,” Aloni said. “You need something that is fast. We’ve got a good mix.” Many of the young musicians go on to careers in music, in sym-

phonies, as chamber musicians or instructors. Virtually all make careers in music, but when they start with the GVYO, most have little experience in large ensembles. “The goal isn’t a factory of musicians, it’s to bring joy through making music,” Aloni said. “It’s like a living organism where they all work together. It’s 65 people moving at the same time, moving through the notes together ... it’s incredible precision. To learn it is phenomenal.” The Greater Victoria Youth Orchestra is performing on Nov. 27, 2:30 p.m., University of Victoria Farquhar Auditorium. See www. gvyo.org for more information. editor@goldstreamgazette.com

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Wednesday, November 23, 2011 - OAK

SAANICH NEWS - Wednesday, November 23, 2011 

BAY NEWS www.saanichnews.com • A17

Breaking News

Oak Bay Village

Christmas Light Up

All of Victoria’s breaking news online at vicnews.com oakbaynews.com saanichnews.com

Sunday, November 27 Details on Page 3 in the Holiday Gift Guide in today’s paper

goldstreamgazette.com

You could WIN…

Submitted photo

Famed quartet plays Victoria The New Orford String Quartet (from left, Jonathan Crow, Andrew Wan, Brian Manker and Eric Nowlin) makes its B.C. debut Nov. 26 at the First Metropolitan United Church. The evening includes Beethoven’s final quartet in F major and Canadian composer Ana Sokolovic’s “Blanc Dominant.” Victoria pianist Arthur Rowe joins the group for Brahms’ F minor quintet. The show begins at 8 p.m., 932 Balmoral Rd. Tickets are $30 or $10 for students, available through www.vsmf.org, vsmf@islandnet.com, 250-383-8763, or Ivy’s Book Shop at 2188 Oak Bay Ave.

IN BRIEF

Four lives clash in the second gritty book by ex-Victorian, Pat Blennerhassett. The former Victoria News journalist and columnist will be at the Penny Farthing Pub on Oak Bay Avenue on Saturday (Nov. 26) to Pat sign his novel, Blennerhassett Random Acts of Vandalism. The story looks at the lives of a novelist, a journalist, an academic and an addict, which spiral together. The book signing and launch happen from 1 to 3 p.m.

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Wednesday, November November 23, 23, 2011 2011 -- SAANICH SAANICH NEWS NEWS Wednesday,

Historian revisits Victoria’s high society roots Natalie North News staff

Valerie Green has gone on a journey to Victoria’s past – to a time, she writes, “when snobbery was rife, and when wealth, education, the right connections and an added touch of charm dictated one’s place in high society.” But if her knowledge of the area and its pio-

neers were first-hand, she’d be sure of one thing. She would have much rather lived “above stairs.” Green, author and former Saanich News columnist, has revisited high society in Above Stairs: Social Life in Upper-Class Victoria 1843-1918. “I just love history and I wanted to do an upstairs-downstairs

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Wood Editions, Green has updated and rereleased Above Stairs with new material, including additional photos and added introductions to each of the eight families profiled in the book. Each chapter now begins with vignettes set in factual situations, but written creatively from Green’s interpretation of her research. “It was a long, long process, but rewarding,” she said. “It’s interesting that there’s still interest in the

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version of life in Victoria,” said Green from her home library, where she writes in the company of her maltipoo cross, Rupert. The work about the city’s upstairs scene was originally released in 1995 by Sono Nis Press. Five years later Green wrote Upstarts and Outcasts: Victoria’s Not-So-Proper-Past, an homage to those serving the rich and living “below stairs.” In light of reader demand, and backed by publisher Touch-

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book 15 years later.” Many of the descendants of the featured families have passed away in recent years. Others, such as the Creases and the Pembertons, remain prominent in the Capital Region. While Green’s interest in the past is not limited by any means, the history of the O’Reilly family and their home, Point Ellice House, is of particular interest to her. “I was always intrigued by Kathleen O’Reilly because she never married and she was a beautiful woman with lots of boyfriends and lots of suitors, but she remained unmarried until she died in that house in her ‘70s.” Green also delves into the history of the Rithets, including onetime mayor of Victoria Robert Rithet. He bred race horses on a parcel of land owned by his family. This area would later be named Broadmead in honour of one of Rithet’s star steeds. Althoug many of her readers assume she has the answer to every historical question about Victoria, Green suggests that anyone inter-

Natalie North/News staff

Author Valerie Green holds a copy of Above Stairs: Social Life in Upper-Class Victoria 1843-1918, a re-release of her 1995 work. ested in the past can learn about it at the archives. “It is rather like being a detective, tracing things back,” she said. “When a piece falls into place it’s a good feeling. Like a jigsaw puzzle.” Above Stairs is available at Bolen Books, Munro’s Books, Cadboro Bay Book Co. and Tanner’s Books. This month, Green also releases Mysterious British Columbia: Myths, Murders, Mysteries and Legends, a look at some of the prov-

ince’s most curious tales (including the elusive cadborosaurus), available now through Chapters-Indigo and coming soon to local book stores.

What’s next? Green is penning Vanished! – The Michael Dunahee story, to be released in 2012. The story of Dunahee’s 1991 abduction is being done with the full co-operation of the Dunahee family, police and Child Find B.C. nnorth@saanichnews.com

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Home is where the work is Fair unites Gordon Head’s home-based businesses

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Ryan Flaherty News staff

Residents of Gordon Head may be surprised to learn just how much business is being done in their own backyard. Though the Saanich neighbourhood is almost entirely residential, a thriving home-based business community exists within its boundaries. It includes everything from aromatherapy to petsitting, Spanish language instruction to bookkeeping and more. The problem that many of these businesses face, however, is that they have a relatively low profile. That’s something Ramona Scott is hoping to change. “I moved here from a small town and it seemed like it was just houses, and it’s hard to get to meet people, and you didn’t know what was going on in the neighbourhood,� Scott explained. “Every once in a while I would hear about somewhere you could get your hair cut, or some other business down the street. I wished there was a directory.� So she created an online listing of all the people in her neighbourhood who work from home. Though the site is only a few weeks old, it’s already attracted nearly 18 different businesses. And this weekend many of them will come together for the Gordon Head Business Fair, an event organized by Scott. “Everyone I talked to about (a fair) thought it was a great idea. Businesses thought it would be a good idea to get their name out there more,� said Scott, who herself offers math tutoring services out of her home. The goal is to build a thriving business community within Gordon Head. “The idea is that you

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Johanna St. Michael, left, and Ramona Scott in the home office at St. Michaelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gordon Head house. could walk down the street to your neighbour and get what you need instead of driving somewhere else,â&#x20AC;? Scott said. So far, a dozen people have registered for the fair. Johanna St. Michael, who runs a graphic design business and also works as a beauty consultant, is looking forward to the event. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s even offered up her services to help promote it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I like the thought of getting to know your community,â&#x20AC;? St. Michael said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like the business version of the hundred-mile diet, or the zero-mile diet. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s neat to be able to see whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s out there and support them.â&#x20AC;? The Gordon Head Business Fair goes Saturday at Lambrick Park Church, 1780 Feltham Rd., from 10 a.m. to noon. Admission is free. For more info, check out www.gordonheadbusinesses.ca editor@saanichnews.com

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Wednesday, November 23, 2011 - SAANICH

SPORTS

Painting

Spartans end a decade’s drought

14-0 lead before the Spartans came alive to tie it. “Its was a hard-fought battle,” said coach Paul Mulholland. “We finally were able to get our offence moving and, with some solid running and precision passing, managed to fight back and score two touchdowns of our own.” But a long series of back and forth play ended with the Titans scoring the go-ahead touchdown in the third quarter. “They added a field goal (24-14) to that. We had a couple of chances late but were unable to put any more points on the board.”

Pee wee Outlaws axe Northmen

Youth playoffs in full effect as Grey Cup week lights up B.C. Travis Paterson News staff

They were the bantam provincial champions in 2000, but little did the Westshore Warriors know a 2001 playoff win would be their last for 10 years. The club now known as the Victoria Spartans is back on the rise. On Sunday the sixth-place Spartans (5-5) defeated the third-place South Delta Rams (7-3) 17-15 in the Vancouver Mainland Football playoff quarterfinals. The win puts the Spartans, whose players are 14 or 15 years old, into the semifinals. Victoria will travel to take on the fourth-place Chilliwack Giants (6-4) this Saturday. “South Delta beat us 34-0 early in the season and took us a little too lightly (this time) I think,” said Spartans coach Paul Precious. Defensive end and running back Jordan Worth as well as linebacker Bryan GalbraithMcTavish, led the Spartans in a “total team effort,” Precious said.

NEWS

Photo by Gord Goble

Victoria Spartan Luc Ottosen carefully touches down on the goal line of the White Rock Titans during the Nov. 20 midget football quarterfinal in Cloverdale. “We only took one penalty. They weren’t ready for us.” The upset is one of two that happened in the quarterfinals, with the second-place Cowichan Bulldogs knocked out by the seventh-place Langley Mustangs. Precious has been coaching with the organization for 15 years. He saw the rise of high school football programs at Mount Douglas and Belmont draw players away. It’s not just in Victoria. Across the province, three-down club football has become secondary behind the four-down variety played in B.C. high schools. “A lot of the kids from our 1998 and 2000 bantam championships played midget, and went on to the Victoria Rebels and Vancou-

ver Island Raiders, some winning Canadian titles,” he said. Since then it’s been a battle to get players out. The odd guy will play club and high school, including one Spartan who plays for Belmont right now. But practising twice a day and playing two games per weekend is often too much.

Midget Spartans fall to Titans Last year’s “Cinderella Story” will forever stand on its own for the Victoria Spartans as the reigning provincial champs fell in the midget football (16-18) playoff quarterfinals to the South Surrey/White Rock Titans on Sunday, 24-14. Played in Cloverdale, the Titans took a

The Victoria Outlaws are the province’s pee wee (9-11) nine-man football champs, beating the Prince George All North Axemen 30-12 in Kamloops on Nov. 12. Outlaws quarterback Gideone Kremler captured the game MVP award with two rushing touchdowns, going 10 for 14 on pass completions. “It was a strong team effort,” said coach Zac Kremler. Dante Carbone rushed for a touchdown and was a standout on defence, as was Soren Hallschmid, who also made four carries for 20 yards, offered great lead blocking and caught a pass from the fullback position. Zairech Kremler caught five passes for 95 yards and one touchdown. Gideone scored an early touchdown but it was quickly matched on a brilliant run by Colburn Pearce from the Axemen, making the score 6-6. The Outlaws then pulled away with touchdowns from Carbone and Gideone and two successful conversions to make the score 22-6 at the half (conversions are worth two points if kicked). The trophy returns to Vancouver Island, where it has lived as property of the rival Victoria Hitmen the past two years. The Outlaws defeated the Hitmen for the Island trophy on Oct. 30. Kremler thanked a number of businesses who sponsored the team to make the trip affordable for the players’ families. sports@vicnews.com

Mount Doug’s Terrell Davis is football’s player of the year Rams set for battle with Knights Travis Paterson News staff

Running back Terrell Davis has given defenders fits for four great years. Don Denton News Staff

If the Mount Douglas Rams were ever ready to upset the province’s No. 1 St. Thomas More Knights, this is it. For one, the Rams’ have the province’s best player in Terrell Davis, who was officially named as MVP in B.C. on Monday. The Rams’ also have an all-star cast around Davis, including quarterback Jordan Deverill, receiver Taylor Young and defensive star Mitch Ottosen. The latter two joined Davis in earning provincial all-star recognition, while several more were named to the Western Conference team. The Rams will meet the highly-touted Knights, of Burnaby, in the B.C. High School football semifinal on Saturday. To get there, the Rams defeated the Lord Tweedsmuir Panthers of Surrey 42-29 in their quarterfinal match at Bear Mountain Stadium in Langford on Friday. The Knights endured a scare before winning 35-32 over un-ranked, but always strong, Centennial out of Coquitlam. Coincidentally, the Rams junior side met their counterparts from Lord Tweedsmuir as well, with Mount Doug winning 35-15. In the senior game, running backs Davis and Mason Swift shared the rushing duties in a near split, with Davis cracking the Panthers for 160 yards and a touchdown on 16 car-

ries and Swift going 150 yards with one touchdown on 15 carries. Davis added a touchdown on a 95-yard kick return. “Our offensive line was the story on Friday,” said coach Mark Townsend. “Easily their best game of the year opening up the running lanes for Swift and Davis. If you give those guys a five yard window they’ll do damage beyond the line of scrimmage.” Running the ball wasn’t the Rams’ entire strategy going in. “We were prepared to run and it worked from the start so we stuck with it. But normally we like a balanced attack, 50-50. But it’s the playoffs.” With just five throws in the game, QB Deverill and his No. 1 receiver, Young, found other ways to contribute. Deverill carried two touchdowns in on foot while Young made a monstrous interception off of Panthers’ star quarterback Mike Messenger to end a promising drive in the fourth quarter. “Messenger does everything. He’s an incredible athlete. We did a great job containing him,” Townsend said.

Jr. Rams chomping for repeat The defending AAA junior high school champion Rams are on the hunt for a repeat after their 35-15 win over the Panthers. Next up for the juniors is a semifinal game versus the Terry Fox Ravens, Friday or Saturday. sports@vicnews.com


www.saanichnews.com www.vicnews.com •• A21 A21

SAANICH VICTORIANEWS NEWS- -Wednesday, Wednesday,November November23, 23,2011 2011

take a look saanichnews.com

SPORTS NEWS IN BRIEF

SMUS join GNS, Claremont at provincials

The Claremont Spartans are the Lower Island’s lone representative at the boys AAA soccer provincials this weekend while Island champions Glenlyon Norfolk Gryphons and finalists St. Michaels Blue Jags are competing in the AA tournament. Both provincials are at the Burnaby Sports Complex. The AA schedule goes first, running Monday (Nov. 21) to Wednesday, followed by the AAA schedule from Thursday (Nov. 24) to Saturday. A surprise upset by the host Blue Jags over the Lambrick Park Lions 4-2 in the second round of the AA Islands (Nov. 8 and 9) put SMUS in the semifinals against Sooke’s Mark Isfeld. The Blue Jags won 3-2, with Keiler Totz scoring the winner to qualify the Blue Jags for the AA provincials. The Spartans look to better their finish at last year’s AAA provincials, which were snowed out and then delayed until the spring. By then many of Claremont’s players were committed to club teams and the team was left out of the final four. Only a big day by host Dover Bay kept the Spartans from winning this year’s Island championship. Dover beat the Spartans 2-0 in the final on Nov. 8 in Nanaimo. Earlier that day Dover squeaked past the Oak Bay Bays 1-0 in the semifinal on a controversial goal that many players believed was offside, eliminating the Bays from provincials. The Gryphons moved from A to AA this year after winning the A championship two years running.

BEST BUY – Correction Notice NEWSPAPER RETRACTION FOR THE FUTURE SHOP NOVEMBER 18 CORPORATE FLYER On the Virgin Mobile headline advertised on page 25 of the November 18 flyer, please note that Canada-wide calling is available ONLY on Virgin Mobile Talk and Text Plans excluding the City Unlimited $35 Plan. All Virgin Smartphone plans DO NOT include Canada-wide calling, as advertised. Please see a Mobile Expert in-store for details. We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused our valued customers.

CHALLENGE PROGRAM Victoria School District’s Challenge Program is for intellectually gifted, creative and talented students. We welcome interested parents/guardians and students to attend a meeting on:

Thursday, December 8, 2011 7:00 p.m. Mount Douglas Secondary Gym APPLICATION DEADLINES MOUNT DOUGLAS & ESQUIMALT SCHOOLS January 13, 2012 (Part 1, Application Forms) January 19, 2012 (Part 2, Portfolio and Testing) APPLICATION FORMS

For prospective candidates will be available at the meeting or can be picked up at: Esquimalt High School, 847 Colville Road or online at www.esquimalt.sd61.bc.ca – or – Mount Douglas Secondary, 3970 Gordon Head Road or online at www.mtdoug.sd61.bc.ca *PLEASE NOTE: This is a joint meeting hosted by both Esquimalt High School and Mount Douglas Secondary School. Applications for grade 9 classes are now being accepted at both schools.

Don Denton/News staff

Setting up for provincials Oak Bay Barbers player Ryan Marcellus, No. 6, sets the ball against the Claremont Spartans at the senior boys AAA Vancouver Island volleyball championships at Oak Bay High on Friday. The Barbers won it all, defeating Reynolds in the final.

Sports stats Volleyball Results from the high school boys AAA volleyball Islands at Oak Bay High, Nov. 18-19 Gold medal: Oak Bay def. Reynolds 25-17, 25-11, 25-21

Bronze medal: Ballenas (Parksville) def. Claremont 25-23, 25-23, 16-25, 25-21 5th place: Belmont def. Dover Bay 25-20, 25-14 Semifinals: Reynolds def. Claremont 19-25, 25-19, 20-25, 25-18, 15-12 Oak Bay def Ballenas 25-11, 25-7, 25-11 7th/8th place: Mt. Doug def. Stelly’s 25-20, 25-18

Gabe Duval (Reynolds) Lars Bornemann (Oak Bay) Zach Mitchner (Reynolds) Alex Swiatlowski (Oak Bay) Elion Wong (Oak Bay) All-Stars: second team Luke Severinsen (Belmont) Leon Young (Oak Bay) Connor McManaman (Claremont) T.R. Doty (Ballenas) Brad Harvey (Ballenas) Steven Shellard (Reynolds)

MVP - Nick Stefanakis (Oak Bay) All-Stars: first team Ryan Marcellus (Oak Bay)

Friday night lacrosse at UVic for KidSport

The lacrosse academy of Claremont secondary is hosting its second annual Friday Night Lights (Nov. 25) event against southerly neighbours Mercer Island, from metropolitan Seattle. Game time is 7 p.m. on the Uni-

Oak Bay, Reynolds, Ballenas and Claremont qualify for AAA B.C.s, Nov. 30 to Dec. 3 in Kelowna.

versity of Victoria’s turf field No. 2, off Gabriola Road. Claremont’s team recently toured New York and Philadelphia. The school’s student government is hosting Friday’s event with all proceeds going to KidSport. The school’s dance program will put on a half-time performance. Tickets are $5.

When it comes to family, you can never be too safe Carbon monoxide (CO) can be highly dangerous, partly because it’s odourless and invisible. Yet with a few extra precautions, you can help keep your family safe. Have your natural gas appliances inspected regularly and install a carbon monoxide detector in your home.

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Breaking News All of Victoria’s breaking news online at vicnews.com oakbaynews.com saanichnews.com goldstreamgazette.com

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Safety. We’ve got our best people on it.


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Nov 23, 23,2011 2011,- SAANICH Saanich NEWS News Wednesday,Wed, November

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!DVERTISEĂĽACROSSĂĽ 6ANCOUVERĂĽ)SLANDĂĽ INĂĽTHEĂĽĂĽBEST READĂĽCOMMUNITYĂĽ NEWSPAPERS /.ĂĽ4(%ĂĽ7%"

UKRAINIAN SUPPER

ST. GEORGEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CHURCH CHRISTMAS FAIR 2909 St. Georgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lane, Cadboro Bay, Sat, November 26, 10am-2pm COME ONE, COME ALL FUN FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY

TOUCH OF ART SALE at The Victoria Flying Club by the Tower on Canso Road.

Paintings by Local Artists

Friday, Nov. 25th 5pm to 8pm Ukrainian Cultural Centre

3277 Douglas St. Victoria, BC Info at (250)475-2585

INFORMATION INFORMATION NEEDED on stolen black, 2008 Dodge Ram 4 door taken Sept. 26/2011 from 3100 block 18th Ave., Port Alberni, plate #CW7744. Call Darlene at ICBC at (250)731-2255 quoting claim #P183524.4

Sat. Nov. 26, 8am-4:30 250-656-4633

WORK POINT BARRACKS history writer seeking reference material. 1887-1994. Email: opcmh@telus.net

WATKINS NATURAL Products for Gifts & Baking. Order by Nov 30. 250-217-8480.

PERSONALS

LEGALS WAREHOUSEMANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LIEN ACT Notice is hereby given that Kustom Towing, (2009) Ltd, 3297 Douglas St, Victoria, BC, V8Z 3K9 will be selling a 2005 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER 3C3AY75SX5T272800 Owner A. Louisy FLEETWOOD WILDWOOD 4X4TWDY202T130719 Owner B. Schroeder 1992 JEEP WRANGLER 2J4FY19P3NJ532261 Owner J. Henry 1991 ISUZU RODEO 2J4FY19P3NJ532261 Owner R. Jones to cover costs incurred. To be sold at 647B Dupplin Rd, Victoria, BC between 10am-2pm November 30, 2011. NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE is hereby given that Creditors and others having claims against the Estate of Cecil Leroy Heide, Deceased, who died on the 7th day of July, 2011, are hereby required to send them to the undersigned Executor at #1127088 West Saanich Rd., Brentwood Bay, British Columbia, V8M 1P9, before the 16th day of December, 2011, after which date the Executor will distribute the said Estate among the parties entitled thereto, having regard to the claims of which he has notice.

WEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;RE ON THE WEB

HOT GUYS! HOT CHAT! HOT FUN! Try Free! Call 250220-3334 or 800-777-8000. www.interactivemale.com

LOST AND FOUND LOST: BMW key fob, Dallas Rd. area and beach, Nov. 14th. (Reward) 250-383-8383.

TRAVEL GETAWAYS

PERSONAL SERVICES DRIVERS/COURIER/ TRUCKING

TRADES, TECHNICAL

DRIVERS WANTED: Terrific career opportunity outstanding growth potential to learn how to locate rail defects. No Experience Needed!! Extensive paid travel, meal allowance, 4 wks. vacation & beneďŹ ts pkg. Skills Needed - Ability to travel 3 months at a time Valid License w/ air brake endorsement. High School Diploma or GED. Apply at www.sperryrail.com under careers, keyword Driver. DO NOT FILL IN CITY OR STATE

DUNCAN/COWICHAN Hooktender wanted. Machine experience an asset. Wage and benefits as per USW Collective agreement. Fax 250-746-0388 or starlake@shaw.ca

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

PERSONAL SERVICES

AIRLINES ARE HIRINGTrain for high paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified- Housing available. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (877)818-0783. Become a Psychiatric Nurse - train locally via distance education, local and/or regional clinical placements and some regional classroom delivery. Wages start at $30.79/hr to $40.42/hr. This 23 month program is recognized by the CRPNBC. Govâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t funding may be available. Toll-free 1-87-STENBERG www.stenbergcollege.com

HELP WANTED HUGHSON TRUCKING INC. is looking for Class 1 Super-B flatdeck drivers. Safety and Performance Bonuses, benefits package, drug & alcohol policy. 2 years experience preferred. We will provide transportation to Southern Alberta. Call 1-800-647-7995 ext 228 or fax resume to 403-6472763 STATION MANAGER- Avant Garde Service Solutions Inc. o/a Tricom Building Maintenance is seeking an experienced Station Manager for our Victoria Office. Completion of high school & 2 years of managerial work experience is a must. $19.50/40 hrs week. E-mail resume to: daniel@tricombuilding.com

ITALY- VILLAGE house in beautiful central Italy for rent. Call Anita 250-655-4030.

WANTED: RAKING leaves, weekly, $15/hr. Reynolds School area. 778-433-1565.

TIMESHARE

We are still hiring - Dozer & excavator operators required by a busy Alberta oilfield construction company. We require operators that are experienced and preference will be given to operators that have constructed oilfield roads and drilling locations. You will be provided with motels and restaurant meals. Competitive wages, bonus and transportation daily to and from job sites. Our work is in the vicinity of Edson, Alberta. Call 780-723-5051.

ASK YOURSELF what is your TIMESHARE worth? We will find a buyer/renter for CA$H. NO GIMMICKS- JUST RESULTS! 1-(888)879-7165. www.BuyATimeshare.com CANCEL YOUR TIMESHARE. NO Risk Program. STOP Mortgage & Maintenance Payments Today. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Free Consultation. Call Us Now. We Can Help! 1-888-356-5248.

TRAVEL BRING THE Family! Sizzling Specials at Floridaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Best Beach! New Smyrna Beach, FL. See it all at: www.nsbfla.com/bonjour or Call 1-800-214-0166.

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES HOME BASED BUSINESS. We need serious and motivated people for expanding health & wellness industry. High speed internet and phone essential. Free online training. www.project4wellness.com LOOKING FOR Avon Reps. Be your own boss. Earn extra money, work from home. Call 250-386-0070 to learn more.

HOME CARE SUPPORT EXP. MAT. Home Support worker, fluent English and Dutch. Understand German. Degree in Home Economics. 250-727-0620

LEGAL SERVICES CRIMINAL RECORD? Guaranteed Record Removal since 1989. Confidential, Fast, & Affordable. Our A+BBB Rating assures EMPLOYMENT & TRAVEL FREEDOM. Call for FREE INFO. BOOKLET

1-8-NOW-PARDON (1-866-972-7366) RemoveYourRecord.com

IN-HOME TUTORING All Grades, All Subjects. Tutor Doctor. 250-386-9333

PHOTOGRAPHY/VIDEO

FINANCIAL SERVICES

DIGITAL PHOTO retouch, editing, add/remove objects/people. Tribute posters, home movies to CD/DVD. 250-4753332. www.cwpics.com

GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877987-1420. www.pioneerwest.com

YOUR COMMUNITY, YOUR CLASSIFIEDS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

CLASSIFIED ADS MEAN MORE BUSINESS

250.388.3535

250.388.3535

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

GIFT

OF EDUCATION

REGISTER FOR ANY SPROTT-SHAW COMMUNITY COLLEGE PROGRAM BETWEEN DECEMBER 1, 2011 - FEBRUARY 29, 2012

RECEIVE UP TO

$1000

*

TOWARDS TUITION LEARN MORE AT: SPROTTSHAW.COM/GIFT *Conditions apply

SALES BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT Manager - generates sales for existing products/services and identifies new opportunities. Requirements: Bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Degree (or higher) in Business, Marketing, plus additional training in sales, management, communications; 5+years demonstrated success in business development and sales. How to apply: see http://www.ethoscmg.com/opportunities.html for full details.

TRADES, TECHNICAL BODY MAN fully qualified or 2nd or 3rd year apprentice. Benefits. Wages dependent upon experience. Call (250)287-8258 or fax resume 250-287-2432.

Looking for a NEW job? .com

MAKE A FORTUNE with $3000, we know how. Free info pack. Call (250)590-9634.

FINANCIAL SERVICES

EDUCATION/TUTORING

THE

PERSONAL SERVICES

Call our Victoria Campus:

250-384-8121


www.saanichnews.com A23 www.saanichnews.com •A23

SAANICH NEWSWed, - Wednesday, Saanich News Nov 23,November 2011 23, 2011  MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE

RENTALS

RENTALS

RENTALS

TRANSPORTATION

BUILDING SUPPLIES

MISCELLANEOUS WANTED

MORTGAGES

APARTMENT/CONDO

HOMES FOR RENT

WANTED TO RENT

CARS

METAL ROOFING & siding sales. Seconds avail. Custom roof Flashings. 250-544-3106.

ANTIQUES, BOOKS, collectibles, furniture, china, jewellery. Estates/private libraries purchased. Galleon Books & Antiques, 250-655-0700

Mortgage Help! Beat bank rates for purchases and refinances, immediate debt consolidation, foreclosure relief, and equity loans. Free, fast, friendly, private consultations. Call 1888-685-6181 www.mountaincitymortgage.ca

MALAHAT 1 & 2 BdrmsPanoramic views. Serene & secure. All amenities on-site, firewood. $700-$1200 inclusive. Monthly/Weekly. Pets ok with refs. 25 min commute to downtown Victoria. Must have references. 250-478-9231.

SIDNEY. BRIGHT 1610 sq.ft Rancher. 3-bdrm, 1.5 baths, 6 appliances incld. $1600.+ utils. Avail. Dec. 1st (250)656-9540.

WAREHOUSE RENTAL required- 2000sq ft shed with 150 amp+ 03 phase power & overhead door. Hydrocarbon contaminated premises preferred. Facility will be used for processing used motor-oil labeled as hazardous material. asif_sadeque@yahoo.com 604-440-6663.

2009 HYUNDAI Elantra. 1owner, only 13,500 Kms, still on warranty, excellent condition, $19,500. 250-360-0892.

FRIENDLY FRANK 1500W BASEBOARD heater with fan & thermostat, $15. (778)433-6170. ACCESSORIES FOR Oster kitchen centre, slicer, shredder & salad maker, new, $35. Call 250-598-0750. BOYS BIKE, red, $60. Small girl’s bike $5. ‘Tree Song’ book, $10. 250-508-9008. COMPUTER DESK $20, bread maker $10, easel $45, 16” plant pot $22. 250-6583948 FRIENDLY VILLAGE 37 piece dinner set, 6 pieces new, $99. (250)383-4578. MASTER LABYRINTH board game. $10. Near new condition. 250-380-8733. TECHNICAL & Trade books (20). Specially for Milwright Trade, $99 (all). 778-433-2899 TRIPOD, (VELBON) model VGB-3, asking $75. Call (250)382-7410.

BOOKS BOOKS & antique paper collectibles. Qualified appraisers. House calls for large libraries. Haunted Bookshop (Est. 1947)250-656-8805

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS

RENTALS

ROOMS FOR RENT TILLICUM HOUSING, $500, $550. Furn, all incl, quiet & clean. Call 778-977-8288.

SENIOR ASSISTED LIVING

APARTMENT/CONDO

SIDNEY, 2 bdrm suite, 55+, Shoal Retirement Centre, Resthaven Drive, Sidney. To arrange to view please call the manager, Independent Living 250-654-0536.

EVERETT ANTIQUE upright piano, excellent cond. $1,100. Must See! (250)370-7626.

REAL ESTATE

SHARED ACCOMMODATION

FOR SALE BY OWNER

COLWOOD: UTILS incl. Furn, on bus route, walking distance to beach & Royal Roads. NS, pets neg. $550. 250-889-4499.

Investment/Residential Opportunity For Sale By Owner. 2 bdrm suite for seniors at the Shoal Retirement Centre, Resthaven Drive, Sidney. $375,000. Call 250-655-7100.

SUITES, LOWER C. SAANICH, 1 bdrm bsmt, all utils incl, priv ent, shared W/D, N/S, N/P, $750 mo, avail immed, call 250-213-8852.

HOUSES FOR SALE

ESQUIMALT- 1 bdrm, self contained, new windows. Avail now. $650. N/S.(250)884-6790

FUEL/FIREWOOD ARBUTUS, CYPRESS, fir, hardwoods. Seasoned. Call 250-661-7391.

ESQUIMALTspacious 2 bdrm suite, lrg bdrms/kitchen/living room. NP/NS. $1000 utils incld, laundry negotiable. Call (250)885-5750.

SEASONED FIREWOOD Vancouver Island’s largest firewood producer offers firewood legally obtained during forest restoration, large cords. Help restore your forest, Burndrywood.com 1-877-902-WOOD.

NADEAU COLONIAL solid maple dining set, 10pc, Exc cond., $800. (250)595-8966.

MEDICAL SUPPLIES

.

SCOOTER: PORTABLE, lightweight, compact w/ folding till, exc condition, new battery pack, $850. 250-656-3032.

DUPLEXES/4PLEXES

SPORTS & IMPORTS

AUTO SERVICES

1997 VOLVO 960 Sedan, Gold edition. Dealer maintained. $3900. (250)595-5727.

$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

CASH PAID FOR ALL VEHICLES in

SIDNEY 2BDRM bsmt, private entrance, NS/NP, ref’s req’d $850/mo.+utils. 250-514-9618.

SIDNEY, 3 BR, RECENTLY reno’d, garage, fenced yard, great location. Available now $1350. Dean 250-857-2210

TILLICUM/BURNSIDE- newly reno’d 2 bdrm lower level suite, utils & shared laundry incld. $900. Call (250)3838282 or 250-588-8885.

APARTMENTS FURNISHED

TRIANGLE MTN. Large 1 bdrm. Laundry, new SS appl’s. NS/NP. $875. inclds utils, cbl, phone, internet. 250-474-6469

SIDNEY: FURNISHED Deluxe suite, newer. Walk to ocean & town. All incl. 250-656-8080.

HOMES WANTED

WE BUY HOUSES Damaged House? Pretty House? Moving? Divorcing? Estate Sale? We will Buy your House Quick Cash & Private. Mortgage Too High and House won’t sell? Can’t make payments? We will Lease Your House, Make your Payments and Buy it Later!

MISCELLANEOUS FOR RENT AIR CRAFT Hanger. All steel, bi-fold doors in secure area. $900 mo. Call 250-656-5371. FERNWOOD AREA Apt, large 2 bdrm, $960/mo. Avail now. Call 250-370-2226 for viewing.

HOMES FOR RENT QUADRA/MCKENZIE- 3 bdrm upper, 2 bdrm down. NS/NP. (250)595-7077 (after 5pm).

Call: 1-250-616-9053

FERNWOOD AREA Apt, large Bach, $675/mo. Avail Dec. 1. Call 250-370-2226 for viewing.

CLASSIFIEDS WORK HARD! Call 250.388.3535

ROCKLAND AREA Apt, large 1 bdrm, incls heat & hot water, $780/mo. Avail immed. Call 250-370-2226 for viewing.

SIDNEY- 3 Bdrm Rancher. Complete Reno. 1 bath, 1056sq ft flat cul-de-sac lot. NS/NP. $1,500. Lease. Firm Management, 250-544-2300.

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

ST. LUKE’S Bazaar. Sat, Nov. 26, 10am-2pm. 3821 Cedar Hill X Rd. Antiques, books, crafts, etc. Lunch is available!

www.webuyhomesbc.com

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

SCRAP CAR REMOVAL

250-885-1427

SCRAP BATTERIES Wanted We buy scrap batteries from cars, trucks & heavy equip. $4.00 & up each. Free pick-up anywhere in BC, Minimum 10. Toll Free 1.877.334.2288.

BEATERS UNDER $1000

‘96 CHRYSLER Town/Country min van, leather, seats 7, P/S, A/C, 187,000K, clean, well maintained, new battery, good tires, $3000 obo 250-216-2835

all conditions in all locations

Call us first & last, we pay the highest fair price for all dead & dying vehicles. Don’t get pimped, junked or otherwise chumped!

TRUCKS & VANS

SELL YOUR CAR... FAST! with a classified ad Call 310.3535

IN ALL SOUTH VANCOUVER ISLAND COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS

SIDNEY. 2-BDRM, 1.5 baths. Laundry, fenced yard. $1200./mo. (778)426-4651.

GARAGE SALES

1-800-910-6402

www.PreApproval.cc

SAANICH: FURNISHED large 1 bdrm suite. NP/NS. Avail Now. Refs req’d. $900/mo inclusive. Call 250-721-0281, 250-858-0807.

BEAUTIFUL WINTER designer “Rodier” coat, grey/off white, $200. 250-658-8201.

MacKENZIE/QUADRA. Studio/ 1 bdrm condo, resort style. Includes indoor pool, hot tub, gym, billiards/games, prkg. New carpet/ furniture. 1/2 block bus/ Airporter/ mall. On route - UVic/ Uptown Centre/ DND. $925 (250)380-2737

858-5865

Watch for our Auto Section

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE

NEWSPRINT ROLLENDS$2-$10. Fridays only, 8:30am to 4:30pm. #200-770 Enterprise Cres, Victoria. Goldstream Press Division.

DreamCatcher Auto Loans “0” Down, Bankruptcy OK Cash Back ! 15 min Approvals

NEAR BEAR Mtn- bright, spacious 2 bdrm, views, 5 appls, separate laundry, F/P, patio, yard. NS/NP. $1150 includes utilities. (250)391-8817.

SAXE POINT- 1 bdrm & den in 3-plex, W/D. N/S pet ok, near park & bus. $850. Equitex, (250)386-6071.

CAN’T GET Up Your Stairs? Acorn Stairlifts can help. Call Acorn Stairlifts now! Mention this ad & get 10% off your new Stairlift! Call 1-866-981-5990.

For scrap vehicle FREE Tow away

AUTO FINANCING

GLANFORD. IMMED. 1100 sq.ft. 2 bdrm, quiet/bright. Reno’d kitch & bdrm closet. W/D, full bath, storage, priv entr., sm yrd. Near bus, amens. NS/NP. $1040. ht, h/w, hydro, incl’d. Refs. 250-704-0197.

FURNITURE

MICROFIBRE LUXURY Sofa Ste $399., Lazy-Boy Reclining Sofa $399.; Leather or Microfibre Sofa, Loveseat & Chair w/5 Built-In Recliners $1199.; Coffee Table Sets from $199., Lamps from $10.; Solid Wood 5Pc Dinette $159., Oak Pedestal Table w/5 Arrowback chairs $299.; Desks, Bookcases from $49.; Solid Maple Bedroom Ste $699., Wood Bunk-Beds w/Mattresses $499.; 39”, 54”, Q/Size Mattress Sets from $199., While Stock Lasts! VIC & TONI’S RETIREMENT Special: no HST on All Like New & Used Furniture, Mattresses, Tools & Hdwe! BUY & SAVE 9818 4th St., Sidney. buyandsave.ca

TRANSPORTATION

$50-$1000 CASH

SAANICH WEST: Bachelor, $700/mo all util’s incld’d, private ent., W/D (250)382-8487.

SUITES, UPPER 1 BR garden lvl suite in Gordon Head close to bus routes, UVic & shopping. Hydro & water incl. Own entrance & laundry. NS/NP Avail immediately, $770/mo 250-477-7883

IN MOTION

Every Friday SOOKE NEWS

fil here please

QUADRA/MACKENZIE: 3 bdrms, $1400+ utils, sun deck, laundry incld, street prkg. Avail immed, 250-516-5556. SIDNEY 2-BDRM. Priv. entrance. N/P, N/S. $950. + utils. Avail Dec. 1st. (250)655-0190.

TOWNHOUSES SOOKE, (2009) 3bdrm, 2.5bath avail immed, all appls incl’d, walk amens/bus/Sooke core, N/S. 250-642-0133.

BUYING - RENTING- SELLING Call 250.388.3535

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

Become a Psychiatric Nurse in your own community There is an urgent need for more Registered Psychiatric Nurses (RPN), particularly outside the urban areas of the province. And with the workforce aging – the average age of a Registered Psychiatric Nurse in BC is 47 years – the number of retirees from the profession is exceeding the number of graduates. Entry-level earnings start at $30.79/hour to $40.42/hour. Train Locally – The only program of its kind in BC, students can learn within their local communities via distance education, local and/or regional clinical placements, and some regional classroom delivery. This 23 month program is accredited by the College of Registered Psychiatric Nurses of BC (CRPNBC). Government student loans, Employment & Labour Market Services (ELMS), band funding & other financing options available to qualified applicants.

MIRROR

Toll Free:

1-87-STENBERG www.stenbergcollege.com


SERVICE DIRECTORY

A24 • www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, November 23, 2011 - SAANICH

A24 www.saanichnews.com

NEWS

Wed, Nov 23, 2011, Saanich News

#OMPLETEåGUIDEåTOåPROFESSIONALåSERVICESåINåYOURåCOMMUNITY

www.bcclassified.com

250.388.3535

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

ACCOUNTING/TAX/ BOOKKEEPING

CONTRACTORS

GARDENING

HANDYPERSONS

HAULING AND SALVAGE

MASONRY & BRICKWORK

PLUMBING

ACCOUNTING Vida Samimi

QUALITY CRAFTSMANSHIP (BBB) All reno’s, kitchen, bath, custom showers. Anything concrete. 250-658-2656. www.wingfieldcontracting.com

AURICLE LAWNS- Hedge, tree pruning, fall/winter cleanups, power washing. 882-3129 DPM SERVICES: lawn/gard, cleanups, pruning, hedges, landscapes, irrigation, pwr washing, gutters 15yrs. 250883-8141. GARDEN OVERGROWN? Big cleanups our specialty Complete garden maint. Call 250-478-7314, 250-812-8236.

Aroundthehouse.ca ALL, Repairs & Renovations Ben 250-884-6603

C.B.S. Masonry Brick, Stone, Concrete, Paving, Chimneys, Sidewalks, Patios, Repair, Replace, Re-build, Renew. “Quality is our Guarantee” Free Est’s & Competitive Prices. (250)294-9942, 589-9942 www.cbsmasonry.com

RAINTEK SPECIAL! Keep your basement dry with RainTek! Camera inspection & roto-rooting of your perimeter drain tiles for $129. www.raintek.ca 250-896-3478.

Certified General Accountant Bookkeeping, Audit, Payroll, HST. Set up & Training. E-File

TAX

250-477-4601 PENNIE’$ BOOKKEEPING Services for small business. Simply/Quickbooks. No time to get that paperwork done? We do data-entry, GST, payroll, year-end prep, and training. 250-661-1237

CARPENTRY BENOIT CONSTRUCTION. Reno’s & Additions. Windows, Doors, Decks. 250-479-0748. QUALITY CRAFTSMANSHIP (BBB) All reno’s, kitchen, bath, custom showers. Anything concrete. 250-658-2656. www.wingfieldcontracting.com WESTCOAST DESIGNS. WCB, Insurance. No job too small. Call Rob 250-213-7725.

CARPET INSTALLATION MALTA FLOORING Installation. Carpets, laminates, hardwood, lino. BBB 250-388-0278

CLEANING SERVICES ABSOLUTELY CLEAN. Husband & wife team. Power Washing. (778)440-6611. AUNTIE MESS CLEANING. Reliable, efficient, honest, 40 years exp, seniors discount. $20/hr. Call 250-634-1077. CARING BONDABLE work since 1985. Supplies & vacuum incld’d. Call (250)385-5869 FIRST CLEAN FREE! Lnsd/Insur. Refs. Pure-Shine-Cleaning.com 250-661-6927 HOUSECLEANING. 15yrs exp cleaning homes/small businesses. Refs. 250-589-7851. MALTA HOUSECLEANING. BBB. Best rates. Residential/Comm. 250-388-0278

COMPUTER SERVICES A HOME COMPUTER Coach. Senior friendly. Computer lessons, maintenance and problem solving. Des, 250-6569363, 250-727-5519. COMPUDOC MOBILE Computer Services. Repairs, tuneups, tutoring, web sites and more. Call 250-886-8053.

CONTRACTORS CARPENTRY, DRYWALL, kitch/bath, wood floor, tiles, plumbing, renos 250-213-6877

DRYWALL AARON’S RENO’S Drywall, taping, texture. Insured/bonded. Free est. 250-880-0525. BEAT MY Price! Best workmanship. 38 years experience. Call Mike, 250-475-0542. MALTA DRYWALL & Painting. Residential/Commercial. BBB member. (250)388-0278. MUD on the RUN. Small drywall repairs, textures & renovations. Ross (250)812-4879.

ELECTRICAL 250-361-6193. QUALITY Electric. Reno’s plus. Visa accepted. Small jobs ok. #22779 AT&T ELECTRIC. Renovations. Residential & Commercial. Knob & tube replacement. #26125. (250)744-4550. EXPERIENCED ELECTRICIAN. Reasonable rates. 250744-6884. Licence #22202. KENDRA’S ELECTRICAL Co. #86952. No Job too Small. Kendra, 250-415-7991.

- Lawn mowing - Hedge trimming - Garden clean up - Leaf Clean up - Power washing - Gutter Cleaning - Aerating - Irrigation Maint.

(250) 858-0588 www.mowtime.ca

LEVEL GROUND Landscaping

Complete Garden & Arborist Services. Lawns, hedges. Insured. Free est. 250-818-0587 PREPARATION FOR Fall, Winter & Spring. Professional garden & landscape services. Maintenance, design & installations. Call (250)474-4373. .... THE GARDENING GAL .... Quality Affordable Gardening. Renovations Maintenance & Cleanups.... 250.217.7708.

NORTHERN SUN Electric Comm/Res. $35/hr. Work Guaranteed. Any size job. (250)888-6160. Lic#13981.

AL’S AVAILABLE to update your home. Kitchens, baths, basements, etc. Licensed & Insured. Al 250-415-1397. BEETLES RESIDENTIAL Renovations Ltd. Bathrooms, decks, painting, landscaping and handyman services. Fully insured and guaranteed. Free estimates. Call 250-889-4245.

MALTA HANDYMAN. BBB member. Best rates. Please call (250)388-0278. MARTIN PROJECTS Home Repair & Reno’s; Tile, Drywall, Electric, Masonry, Complete Landscape Services & Drainage. Ref’s avail. Call Jeremy 250-812-9742. SENIOR HANDYMANHousehold repairs. Will assist do-it yourselfers. Fred, 250888-5345.

HAULING AND SALVAGE 250-217-0062 GARDEN CITY GREEN Hauling & Recycle junkremovalvictoria.com

CITY HAUL- a lot of junk won’t fit in your trunk, you’re in luck I own a truck. 250-891-2489.

BUBBA’S HAULING. Mini excavator & bob cat services. Call 250-478-8858.

AAA. NO job too small. Fences, decks, installation & repair. Glowing References. Insured. Affordable. 15+yrs. experience Call Les at (250)880-2002. ALL TYPES of fencing, repairs. Reliable, on-time. Free estimates. Call 250-888-8637. MALTA FENCING & DECKS. BBB member. Best rates. Please call (250)388-0278.

FURNITURE REFINISHING FURNITURE REFINISHING. Specializing in small items, end-tables, coffee tables, chairs. Free pick-up & delivery. References available. 250-475-1462.

✭BUBBA’’S HAULING✭ Honest & on time. Demolition, construction clean-ups, small load deliveries (sand, gravel, topsoil, mulch), garden waste removal, mini excavator, bob cat service.(250)478-8858.

HOME IMPROVEMENTS IFIX HANDYMAN Services. Household repairs and renovations. Free estimates. Call Denis at 250-634-8086 or email: denisifix@gmail.com MALTA DRAIN Tiles. Replace and Repair. BBB member, best rates. (250)388-0278. MALTA HOUSE Renos & Repairs. BBB member. Best rates. (250)388-0278.

EXCAVATING & DRAINAGE

FENCING

2 BURLEY MEN MOVING. $85/hr for 2 men (no before or after travel time charges on local moves. Please call Scott or Joshua, (250)686-6507.

RENO MEN. Ref’s. Senior’s Discount. BBB. Free Estimates. Call 250-885-9487. Photos: happyhandyman.co

WATTS ON ELECTRIC, Residential, Commercial, Renovations. #100213. 250-418-1611.

RAINTEK SPECIAL! Keep your basement dry with RainTek! Camera inspection & roto-rooting of your perimeter drain tiles for $129. www.raintek.ca 250-896-3478.

MOVING & STORAGE

CLEAN-UP SPECIAL. You load bins, size 12 yard $100 plus dump fee or we do it all. Call 250-361-6164.

GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS DIAMOND DAVE Gutter cleaning, gutter guard, power washing, roof de-mossing. Call 250-889-5794. GUTTER CLEANING, repairs, de-mossing. Windows, power washing. 250-478-6323. GUTTER CLEANING. Repairs, Maintenance, Gutterguard, Leaf traps. Grand Xterior Cleaning Services. WCB Insured. Call 250-380-7778. PERIMETER EXTERIORS. Gutter cleaning, repairs, upgrades. FALL SPECIALS! WCB, Free est. 250-881-2440. V.I.P. GUTTER Cleaning. Gutter guards, all exterior, power washing, roof de-mossing, spray, windows. Package deals! Insured. (250)507-6543 WE SWEEP your roof, clean your gutters & remove your waste. Fair prices. Insured. Fred, (250)514-5280.

FAMILY MAN Hauling. Prompt, Courteous. Call Chris for all your hauling needs. 250-920-8463.

QUALITY CRAFTSMANSHIP (BBB) All reno’s, kitchen, bath, custom showers. Anything concrete. 250-658-2656. www.wingfieldcontracting.com

INSULATION MALTA BLOWN insulation & batting. Removal. Best rates. BBB member. (250)388-0278.

INTERIOR DESIGN

CLASSIFIED ADS MEAN MORE BUSINESS PARRY’S HAULING We haul it all - FREE estimates. Call Shawn 250-812-7774

250.388.3535

PRESSURE WASHING DRIVEWAYS, WALKWAYS, Decks, etc. Reasonable rates. 250-744-8588, Norm.

PAINTING

RUBBISH REMOVAL

ALFRED, ALFRED Quality Painting. Wholesale, Discounts! 50 years experience. 250-382-3694.

MALTA GARDEN & Rubbish Removal. Best Rates. BBB member. (250)388-0278.

A PROFESSIONAL Woman painter. Karen Bales Painting & Wallcoverings. Over 25 yrs exp. Free est. 250-514-5220.

STUCCO/SIDING

BIG BEAR Handyman & Painting Services. No job too small. Free Estimates. Get ready for Xmas. 250-896-6071 BLAINE’S PAINTING- Quality workmanship. $20 hr, 20 yrs exp. Blaine, 250-580-2602. DRYWALL REPAIRS & HOUSE PAINTING. Free estimates. If you, your family or friends need any of the above give Joseph Bronson a call 250-686-0663. Reasonable rates in a tight economy. I take pride in the end results. LADY PAINTER Serving the Peninsula for over 20 yrs. Interior/exterior. Call Bernice, 250-655-1127. NORM’S PAINTING- 15% offQuality work. Reliable. Refs. 25 yr exp. 250-478-0347. OLD TIMER. Quality old fashioned service. Great rates. Excellent references. Call Al at 250-474-6924, 250-888-7187.

PLUMBING

DISCOUNTED WINTER RATES on Installations. Oak Bay Irrigation & Landscape Lighting. 778.440.1883.

PATCHES,Drywall, skimming, old world texturing, coves, fireplaces. Bob, 250-642-5178.

MALTA MOVING. Best Rates. BBB Member. Residential/ Commercial. (250)388-0278.

SPECIALIZING IN Interior painting of residential homes, condos & townshouses. 30 yrs exp. Call Larry (250)744-9801.

IRRIGATION/SPRINKLER SYSTEMS

PLASTERING

PATCHES, ADDITIONS, restucco, renos, chimney, waterproofing. Bob, 250-642-5178.

TILING A1. SHAWN The Tile GuyRes/ Comm/ Custom/ Renos. 250-686-6046

TREE SERVICES LOCAL TREE CO. 30 yrs exp. Bucket truck, chipper. We buy logs. Insured. (250)883-2911.

UPHOLSTERY FIBRENEW EXPERTS in Redye furniture, leather, Vinyl, plastic repair, auto, burns, cuts, pet damage. (250)8917446. Visa, MC, Debit. www.werepairleather.com

WINDOW CLEANING DAVE’S WINDOW Cleaning. Windows, Gutters, Sweeping Roofs, Pressure Washing, Roof Demossing. Call 250361-6190.

WINDOWS

EXPERIENCED JOURNEYMAN Plumber. Renos, New Construction & Service. Fair rates. Insured. Reliable, friendly. Great references. Call Mike at KNA (250)880-0104.

ALFRED, ALFRED Quality Windows Wholesale, Discounts! 50 years Construction experience. 250-382-3694.

FELIX PLUMBING. Over 35 years experience. Reasonable rates. Call 250-514-2376.

READ THIS....

FREE ESTIMATES. Reasonable. Reliable. No job too small. Call 250-388-5544.

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KERRY’S GAS & PLUMBING SERVICESRepair, maintenance & install. 250-360-7663.

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TAKE ON A PAPER ROUTE! fil here A paper route can provide money to buy new games for your computer, XBox or Wii or cover the cost of a cell phone each month.

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circulation@vicnews.com | circulation@saanichnews.com | circulation@goldstreamgazette.com SOOKE NEWS MIRROR


SAANICH NEWS - Wednesday, November 23, 2011 

sceneandheard

www.saanichnews.com • A25

P H O T O

F E A T U R E

Photos by Adriana Durian

To book events call 250-381-3484 or e-mail adminassist@vicnews.com

Photo reprints from this or past Scene & Heard pages are available through Black Press at www.vicnews.com. Just click on the Photo Store/Gallery link located below the “Search” box.

■ Victoria Hospitals Foundation - Visions Gala ■ Saturday, Nov. 19 ■ Fairmont Empress Hotel

Community shares Vision at annual gala for Victoria Hospitals Foundation On Saturday November 19th the community once again showed it’s enduring support for health care in Victoria raising $436,000 at the Victoria Hospitals Foundation’s annual Visions gala. The black-tie event raised funds for the foundation’s Fall Campaign through ticket sales, live and silent auctions, a bear raffle, cash gifts and 25 community sponorships totalling $164,000. Visions is one part of the Fall Campaign, which aims to raise $595,000 for 94 specialized vital signs monitors.

Executive Director, Hospitals Foundation Melanie Melanie McKenzie pins a boutineer on the MC McKenzie and event Chair, Dr. Dorothy (Sam) Williams. Michael O’Connor.

Guests showed incredible generosity; one gifting an all expense paid cruise she had won in the bear raffle back to Visions. The cruise was then auctioned off for $8,400. As well, two guests made straight donations of $6,700 each. The donations went towards the purchase of two vital signs monitors. More photos available online at; http://gallery.pictopia.com/bclocalnews/gallery/97246

Rick Anthony and Dr. Christine Hall.

Mark and Tammi Romano guests of Ideba Marketing travelled all the way from Seattle WA to attend Visions.

Board Chair of the Victoria Hospitals Foundation Rod Dewar and his wife Susan.

Gary and Lori Sorenson hold up a teddy bear they purchased in support.

Jenni Aitken and Lance Abercrombie.

Jocelyn Honeyman and Bruce Knapp.

Terri and Tom Siemens.

Photo submitted.

Dr. Stephen Wheeler and his wife Sandy.

VICTORIA HOSPITALS FOUNDATION’S FALL CAMPAIGN Once again Visions was a success, but we still need your help.

There are many ways to donate to help purchase 94 specialized vital signs monitors for the Heart Health and General Surgery units in the new Patient Care Centre.

You can reach the Victoria Hospitals Foundation at 250-519-1750 or online at www.victoriahf.ca

Giving makes us all better.


A26 A26 ••www.saanichnews.com www.saanichnews.com

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Wednesday, Wednesday,November November23, 23,2011 2011 --SAANICH SAANICH NEWS NEWS

Pennies add up to a big change Young Parents support group helps families succeed Laura Lavin News staff

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Society may look down its nose at teen parents, but they’re the ones running the show at the Young Parents Support Network. “We have a board of directors who are current or past participants, as well as young parents who are very tuned in to what the parents we work with want as programs,” said Young Parents Support Network program co-ordinator Margo d’Archangelo.

The Young Parents Support Network, a small, non-profit group that has helped young parent families around Greater Victoria since 1994, offers support to parents between the ages of 13 and 29. It assists with family support, prenatal outreach, parenting education, a naturopath clinic, a free store, a workout group and more. The group serves 170 families; participants choose the programs that are most suited to their needs. “A large portion of the population we serve are in tricky economic situations,” d’Archangelo said. “A large portion of them are also well below what is considered to be low-income.” The Young Parents Support Network

Sharon Tiffin/News staff

Samantha Hosie, family support worker and childcare and volunteer co-ordinator, holds nine-month-old Altessa Allison at the Young Parents Support Network drop-in group in Victoria. provides group, oneon-one and in-home services to young parent families. “It’s open to everybody. You can still be really isolated even if you’re (not low income),” she said. The Young Parents

Support Network is there to help young parents cope with one of the biggest challenges in life – raising kids. “The youngest of the young parents use the service most intensely,”

’ LPNs, WE RE

THIS CLOSE TO UNITING NURSES We’re just a few signatures away from a majority of LPNs choosing BCNU as their professional union in every BC health region. Let’s make that decision clear everywhere. If you haven’t signed your BCNU membership yet, there’s still time. Visit BCNULPN.org today and request a membership application. We must receive your signed application by November 29. Casual, part-time and full-time LPNs are all welcome. Thank you for sharing our vision. Together we can unite the nursing profession and improve patient care.

Michelle, LPN

d’Archangelo said. “They cycle through, then things become more stable and they become more committed to give back to the community.” The organization is funded entirely by donations including those that come through the United Way, the Community Action Initiative, the Victoria Foundation and the Community Action Program for Children. “We’re really respectful, and therefore really responsible, to the population we work with. We’re right here listening to their needs. Sometimes a program that’s really needed doesn’t get to continue because there’s no funding,” d’Archangelo said. This year Black Press’ Pennies for Presents fundraiser will help five organizations including the Young Parents Support Network, the Mary Manning Centre, Threshold Housing Society, Victoria READ Society and suicide prevention group, NEED2. Pennies for Presents has raised about $618,000 for local charities since the campaign’s inception 15 years ago. Last year, more than $12,000 was generated by businesses, schoolchildren and readers of the Victoria News, Saanich News, Oak Bay News and Goldstream News Gazette. editor@saanichnews.com

How you can help ■ Cash donations can be dropped off at Black Press head office, 818 Broughton St. and at the Goldstream News Gazette, 117-777 Goldstream Ave. in Langford. ■ For a list of businesses that are accepting donations, watch for notices in the Saanich News and Victoria News Daily. ■ Schools and businesses interested in participating can call 250-381-3633 ext. 269 or email kslavin@ saanichnews.com.


A28 • www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, November 23, 2011 - SAANICH

Thank You!

NEW TO OUR DELI!

to all of our Sponsors and all of our Customers for making our Customer Appreciation Day another great success.

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Smoked Turkey Local, Saanich raised all natural free range turkey. Smoked by Victoria’s own Glenwood Meats.

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266

per lb 5.86 kg

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2

96

800 g

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Mon-Fri Excluding Holidays

3 lb Bag

5

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3

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269

86

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COUNTRY HARVEST

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750 mlg 680-900

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246

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26

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per 100 g

596

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356

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226

per 100 g

66 Reg Original

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86

456

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520 g

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500 g

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per lb 7.85 kg

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per 100 g

Goat Milk Feta Cheese

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76

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650 g Asst.

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2

LOCAL ISLAND FARMS

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86

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per 100 g

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56

per lb 5.20 kg

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per lb 2.12 kg

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26

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BC

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426

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Nov.23,2011 SaanichNews  

Saanich Board of Education PAGE A5 Greater Victoria Board of Education RECEIVE A FREE UNIFORM Wednesday, November 23, 2011 PLEASE SEE: Regio...

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