Issuu on Google+

e n e c S SAA

APRIL 2014

SAAS ON TRACK PAGE 36


FROM THE CEO My first 9 months at SAAS have held many ‘firsts’ and milestones: my first road shifts in SAAS greens, my first opportunity to work with our fantastic volunteer staff, and now my first budget cycle in SA. In a recent television broadcast, the Premier outlined the financial challenges facing the state, the need for change and the reality that some people will be upset. We are currently in budget planning mode for 2014-15 and, as part of this process, we are required to meet the cost saving targets which have been set for us by Treasury. I want to reiterate that the focus of everyone in SAAS must be on patient safety. In order to continue to improve patient safety and fulfil our duties and obligations to our staff, it is essential we implement a Cost Containment process that delivers on three objectives: deliver on the cost saving targets, deliver the same range of services at less cost (cost efficiencies) and release funds to deliver service improvements. At this stage, our key areas of focus are on recovery of bad debts, a review of our training efficiency, streams for generating more revenue and improving the management of absenteeism. Everyone in SAAS will have a role to play in ensuring wins in these areas. Successful implementation of a cost containment process means we can achieve our objectives and safeguard patient safety. That’s good news for our patients.

In the last issue, I touched on our revised Clinical Governance Framework. We are now into the next leg of the journey which is getting systems and procedures in place to measure what we do clinically. It’s one thing to say you’re going to focus on patient safety; it’s another to actually do it. In advance of professional regulation and clinical reform, it is essential we are able to demonstrate that our clinical practice is audited, best practice and patient safe. One example of how we might be able to do this is the introduction of an electronic patient care reporting system. This will greatly assist us with data collection, clinical audit and the evolution of our clinical practice. This is something that was spoken about at the recent Senior Leadership Team Briefing meeting on 1 April. The meeting provided us with an opportunity to update our team leaders and managers on a few key projects going on at SAAS including the upcoming SACAD update, what we are doing with our bad debts, the future of triple zero (000) and the new Clinical Performance and Patient Safety directorate. There’s also been a lot going on in our volunteer sector of late. In my second ever CEO column back in October last year, I said I had spoken to some volunteers about what they want to make their volunteering experience

SAAScene

/ APRIL 2014

better. We’ve taken this feedback on board and I’m very pleased to say that we have now launched a revised Certificate IV in Healthcare (Ambulance). A key feature of the course is that it allows volunteers to get on an ambulance quicker. After just one month, trainees can head out on an ambulance as a third and they can form part of a two-person crew (with another fully-qualified volunteer) in just six months. The course is also much more flexible and you can take as long as you need to complete the course if you have other commitments. I’ve had the privilege of attending some volunteer events recently with Volunteer Team Leader conferences held in Port Pirie, Whyalla and Bordertown, with one more to go in Murray Bridge. At the conferences there has been much talk about the volunteer workforce planning project; a key project for SAAS which is looking at the issues faced by each of our volunteer stations and what we can do to address them. (See the article on page 44 for more info). Finally, while I’m talking about volunteers, I do quickly want to touch on our Country Regional Response Team (CRRT) and Volunteer Regional Response Team (VRRT). They are doing a great job in adding value to volunteering and in supporting our existing volunteers who do such an amazing job in their communities. Our volunteer workforce is such a vital part of SAAS, which is why we have initiatives such as the VRRT and CRRT in place and why we are investing time and resources into the volunteer workforce planning project.

Robert Morton

3


CALENDAR Editor Marise Kalika

APRIL

APRIL Sun

Mon

Tue

Wed

Thu

Fri

Graphic Design Svelte Studios

TUESDAY 1 APRIL 2014 Senior Leadership Team Briefing

30

31

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

Writers Megan Cree Sarah Fitzharris Marise Kalika Lisa Morrison Simon Nankivell Brigitt Olsen Alexi Tuckey Denis Roberts

SATURDAY 6 APRIL – SUNDAY 7 APRIL South Region Volunteer Conference

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

1

2

3

Sun

Mon

Tue

Wed

Thu

Fri

Sat

FRIDAY 18 APRIL 2014 Good Friday

27

28

29

30

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

SUNDAY 20 APRIL 2014 Easter

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Sun

Mon

Tue

Wed

Thu

Fri

Sat

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

SAAScene is the offical internal magazine of SA Ambulance Service. The publication is produced bi-monthly by the Corporate Communications team. Find the latest edition of SAAScene, as well as all back issues, on SAASnet.

MONDAY 21 APRIL 2014 Easter Monday FRIDAY 25 APRIL 2014 Anzac Day

MAY

Contributions, including articles and photographs, are welcome from all SAAS staff. Please ensure you have received approval from your line manager before submitting.

MONDAY 12 MAY – SUNDAY 18 MAY 2014 National Volunteer Week

GPO Box 3 Adelaide SA 5001

THURSDAY 22 MAY 2014 Biggest Morning Tea

Telephone 8274 0489 Facsimile 8272 9232 saasnews@health.sa.gov.au © SA Ambulance Service 2014 Material from this publication may be reproduced with the approval of the Editor providing appropriate acknowledgment for all photographs and articles. SAAScene and Pulse are printed on 100% carbon neutral paper.

Front Cover: Darren Brealey takes to the track with the Clipsal race teams.

FRIDAY 16 MAY 2014 25 Year Dinner for Volunteers

Sat

MAY

JUNE

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

1

2

3

4

5

Sun

Mon

Tue

Wed

Thu

Fri

Sat

29

30

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

JULY

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

1

2


CONTENTS

14 6

6 Commendations Special thanks to our staff

11 12

11 On the Job After the crash 12 Falls Prevention– Top Priority New training program for staff

14

14 The Day the World Changed Mercury 04– ten years on

25 42 24 16 18 42 20 51 16 A Day in the Life of... Joe Ciccone

24 Pulse General news

18 SAAS is a Family Affair Mt Gambier's team of family members

42 SAAS Conscience SAAS lends a hand to top dogs

20 A Moment with Mazur Management of Tachyarrythmias

51 Media Rap-Up What's in the news?

22

22 Gang Green Meet Bruce, Gavin, Susanna, David & Lee

SAAScene

/ APRIL 2014

5


COMMENDATIONS Metro Thank you for the care and support given on our flight home. Both doing well and thanks to you, returned home to our family safe and sound. Robert Morton – CEO Grateful thanks for assisting young son who had placed Lego up his nose. You arrived promptly and were amazing, putting him at ease and interacting well with both children. Thank you for providing a positive experience which included a viewing of the ambulance and its equipment. Millicent Pike and Owen Jones – South C We were immensely touched and impressed by the care and professionalism shown by the four officers. Mark Dubois, Lauren Gormlie, Aria Kallonen and Jessica Sala – West D Sincere thanks to you for your professionalism, empathy and humour whilst en-route to hospital. Christopher Kaehne – Gepps Cross PTS Sincere gratitude for your professionalism and empathy. I greatly appreciated your reassurance and advice during a stressful and difficult time. James Kosmala – North C Sharni Sattler – Redwood Park PIDT

6

Please pass on my grateful thanks for the professionalism displayed and for attending so promptly. You provided a wonderful service. Trudy Borgas – North B Jason Keefe – SPRINT Sincere thanks to you for your professional manner. Appreciated the sincere consideration for mum who was clearly distraught by the event; you provided great comfort and important information on his father’s condition. Anita Hoogland and Stephen Haldun – South D Courtney Halliday and Julie Power – West D Luke O’Callaghan – ECP Sincere thanks for the professional care and treatment provided in difficult conditions (extreme heat) following a cardiac arrest. As a young mother of several young children, the patient is thankful for exceptional skills displayed which undoubtedly saved her life. John Reeves and Kerry Dohnt – Bariatric ESS Graeme Coles and David Blanksby – West A Rhys Bache – Fulham PIDT Tristan Moyle – East C Sincere thanks for your professionalism and the courteous and friendly manner afforded to father and brother who were on scene. The patient's son is a paramedic in Queensland and is grateful for the appropriate care his father received; it certainly assisted with an earlier than expected discharge from hospital. Christian Brazil and Amanda Cameron – East D

SAAScene

/ APRIL 2014

Please pass on sincere gratitude and thanks for efforts to save their grandson. You did this with great professionalism and commitment. Unfortunately he did pass away but they have comfort in knowing that everything possible was done to help him. Jordan Pring – E Shift Darren Tidswell – North A Caitlin Wegner – East PT Grateful thanks for the excellent service you provided; little to no damage to heart following a cardiac arrest. Carly Strapps – South A Deborah Agus – South D Sincere thanks for your prompt medical treatment and professional skills. I was impressed with your manner and how all in attendance from SAAS worked so well together. Tina Bolto – SPRINT Paul Coombs and Nicola Thoo – East D Sincere thanks for the wonderful support and care father received. He is now in appropriate care and doing well. Shane Kulhmann – SPRINT Andrew Loch – East D Thank you for the respectful and efficient care provided to the patient, wife and all staff involved. It was greatly appreciated. Daniel Hirst – SPRINT Nick Kaye and Adam Hughes – Ashford PIDT


Thank you for the wonderful and professional service you provided during his transfer from Tarlee to the Ashford Hospital. I greatly appreciated your kindness and your ability to put him at ease during a stressful time. Paige Cotter – Gepps Cross PTS Kim Scadding – Edwardstown PTS Grateful thanks for the professionalism you displayed and the excellent service you provided; very impressed. Alexander Wells and Cameron Johnson – East D John Noble – ECP Please pass on our gratitude for the exceptional professionalism, calmness and kindness to our colleague. Your compassion and kindness during an unpleasant situation certainly left an impression. Thank you for your wonderful support. Mary Bagshaw – West B We thank you for your respectful approach and for all your efforts in assisting our father and husband who died suddenly and unexpectedly. We will remember your kindness and compassion. Paul Pegoli – SPRINT Olivia Delli Quadri, Matthew Maylin and Charlotte Davis – West C

A note of sincere thanks to all staff involved, you were prompt, incredibly kind and efficient. Thank you so much for your dedication, professionalism and the care given to my father. I didn’t think I would enjoy my father’s company again, however he is responding well to treatment. You were simply incredible. Todd Kenny, Patrick Frawley, Sarah Moore and Christine Cotton – West B Shaun O’Sullivan and Simon Craddock – SOT Sincere thanks for your professionalism, assessment and courteous care. The public is in very good hands; I admire your profession and the wonderful training you must receive. David Simmons – 8 Hr Team Craig Turner – Murray Bridge Your kindness and care has been greatly appreciated. Aaron Baker – North C Steffi Hacket – North B They dealt with a difficult situation with such efficiency, kindness and humanity. Sincere thanks to you both. Eli Southern and Sam Ashcroft – East A

ECP/SPRINT Thank you for your pleasant manner, professionalism and attention to detail Bronwyn Cadd Sincere thanks to you for the wonderful support and care she received Cindy Hein Sincere and grateful thanks for your support and care. Patient was able to pass away at home some days later per his request, this meant a great deal to them both. Richard Larsen In appreciation of your support and the assistance provided. The course was a great success, the professionalism displayed was a key factor in the program’s success. Shaun White, Director Clinical Services, Ambulance Tasmania Sincere thanks, an extraordinary job with the very short time you had to familiarise yourself with their equipment. Even with these constraints you still produced a great training session and learning environment. From Clinical Education thank you and your families for your time and expertise in showcasing our Smart Moves program to other services. Neil Clune, Operations ManagerClinical Development Toni Meli – SPRINT Paul Ekkelboom – ECP

SAAScene

/ APRIL 2014

7


COMMENDATIONS Recent palliative care, simply put, it was awesome. Having an ECP available to administer analgesia was a perfect example of the services the program offers. It reduced the impact on the hospital. More importantly it reduced the impact on the patient and the family. The patient was able to remain where she was comfortable and negated the confusion and pain of being transported to hospital. This one case alone shows the value of the concept. Tim Partlow, Marc West and Mel O’Donnell – Port Lincoln ECP Team

COUNTRY Please pass on my grateful thanks for all the support and education provided; your compassion and understanding has not gone unnoticed. Sarah Hamilton – Mallala Sincere gratitude for the wonderful service, treatment and support received. Son adores the knitted penguin; it gave him great comfort during this experience. Deb Wimshurst, Paul Black and Lee Roberts – Victor Harbor Clive Vernis, Paul Wiese and Bronwyn Godson – Victor Harbor RMTS Thank you for being so kind and enthusiastic; you introduced yourself and provided my son with a tour of the ambulance during your break. I was very impressed with your efforts; you gave a curious boy an encounter he will never forget. Holly Walker and Aaron Kennewell – Tailem Bend

8

Thank you for your prompt response; I cannot adequately express how grateful we are to have such help. All is well, thank you for the work you do. Peter Keizer and Colin Cronk – Woodside We are recovering and this is attributed to your care; thank you so much. Jason McLaughlin and Chris Bonnici – Woodside To all those at Port Lincoln Ambulance Station who helped care for our mother, with sincerity, we would like to thank you for your support, care, kind acts and deeds towards our mum. Port Lincoln Team Thank you for the wonderful help, support and care provided to our daughter. You were so calm and caring in your approach and put us all at ease. Tracey Callanan and Tim Lloyde – Barossa You managed the incident with great professionalism; be proud, you did a great job. Katie Meadow – Roxby Downs Congratulations for the respect shown to this patient and the extra time taken to manage his care at his home. You were flexible in your clinical approach, providing management outside of the normal scope in consultation with the ECP and metro palliative care consultant. All done to ensure the best outcome for the patient and his family. Tim Scott and Daniel Forrest – Mount Gambier

SAAScene

/ APRIL 2014

Sincere thanks on behalf of all the staff present for your compassion and the respect that was afforded to the deceased patient, residents and staff members. You provided great support during a challenging situation. Jarrod Gilbert and Jay Mancuso – Mount Gambier Sincere thanks and appreciation for the treatment and care you provided. Recovering well thanks to you. Ashley Lovett, Gary Lovett and Sheryn Schultze – Strathalbyn Please pass on sincere thanks for the wonderful care given to Mr Bell following a stroke. He is recovering slowly and they acknowledge the wonderful work you do; without you the outcome would have been very different. Michael Berden, Stephen Dixon, Paula Martin and Trish Leeuwenburg – Kingscote A sincere thank you for your immediate response and for the professional expertise given. Thank goodness for selfless people like you and all the volunteers. Leslie Dawson, Clive Fordham and Peter McGuire – Gladstone Michael Bunder and Peter Kendall – Port Pirie We know you did you best, with sincere thanks. Helene Parker and Sue Gregory – Kadina, Vincent Slattery, Anne Hatchmann and Bec Jenner – Wallaroo


Sincere thanks for your professionalism and care, and thank you for the important job you do. Mark Penney and Amy Rutten – Stirling

Sincere thanks for your kindness, concern and help. People like you are a credit to our society. Amy Rutten and Scott Baulderstone – Stirling

Sincere thanks; you surpassed all expectations of assistance and professionalism. David Kemp and Phil Gloede – Whyalla

Thank you, I respect you all for the amazing work you do especially as volunteers. I could not have asked for more friendly or understanding people to help. Julie Sayer, Gary Lovett and Ian Harrison – Strathalbyn

On behalf of myself and my colleagues, I wish to thank the SAAS crew for providing assistance promptly, their calm manner and professionalism. This avoided any further injury to police and the patient. Their approach was perfect for the situation and complimented the efforts of police, a dynamic team. An excellent example of two agencies working well together. Senior Constable, Gary Pusey – Roxby Downs Police Peter Dospisil and Luke Scott – Roxby Downs Sincere thanks for all you did doesn’t seem enough. Volunteers do a tough job for others in distressing and stressful times. Take care and thank you. Rebecca Jenner and Vincent Slattery – Wallaroo Helene Parker and Julie Frost – Kadina Cathy Niemann – RTL Upper Yorke Peninsula Thank you; your professionalism and the care provided was outstanding. Chris Taliangis and Rose Coldwell – Stirling

EOC Thank you for the remarkable and calm assistance you provided throughout the birth. Your manner and professionalism assisted greatly during a difficult situation. Andrew McDougall – EMDSO

A sincere thank you for the professional expertise given. The road to recovery has been arduous but he continues the fight with a pacemaker. Keep up the great work. Andrew Pearce – MRC Wendy Gray – NRC Stuart Baker and Trevor Matthews – SOT Sincere and heartfelt thanks to the SAAS staff involved in caring and saving the life of our dear and precious son in August 2013. The clinical competence, respect and great support will never be forgotten. Thank you just doesn’t seem enough, the worst is over and he now begins his recovery. Without SAAS in all its forms, he would not be alive today. Andy Ratcliffe – MRC Steve Tebbett – SOT

Sincere thanks for your professionalism, politeness and the ability to keep my calm during distress. You were understanding and very helpful. Emily Thorn – EMDSO

MEDSTAR Sincere thanks to the wonderful team that assisted my daughter following a horrific vehicle accident. The team did a fantastic job; she is recovering slowly. Dr Bruce Paix and Damien Schoolbread – RN

SAAScene

/ APRIL 2014

9


M Las on t th

WHAT'S UP DOC? In the last edition of SAAScene we asked what secret Paramedic Pete was telling the police horse.

" You had me at hello . ."

M Thi on s th

And now to this month… What are these SAAS MedSTAR team members discussing?

Send your ideas to saasnews@health.sa.gov.au by COB Friday 16 May 2014. The winning caption will be published in the June edition of SAAScene. If you have a picture of a SAAS staff member you’d like to see with a caption, email it through (get their permission first!)

10

SAAScene

/ APRIL 2014


ON THE JOB

Staff Moves

After the crash

Mahsa Mirrazavi commenced with SAAS on 1 April as a Data Analyst with the Operational Information Unit.

A Wistow couple says SAAS’s care made all the difference It’s dark. You’re trapped in your car with your spouse. Badly injured and with bones broken, you don’t know what happened. But it seems you’ve crashed into a tree on a country road. This is the nightmarish scenario Pat and Bruce Hemer were in late last year on the Goolwa to Alexandrina Road (near Finniss), and why they’re so thankful for the SAAS crews that came to their rescue. Almost six months after, Pat said she and her husband were “getting along okay”. However, Pat has months of hospital check-ups and hydrotherapy ahead, and Bruce still limps after his broken leg has mended. In the car crash, Pat suffered fractured arms, severe chest injuries, a punctured lung, and damage to her spleen and bowel. Her husband broke his leg. “All in all, we’re doing pretty good, considering what happened!” Pat said. The care Pat received from Di Peters, a volunteer ambulance officer from Goolwa, is one remembrance that lingers strongly. While Di was unable to provide much treatment until further help arrived (because of the patients being trapped), her reassurance clearly made all the difference. “She was absolutely amazing and calming,” said Pat.

Jonathan Zhouyi also commenced with SAAS as a data analyst. “She was absolutely gorgeous!” Di’s ambulance partner Franca Tanti looked after Bruce until backup arrived: a crew from Aldinga (Daniel Grey and Jeanette Holmes) and MedSTAR (Aziz Alrabiah, Simon Gibbon and Bill Griggs). Daniel said he was impressed at how the volunteers had performed in difficult circumstances and the way everyone worked together.

The EOC have welcomed some new people to their EMDSO team: • • • • • • • • •

Lachlan Graham Keith Scott Scott Torbet Madeline Paech Jayne Eastall Sarah Kirkman Jessica Van Dijk Jodie Paton Vicki Leane

“It was a good all-round team effort,” he said. “It was a lengthy scene but had a really good outcome.” Pat and Bruce were so impressed by the care they received, that they wrote a letter to the editor of the Mount Barker Courier and Victor Harbor Times, thanking everyone involved. In particular, Pat wanted to find “this person who crawled into the car with me”. And she did. A reunion was organised about six weeks after the crash. “It was lovely,” said Di. “I was really longing to catch up. I like to catch up with people and see how they’ve got on.” While she had “felt a bit useless” at the time because treatment was too difficult to attempt, Di’s caring words and tone did their work. “She was so appreciative.”

Di got in the backseat of the car behind Pat and talked her through what was happening. When the roof of the car was being levered off, when there was the sound of glass smashing, she was there explaining it all.

SAAScene

/ APRIL 2014

11


FALLS PREVENTION— SAAS’s new falls referral training program is set to see improved access to South Australia’s falls prevention services for our patients.

“The new training program is all about getting the right service to those who really need it,” said Rob Elliott, General Manager Clinical Effectiveness and Patient Safety. “We receive an average of 15 000 calls for assistance each year for people who have fallen and are either injured or unable to get themselves off the ground. Instead of just helping them out at that time, we want to do whatever we can to prevent it from happening again,” said Rob. “Our focus is patient care and patient safety. We want to provide our patients with the best possible care and prevent them from unnecessarily having to go to an emergency department or having a stay in hospital in the future.” Injuries resulting from falls cause more hospitalisations than any other injury among older people. In 2012, 26 older adults were admitted every day to a South Australian public hospital following a fall. Their stay in hospital averaged 7.9 days. The training program, being rolled out to all paramedics and ambulance officers across the state from April, has been developed in close collaboration with SA Health and the regional Falls Prevention Teams.

12

Gill Bartley, Clinical Manager of the Community Geriatrics Service at the Northern Adelaide Local Health Network, said they hoped to receive an increase in the number of patient referrals from SAAS as a result of the new training program. “We are really excited about this new initiative,” said Gill. “Research shows that many falls can be prevented. The more people we can have accessing our services, the better. This training program should assist in improving ambulance clinician’s knowledge of our services and identifying which patients would benefit from them. “We receive more than 700 referrals each year. Our service operates a falls triage service, two falls assessment clinics and a short term home-based program. Our aim is to identify falls and injury risk factors and put some measures in place to build confidence and independence. In many instances, we put people in touch with services that can assist them to stay safely at home.” Norma Ford knows all too well what can happen when you fall in the home. Norma’s husband Bill, 81, averaged three falls per month before he was referred by his GP to the GP Plus Health Care Centre Elizabeth in June 2013.

SAAScene

/ APRIL 2014

WHAT DO I NEED TO DO? All career staff are required to do the new training module on SAAS e-Learning. Volunteers will be trained as part of the 2014 CDP program by your RTL.

The Falls Clinic arranged for an inhome safety assessment, and a rail and adjustable shower head were installed in the bathroom. Bill also now attends weekly physiotherapy and exercise classes and receives regular phone calls to check on him. Since his referral to the Falls Clinic, Bill has not had any further falls. “Usually when he fell I would be with him or he would call out and I would try and pull him up myself, but a couple of times I had to call the neighbours to help me get him up,” said Norma. “(The Falls Clinic) has made Bill and I much more aware of the reasons why he was falling and we are now more careful.”


—TOP PRIORITY

Criteria for falls referrals: • Is over 65 and living in the community • Is ambulant but experiencing physical decline • Would benefit from a comprehensive falls risk assessment • Existing services do not meet needs • Consents to referral and indicates willingness to engage in strategies to address falls and injury risk

Metro falls pathway

Country falls pathway

How soon does the patient require follow up?

Fax all referrals to the Country Referral Unit on (08) 85 612 128

1. Is the patient refusing transport to hospital despite your advice? 2. Is the patient at imminent risk of further falls? 3. Would an in-home falls risk assessment in the next 48 hours prevent a hospital admission? If the answer to any of the above questions is, yes, phone the MRU on 1300 110 600 For all other referrals, phone the metro falls team on 1300 032 557 (1300 0 FALLS)

SAAScene

/ APRIL 2014

13


The day the world changed SAAS’s participation in multi-agency exercises designed to test our response capabilities to a terrorist incident now seem quite run-of-the-mill. There was a time when this was not so commonplace. Australia’s disaster preparedness used to focus on natural hazards, such as bushfires, floods and extreme weather. This approach all changed on a fateful day on 11 September 2001, when terrorists hijacked four commercial airliners and crashed into the World Trade Centre buildings in New York City, the Pentagon in Washington DC, and a field in Pennsylvania. The world, including Australia, had no choice but to take notice and change the way it looked at its disaster preparedness activities.

And then came the Bali bombings in October 2002, where 202 were killed and 209 injured; with the largest number of people killed or injured being Australians on holiday. This terrible event resulted in a further comprehensive review of Australia’s disaster plans. It’s now been 10 years since the inaugural multi-jurisdictional terrorist response exercise, Mercury 04. The exercise involved a fictional group of terrorists carrying out various terrorist activities, starting with the ‘bombing’ of an oil rig in the Timor Sea. Former General Manager, Special Operations, Lee Francis said the exercise was the first of its kind for SAAS. “SAAS had never played in such a big space before; with so many different agencies involved across different states,” said Lee. “It’s like a wedding; you can’t just turn up on the day. We started planning for the exercise over a year before it took place. We had to look at staff rosters, case cards, equipment, vehicles, staff – everything you would need for a real incident.” “Overall, it was a great exercise with a lot of effort over a sustained period.”

National Counter-Terrorism Committee (NCTC) established 13 February Sydney Hilton bombing

11 September Terrorist attack in NYC

12 October Bali bombings

1978

2001

2002

14

SAAScene

/ APRIL 2014


Acts of terrorism in 2001 and 2002 – what did they mean for SAAS?

• November 2001: CBR training upgraded to in include biological and radiation. • 2003: A critical infrastructure report was conducted. SAAS’s HQ building is considered ‘critical infrastructure’ because it houses the emergency operations centre. The report recommended a number of actions which were carried out: – upgrade and expand electronic access systems – install control doors on each floor – upgrade external lighting – install recorded CCTV on all exit doors

Federal Government commits $426.6 million over four years to safeguard the nation and strengthen existing security arrangements. New measures include upgrading counterterrorist capabilities at all major airports, engaging and training more air security officers, and increasing the number of explosive-detection dogs at airports.

2002 2003

– install electronic access security gates and perimeter fencing in the underground car park – remodel the front Reception area, increasing staff safety by installing new security screens and mirrors to see who is approaching the foyer – installed electronic door release equipment in the EOC – increase staff awareness to report unauthorised persons and to wear photo ID at all times. • 2004: SAPOL security recommended safety glass on certain doors which was undertaken.

Mercury ‘04 What? The first multi-jurisdictional exercise conducted under the auspices of the National Counter-Terrorism Committee. Who? Agencies from the Commonwealth, Northern Territory, Tasmania and South Australia. When? 22 March – 2 April 2004 Why? The aim of the exercise was to identify Australia’s counter terrorism capability to prevent, respond to and recover from simulated threats and acts of terrorism occurring in multiple jurisdictions within a common timeframe.

9 September Australian Embassy bombing in Jakarta 22 March-2 April inaugural multi-jurisdictional exercise involving Tasmania, South Australia, the Northern Territory }and Victoria (Mercury 04)

2004 SAAScene

/ APRIL 2014

December new laws passed in Australia; Anti-Terrorism Act

2005

15


A day in the life of ... This edition we meet SAAS Fleet Service Technician, Joe Ciccone SAAS service technicians provide servicing and mechanical support to our extensive range of fleet vehicles. So, what prepares a person for such an important job in the Fleet Department? Joe Ciccone’s experiences before joining SAAS were a good start. Joe started his career working in similar technical servicing roles within the automotive industry in an apprenticeship role before the opportunity arose for him to join the SAAS Fleet Department as a service technician.

16

In the coming editions of SAAScene we will be delving into the every day working lives of some of our support staff. The work our paramedics and ambulance officers do on the road is very visible…but what goes on behind the scenes as our support staff work tirelessly to ensure we are ready to respond to that next triple zero call? Whether you be from our customer service centre, revenue, comms engineering—everyone has a vital role to play at SAAS.

Coming from a big family himself, Joe appreciates that when he is at work he can count on the same support, friendship and at times playful antics as with any family. A part of SAAS Fleet Team for over six and a half years, Joe said, “A highlight of the job isn’t only the challenges of the daily mechanical jobs but also that our team is very much like a big family.” A typical day in the Fleet Department involves anything from conducting a general vehicle service to complete engine repairs. Joe and the team work hard to make sure each vehicle is serviced to SAAS’s high service standard and ensure

SAAScene

/ APRIL 2014

that each vehicle can be safely rotated back out onto the road as quickly as possible. Apart from the servicing and mechanical side of the role, service technicians are also responsible for doing repairs to fleet stretchers. The Fleet team all work together tirelessly to ensure each of our vehicles are safe and road-ready to be efficiently run through their paces 24/7 responding to the needs of the South Australian community. Fleet Service technicians are fully equipped to eliminate the down time if any of our vehicles are required to be sent to Fulham for servicing. SAAS crews can quickly


transfer into a spare vehicle, leaving the faulty vehicle with a service technician, such as Joe Ciccone. Joe enjoys the demands of working in a busy and sometimes demanding environment and having the opportunity to occasionally perform in other roles in the department such as Workshop Controller. This role involves managing the daily workload for the team and making sure each job is completed quickly and up to their high service level standard. An encouraging opportunity within SAAS, this provides Joe with the chance to continually develop his skills and face new challenges.

What activities might Joe get up to on a typical day? • changing over vehicles required for service • carrying out minor repairs • changing flat tyres • replacing used fire extinguishers • replacing faulty O2 gauges • repairing or replacing stretchers • replacing soiled stretcher belts (although service technicians do not clean stretchers) • changing over monitors due for service • engine repairs “The people and the culture make it a great place to work. They’re a good bunch to work with. And being part of the wider SAAS team and contributing to what we do for the community is a good feeling.”

SAAScene

/ APRIL 2014

17


SAAS is a family affair In December’s SAAScene we caught up with the members of two families who work at SAAS. This edition we met some members of the Mount Gambier CD team. This team has 16 members and astonishingly nine paramedics and ambulance officers are either married or related to somebody in the team!

In a day that Limestone Coast Operations Manager Andy Thomas jokingly coined the day ‘bring your dad/son to work day’, on Sunday 5 January, both ambulances in Mount Gambier were crewed by two father and son teams. The rare event occurred when local paramedic Joe Renko was on shift with his father, ambulance officer Slav, who was in Mount Gambier from Adelaide to cover another crew member’s time off. CTL Alan Scott also paired up with his son Tim. Joe said he enjoyed the opportunity to work with dad, Slav on the RMTS vehicle. “We had a brilliant day! It was a surreal experience to see him in the green uniform attending cases and being a part of the SAAS family. I taught him everything he knows… kind of.” SAAScene sat down with Mount Gambier team members Joe Renko, his wife Melissa and David Adkins (whose wife Merryn Sadler is also on the team) to find out what it’s like to work as a husband-wife team…

Joe Renko “I was lucky when the opportunity came about to work together because I didn’t need to plan my meals for work; she was much more organised! We had a number of cases where I inadvertently slipped out the word ‘babe’ when needing a certain observation taken or to grab equipment – luckily these weren’t heard by the patient or family member! There had been an occasion in the past where an elderly gentleman had a syncope episode and we were called to the job. Mel was the attendant and whilst walking into the house the patient was giving me the wink and said that he had died and seen an angel (pointing at Mel, not me). The whole journey to the hospital he was quite the smooth talker!” Melissa Renko “For a lengthy period of time Joe was the CTL of Mount Gambier CD team, which made him my boss (at work, not home!). Working at the same station certainly has its advantages – if I leave anything on station, he can bring it home and I can always go

18

SAAScene

/ APRIL 2014

to him first if I’m looking for a shift swap. When I was on maternity leave, having Joe working on the same team was very beneficial. It allowed me to keep my finger on the pulse with what was happening on station, clinical aspects of jobs and changes at SAAS. With so many family connections in one team, our team mates are all very family friendly and we try and help each other out with couples getting leave at the same time or shifts off together when needed. When I look at what I’ve got, I wouldn’t have it any other way.” David Adkins “There are some great benefits of spouses working together in the one team, more so if you have an understanding CTL like we do. We get to take eight weeks of holidays, your partner understands the complexities of the job and they know why you're still tired even though you only did three jobs on the night shift. The only negative is the look your partner gives you when you both get home and you ask: ‘how was your day?’”


If you have a family member in SAAS we’d love to hear from you! If so, drop us a line at saasnews@health.sa.gov.au

MOUNT GAMBIER CD TEAM FAMILIES

Alan Scott (father) Tim Scott (son)

David Adkins (husband) Merryn Sadler (wife)

John Baseley (husband) Cecilia Baseley (wife) Katie Campbell (Cecilia’s sister)

Joe Renko (husband) Melissa Renko (wife) Slav Renko (Joe’s father, based at Fulham)

MOUNT GAMBIER AB TEAM FAMILIES

Meanwhile on the AB team, paramedic Rob Jenner has worked at various times throughout his career with his father and wife who were both career officers at Mount Gambier. His wife Jo now volunteers up the road at Nangwarry.

SAAScene

/ APRIL 2014

19


A MOMENT WITH MAZUR

MANAGEMENT OF TACHYARRYTHMIAS

The management of tachyarrythmias, both in hospital and in the pre-hospital environment, has been an interesting topic of a number of recent clinical discussions. Recently I had the opportunity to assist a crew with the management of a patient in PSVT (paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia) or more correctly termed AVNRT (AV nodal reentrant tachycardia).

will be regular when mapped out. P waves will not be seen in atrial fibrillation. In AVNRT, if they are seen (rare), it will almost always be in lead II, where they will have a negative axis indicating retrograde conduction.

One of the issues around AVNRT is the difficulty in sometimes differentiating it from new onset rapid atrial fibrillation. Some important features that help can often be found in the history. Patients are usually more aware of the exact time they went into a tachyarrhythmia with AVNRT. With atrial fibrillation, the timing of onset can often be a little more vague. Many patients with AVNRT will be able to describe previous episodes and the how the problem was resolved. The previous successful use of valsalva manoeuvres or adenosine are helpful hints in the history to support AVNRT as the diagnosis.

Adenosine restores sinus rhythm in AVNRT by temporarily blocking the AV node. This will result in both the normal pathway and the accessory pathway being blocked. This stops circus electrical conduction and allows the sinus node to recommence dictating heart rate with conduction of the atrial electrical impulse down the normal pathway in the AV node into the ventricle.

Close examination of the ECG will be the most helpful diagnostic tool in making the diagnosis of AVNRT. Most importantly, QRS complexes will be irregularly irregular in atrial fibrillation whilst in AVNRT the QRS complexes

20

The administration of adenosine in the patient with atrial fibrillation will still result in blocking of the AV node hence causing temporary slowing of the overall ventricular rate, but once this effect has worn off the tachycardia will continue unabated. In patients who have developed new onset rapid atrial fibrillation due to an underlying medical condition, this decrease in cardiac output due to the sudden reduction in heart rate, can have significant adverse clinical consequences.

SAAScene

/ APRIL 2014

The acute management of rapid atrial fibrillation in the pre-hospital environment can be difficult. After identifying that someone is in atrial fibrillation, key management decisions will occur on the basis of the patient’s clinical condition and the purported underlying cause. It’s important to know how long the patient has been in atrial fibrillation. Whilst some patients can be very clear about when they noticed that their heart become irregular and a bit faster, for many the time of onset can be more vague. Time of onset is an important historical fact when considering management options. The longer a patient is in atrial fibrillation the increased likelihood that they have developing thrombus in their atria. Right atrial thrombi are generally filtered out by the lungs (i.e. small pulmonary emboli with generally limited clinical consequence), left atrial thombi can disseminate over a range of vascular pathways. These can cause a wide range of adverse clinical consequences, ranging from ischemic stroke due to carotid artery emboli, ischemic internal organs such as gut or kidney secondary to mesenteric or renal artery emboli, through to ischaemic limbs as a result of peripheral arterial emboli. Generally, once a patient has been in atrial fibrillation for longer than 48 hours, a period of anticoagulation is required before any attempt at returning the patient to sinus rhythm is made. This mitigates the risk of peripheral emboli occurring once the atria return to sinus rhythm and a coordinated sustained


atrial contraction is happening. In this circumstance, depending on the clinical situation that precipitated the atrial fibrillation, it may be that a degree of rate control is tried with a period of anticoagulation before any attempt at getting the patient back into a sinus rhythm is made. Even in patients with definite new onset atrial fibrillation the management options are often not clear cut as a ‘chicken or egg’ type scenario develops. Is the atrial fibrillation the cause of the symptoms or the result? Consider the hypoxic and/or hypotensive patient with chest pain who has gone into new atrial fibrillation? Is the rapid heart rate causing myocardial ischaemia with poor left ventricular function resulting in decreased cardiac output and hypotension, poor coronary artery perfusion and cardiac failure? In this case slowing the heart rate may be the right thing to do. Or has the patient developed a degree of heart failure and hypotension due to underlying chronic coronary artery disease and in attempting to compensate for this, the heart has increased its rate in order to maintain cardiac output? Or are they hypoxic and/or septic from an underlying pulmonary infection? Are they hyperkalaemic due to developing renal failure secondary to fluid losses or depletion? In these circumstances, any attempt at slowing the heart rate alone may make the clinical situation worse. The tachycardia may be a physiological compensation for the underlying medical condition.

It is important that potential causes for the atrial fibrillation are identified and managed before any attempt at rate control is instigated. Treating the underlying cause will in many circumstances achieve rate control and a return to sinus rhythm. In the pre-hospital environment it is important to recognise this and ensure hypoxia is managed, volume status is restored, chest pain is relieved and any other likely causes are identified and managed appropriately.

For those that are interested in learning more about AVNRT and other tachyarrythmias that may be present on ECG there are great online FOAM (free open access medical education) resources that provide great examples and valuable teaching points on a wide range of ECG presentations including; 1. Life in the fast lanes ECG resource at http://lifeinthefastlane.com/ecglibrary 2. Dr Smith’s ECG Blog at: www.hqmeded-ecg.blogspot.com.au

Stefan Mazur - Chief Medical Officer

Stefan Mazur Chief Medical Officer

SAAScene

/ APRIL 2014

21


GANG GREEN WANDERING WILHELM

When he’s not travelling around regional South Australia, particularly the West Coast, working as a paramedic, Bruce Wilhelm likes to enjoy a round of golf with his mates at the Port Augusta Golf Club. An avid golfer, Bruce can regularly be found enjoying his down time on the course, even regularly taking part in mid-week golfing competitions.

Bruce Wilhelm

Married to Bernice, Bruce and his wife were bitten by the travel bug some 30 years ago and have visited Bali 25 times in the past 30 years! “The Balinese are very friendly and that always draws you back,” Bruce said. These two international jet-setters plan an overseas trip once a year and have already visited a number of exotic and beautiful places such as New Zealand, Fiji, South East Asia

GAVIN’S GHOSTS

Here’s something about Gavin McCarthur, from Administrative Services, you probably don’t know: he has had a fascination with paranormal activities since he was a child.

Gavin McCarthur

On top of his bucket list is to travel the world visiting the most haunted dwellings, and number one on that list is one of the scariest places of the world, Waverly Hill Sanatorium, Kentucky USA. Rumour has it that the place is haunted after over 100,000 people died there from tuberculosis in the 1920s. Thankfully, Gavin has not yet had any personal encounters, because, as he says, “the ghosts hide from me”. With his favourite movie being The Crow with Brandon Lee, it’s clear that he also has a love of horror movies.

22

SAAScene

/ APRIL 2014

and Canada. Their next trip, planned for later this year, will be a cruise departing out of Singapore. With a career in healthcare spanning more than 32 years, Bruce started as a nurse before joining the ambulance team in Western Torrens, which was then a part of St John Australia. Bruce has also worked as an air attendant with air ambulance services in South Australia before moving on to Whyalla and finally Port Augusta as a paramedic, when the ambulance service formally changed to SA Ambulance Service. “I really enjoy working in the country and having the opportunity to relieve as an RTL in different areas across the state,” he said. Currently acting in the RTL position in the West Coast, his ultimate goal is to secure a permanent role as a Regional Team Leader at SAAS.

Aside from his interest in all things spooky, Gavin has also a third Dan qualification to teach Tae Kwon do and has written a draft trilogy novel on the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse that he hopes to finish one day. Married with three children, he also shares his house with a dog the size of a horse, but it’s really a Malamute and a big softy. Gavin came to SAAS from the FMC just over 12 months ago and was assigned to Administrative Services in the mail room. He’s enjoyed a change recently and has spent the last month as holiday relief in Client Services. Gavin says he enjoys working for SAAS and appreciates the support he is receiving and the opportunities for development.


Do you know someone who you think should be featured in Gang Green? If so, drop us a line at saasnews@health.sa.gov.au

SUSANNA HAS A SWEET TOOTH

Susanna Carpinelli

Susanna Carpinelli works as a rostering officer in, you guessed it, the Rostering Unit at SAAS. She moved here two years ago looking for something different after 10 years working for the payroll department in the construction industry. Known as ‘the foodie of the office’, Susanna has a passion for cooking (and eating) – especially desserts. Susanna also enjoys spending time with her family when she’s not at work and is married with two boys, aged 21 and 23. When she has time Susanna relishes going for walks and reading, although spare time is hard to come by. Last

VOLUNTEERING FOR THE LOVE OF IT

Volunteering on the ambulance together has brought newlyweds David and Lee Mott even closer, and they’re encouraging other couples to follow their example. “We love it!” said David. “It adds another layer to your relationship.”

David & Lee Mott

Lee agrees. “We think it’s a healthy thing for couples to do. It does tend to bond you. It’s nice that you go out [to ambulance cases] as a team and really feel like a team.” The couple, who moved from Tasmania four years ago for work in Coober Pedy, married earlier this year. They’ve been volunteer ambos for two years. Lee is a community nurse and David has his own plumbing business. The radical change in landscape hasn’t daunted them. Instead, they’ve quickly embraced their new home and community.

year she holidayed in Phuket and Kuala Lumpur, she’s also travelled to Singapore in the past and to her native country of Italy to catch up with family. She admits this trip to Italy was “a little while ago”, speaking about the soccer world cup being on at the time. The last time the world cup was in Italy was 1990… Back in the office, Susanna enjoys seeing how the many facets of SAAS work together and especially likes talking to volunteers to hear their stories. She’s also interested in finding out which stations are reportedly haunted and, yes, she is compiling a list. Maybe she needs to team up with Gavin so they can get to the bottom of the SAAS paranormal activity?

“We like to help others, so we put our hands up,” said David. While plumbing and emergency medicine aren’t obvious companions, there are ways to combine them. “Sometimes I struggled to understand the circulatory system, so the trainer used plumbing terms to help me!” said David. Fitting volunteering in isn’t always easy. But they enjoy it and don’t overdo things. “We try to find a healthy balance,” said David. “The one thing we’ve been strong on is not being martyrs,” Lee said. “Ultimately it’s our life. We just feel we’ll do our bit. “We love that it’s something that is genuinely helping the community.”

“We looked around and identified where the greatest need was, and it was the ambulance service,” said Lee.

SAAScene

/ APRIL 2014

23


Pulse GENERAL NEWS

24

SAAScene

/ APRIL 2014


WHEN A TYHOON HITS Last month in SAAScene we heard from paramedics Cliff Collett and Tracy Callanan about their recent visit to the Philippines with the Australian Medical Assistance Team (AusMAT) in response to the devastating Typhoon Haiyan. This month Dan Ellis, Director MedSTAR, tells us about his experience and what he gained from the trip. “I was very privileged to form part of the SAAS/SA Health response to the Philippines in late 2013. For me it was an opportunity to work in a true ‘area of need’ and also the opportunity to work as a regular doctor and not be in charge! The first night in the camp in Tacloban was a truly remarkable experience. Having been told I was

the ‘on call’ doctor for the first night I was greeted almost immediately at the entrance to the emergency tent by an ambulance (in fact a beaten up Volkswagen van) with three patients squeezed on board. Two of those patients were pregnant women in labour and I had to deliver the first baby right there in the back of the van! The second had a delayed second stage which we both sweated out until she delivered at 3am. Having last delivered a baby 10+ years ago I must confess to being a little nervous. The third patient was a desperately ill young lady with a chronic cardiac condition who we had to manage through the night in the resus tent with just an x-ray and a handful of drugs. All in, the 14 days I spent in Tacloban were probably the most humbling and rewarding I have spent in clinical medicine. Attempting to

SAAScene

/ APRIL 2014

practice high quality medicine without any recourse to the array of tests and scans that we have instantly available in the West is a massive challenge and requires a complete change of mindset. That said, I am hopeful that we made a genuine difference to patient care for the people that we treated. It is certainly something I shall always remember.” Dr Dan Ellis, MedSTAR Director

25


Keith started with the service back in 1989 as a student prior to the diploma commencing. Since that time he has enjoyed a variety of roles within SAAS, including ambulance officer/paramedic, in service training officer, team leader and his current role with Clinical Education that he’s held for the past nine years.

1

STAFF RECOGNISED FOR LONG SERVICE Congratulations to Keith Rooney, Volunteer Clinical Education Manager, who celebrated 25 years of service with SAAS on 18 January 2014. Keith received a service award and watch in recognition of his contribution over the years.

Keith has seen a lot of change over the years, most of which have been positive and exciting. He’s looking forward to continuing to contribute and support the volunteer sector in their role of providing patient care in regional areas. Meanwhile on 6 February, Terry Whales was busy handing out awards to his staff with Craig Todd, Loxton ICP receiving his 25 year award and Kathy Delaney, Barmera Paramedic receiving her National Medal.

The Customer Service Centre (CSC) receives hundreds of queries a month regarding Call Direct, and whilst they are well versed on the topic, administrative functions had to be referred to the Call Direct team, which sit in an entirely different building. It became increasingly difficult for this type of communication to be efficient and consistent.

26

2

Congratulations Keith, Craig and Kathy! 3

CALL DIRECT JOINS THE CUSTOMER SERVICE CENTRE Here at SAAS we are always looking for opportunities to better ourselves and our resources. We strive for the best performance of our teams across the organisation. Customer Services has seen some recent changes that will contribute greatly to this.

1. Well done: Rob Elliott, General Manager Clinical Effectiveness and Patient Safety was on hand to present Keith with his award. 2. It’s an honour: Kathy Delaney receives her National Medal for long and diligent service (15 years). 3. 25 years: Craig Todd receives his 25 year award from Terry Whales.

This April, Call Direct administrative and technical staff will move from 207 Greenhill Road to join the CSC team on the ground floor at Head Office, Eastwood. The establishment of this newly formed team will ensure the effective use of our resources, help workflows and provide development opportunities under the leadership of Carmela Paravia, Customer Service Centre Manager. Just another step into the SAAS future!

Above right: Kristin Fabrizio from the CSC Right: Leanne Westwood with a Call Direct Brochure

SAAScene

/ APRIL 2014


lse Pu

Andrew Thomas, Operations Manager for the Limestone Coast, said the event was a great opportunity for SAAS to promote itself to country people, and volunteers were a big part of that.

1

“We really appreciate the volunteers that take the time each year to man the stand and provide an additional crew,” he said.

2

Ambulance volunteers from Keith, Kingston, Lucindale, Nangwarry, Padthaway, Penola and Robe were represented at the field days. Andrew Thomas, Ross Elliott and Gary Wyld shared attendance as managers over the two days. 3

PARAMEDIC PETE GREETS SOUTH EAST

their community. Ten people who visited the stand were interested in becoming volunteer ambulance officers and left with information packs.

SAAS’s cute bear mascot, Paramedic Pete, met lots of people at the South East Field Days in Lucindale on 21 and 22 March.

“I was happy with the response we got in terms of recruitment,” said Gary.

Children and their parents were keen to have their photo taken with him when they visited the SAAS stand at this annual country fair. Paramedic Pete promotes SAAS to children in a friendly and accessible way at public events and added extra crowd-pulling power to SAAS’s display. “Paramedic Pete proved a hit,” said Gary Wyld, SA Ambulance Service Regional Team Leader for the Lower South East. Children could also collect an apple and giveaways from SAAS, as part of the Blue Yakka Trail. They could even listen to an emergency call on a special phone in the interactive ambulance. People also had the opportunity to talk to volunteer ambulance officers about what it’s like to help

SAAS personnel also attend the field days to provide emergency response if needed, but this year things were very quiet. Only a few very minor treatments were needed.

The South East Field Days is the biggest annual agricultural show in SA. The event covers 16 hectares, includes 580 stands and sees more than 20 000 visitors over the two days. 1. Paramedic Pete with Amanda Carter, Rubin Carter and Alli Wilson 2. Paramedic Pete at the mettwurst stand 3. Desma Jenke, Heather Ryan, Gary Wyld, Michelle Bartlett and Amanda Carter 4. Paramedic Pete with Olivia Wisbey 5. Pete with Smokey and Paddy Platypus

Paramedic Denis Roberts, who attended from Corporate Communications, said while numbers were down because of rain on the Friday, SAAS received plenty of interest on Saturday, particularly from children. “The kids loved the [ambulance] stamp,” he said. “Balloons were very successful.”

4

Amanda Carter, a volunteer ambulance officer at Lucindale, said she was flat-out: staffing the SAAS stand during the day and working at the local pub at night. “It was a very busy weekend,” she said. “I enjoy the field days. It brings a lot of business to the town.” 5

SAAScene

/ APRIL 2014

27


SAAS ONBOARD FOR A GREAT NIGHT OUT

And each time they answered from their personal or ambo perspective.

1

SAAS’ own Simon Leonard, ICP and Shana Brewer, Paramedic recently ‘got on board’ the Sammy D Foundation’s Great Night Out Bloga-Van in support of safe partying messages. After sharing their personal views in street clothes, the pair morphed into uniform and shared their ambo reflections. Each time they were asked: “What makes a great night out?” “What spoils a great night out?” “How to stay safe on a great night out?”

Reflecting on his years as an ambo, Simon said he has seen his fair share of alcohol and drug fuelled violence, and the potential for this to have a life-long impact on those involved. “If we can get young people to adhere to a few simple safety rules, such as 'look out for your friends', we can reduce the incidence of such tragic events,” he said. “It’s a real honour to be involved in a project such as Great Night Out and it was especially touching to meet Sam's mum. “Through enormous personal tragedy she and her husband have created the Sammy D Foundation to ensure that no other parent has to live through what she has; a truly wonderful woman.”

2

28

SAAScene

/ APRIL 2014

In addition to SAAS, SAPol and security industry personnel have also jumped onboard in support of the initiative and shared their own video blogs. Check out Simon and Shana plus the others here What’s the Sammy D Foundation? On 4 May 2008, the lives of one Adelaide family changed forever. They lost their son Sam to a cowardly punch thrown by a gatecrasher at a party. Breaking up a fight that had broken out between the gate-crashers and some of Sam’s friends, he intervened and was knocked unconscious – never to wake up. What his family chose to do with this tragedy was as inspiring as the reality of what happened to them was devastating.


3

Sam’s parents, Nat Cook and Neil Davis are the joint CEOs of the Sammy D Foundation and have committed their lives to the hope of sparing other Australian families the tragedy that hit theirs.

of passage – and one that comes with their friends’ approval. Not surprisingly, when they scratched the surface of this notion and spoke to the peer group, they actually think they’re being idiots.

exterior wrapped in street sprayart by a renowned artist, interior stripped of all school bus traits and transformed into a brightly coloured chill-out zone and, voila! – the ‘Bloga-Van’ was born.

What’s the Great Night Out?

The Great Night Out campaign aims to educate young people on the consequences of alcohol fuelled violence, tackle the drinking culture among young people, and ultimately reduce the number of alcohol fuelled violent incidents in and around late-night venues. At its centrepiece is an eye-catching ‘Blog-a-Van.’

This chill-out zone come mobile film studio is literally ‘taking to the streets’ to capture young people’s thoughts on the consequences of alcohol fuelled violence and turning these into blogs that speak directly to their peers. Overwhelmingly these video blogs are giving voice to peer intolerance for this behaviour and reinforcing that everyone has a right to enjoy a safe night – free from the threat of violence.

In addition to their workshops in schools, sporting clubs and regional communities, the Sammy D Foundation (in partnership with the State Government) has created the Great Night Out. The campaign is in direct response to the chilling research that revealed some young men think getting involved in a fight is a rite

“What’s a Blog-a-Van” I hear you ask? Think recycled Kimba school bus,

Nat Cook and Neil Davis would give anything to get their Sam back – but there’s no hope of that. Their only hope is that their work, and the Sammy D Foundation, can return other kids home safely at the end of a great night out.

4

SAAScene

/ APRIL 2014

1. Simon and Sharna get ready to share their views on a great night out. 2+3. Bus artwork by renowned street spray artists Vans the Omega 4. Simon and Sharna in uniform to talk about things from an ambo perspective 29


THE SAAS FAMILY ALBUM 1. Kerry Wordley with Marilyn Langley from Tanunda Lutheran homes. Marilyn has been an advocate of Call Direct for more than 10 years! 2. Simon Leonard and Shana Brewer monkey around in the Great Night Out bus. 3. Say cheese! Paramedic Intern Group PI114 show us their pearly whites. 4. Dave Tingey cleans up around the MedSTAR base. 5. Stefan Mazur models the new MedSTAR bucket hat. C’est tres chic! 6. On shift: Barb Keller and Robert Morton visit the Mt Barker station

1

2

3

30

SAAScene

/ APRIL 2014


Last month’s CEO column introduced the new Southern Health Alliance involving SAAS, Southern Adelaide Local Health Network (SALHN), Southern Adelaide-Fleurieu-Kangaroo Island Medicare Local (SAFKI) and Health Consumers Alliance of SA.

This project will develop an awareness resource that is designed to inform consumers and health professionals in the SALHN region of available primary health care services (including after hours) that can be utilised as an alternative to ED presentation.

The alliance is all about planning for the future to improve patient flows through the health system.

2. COPD pathways – managing COPD in the community

Three task force groups have been organised with the joint goal of giving back 500 000 hours of quality time to patients. At the last meeting, six projects were presented and SAAS is now actively engaged in two projects.

4

lse Pu

SOUTHERN HEALTH ALLIANCE UPDATE

1. After hours service directory and triage resource Many residents living in the SALHN catchment have a limited understanding of out of hours alternative care options in the metropolitan south region. As a result, it is likely that as an alternative the consumer is unnecessarily presenting (either via SAAS or self-presentation) to the Noarlunga and FMC EDs, instead of appropriately managing their condition through other community resources.

The National Health Performance Authority (HPA) listed a number of chronic conditions for which hospitalisation is considered potentially avoidable. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is one such condition on the list. The aim of this strategy is to develop options for patients and health care professionals to seek advice and implement strategies to manage COPD in a primary care setting. This would include providing training on COPD guidelines and COPD care plan promotion. The SALHN Respiratory Intensive Care Service (RICS) program is already in place and will actively assist in this training, which will include GPs and ECPs. SAAS will also develop a referral pathway for ECPs directly into RICS. This alliance is a positive step towards a more integrated health system in the southern Adelaide catchment. Watch this space for more information as it progresses.

5

6

SAAScene

/ APRIL 2014

31


Pu lse

VECOS:

humans humans HELPING

The official documents about the Volunteer Equity Program and Volunteer Equity Contact Officers (VECOs) reveal a number of keywords and government speak. Delving a little bit deeper into what those words actually mean and you find that those who are VECOs and those who need a VECO, are not about words – they are about people. The list of VECOs seems short, but they reach far and wide. Part of the Employee Assistance Program, VECOs are a dedicated resource for volunteers who need an attentive, caring and confidential ear. Jan Bock, volunteer ambulance officer in Mannum for 19 years, Peer Support Officer and VECO speaks with an extremely ‘human’ insight into what it really means to be able to help people. “When you are faced with tragedy, it forces you to become more compassionate and nonjudgemental,” said Jan, “that is exactly what a VECO must be”.

The official line is: VECOs are trained to listen to the volunteer's grievance, and provide options to assist the volunteer in resolving the issue. Jan thinks it goes a bit further.

SAASnet > Patient Services > Country Patient Services > Volunteer Support Unit > Volunteer Equity

“Often, people contact me for a casual chat. Without having to go through a formal meeting, volunteers can talk about an issue, and have confidence in knowing the conversation is totally private.” VECOs are what Jan calls a “catchment for early intervention”. Volunteers have the opportunity to express their minds; no issue to too minor or foolish. Jan hopes that talking to a VECO can prevent an issue spiralling out of control. This can be done by talking to a VECO and/or referring to a Peer Support Officer or psychologist. “It’s about positive interaction, and assisting people by using a holistic approach.” VECOs are required to go through an application process that will ensure they are the best person for the job, but it doesn’t stop there. VECOs come together for a full-day workshop each year to develop their skills. “Humans are constantly learning; if we don’t share this learning then it is wasted knowledge. It is better to share your knowledge and compassion with someone who can benefit from it,” said Jan.

Jan Bock finds inspiration in these words, we hope you do too: The true meaning of life. We are visitors on this planet. We are here for 90 or 100 years at the most. During that period, we must try to do something good, something useful, with our lives. If you contribute to other people’s happiness, you will find the true goal, the true meaning of life. His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama

32

If you are a volunteer and would like to contact a VECO, please visit:

SAAScene

/ APRIL 2014

SAAS’S VOLUNTEER EQUITY CONTACT OFFICERS ARE: • Jan Bock, Mannum • Louise Clothier, Coomandook/Coonalpyn • Mark Haby, Kingscote • John Holland, Tailem Bend • Greg Joseph, Moonta • Helen Luke, Tailem Bend • Robert Miller, Wallaroo • Peter Nearmy, Tailem Bend • Michael Scott, Middleton


MANAGING STRESS By Dr Joseph Magliaro What is stress? Stress is often described as a feeling of being overloaded, wound up tight, tense and worried. We all experience stress at different times in our life. Depending on the situation, stress can sometimes help motivate us to complete a task or perform well. While stress is not a disease or a mental illness, it can also become harmful if we become over-stressed and if the stress is impacting on everyday life. What are signs of stress? When we experience acute or cumulative stress, our bodies respond by activating the nervous system and releasing hormones such as adrenalin and cortisol. In turn, these hormones cause physical change in our body, which is sometimes referred to as the fight or flight response.

Common symptoms of either acute or cumulative stress include: • headaches • pain and muscle tension • sleep disturbance including insomnia • emotional lability • abdominal discomfort • fatigue • feeling overwhelmed and out of control • difficulty concentrating • low self esteem • lack of confidence Tips on how to manage everyday stress: • Identify warning signs – attempt to understand how you react to stressful situations and what your warning signs are. Everyone is different. • Identify triggers – reflect on what’s caused the stress for you, given a general awareness of triggers, e.g. fatigue due to excessive overtime, deadlines and difficulties maintaining work/life balance may need to be addressed.

SAAScene

/ APRIL 2014

• Establish routines – e.g. regular time for exercise and relaxation, regular meal times, planning ahead to do a particular task or activity leading to a sense of achievement and accomplishment. • Spend time with people you find uplifting – rather than people who continually place excessive or unexpected demands upon you. • Share your thoughts and feelings with others when opportunities arise – don’t bottle up your feelings. • Ensure you eat healthy food and exercise regularly – e.g. a twenty minute walk daily. • Moderate alcohol use • Keep things in perspective avoid over-generalising or catastrophising a particular situation.

33


SAFE WORK ENVIRONMENTS: IDENTIFYING HAZARDS AND RISK MANAGEMENT SAAS is committed to providing a safe work environment by proactively managing hazards and associated risks in the workplace.

Above: Hans Glass from Fleet

To ensure this can be achieved SAAS has implemented mechanisms for identifying hazards, assessing and evaluating the level of risk, determining risk control measures, and monitoring and reviewing work health and safety hazards and risks. Hazard identification is an ongoing process of identifying items, activities and situations or products and services that have the potential to harm a person, the environment or property. There are five key steps in the hazard identification and risk management process:

Step 4: Implement the controls Step 5: Monitor and review the controls Please refer to these Workforce Health documents for more information: • Hazard Identification and Risk Management Policy Directive • Mechanisms for Hazard Identification and Risk Management Procedure • Hazard Identification and Risk Management Documentation Matrix • Hazard Identification and Risk Management Flowchart You can find them here: http://in.health.sa.gov.au/wc/ Default.aspx?tabid=769

Step 1: Identify the hazard Step 2: Assess the risk Step 3: Identify risk controls using the Hierarchy of Control

Risks must be minimised to the lowest reasonably practicable level by taking these measures in the following order. In most cases a combination of these measures are chosen to effectively control the risks.

34

Elimination

Removing the risk in its entirety.

Substitution

Substituting a safer process or material for the hazardous process/material identified.

Engineering

Designing and/or adding physical safety features to plant or equipment.

Administration

Administrative controls are most effective when used in conjunction with measures mentioned above or as an interim control whilst more effective control measures are developed and implemented. May also include the development of policies and procedures.

Use Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

To be used when all other control measures are impractical and in conjunction with other more effective, control measures.

SAAScene

/ APRIL 2014


Accidents can happen anywhere, anytime. What happens when a vehicle accident or emergency happens in a rural or remote area? We all know that SAAS resources are dispatched, but how does SAAS engage rural GPs to assist in an emergency? Previously, rural GPs would attend the sites of these emergencies as part of an ad hoc arrangement. No formal requirements or competencies were mandatory from these GPs and it was a voluntary, unpaid activity. In 2007, Country Health SA (CHSA) created a Rural Emergency Responder Network (RERN) that GPs could join in order to attend out-of-hospital emergencies. This network created a ‘virtual hospital’ where GPs could be engaged as if they were assisting a patient in the hospital’s Emergency Department. The concept allowed the hospital’s Emergency Department to extend its boundaries to encompass patients outside the hospital creating a hospital ‘without walls’. The RERN’s specially trained rural based GPs attend out-of-hospital emergencies in partnership with CHSA, SAAS and the SAAS MedSTAR retrieval service, providing optimal care to patients in rural and remote settings by utilising doctors located throughout rural South Australia. By essentially bringing the hospital to the patient, RERN members are able to thereby accelerate advanced care in an emergency situation. The group of approximately 30 RERN members across the state have current qualifications in emergency medicine and are mobilised in response to pagers from the SAAS Emergency Operations Centre. RERN members can act as a part of the initial response to a SAAS call-out and will usually attend the scene of an incident with a SAAS crew in a SAAS vehicle, providing significant communication and logistical benefits.

Clinical Director of Emergency for the RERN group, Dr Peter Joyner said, “the RERN squad makes an enormous difference. They get there early and can provide extra lifesaving care”. Senior Project Officer Jennifer Smith from CHSA is credited as the 'behind the scenes' specialist who ensures the RERN initiative operates smoothly and efficiently on a daily basis. Jennifer, who is also a qualified emergency RN, publishes a bi-monthly newsletter for members and is the problem solver and administration manager for all the requirements of this vital network. Supported by SAAS Clinical Resources Officer, Bryan Millowick and Stuart Baker from SAAS MedSTAR, this team works to support the RERN group by providing the full equipment packs containing everything needed for use in the field. This equipment is vital for RERN members’ ability to constantly provide the accelerated advanced care required of them in the often critical and time sensitive situations they respond to, treating patients outside of the usual hospital care environment. Organised and supported by the Country Health SA Local Health Network, RERN was recently recognised at the 2013 SA Health Star Awards winning the ‘Building and Strengthening Partnerships’ category.

lse Pu

WORKING TOGETHER: THE RURAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE NETWORK

Policy Framework

The following documents in the policy framework were distributed this month: OPERATIONS INSTRUCTIONS • Change to ketamine formulation • Blood and body fluid exposure PROCEDURES • EOC lock down • Fuel cards (updated) CLINICAL COMMUNICATIONS • Selection, checking and administration of medications • Medication checking and administration • Urgent notice – drug administration • Adenosine SAFETY ALERTS • Phillips MRx safety alert message • Recall MRx • Airbag deployment Mercedes sprinter PUBLIC HEALTH ALERTS • Measles cases • Legionnaires’ disease acquired in Adelaide CBD

Bryan Millowick prepares a pack for RERN

SAAScene

/ APRIL 2014

35


Pu lse 36

SAAScene

/ APRIL 2014


SAAS HITS THE TRACK SAAS crews attended the Clipsal 500 motor race from 27 February – 2 March at Victoria Park. There were the usual few prangs, but nothing that required crews to extricate patients. It was a good opportunity for SAAS to have a highvisibility, positive community presence and a perfect excuse for the crews to get up close and personal with some of the world’s best drivers.

SAAScene

/ APRIL 2014

37


1

SOUTH EAST CREWS PUT THROUGH THEIR PACES A mid-air crash between two planes over Mount Gambier Airport. That was the situation crews from the Limestone Coast were confronted with during a mass casualty exercise on the evening of Tuesday 18 March. With 10 months of planning the exercise ran extremely smoothly and tested the response of multiple agencies. SAPol, MFS, CFS, SES, Mount Gambier Hospital and airport staff were all involved. Although they all knew they would be responding to an incident at the airport, the exact details of the simulation were kept secret. Seven ambulance crews and a commander in light fleet took up the opportunity to be involved, where all patients were triaged, treated and then transported 10 km to the Mount Gambier Hospital. Once patients were handed over to hospital staff, their treatment continued in the emergency department to test the hospital’s ability to cope with a sudden influx of patients.

4

38

The scenario involved two aircraft colliding over the airfield, with one being a small aircraft with three persons on board (POB) and the other a larger commercial aircraft with 10 POB. The aircraft ended up 300 meters apart with the small one on fire. SAAS crews were first to arrive on scene with their arrival times being staggered to simulate the realistic timing of crews responding from stations further out. The casualties included four P1s, two P2s, four P3s and three DOAs.

collection area and safely moving large numbers of patients. Staff members from Keith, Millicent, Mount Gambier, Nangwarry, Penola, Limestone Coast regional admin, and EOC all were involved and the overwhelming feedback was that they loved the exercise and learnt a lot. Everyone involved did a great job and patients were triaged, treated and transported from the incident in a timely and orderly fashion. Andrew Thomas Limestone Coast Operations Manager

All patients received moulage before the event and were briefed about how to role-play by staff from the Flinders University and the Greater Green Triangle University of Rural Health clinical simulation unit. The EOC was also involved in the exercise, with all communications coordinated by EMD Phil Lawson. It’s safe to say all the Country Health SA hospitals in the area were tuned in and listening to the action intently. The field exercise provided a valuable opportunity for crews to practice the SMART Triage System and work together to establish command and control positions across all agencies. It was also good to practice setting up a casualty

Copyright Agency licens (www.copyright.com.au

2

D

Em

3

DISASTE Tuesday a

5

SAAScene

/ APRIL 2014

Ai pl

Ser


lse Pu

, Mt Gambier SA

bier) Border Watch (Mt Gam 20 Mar 2014

6

- Size: 182.00 cm² General News, page 5 : 6,461 (-TWTF--) Regional - Circulation

ID 244369825

ed copy Copyright Agency licens (www.copyright.com.au)

PAGE 1 of 1

BRIEF AMBO_ISS

to test ‘Casualties’ bringg realism

rience ents with on-ground expe ’ provide medical stud Volunteer ‘crash victims had exercise and an educator was on nteers given to A GROUP of 13 volu hand to explain the care later at and bodies their clothes ripped scene and as part of a victims at the ital. seemingly mangled hosp bier Mount Gam y operation ves from large-scale emergenc Two repr esen tati airp ort on travelled at Mou nt Gam bier Simulation Australia y for the ciall Tuesday. espe ario , cre- from Adelaide The ficti onal scen t. ice even serv cy rgen d pati ents ated to test eme late simu ng the “Usi e of ario enawork ers, mea nt thre and the in this disa ster scen d group were to be kille e real istic bles us to repr oduc a collision inin g the reta remainder injured in cond ition s whil e between two planes. controlled envistart until advantages of a h Boyd Sara r The exercise did not inato coord were at the ronment,” 5pm, but volunteers said. e moulage airport from 2pm, wher realism stud ents (wer e) and ff “Sta the task s and was applied to add to able to und erta ke r conditions of their mock injuries. make decisions unde nts” were The “simulated patie ly represent real close more n that Gree ter recruited by the Grea rtment life.” Depa Triangle University T UDRH), of Rural Health (GG District and bier Gam nt the Mou Flin ders Hea lth Serv ice and School,), Mt Gambier SA l Clin Gambier (Mtical Watch Border ersity Rura Univ rgen cy eme d joine h whic of Mar 2014, by Danielle Grindlay all 20 ng out rolli in serv ice agen cies exercise. the training cm² - Size: 1i n d page News, g a n940.00 General s r u n , c i d e m a Par ) er eith(-TWTF-n: 6,461 - Circulatio Regional ents were ical stud med in the obse rvin g or invo lved

sed copy u)

ID 244376128

Copyright Agency licensed copy (www.copyright.com.a u)

airport mergency services prepare for worst at city DANIELLE GRINDLAY

danielle@tbw.com.au

action on Tuesday afternoon as part of the biggest multi-agency training project Mount Gambier has seen. The three-hou r operation involved paid staff and volunteers from the airport, SAPOL, SA

death and volunteers respond to a fictional scene of ER SCENE: Dozens of emergency service staff alight as part of a large-scale training exercise. afternoon, where one of two planes was set

BRIEF AMBO_ISS

PAGE 1 of 1

hierarchy to on-site person nel

WHIL E more than 100 emergency service workers scram bled at Moun Gambier airport on Tuesd t ay, one man sat in a tower , direc ting the organ ised chaos. Adelaide Chief Inspe ctor Dennis Lock could not even see the burni ng plane , dozens of appliances and dying patients that made up a fictional scenario created to test response plans in a large-scale emerg ency operation. He was at the top of a chain of comm and, coordinating two incide nt controllers stationed at separate crash sites who were in turn directing dozen s of Ambulance, SES, CFS, MFS and police commander s. “It’s a certainly a learning curve for everyone and most of it is about comm and AWARD-WIN structure,” Insp Lock said NING: Third-year medic at operation when al student Nina Sandf ord becam the close of the threeshe put in a realistic perfor hour mance as a mother screame the face of the entire exercise. ing for her missing son. got to be done,” he said. “The government decide “We’d be stupid to say police would take charg d it’s e of never going to happen.” these situations becau se A visitor to the Blue Lake they’re the most popul ous city, Insp Lock said he was and have a 24-hour servic e. “very impre ssed” “Naturally the more by the we scale and execu tion of the can practice, the better we’ll exercise. be when something like this “It went really well, happens.” but Each agency held its own you always learn,” he said. “You repeat what went de-briefing after the event followed by an inter-agenc , well and impro ve what y didn’t .” meeting at the hospital with feedback from airport man- THREE DEAD: As part agement and the exerci se the fictional scenario, of director. three volunteer actors were “This is good for the air- found dead by emerg to be port because they’ve ency seen service workers after a our strengths and weak mock two-plane collision nesses, they know what’ s Mount Gambier airpor at t.

Ambulance Service, Country Fire Service, Metropolitan Fire Service, State Emergency Service and Mount Gambier hospital. Continued page 4

and despair at Mount Gambier Airport on

irport emergency action lan put into moc k disaster

rvices put to test during

ID 244369849

Command chain links Ad elaide

DANIELLE GRINDLAY

Disaster plan “THERE is a confirmed crash at Mount Gambier Airport - it appears two planes have collided in the air.” That was the mock radio message that spurred more than 100 emergency service workers into

le Grindlay

General News, page 5 - Size: 356.00 cm² Regional - Circulation: 6,461 (-TWTF--)

PAGE 1 of 3

BRIEF AMBO_ISS

Border Watch (Mt Gamb ier), Mt Gambier SA

20 Mar 2014, by Daniel

SAAScene

1. Crews at the ambulance staging and survivor reception areas 2. Sandra Jones, CTL for Mount Gambier AB team was the Bronze Commander for the incident. 3. Working together: SES volunteers assist SAAS crews at the mock incident. 4. Sandra Jones with Jim Bartlett. 5. Andy Thomas, Limestone Coast Operations Manager was part of the planning team that made the incident possible. 6. Crews work in the casualty clearning station

/ APRIL 2014

39


Pu lse

S WN Women in Leadership: The key to success

SA AMBULANCE SERVICE WOMEN’S NETWORK

In early February 2014, the SAAWN committee presented SAAS women with an opportunity to attend a Progressive Business SA event in which attendees would join Premier Jay Weatherill in welcoming home Julia Gillard for her first Adelaide public address since her departure from politics. The ‘Lunch with Julia’ event allowed attendees to gain an insight into the former Prime Minister’s historic achievements and to also reflect on the important role Julia’s success will provide other women inspiring to be future business and community leaders. To register interest, applicants were asked to submit their ideas around ‘the key to successful women’. The exercise provided great insight into some of SAAS’ female

Above: SAAWN Chair Lorraine Amos

workforce beliefs around the key attributes and characteristics of successful women. Here are excerpts from some of the submissions: “The quote by Julia Gillard, ‘What I am absolutely confident of is it will be easier for the next woman and the woman after that and the woman after that. And I'm proud of that’ is something that resonates very strongly with me. I believe that this statement highlights that ALL women can achieve success in leadership roles regardless of their age, experience, religion etc.” – Emily Thorne “While sexism is a dying breed, it is still something myself, and I am sure many other women, encounter, particularly as we progress to positions of greater responsibility and leadership. I am far from political, but Julia Gillard is someone I have always admired. She was continually shot down by the media and even other colleagues, but always seemed to deal with whatever was thrown her way with stoicism and grace. As I move up my career more and more, I look to people like Julia as an inspiration, and hope that I will be able to provide inspiration to others one day too.” – Kathryn Mason

40

SAAScene

/ DECEMBER 2013


“The key to success in my opinion has a lot to do with relationships, commitment and a passion for what you are doing. Success is also different for each individual. It is important to build then retain healthy relationships with your peers, mentors and other people of influence in your life. These relationships help with your knowledge but most importantly with the confidence to take that next step.” – Kylie-Jo Prior “I think women give great consideration to the burdens they carry before making the move into more senior roles, for example it may be that as a woman we tend to take on the larger share of domestic responsibilities. For some women this can be the ‘make or break’ in making that decision to keep reaching for success in leadership. What we need is the confidence in our capacity to carry the load to reap those rewards and to remember that ‘popularity is temporary; respect is timeless’.” – Leeann Faddoul SAAWN selected Kathryn Mason and Kylie-Jo Prior to attend the event and they gave some excellent feedback. Kylie-Jo Prior said after attending the lunch: “Lunch last Wednesday with Julia Gillard was amazing. Jay Weatherill gave a great speech about working with Julia and said she was fair and heard everyone’s comments no matter who you were. Julia was great, she spoke about how it still matters what women wear and it shouldn’t. Julia said, ‘After being at an international NATO meeting talking about our troops in Afghanistan, the media in Australia reported on what colour jacket and pants she was wearing’. Highlighting woman are still judged on what we wear. She urged woman to take up politics and not be put off by the way she was treated, the more woman the more change we will achieve.” – Kylie-Jo Prior

Women in Services: Health and Wellbeing Forum On 17 February 2014, Lorraine Amos, General Manager, Metropolitan Emergency Operations, was asked to sit on a panel at the University of Adelaide’s Centre for Traumatic Stress Studies and The Repat Foundation’s Women in Services Health and Wellbeing Forum. The event was held at the National Wine Centre and was developed with the aim to set the agenda for research into the health and wellbeing of Australia’s servicewomen over the coming decade. The event succeeded in bringing together established and emerging leaders to share knowledge and expertise, develop collaborative networks, and ultimately shape the future of research into the health and wellbeing of women across the services in Australia. Attendees included representatives from the Navy, Army and Air Force, as well as State Emergency Services, Ambulance Services, South Australia Police and the Metropolitan Fire Service. The forum also hosted a number of thought leaders in this field from national and international government agencies and departments, academia and the community. The expert discussion panels focussed on four key pillars: female workforce capability; female health; support for women and families; and female veteran/service identity. Participants engaged in cutting-edge discussions which will be published as part of the forum proceedings.

Future opportunities The SAAWN Committee are always on the hunt for great opportunities to offer our members. In the past we have sent people to conferences, training and events with high profile guest speakers. If you know of an event that you feel encompasses the SAAWN values and mottos of empowering women, career development and work life balance, send in your suggestions to Health:SAAS SAAWN Communication.

Top: General Rhonda Cornum presenting Above (L – R): Kathryn Mason, Former Prime Minister of Australia Julia Gillard, and Kylie-Jo Prior

Keynote speaker, Retired Brigadier General Rhonda Cornum, spoke about her personal experiences as a servicewoman and female veteran, and her involvement in large scale health surveillance planning and implementation in the United States Department of Defence. Several academic presentations focussed on the current state of knowledge regarding the health and wellbeing of Australia’s servicewomen and female veterans. Forum presentations and outcomes will be published in the near future. We will let you know where you can find them if you are interested.

SAAScene

/ DECEMBER 2013

41


SAAS CONSCIENCE SAAS LENDS A HAND TO TOP DOGS On average, Australians upgrade or exchange their mobile phones every 18-24 months, and it’s estimated there are more than 22 million unused mobile phones in Australia. Around 60 per cent of these have resale value as a refurbished phone, while the rest can be recycled. SAAS has a firm commitment to reducing our environmental footprint. As part of that commitment, the SAAS Conscience Council collected and donated more than 540 mobile phones in March this year. The phones were given to FoneFund, which will

42

re-home most of these into OECD countries where they will continue to be used. Approximately $4 000 was raised through this process, with the money donated to Guide Dogs SA/ NT to continue their excellent work in changing the lives of people with disabilities. This exercise was part of the SAAS Conscience Strategic Charity Initiative where SAAS partners with one state and one national charity each financial year, to provide assistance and build stronger community relations. This donation of phones was just one activity undertaken in partnership with Guide Dogs SA/NT; a partnership that has also resulted in improved understanding regarding the SAAS transportation of medical assistance

SAAScene

/ APRIL 2014

dogs. The other (national) charity is beyondblue, and the Council has been actively promoting beyondblue activities, such as Movember and Mental Health Week. The donation of these phones not only assisted a great charity to continue its work in the community, but also allowed SAAS to rehome many old phones that were obsolete. The partnership with Guide Dogs runs until 30 June 2014, and if you wish to contribute you can send you old phones to the SAAS Conscience Council, c/o OCEO: 216 Greenhill Road, Eastwood. There is also a large plastic Guide Dog in the foyer of the building for those wishing to make a cash donation.


lse Pu

Environmental facts and figures • The big energy users and greenhouse gas emitters in offices are lights and computers. Switching them off when they're not needed will save more energy than all your other actions put together. • Lighting and office equipment also produce a lot of heat - they account for up to 15% of your air conditioning energy costs and greenhouse gas emissions. • Power management is a great way to make sure your computer sleeps when you're not using it - but only if you set it for a short delay time, like 10 minutes. Longer delay settings like 30 minutes are hardly worth the effort. • Screen savers don't save energy they save screens. • You can just about halve the power used by your LCD monitor by setting it to run on low brightness (20 Watts compared with 34 Watts on full brightness).

• A tonne of recycled paper saves 13 trees, 2.5 barrels of oil, 31,780 litres of water, 4 tonnes CO2 and 4 m3 of landfill.

Resources: http://www.abc.net. au/greenatwork/yourwork/facts. htm and http://www.ozharvest.org/ ourimpact.asp?pageID=611

• Old mobile phones don’t die – they just leach heavy metals into our waterways. Contact SAAS Conscience to donate your old phones today. • Over-catering by providing too much food in forms that cannot be stored for later use adds to the 'embodied' emissions of food. And if the food waste is dumped in landfill, it will generate more greenhouse gas. Each kilogram of food disposed of to landfill generates the equivalent of 0.9 kg CO2. • Australians discard up to 20% of the food they purchase = 1 out of every 5 bags of groceries they buy • 24 to 35% of school lunches end up in the bin.

Left: Just a few phones Simon Nankivell from the Corporate Comms team was on hand to donate the phones, along with Guide Dog Tango. A photographer from the Messenger took some pics to promote the initiative to the community!

SAAScene

/ APRIL 2014

43


Pu lse Nicole goes for gold

NICOLE LIFTS THE WORLD Nicole Chamberlain, Paramedic West A, recently competed in the World Cup Masters Weightlifting Championships. Not only did she win in the competition, she also broke a world record! Here is her story…

VOLUNTEER WORKFORCE PLANNING Volunteers may remember that in July last year the VSU sent questionnaires out to all volunteers and team leaders seeking feedback on your experiences as a volunteer with SAAS. We received: • • •

481 responses [33.6%] from the volunteer workforce 47 responses [55%] from the VTLs 17 responses [85%] from the RTLs

These responses have been analysed and we are close to producing a report which will include summaries of these findings,

44

In November last year, I travelled to Penang in Malaysia to compete in the World Cup Masters Weightlifting Championships. The event ran in conjunction with the Commonwealth Championships, with a total of 500 athletes. It was one of the biggest weightlifting competitions ever held in Malaysia. On the day of my competition, I was feeling pretty relaxed but excited to be on the international stage again. The venue was very different to Australian venues; the warm up areas were undercover but outdoors. The weather was very hot and humid, so many athletes from colder climates found it had an impact on their lifts.

Even though, I swung the bar a little, I managed to hold the weight and was successful. Victory was mine! To say that I was happy would be an understatement. Next were ‘clean and jerks’ and I opened with 82kg. I went on to successfully lift 86kg. My final attempt was 88kg, which I managed to clean, but was failed on a technicality for a press out by the jury. My total placed me 3rd overall best lifter in Penang, and I was ecstatic with the results of the competition – a personal best of 159kg, a gold medal for Australia and a new world record secured!

I was in the Age 35-44 Category, competing against six athletes. I opened my campaign with 67kg snatch, which I lifted easily. I then jumped to 70kg, with another successful lift. I then nominated 73kg on the bar for my final attempt. If I could lift this, there would be a gold medal and a new Masters World Record!

Thank you to SAASfit for their support in helping me get to Penang.

a summary of exit volunteer surveys and individual reports for each volunteer station.

strong picture of the issues facing volunteers at each station and will be able to develop strategies for addressing these issues.

We have taken notice of what has been said and have already put in place training for VTLs and followed up on some concerns that have been raised by volunteers. Thank you for giving your time to complete these questionnaires or talk to us about your volunteering. The results of the surveys will also be used to help develop a workforce plan for the volunteer sector which will consolidate data from a range of sources, including workload data, rostering, volunteer recruitment and exit numbers. At the end of this project SAAS will have a

SAAScene

/ APRIL 2014

Nicole Chamberlain World Champion and World Record Holder!

If you would like more information about the project please contact Mercedes Iasiello on 8274 0379.


1. Internal load levelling – redistribution of patients between hospitals within a Local Health Network (LHN). As an interim measure whilst waiting on software updates this will appear as a “Local Divert” on your MDT.

HNC AND LOAD LEVELLING EXPLAINED… The Health Network Coordinator (HNC) in the EOC is responsible for metropolitan patient flow co-ordination between the hours of 7am and 12am. There are three ways in which this is facilitated: Normal Distribution (ND), Internal Load Levelling (ILL) and Metropolitan Load Levelling (MLL). The HNC’s role during the process of ND is to guide ambulances to present evenly across the State’s metropolitan hospital EDs, proactively managing potential surges in ambulance presentations. Outside of the ND process, there will be times when acute increases in hospital activity will require ambulance flow to be more actively managed by the HNC through the processes of ILL or MLL.

HAVE YOU GOT A STORY FOR SAASCENE?

2. Metro load levelling – redistribution of patients to hospitals across a neighbouring LHN. As an interim measure whilst waiting on software updates this will appear as a “Total Divert” on your MDT. 3. DIVERSION – DOES NOT APPLY during HNC operational hours and may only be initiated in an effort to manage chronic ED access block after HNC hours. After hours hospital diversions must be authorised by the SAAS State Duty Manager. There are three LHNs in the metropolitan area – Northern Adelaide: LMH and MOHO; Central Adelaide: RAH and QEH; and Southern Adelaide: FMC and NHS. There are a number of reasonably predictable triggers that will signify an increase in demand and therefore herald a potential risk to ambulance flow and our ability to continue to respond to community demand within SAAS’s established timeframes.

Don’t forget to include a photograph with your SAAScene article admission. Now that SAAScene is online, photos maketh the article! Submitting a photo will mean your article has a higher chance of being published and read.

SAAScene

/ APRIL 2014

Timely recognition of these triggers together with discussion between the HNC and the affected hospital may enable the activation of appropriate load levelling processes, with it being generally understood that ILL will occur as an initial effort to manage demand within a LHN, and MLL being subsequently initiated when it has been identified that ILL has reached the maximum effort. At this time crews will often be contacted via MDT Update or Direct Page and provided with advice regarding a hospital’s status or encouraged to ring the HNC so that crews can discuss appropriate ED access. It is important to note that an activated load levelling event does not automatically exclude a patient from attending a congested ED, with a crew’s clinical judgement being paramount in this process. All crews should put ‘SAAS HNC, 1300 117 362’ into the speed dial of fleet phones. Please also ensure you are familiar with the Policy Directive (you can access it via the SAASnet homepage under Quick Links). If you work out of a station where you have the potential to attend one of the metropolitan hospitals identified above, it’d be a good idea to print off a copy and place it at the station for everyone to read.

It’s as simple as that. Articles and photos can be submitted to Corporate Communications at saasnews@health.sa.gov.au

45


1

SAAS ‘RAMBOS’ RELAY FOR CANCER SUFFERERS The 2014 Cancer Council Limestone Coast Relay for Life was held in Mount Gambier on 15-16 March with 38 teams walking a baton around the Blue Lake sports park for 19 hours. Relay for Life is an incredible overnight event that is an opportunity for family, friends and colleagues to get together with the community and celebrate cancer survivors, remember loved ones lost to cancer, and fight back against a disease that takes too much.

even 15mm of rain couldn’t dampen the spirits and enthusiasm of those involved. The event is aimed at raising money to support those going through their cancer journey and remembering those who we have lost to this disease. This year had particular relevance because everyone in the team knows someone currently undergoing cancer treatment or remembering someone who has recently passed away. The team baton was a teddy bear affectionately named 'Saasy' which had a handmade uniform, personally embroidered by one of the Nangwarry volunteers. The baton completed every lap and received the prize for best team baton. 'Saasy' was auctioned off at the end of the event to a good home which raised more money for the team. The team banner was also made by one of the volunteers and definitely made everyone aware that SAAS was involved! The event was a great opportunity to promote SAAS while building and strengthening relationships between staff members from the teams across the Limestone Coast.

The SAAS Rambos team had been involved with the previous two relays and was proud to fly the SAAS flag again this year. The team consisted of volunteers and career staff members from the Penola, Nangwarry and Mount Gambier teams. In typical SE fashion, the weather was wet and wild throughout the whole event, but 2

3

46

4

SAAScene

/ APRIL 2014

The day and night were filled with walking, quizzes, walking, games, walking, live band entertainment, walking, and even Andrew Illman competing in the Miss Relay for Life contest. While he didn't win, he looked very sporty in the swim wear. Oh, and did I mention the walking? The team raised nearly $8 000 of the $110 000 raised for the entire event. The main fundraising was an auction of donated goods held in Penola in late February and was organised and conducted by the Penola team. Huge thanks the SAAS Rambos team members, those who assisted with the fundraising and support of the team, and those other staff members who just dropped in during the event to walk a lap or three and give the team members a break. Andrew Thomas Limestone Coast Operations Manager 1. Ali Wilson and Simone Cornelius 2. Rob Jenner, Simone Cornelius, Andrew Thomas, Kobie Thomas and Andrew Ilman 3. Simone Cornelius, Andrew Thomas and Andrew Ilman with the prize for best baton, ‘Saasy’ 4. Andrew Thomas and Ali Wilson


Some of you may not know this, but before Entonox and Penthrox, the self-administered analgesic we used was Trilene. Trilene was originally developed by Imperial Chemical Industries (ICI) in 1920 as a solvent called trichloroethylene (TCE). It was used, amongst other things, as a degreaser and to decaffeinate coffee. Then, in 1941, after a study showed that TCE was effective as an anaesthetic, ICI developed a purified version of the chemical, which it called Trilene. It was available in 6 ml ampoules, the necks of which could be broken and the fumes inhaled through the nostrils. Trilene resembled chloroform in its effects on the patient, but was less toxic and less potent.

ANOTHER WORKPLACE BENEFIT FROM MAXXIA DON’T GET TAKEN FOR A RIDE

Incidentally, although Trilene was less toxic than chloroform, it was found that when it was used in a carbon dioxide (soda lime) absorbing system, it produced phosgene—a substance also known as mustard gas and used during World War I. Trilene was used as an anaesthetic during World War II and was also developed for assault landing troops as a self-administered analgesic in the form of a Trilene-soaked wool plug in a Benzedrine nasal inhaler. This unit was highly successful in relieving short-term pain. After World War II, in 1947, Dr John Hayward-Butt, a South African anaesthetist, published in The Lancet an article describing a hand-held instrument (called the Hayward-Butt inhaler) to be used with Trilene as an analgesic device. It consisted of a metal tube, cotton wick and spring-loaded ampoule. When the tapered and hollow nasal nozzle was pushed down to break the ampoule, the cotton wick was soaked with the Trilene.

lse Pu

FROM SOLVENT TO ANAESTHETIC TO ANALGESIC

Patients were shown how to use the inhaler by waving it under their noses to get used to the smell and then placing it into one nostril, while closing the other with the index finger, and then slowly breathing through the nose.

Trilene was used on ambulances in South Australia until the introduction of Entonox in 1978. References: 1. http://en.wikipedia.org/ wikiTrichloroethylene , accessed February 2014 2. The Lancet, Vol. 250, Issue 6485, 13 December 1947 (Originally published as Vol. 2, Issue 6485) 3. Manual of Ambulance Transport Nursing, St John Ambulance Brigade, SA District Inc.,1966

In Australia, the Trilene HaywardButt inhaler was introduced onto ambulances in 1963 by The St John Ambulance Brigade as a trial.

The team at Maxxia understand that when you’re shopping for a car, it can sometimes feel like you’re being taken for a ride. So why not let them take care of it for you, so you can enjoy that new car feeling – and you could save on tax! All you have to do is contact Maxxia with the make, model and colour and they can take care of the rest. Your dedicated Maxxia leasing consultant can: • find the car you want and arrange a test drive – no Saturdays spent scouring car yards

SAAScene

/ APRIL 2014

• use our buying power to negotiate a great deal – no haggling with salespeople • organise finance approval and insurance – no need for multiple phone calls • set a payment plan for your lease and running costs – made easier with a handy fuel card • organise your after sales care – our qualified mechanics can review and authorise work on your car so you don’t get taken for a ride by paying for things you don’t need. Get the car you want. Call Maxxia today on 1300 123 123.

47


SAPES GAMES IT’S NOT TOO LATE TO GET INVOLVED! Want to improve your athletic skills and play one of the coolest sports going around? Get some mates together and limber up – dodge ball is on the official sports list for this year’s South Australian Police & Emergency Services (SAPES) Games! So dust of your copies of the movie namesake and start practising the five ‘Ds’ of dodge ball – dodge, duck, dip, dive and .. dodge! The SAPES Games kicked off in March and runs until late May. Dodge ball is one of the many sports still open for entries. If you’re interested in participating in any SAPES Games event, you’ll be even more interested to know that SAASfit will reimburse you the $25 registration fee (not including the sporting fees). Please send the registration invoice and reimbursement form to SAASfit via email – SAASSAASfit@health. sa.gov.au or internal mail – ‘SAASfitEastwood’. Also, don’t forget to represent SAAS while you’re competing. SAASfit has sporting attire including t-shirts, singlets, shorts and socks available to wear for the event. Head to www.sapes.com.au to register and for more information about the games or contact Adam Zerner, SAAS Exercise Pysiologist, on adam.zerner@health.sa.gov.au or 8274 0812 if you have any questions.

SPORTS STILL TO COME IN THIS YEAR’S SAPES GAMES

Saturday 3 May, 2014 0930 Shooting – Rifle, Monarto Metalic Silhouette Rifle Club, Monarto

0900 Lawn Bowls (Finals), Marion Bowling Club, Sturt Rd, Marion

Thursday 8 May, 2014 Sunday 4 May, 2014 0600 Angling, Pt Hughes, Boat Ramp, Port Hughes 0900 Stair Race, Wakefield House, Wakefield St, Adelaide

Monday 5 May, 2014 0900 Lawn Bowls (Fours), Marion Bowling Club, Sturt Rd, Marion

1200 Cue Sports, Chalkers 8-Ball, 112 Jetty Rd, Glenelg

Friday 9 May, 2014 1200 Cue Sports, Chalkers 8-Ball, 112 Jetty Rd, Glenelg 0800 Golf, Tea Tree Gully Golf Club, Fairview Park

Monday 12 May, 2014 Tuesday 6 May, 2014 0900 Dodge Ball, ICA Sportworx, 1 Stepney St, Stepney 0900 Lawn Bowls (Pairs), Marion Bowling Club, Sturt Rd, Marion

0830 Basketball (day one), Wayville Stadium, Rose Tce, Goodwood

Tuesday 13 May, 2014 0830 Basketball (day two), Wayville Stadium, Rose Tce, Goodwood 0900 Soccer (day one), Barratt Tce, West Beach, Adelaide Shores

Look out for the June edition of SAAScene for a SAAS medal tally and list of winners so you can see where we’ve scored goals (literally, in some cases) and which sports you should start training for next year so we can bring home the bacon!

48

Wednesday 7 May, 2014

SAAScene

/ APRIL 2014


SAASVHAC – SERVING OUR VOLLIES

Wednesday 14 May, 2014 0900 Cross Country, Belair National Park, Upper Sturt Rd, Blackwood

Thursday 15 May, 2014 0900 Shotgun (Trap & Skeet) State Shooting Park, Pt Wakefield Rd, Virginia 0900 Soccer (day two), Barratt Tce, West Beach, Adelaide Shores

Friday 16 May, 2014 0830 Indoor Volleyball, MARS Sporting Complex, Ascot Ave, Marden

Tuesday 20 May, 2014 0900 Soccer (day three), Barratt Tce, West Beach, Adelaide Shores

Thursday 22 May, 2014 0900 Soccer (final) Barratt Tce, West Beach, Adelaide Shores

SAAS Volunteer Health Advisory Council (SAASVHAC) met on 7 February to talk all things volunteer related. For those of you who don’t know, SAASVHAC exists to provide advice about and advocate for SAAS volunteers. What is SAASVHAC? SAASVHAC provides advice to the Minister for Health, usually through our CEO Robert Morton, on ambulance service matters that impact ambulance volunteers. SAASVHAC advocates for SAAS volunteers and also works closely with the SAAS Executive Director Emergency Operations. SAASVHAC ensures strong links are maintained between the ambulance volunteer community, local country communities and SAAS. There are a total of 14 SAASVHAC representatives drawn from seven different zones around the state. These representatives serve two year terms and represent all of the needs, wants and issues raised by vollies in their region.

• • •

that CRRT and VRRT volunteers receive reimbursements to the same level as any volunteer who does a shift at a station that is not their home station ICT upgrades and the need for ICT issues to be raised directly with the eHealth Systems Service Desk updates to the 2015 CDPs so they will be more manageable.

Want to get involved? To learn more about SAASVHAC, check out meeting minutes and to find out who your local representatives are go to: SAAS Intranet > Patient Services > Country Patient Services > Volunteer Support Unit > Volunteer Communities > SAASVHAC All SAAS volunteers can have a voice through SAASVHAC by suggesting topics for discussion through their local SAASVHAC representative. Meeting minutes are posted on SAASnet, discussed at local Zone Meetings and given to VTLs to pass onto all volunteers.

What happened in February’s meeting? SAASVHAC formally meets every two months to discuss items raised by volunteers. During February’s meeting SAASVHAC discussed: • making sure equipment in ambulances is in standard locations • the need for all qualified volunteers to wear epaulettes • training requirements for WHS trainers • honorarium payments for exceptional volunteers • a stretcher injury incident and the need to follow WHS procedures • the need to lock fleets for security

SAAScene

/ APRIL 2014

49


A humble award recipient, Lou says the days’ successes are a team effort with lots of behind the scenes planning to make them possible. “It makes me proud to represent the community the way I do and work with the other emergency services. Even the major crash unit make effort to come and it’s great to have the privilege to work alongside these people and to share the passion of providing an emergency response within our communities,” Lou said.

COORONG VOLUNTEER RECOGNISED Coomandook/Coonalpyn Volunteer Training Coordinator Lou Clothier is used to giving back to her community through her volunteering with SAAS. However, Lou is also extremely passionate about community education and has been the driving force behind a series of mock vehicle crashes to educate young drivers about what can go wrong on the road. Lou has taken her ‘day of road safety’ to area schools around the Murraylands, Murray Mallee and Coorong, and received a commendation letter from Premier Jay Weatherill acknowledging her work.

Lou has been a volunteer ambulance officer for 15 years and has been organising mock crash days for a decade. Students from schools at Coomandook, Lameroo, Murray Bridge, Karoonda, Meningie and many others have all taken part in at least one crash demonstration which is run every three years. “I’ve had a really positive reaction to the sessions, kids come up to me – sometimes years later – saying I still remember what you showed us and it makes me think about how I drive and who I jump into a car with. That’s the most rewarding part,” she said.

“Your contribution in the organisation of a mock crash demonstration for secondary school students has made a real impact in promoting road safety in South Australia,” Premier Weatherill said in his letter. The mock emergencies allow all emergency services to demonstrate their role in crashes and drama students assist by acting as patients and distressed relatives to make the events as realistic as possible.

50

SAAScene

/ APRIL 2014

“We make it as realistic as possible, to deliberately make it confronting for students, parents and teachers alike. Last time SAPol put the driver in handcuffs and the whole audience went completely silent. We also use the actual parent of the young person who is declared dead on scene to identify the body, so there is a personal impact.” “We also get a speaker from an insurance company to come to out and discuss the financial cost of being involved in a crash. That can surprise a lot of people.” “I’m so thankful of all the SAAS and other emergency service volunteers who come out, it’s good that it’s a massive training exercise for them and it’s also a good community relations experience for everyone.” Mike Holland, Coomandook/ Coonalpyn VTL, says he’s proud of the work Lou does for the community and that she is well respected in her team, neighbouring teams and the community as a whole.


MEDIA RAP-UP

Border Watch (Mt Gambier), Mt Gambier SA

Headline News

07 Feb 2014

What else has been happening on the media front?

Editorials, page 8 - Size: 43.97 cm² Regional - Circulation: 6,708 (-TWTF--)

Copyright Agency licensed copy (www.copyright.com.au)

ID 235926550

Children left unaccompanied in cars February 2014: SAAS provided a spokesperson for a joint press conference and ad hoc media opportunities throughout February on radio and for print media after three young children were found left Gary Wyld, Regional Team Leader, in cars in separate incidents over a South Region, was interviewed on three week period. Key messages regional radio about recruitment for highlighted the risks of leaving additional volunteers to assist local Copyright Agency licensed copy (www.copyright.com.au) children of any age, especially crews in the south east, explaining infants, unattended in vehicles and the training process and plans to try the extreme difference in temperature and set up weekly training in Mount between the outside and inside Gambier (ABC South East, 18 February Copyright Agency licensed of vehicles overcopy even the shortest 2014). (www.copyright.com.au) period of time, along with a child’s In a recent radio interview, Maree inability to manage their own body Geraghty, CEO, Country Health temperatures accordingly. SA, praised young people being The search is on for more recognised for their role in health volunteers. They are the life blood care, she credited Chloe Slarks, a of communities - men and women paramedic intern at Mount Gambier who give up their time for free to Ambulance Station, with creating a help fight fires, crew ambulances program to teach children CPR while or generally lend a helping hand. studying Bachelor of Paramedic Terry Whales, General Manager Science at Mount Gambier (ABC South South Region, was interviewed East, 25 March 2014). recently encouraging members of the local community to join SAAS as a volunteer ambulance officer. Part of a current recruitment initiative, this program has also been supported in statements to regional newspapers SAAS MedSTAR’s new Registrars by various Regional Team Leaders have been learning to how to across the state (ABC News, 17 February safely retrieve and carry seriously Copyright Agency licensed copy (www.copyright.com.au) 2014 and ABC Online, 21 February 2014). ill patients in all kinds of situations. The students are all senior doctors Patients in Robe would have been and nurses. While helicopter is their surprised to know at times they most recognised form of transport were being treated by CEO, Robert the group also uses fixed-wing planes Morton. Robert is a qualified and road ambulances (Channel 9, 6 intensive care paramedic, who February 2014). spent some time in Robe to offer his services over the Australia Chris Cotton, intensive care Day weekend with his Executive paramedic, gives advice on treatment Assistant, Barb Keller, who is also a for a snake bite. The story was volunteer ambulance officer (891 ABC prompted by an increase in snake

Tell it on the radio

BRIEF AMBO_MENT

Border Watch (Mt Gambier), Mt Gambier SA 07 Feb 2014

Islander, Kingscote SA 12 Feb 2014 General News, page 1 - Size: 613.19 cm²

- Circulation: 6,708 (-TWTF--) GuardianRegional Messenger, Adelaide

Copyright Agency licensed copy (www.copyright.com.au)

06 Mar 2014 ID 235901770

BRIEF AMBO_MENT

Letters, page 9 - Size: 67.57 cm² ID 236686540 BRIEF AMBO_MENT Regional - Circulation: 1,588 (---T--

ID 240498325

BRIEF AMBO

Chance to help

Dear Editor, Dear Editor, Volunteer ambulance Students to the rescue offic Kangaroo Island have respon 393 cases in the past year. Thes ranged from High plans to life-threatening save lives gencies to simply helping an e person up off the floor at night fall. It’s varied, but all is an es service to the community. Southern Times Messenger, Adelaide However, volunteers 05 Mar 2014, by Amelia our Broadstock humble and matter-of-fact th General News, page 1 - Size: 360.34 cm² sure many islanders Suburban - Circulation: 69,320 (--W----) are no aware of this great work. We n let people know about it thou ID 240308696 BRIEF AMBO_MENT cause more volunteers are need We have 43 ambulance volu at Kingscote, Parndana, Am River and Penneshaw. They their time to ensure the islan ambulance coverage 24 hours a They do a fantastic job, do me wrong. But more voluntee needed now to continue this li SA Ambulance ing work. The only prerequisit enlightens that you have children a driver’s licence caring person and have some t help your community. All train provided free by SA Ambulance ice . If you are interested or have tions, please call me on 0429 99 visit www.saambulance.com.au the volunteer hotline 1800 655 Michael Berden - Reg Team Leader, Kangaroo I Murray Valley Standard (Murray Bridge), Murray Bridge SA 06 Mar 2014 General News, page 2 - Size: 139.71 cm² Regional - Circulation: 3,546 (-T--F--)

Copyright Agency licensed copy (www.copyright.com.au)

ID 240498453

BRIEF AMBO_MENT

A day in the heat

Adelaide, 4 February 2014 and Coast Leader, 19 February 2014)

1 of 1

Backtotohishis roots Back roots Back to his roots

PAGE 1

06 Mar 2014

SA Ambulance Service CEO Robert Morton spent Copyright Agency licensed copy the Australia (www.copyright.com.au)

Day weekend getting back to his volunteer roots with the SA Ambulance team in Robe.

Not only was Mr Morton able to see joint Citizen of the Year and SA Ambulance volunteer Michelle Everett accept her award, but also witness SA Ambulance volunteer Gary Thomas receive a mayoral award for his long term commitment to the Robe community. “Being from Ireland, the Australia Day celebrations were new to me,” said Mr Morton. “But it was a great experience and I was very proud as CEO to see locals Michelle Everett and

General News, page 27 - Size: 335.45 cm² patients in the Robe area. Michelle Everett and 3,227 Regional - Circulation: (-T-T---) “It was a great opportuGary Thomas honoured, along with many other nity to work with the local SAAS staff members team and the local GP Dr ID the 240579140 BRIEF David AMBO_MENT Senior,” he said. around State.” “I hope we made some Mr Morton enjoyed his time in Robe and said it positive impacts on those was an opportunity for patients.” him to do two things. Mr Morton said it was “One was to get back to important for him to see my volunteer roots and what was happening first the second was to help hand on the ground and out the local team and how his SAAS colleagues directly care for patients, were getting on - both in which I love doing,” he terms of the volunteer said. community and career “We have a system at staff members. SAAS where because “For me as CEO I need of the 10-fold increase to keep in touch with in population in Robe what’s happening,” he we position additional said. resources in the Robe “Robe is just one of area every year to sup- the many stations in the port our existing crews State I’ve been to and it who do a wonderful job was great to see the local down there.” ambulance volunteers During the visit Mr doing such amazing work. Morton responded to nine “I’m also getting a patients in the Robe area. chance to see, first-hand,

chance to see, first-hand, what patients have to say about the high-quality care we give to them.” Mr Morton is an inten- PAGE 1 of 2 sive care paramedic with SAAS and he said it was important for him to maintain his clinical practice. For this reason he intends to get out on the road at least once a month in his own time and work with crews in country and metropolitan SA. “The local community in Robe and the entire region was extremely friendly,” said Mr Morton. “It was reassuring to see the local ambulance volunteers held in such high regard by the community.”

Back to his roots

Back to his roots

14 February 2014).

PAGE 1 of 1

“That is why a re-elected out of hospital. AN AMBULANCE base Opposition health next to the existing helipad at Labor government would Adelaide Airport could save move SAAS MedSTAR closer spokesman Rob Lucas said up to nine minutes when a to the helipad, so people in the South Australian Liberals helicopter is used in an emer- regional and remote areas of were sympathetic to the value gency and save regional South the State who are very seri- of locating SAAS MEDStar Australian lives, according to ously ill or injured are seen team closer to Adelaide sooner.” the State Labor government. Airport but have not been proForty per cent of vided with the detailed busiPremier Jay Weatherill announced Labor, if re-elect- MedSTAR’s work, providing ness case. ed, would build an $11 million care to the critically ill or “If successful on March 15, base for the SA Ambulance injured 24-seven, is performed a Liberal government will Service (SAAS) MedSTAR by helicopter. assess the proposal within the team to reduce the time it parameters imposed by the MedSTAR also conducts South East Coastal Leader, Kingston SA Southern Times Messenger, Adelaide wasted travelling on busy Labor government’s $14 biltransfers back to rural and 05 Feb 2014 main roads. facilities for paedi- lion debt and a $1 billion 05 Marinterstate 2014, by Amelia Broadstock “It currently takes an aver- General atric and neonatal patients on deficit,” he said. News, page 2 - Size: 252.40 cm² “(The Liberals) would (also) a regular basis. - Size: age of 15 minutes from when Regional - Circulation: (--W----) General News, page 1 1,174 360.34 cm² Labor would also spend provide $60 million to the the SAAS MedSTAR team is Suburban - Circulation: 69,320 another $5.8 million over(--W----) four Regional Development Fund first activated until the heliCopyright Agency licensed copy in starting BRIEF a community copter is ready to leave from IDyears (www.copyright.com.au) 235641744 AMBO_MENT to improve infrastructurePAGE the current AusHeli premis- paramedics program to keep regional South Australia.” Copyright Agency licensed copy as many people as possible es,” he said. (www.copyright.com.au) ID 240308696 BRIEF AMBO_MENT out ofNews, hospital. “That is why a re-electedWhyalla Whyalla SA

On the big screen

hatchlings at this time of year, initiating warnings for people to be on the lookout for snakes (Channel 9,

PAGE 1 of 2

General News, page 9 - Size: 63.22 cm² Suburban - Circulation: 70,495 (--W----)

SA Ambulance CEO Robert Morton (right) with Robe’s joint Citizen of the Year and SA Ambulance Service

volunteer Michelle on Australia Dayambulance in Robe. HEART MONITOR: Charli-Rose Douglas had her heart rateEverett monitored by the officers who visited Story Time last week.

Whyalla Public Library welcomed the SA Ambulance Service to its pre-school Story Time sessions last week. The visit from the SA Ambulance Service was part of the library’s community engagement program with the aim of educating the public, especially children, about Whyalla’s emergency and rescue service organisations. Previous visitors to Story Time have included members of the SA Police, SA Fire Service and Whyalla Surf Lifesaving Club. Whyalla Public Library children’s program coordinator Chris Barsby said the programs were aimed at familiarising the children with different community services. “These programs give our Story Time children an

opportunity to become familiar with the different services they may encounter in Whyalla, and should they ever require help it will hopefully make it a less stressful time for them,” she said. SA Ambulance Service clinical team leader Adrian Stephenson along with paramedic Tess Say and Kristian Glover showed children aged from two to five years old and their parents some of the equipment SA Ambulance staff use every day such as the stretcher bed, oxygen and mask and demonstrated a heart monitor and bandaged a willing volunteer. The children were also given the opportunity to see an ambulance up close and were

even allowed inside. Mr Stephenson highlighted the importance of the triple zero message for emergency services and let children know ‘if you need an ambulance call 000 and stay on the phone until help arrives.’ Pre-school Story Time is for children from two to five years old and is held during the school term on Wednesdays at 10.30am and Thursdays at 10.30am and 2pm at the Whyalla Public Library. Each week has a different theme and the sessions allow children to share stories, songs and craft activities to meet their language and literacy needs in a fun and stimulating environment. Story Time is a free program run by the library for the Whyalla community.


SAAScene

saasnews@health.sa.gov.au Š SA Ambulance Service 2014


SAAScene April 2014 Edition