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September 2013

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INSIDE 1 Migration: Effects on the Family and Society 2 Message from the Director 4 Migration and HIV/AIDS in India 8 Together We Can Stop HIV 10 Recent Updates on HIV 15 Lighthouse Series: Daud Memorial Christian Gramin Vikas Samiti 16 CANA News 18 The Protection of Children from Sexual Offences Act, 2012

MIGRATION: EFFECTS ON THE FAMILY AND SOCIETY

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VERVIEW OF MIGRATION: Migration is a common phenomenon among people with no land to cultivate or those with lands suitable only for seasonal agriculture. Permanent in and out migration is seen throughout the world and in most cases the migrant is provided no compensation if their ancestral property is lost or damaged. When the poor temporarily move out of their homes in search of employment, it creates a situation conducive to exploitation of these migrants. The impact of migration on the family can be enormous especially if the male head of household has to migrate out for long periods of time. It is even harder on the family when the mother migrates with young children including those of school-going age. The duration of migration ranges from few weeks to few months. The distance travelled to seek employment could range from 80 to 150 Kms. The distance and number of households determines the mode of travel; in form of public jeeps, buses, private lorries or trucks. In the year 1994, we conducted a survey of the Vasava tribal people, in Songadhtaluk, South Gujarat who were engaged in violent activities because they had lost their ancestral land and other privileges due to the construction of the Ukai dam across Tapi River near Songadh. The people of 14 villages clustered close to each other between Songadh and Selamba along the northern contd.. on page 12 .................................................................................................................................................. SCAN - Transform communities and nations

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Dear Friends, Greetings from CANA in the Name of Jesus!!! I am pleased to have this opportunity once again, to interact with you through this tool that you are very familiar to, known as “SCAN”, the newsletter of CANA. To be more environmental friendly (and to reduce the cost of CANA’s overhead), we have decided to have few hard copies, for those who have no access to reading the electronic version.

Disclaimer: The views expressed in the articles do not necessarily represent those of CANA and some of the articles have been edited for space and technical appropriateness.

This particular issue of SCAN that you are reading has a special focus on the subject/issue of “MIGRATION”. What is migration? When one tries to understand migration, especially human migration (as every species migrates in some form or other), which is the movement by humans from one place to another, in varied distances, at varied periods, alone or in large groups. Historically this movement was nomadic, often causing significant conflict with the indigenous population and their displacement or cultural assimilation. Only a few nomadic people have retained this form of lifestyle in modern times. Migration continues today in the form of voluntary migration within one's region, country, or beyond. People who migrate into a territory are called immigrants, while at the departure point they are called emigrants. Small populations migrating to develop a territory considered void of settlement depending on historical setting, circumstances and perspective are referred to as settlers or colonists, while populations displaced by immigration and colonization are called refugees. There are various forms of temporary migrations which include travel, tourism, pilgrimages, or the commute. Some includes "change of residence" and others may pitch temporary shelters. Many kinds of migration are still involuntary migration which includes the slave trade, trafficking of human beings and ethnic cleansing, which is such a common phenomenon. In today’s life, who is not a migrant? The answer is almost everyone is migrating at some point or the other in their life. Therefore the question is why have we given importance to this issue of migration and dedicated to focus it in SCAN? It is because when we see the vulnerabilities to HIV, migration plays and has played as one of the root causes for its spread. Today, in India, the migrant population (long distance truckers, migrant laborers) serve as the major “bridge population” to carry HIV, the virus that causes AIDS from the high risk population groups (FSW/MSW-Female and Male sex workers, IDUs-drug abusers, Homosexuals) to

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the general populations ,especially the house wives, and those who live in no risk situations. Various sources have identified that mass migration in India is causing the widespread of HIV in India, including governmental agencies, NGOs, FBOs and media organisations. An article ‘Mass migration driving widespread HIV in India, January 30, 2013 can be found in http://group.bmj.com/group/media/latestnews/Mass %20 migration %20driving%20widespread %20HIV %20in %20India.pdf . At CANA, we are concerned about communities in the source and destination points from where migrants leave and eventually go to. We have moral and Christian responsibilities at this given time, to make every migration “SAFE”. Therefore, we promote “Safe Migrations”. What do we mean by this?. There is a great and definite role that the Church and Christian agencies play in order to help the migrants to be safe in all aspects of life: physically, emotionally, socially, economically and spiritually, and specifically, in our context, to be free from getting infected by HIV, due to a high prevalence of high-risk behaviors or due to ignorance. The Church needs to prepare and protect at source or at destination, young adults and grownups by facilitating them to live a life that the Lord Jesus promised of fullness and in abundance so that they do not fall prey to temptation and ruin their life. The current issue of SCAN is a call for readers, to learn more on the issue of “migration” and learn to take the responsibility to make the migration phenomenon a safe, non-threatening and positive exchange of social, cultural and spiritual well beings of human kind. We welcome your suggestions on themes for the future SCAN issues, which may serve as root causes, fuelling the increase of HIV and increasing devastations such as migration. We call out to the Churches and Christian communities in India to urgently respond to such issues.

S. SAMRAJ Executive Director, CANA

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The Census of India defines a migrant as a person who has moved from one politically defined area to another similar area. Migrants can be classified into 3 categories: ä In country rural –urban migrants and rural to rural migrants ä Trans border migrants from neighboring countries ä Overseas migrants Rural poverty and impoverisation have been major reasons for migration of people from the lower socio economic strata, especially, unskilled and illiterate people from populous and poorest states to urban areas. Studies have shown that there are clear patterns in migration and also pockets of migration. Large number of people migrate from rural area during nonsowing seasons and there are certain geographical regions to which large number of people migrate. For example, Ganjam district in Orissa to Surat in Gujarat, Tirunelvelli district in Tamil Nadu to Mumbai in Maharashtra. Migration has

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been significantly studied in the country for HIV programming. Mapping of in country migration has been completed for more than 22 states, which provides significant information about the source- destination place, duration and season of migration. Migration and the spread of the HIV Virus While migration is not a risk factor, short term and single migrants pose high risk for HIV because of their frequent movement between source and destination places. This short term migration accounts for more than 8.64 million people spread over different locations in India which has


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become a significant challenge for programming. As per the 64th round of the National Sample Survey, there are over 200 million migrants in India. As per the survey conducted by National Sample Survey Organisation in 2007-2008 it was estimated that 326 million or 28.5 per cent of the population are internal migrants. In addition to the above, nearly 3 million Indian migrants live in Gulf countries. Migrants bear a heightened risk to the HIV infection, which is a consequence of the prevailing condition and structure of the migration process. Available evidence suggests that migration could be playing an important role in the spread of HIV epidemic in high out- migration states( source states from which many people move out in order to find jobs) such as Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Rajasthan, Orissa, Madhya Pradesh and Gujarat. HIV sentinel surveillance data shows that these states accounts for 41% new infection. In addition, data from integrated counseling and testing centers (ICTCs) in destination areas such as Thane District of Maharashtra State and Surat district of Gujarat State have revealed high HIV-infection rates among migrants. The HIV-positivity rate among male migrants from UP tested at Thane ICTCs was 9.1% and female migrants were 7.9%. Similarly, the male migrants from Andhra Pradesh tested in Thane ICTC had a prevalence of 23.8% and female migrants were 16.4%. Likewise, the ICTC data in Surat district shows that 2.3% of migrant men and 3.5% of migrant women from Orissa tested were diagnosed 1

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HIV-positive . Growing evidence of research on migration and spread of HIV from high to low prevalence areas suggests high incidence of HIV among migrants returning to source from destination states and the partners of migrants in the places of origin. Since, the migrants contribute significantly to national income, the involvement of industries is important to address the needs of the migrants. Addressing health issues Access to health care, counseling and information are of paramount importance for migrants’ wellbeing. However, this is grossly inadequate at the destination (place where a migrant goes to find work) which is further fuelled by social exclusion which leaves them highly vulnerable. Programs have to address all categories of migrants i.e., active migrants, returning migrants and potential migrants.HIV intervention needs to map clusters of region high in migration, identify key source and destination sites of migration and run focused intervention programs. Developing a database on the number, route and types of migration will help to plan effective strategy for intervention. HIV intervention should focus on prevention activities at both source and destination, on short term migrants who typically live in large cluster formation around industries and unauthorized slums. Female migrants There is no much information available on

NACP IV Plan document

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female migrants. Female workers in unorganized sector are difficult to reach and equally vulnerable to HIV and females who may not be migrants, but are partners of migrants at the workplaces are also vulnerable. HIV intervention needs to focus on linking source, transit and destination. Comprehensive program at source combined with services such as HIV counseling and testing services for returnee migrants and their spouses and linkages to services is essential. Migrants are heterogeneous in nature due to language, culture and place origin. Program needs to be designed in a way to overcome these cultural barriers to improve access to services. Migration from low prevalent states and location to high prevalent destination poses a high risk of transmission and is a barrier to forming an effective program. At source Rapid assessment to understand places, pattern, route and mode of transport and risk behavior of migrants are important. This information will help to design programs more effectively. In many of the projects implemented at the source, information was provided on destination places, job opportunities, heath care facilities, cultural groups and their contacts along with information on HIV which has found to be effective. Community led activities for spouses of migrants and HIV testing of returnee migrants can decrease the risk of transmission and providing early care and

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support can increase awareness levels of families of migrants. In transit The transit locations are those routes through which migrants either leave for destination or return from destination before they finally reach their areas. Migrants spend few days to several weeks before moving to destination or source. It is important to carry out strategic behavior change communication activities at these transit locations in partnership with either state or central funded agencies (such as bus depots, railways etc.) At destination At the place of destination, peer led activities will be able to provide information in a more acceptable manner. Linking migrants to socio-cultural activities will also be helpful to attract migrants to safe spaces such as drop-in centers. These centers should be able to provide HIV prevention information, counseling and testing facilities. Linking migrants with affordable health services is also an essential component. Innovative ways such as radio programs in the same languages in destination sites can be used to reach out to migrants. For imparting HIV information the migrants can be linked to the corporate sector and industrial bodies to initiate work place intervention which will prove to be sustainable in the long run. Care and support services for migrants living with HIV There are special challenges when migrants need to accesses treatment especially ART. Since they are mobile in nature many are


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denied services due to lack of supportive documents such as address, ration card as well as peers to ensure treatment compliances. Due to the same, migrants are often denied services at destination sites. Successful migrant programs are able to provide necessary linkages with treatment services both in destination and source places so that migrants can continue to work and earn rather than losing their job and being located in one place for treatment. Linking with ADHAR card and providing identification card are also some of the measure to overcome these issues. Given that sexual transmission is one of the main means of HIV transmission, it is crucial to ensure that sexual and reproductive health services and HIV initiatives are integrated. Intervention for migrants should go beyond prevention, treatment and care to the provision of HIV

services which would include among others, education programs, counseling on safer sex, contraception, pregnancy and birth. Programs should be designed to reach the greatest number of people possible. In this context, special attention should be paid to women, mothers and young girls and children from migrant communities, who are often extremely vulnerable and confronted with multiple sources of discrimination and exclusion. Universal access to health services has a beneficial impact on the individual as well as on society at large, whereas exclusion exacerbates vulnerability, stigmatization, and discrimination. Understanding and constant monitoring migration pattern in low prevalent settings will help design programs more effectively.

- Mrs. Mini Varghese

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Together We Can Stop HIV An article was written by Debbie Dortzbach on how in the next 1000 days we can stop HIV from infecting babies worldwide. UNAIDS and the United States Office of Global AIDS Coordination set up a task force with a goal to eliminate new infections among children by 2015 and to keep their mothers alive. Debbie writes in the article that, “Being the faith community and members of the global family, we have work to do. Only a few years ago, I cradled a pencil-thin woman whose one desire was to cradle her own baby just one more time. Her children were far from her. She longed to be strong enough to return to them.” Today, antiretroviral treatments enable infants to avoid getting HIV from their HIV-positive mothers and dramatically enable HIV-positive women to not only become healthy but maintain their health for many productive years, investing in their own lives and the lives of their families.

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She goes on to share the tragic story of a Mozambican family of three generations impacted by HIV. The boy, who is the primary caregiver now, is providing care to his nephew whose mother died of HIV, along with the boy’s mother, the grandmother of the baby. Their local church stepped in to help this family. Once again, faith communities across our world have a clear call to accept the challenge to help millions of children, born and not yet born, to never be exposed to the virus. At a recent event in Washington, DC, Dr. Eric Goosby, the U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator praised the past work of faith communities, claiming they had a “pivotal, unique role…providing health, healing, and especially hope.” He concluded by saying, “We need you now, more than ever.” What can we do as a faith community? Here are some immediate steps from recent lessons learned from PEPFAR and collaborative discussions with faith-based


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organizations and CCIH members that she shares. 1. Keep the course. We cannot grow weary. The images may not splash across our screens and the money may not pour in, but the need is no less. Harness the good experience and knowledge base and networks, avoid duplication of resources and keep going. Read the Institute of Medicine’s Evaluation of PEPFAR, and the Countdown to Zero: The Global Plan toward the Elimination of New HIV Infections among Children by 2015 and Keeping Their Mothers Alive. Learn more about knowledge management, and current thinking on bringing

successful programs to scale. Stay active in networks such as CCIH to exchange ideas and be innovative. 2. Integrate the Faith Partnership Campaign developed by CCIH and partners into your church networks and organization and encourage continued engagement of churches to work toward an HIV-free generation. 3. Pray that the Lord, “like an eagle that stirs up its nest, that flutters over its young, spreading out its wings, catching them, bearing them on its pinions…” (Deut. 32:11) will use His people to care for His families and spare generations to come from the impact of HIV.

Debbie Dortzbach is Senior Health Advisor at World Relief. She has spent 16 years with World Relief, most of it in Kenya, and presently is a Senior Health Advisor, calling Baltimore, Md. her home. She is a nurse and has always loved public health. She claims it is a profession birthed right at home, in her role as the oldest of nine children For more on CCIH (Christian Connections for International Health), view their website - http://www.ccih.org/

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Leash on NACO funds stops free HIV treatment, April 25, 2013 HIV patients, who were getting free treatment at a community care centre in the remote Tarwa-Karwa village at Hazaribag have stopped getting the facility because of withdrawal of Rs 14 lakh grants from the National Aids Control Organization. The centre provided medicines, food and accommodation to 40 to 50 patients suffering from HIV but now they have been compelled to withdraw the facilities as NACO felt patients should avail treatment at the ART Centre functioning on the Sadar Hospital campus. The funds provided by NACO have stopped since March 31 and 90% of HIV patients admitted to the centre were discharged as there was no money to meet the expenses of the patients. Source- http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/ranchi/Leash-on-Naco-funds-stops-free-HIVtreatment/articleshow/19719264.cms

Scientists say 'promising' HIV cure on the horizon, April 29, 2013 Denmark researchers say a promising breakthrough that could ultimately lead to a cure for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) may be very close. Researchers from Aarhus University Hospital said they will be trying a novel strategy in humans with HIV. The therapy involves cleansing HIV from the reservoirs it forms within DNA cells forcing the virus to come to the DNA’s surface. The body’s immune system then cooperates with a potential vaccine which can find the virus and destroy it. The therapy was found to be effective when utilizing human skin cells in the lab. Its success in the human body is still unknown. Researchers state that the challenge in the therapy will be getting the patients' immune system to recognize the virus and destroy it which depends on the strength and sensitivity of individual immune systems. Source- http://www.foxnews.com/health/2013/04/29/scientists-say-promising-hiv-cure-on-horizon/

New Guidelines Suggest HIV Screening for All Adults, April 29, 2013 New guideline from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force has called for virtually every adult to be routinely screened for HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. The updated recommendations, which are published in the April 30 issue of the journal Annals of Internal Medicine, suggest that pregnant women and all people aged 15 to 65 be screened for HIV. The guidelines have been updated with an evidence that treatment is effective especially when started early in the course of HIV infection. Experts agree that such blanket screening is the best and only possible way to stop the HIV epidemic in its tracks. HIV screening will be effective as treating HIV infection has both personal and public health benefit. Source- http://health.usnews.com/health-news/news/articles/2013/04/29/new-guidelines-suggest-hivscreening-for-all-adults

HIV deciphered, scientists hope to find its weakness, May 30, 2013 Scientists have for the first time peeled open the virus that can lead to AIDS from its shell giving an insight into how it can be stopped from infecting millions across the globe every year. A team of researchers from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine have announced that they have peeled open HIV's outer coating and discovered 4million-atom structure inside the protein shell. The findings will ultimately lead the way to fending off an oftenchanging virus that has been very hard to conquer. Scientists say developing an effective vaccine to prevent HIV

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infection is one of the most daunting challenges ever faced. One of the main reasons for this is that HIV is an incredibly elusive virus. HIV is among the most mutating viruses. Source- http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/2013-05-30/science/39628226_1_hiv-infection-hivgenome-hiv-replication

Folk artistes roped in for AIDS awareness efforts, June 18, 2013 The officials of District Aids Programme Control Unit (DAPCU) are reaching out to migrant laborers and truckers through folk artists, appraising them about methods helpful in preventing the spread of HIV. Almost 40% individuals among the target groups of migrant laborers and truckers were aware of the factors responsible for the spread of AIDS. The DAPCU has deputed teams of Meerut and Lucknow-based folk artists to spread awareness among the target groups. Under the strategy, two street plays or other events are being held in 60 selected villages with basic health workers motivating villagers to attend the folk artistes' show. The artistes also carry out counseling and IEC (information, education and communication) sessions for truckers/migrant laborers, who are one of the strongest modes of HIV transmission across the state. Source- http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/allahabad/Folk-artistes-roped-in-for-AIDS-awarenessefforts/articleshow/20640432.cms

Chennai Corporation targets metro workers for AIDS awareness campaign, June 20, 2013 The Chennai Corporation AIDS Control and Prevention Society has taken up the task of sensitizing about 16,000 migrant labourers from Bihar, Madhya Pradesh, West Bengal and Odisha, working for Chennai Metro Rail project. The laborers camp mostly on allotted sites in 14 different locations in the city. These laborers are vulnerable to HIV and need to be sensitized and oriented towards better management of sexual needs. The objective of the programme is to continuously motivate them on safe sexual behavior. The current action plan envisages a schedule of activities to provide them with sustained information and access to available HIV intervention services in the metro. Source- http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/chennai/Chennai-corporation-targets-metroworkers-for-AIDS-awareness-campaign/articleshow/20677791.cms Two-drug combo poll to fight HIV: scientists Washington: Scientists have developed a new delivery system for a combination of two HIV drugs that may serve as an effective treatment for the deadly virus. The discovery, which allows for a combination of decitabine and gemcitabine to be delivered in pill form, marks a major step forward in patient feasibility for the drugs, which had been available solely via injection. Source- Hindustan Times, Vol II.No.173, Monday, September 02, 2013.

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cont... from page 1

banks of the Ukai dam reservoir and had their villages near the river. The water began to submerge the village as the height of the dam was raised up. The people were permanently displaced and were not compensated by the government for the loss and damage of their property. This sudden incident, which threatened their existence and shook the smooth running of their life, caused interest groups to allot a land for them in Baroda, a forest land, located 48 kms away from Songadhtaluk. This change resulted in them being cut off from easy access to road, transportation, electricity, schools and markets, in addition to which the changed environment caused inconveniences in their lifestyle as they had less access to maintaining a livelihood. The people were forced out of their hometown for no fault of their own. In order to sustain themselves and their families many migrated seasonally to cities like Surat, Vapi, Valsad, Bharuch, Rajpipla and Vadodara districts for a period of 6 to 8 months in a year, which badly affected their children’s education, health and life in total. The people of these 14 villages were under conflict with the government officials in order to claim exclusive ownership over the newly given forest land. The clashes between government and the affected people group spread like wild fire and the area was under the grip of unpredicted ethnic violence. The whole community was in great distress and confusion. Since the people had no other way to sustain themselves, they became an easy prey to agents who promised them work in

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other parts of the state. The people travelled to look for employment opportunities. The mode of transportation was decided, after the distance and the number of families travelling were listed. In most cases the migrants travelled by public jeeps, buses, private lorries and trucks. The agents arranged the vehicle to pick the migrants and deducted the expense for the travel from the migrants, which was the first of many ways in which migrants got exploited. The migrants however were willing to oblige as it was their only way of escape from the dire situation. Therefore, the first point of exploitation in migration began when the migrants were transported from his/her hometown to the place of work. At the end of each monsoon, which was usually in the month of September, agents approached the villagers and informed them about work in other cities and towns in Gujarat. They were taken to the work place and returned back to their village in the middle of April every year. At the place of work the migrants were housed in very small huts either on a public vacant land or along the sides of the roads. In each locality hundreds of such hutments were found. This was the second point of exploitation which occurred at the place where the people migrated. The major activity that the migrants were involved in was to cut sugarcane for the factories in Surat, Valsad, Vapi, Rajpipla and Bharuch districts and load the cut sugarcane onto a bullock cart which was provided by the agents or the factory. The migrant was then expected to cut a specific


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number of sugarcane and supply it to the factory every day. If the required amount of sugarcane was not given then, the exact wages were not given to the family. This formed as the third point of exploitation in the migrant’s life. The exploitation of labor took its worst form when wages were not paid regularly to the migrant worker. In most cases wages were not paid regularly. Money was arbitrarily deducted for transportation, housing and cost of advances. At the end of their labor a migrating family usually received about Rs. 2000.This was a huge sum of money for the migrant but did not represent the entire wages. The migrants usually had a lingering suspicion that they have been cheated of their rightful full wages. This formed as the fourth point of exploitation. One way to end the exploitation was to fight for their rights but it was unlikely that it would be favorable as agents and sugar factory owners could harass them and eventually deny them employment, which would further multiply the problems of the migrants. However we chose a strategy to provide alternate livelihood to ensure that migrants would get an adequate income throughout the year. We used a community based child centered socio-economic development approach as, in migration, the entire family and social system of the village got affected. The main aim of the project was to stop migration of the people from the area through implementing development programs based on their felt needs and to

educate the children over a period of 8 years. The program addressed the main causes of poverty in the migrant population, which were: 1. Permanent displacement which was caused by the submersion of their land by Ukai dam. 2. Seasonal Migration which was caused due to lack of employment opportunities in the displaced area and 3. Lack of infrastructure facilities such as school, good road & transportation, electricity supply, health care services, safe drinking water, free civil supplies and food services. The 7 villages covered under this programme consisted of 822 families and a total population of 3308. The population consisted of 96.5% from the Vasava community and 3.5% from the Kothvalia and Kothadia community. In 1988, there was only one primary school up to 3rd standard in each village with only 1 teacher. There were, however, schools in the neighbouring district. The problems that the community identified and prioritized were seasonal migration, lack of education, lack of health facilities, lack of agricultural infrastructure, prevalence of polygamy and substance abuse. The community based child centered socioeconomic development approach provided Early Community – based Child Care which included provision of nutritional supplements, education to children,

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education-based resources and spiritual care. The program also provided sports materials to middle school going children and provided education support without nutrition and clothes for high school-going children. Apart from educating the children, the program also was involved in women empowerment, economic empowerment, community health, spiritual care and development programs based on general need. We provided child care support to the people without reservations based on caste, creed or religion. Some of the villagers were skeptical of the program in the beginning and refused to participate as they had doubts about the purpose of the program. But, eventually as time went by, the villagers could see that we were motivated to serve them because of the love of Christ and realized the benefits that were provided to others and requested if they could be included as well. Before the program began, Christians and nonChristians lived in enmity and there were occasional attacks on Christians. The program, however, brought different committees and groups together.

In many instances we were able to stand above the situation and build bridges for communal harmony with the packages of social, economic and other need based development programs with the assurance of God’s continuous presence and protection. We find in the scripture that in many circumstances holistic ministering was involved. We learnt some valuable lessons based on our experiences there. a) While working in the migration prone areas, it was important for us to know the root causes, the expectations of the affected people and how they operated. b) It was important to get the right information about the affected group and the safety of the staff. c) To build rapport with the affected people and the groups in the community d) Our work was to unite people rather than separate them. e) Above all of these, we found that prayer was the key to our safety, sanity, satisfaction, and sustenance. The Bible encourages us to ‘live in harmony with one another’, so let us be willing to serve people with fewer means.

Henry Jesu Dasan is currently working with Navjeevan Seva Mandal in its headquarters at Sevoor, Tamil Nadu. This is an example of intervention on migration which plays a great role in reduction of vulnerabilities to HIV in the communities. [The views expressed here are personal and may be prone to bias. It offers insights about the migrants, their challenges and their work life ethics, in south Gujarat].

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Light House Series shares the expertise and experiences of Churches and Church based agencies in their efforts in envisioning a HIV free nation. Please forward your profile and updates on HIV and AIDS ministry for the next Light House Series.

DAUD MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN GRAMIN VIKAS SAMITI Daud Memorial Christian Gramin Vikas Samiti is an organisation working in Gorakhpur, Mahargunj and Siddharth Nagar areas in Eastern U.P. The organisation was set up with the vision to visualize a developed community based on equality, self-dependence, justice and cheerfulness of life for all. Even though it is an organisation with few staff members, the work they have done over the past few years has brought tremendous change in the region where they are working. In September 2012,the group attended a 6 day Love your neighbor with AIDS TOT (Training of trainers) at JSK, Thane, organized by Christian AIDS/HIV National Alliance (CANA) which motivated them to begin a project called the ‘Pratham Sopan’ to support people living with HIV and AIDS. They began the program in December 2012, by requesting a list of PLHAs from the positive network in Gorakhpur for providing them with nutrition and clothing. They took the opportunity to invite 25 people living with HIV/AIDS to celebrate Christmas with them. During this meeting, they were given the Christmas message of hope. Their interaction with the people living with HIV did not end there. They decided to raise support to provide nutrition and clothing on a monthly basis. In January, 2013, the members of the organisation began to raise funds

individually and were able to organize a meeting with the 25 PLHAs( 15 children, 13 widows and 2 widowers) they had met during the Christmas celebration and provide them with nutrition and school uniforms for the orphaned children. In the month of March the organisation also invited, Dr O.P.G Rao, Deputy CMO of Gorakhpur to share to the 25 people about the schemes provided by the government for PLHAs and also talked on different health issues related to children and widows. Currently, the organisation has 35 voluntary sponsors who have agreed to help the families on a regular basis for a year. The people living with HIV/AIDS are motivated to live a joyful life, receive hope through the word of GOD, they are also provided with information to live a healthy life and the importance of regular medication. They are invited to an environment void of stigma and discrimination in order to discuss their problems and find out a solution for it.

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1. S e r v i n g i n M i s s i o n ( S I M ) Missionaries, Marcus, Kenneth and his

daughter Jena visited CANA on April 15 – 16th 2013 for an exposure visit to the work CANA is involved in. CANA presented the different areas of work that it was involved with. The visitors visited CANA’s partner organisation, Navjeeevan Seva Mandal (NSM), where they had the opportunity of seeing their work, interacting with the staff and volunteers and met with families living with HIV/AIDS.

Mandsaur, Madhya Pradesh between April 25th to May 1st, 2013 to visit churches and see their involvement in sociocommunity activities. They had the opportunity to interact with church leaders and heads of Christian organisations to assess the issues prevailing in Ratlam and Mandsaur and encouraged the churches to particularly respond to HIV/AIDS in the districts. 3. O n A p r i l 2 7 t h , C A N A s t a f f , Christodan Benya took part in the Life Coaching Master’s Training program. This training focused on equipping a group of individuals in games and activities to include in between workshop sessions for participants. 4. CANA’s program officer Ayangla, met with Rev. Dr. Alemrenba of the Ao Baptist Church, Delhi to interact with the

2. Mr. S. Samraj, Executive Director, CANA and Mr. Benjamin, Senior Program O f f i ce r t r a v e l l e d t o R a t l a m a nd

church to encourage them to get involved in the Church and Community Mobilization Process (CCMP) on May 10th.

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An interaction on integral mission in responding to vulnerability issues also took place. 5. CANA staff, Ayangla Pongen took part in the 1st Educators Prayer Fellowship at Delhi Brotherhood House on May 23rd. Teachers from schools in Delhi and few individuals from nongovernmental organisations were also part of the discussion on the educational system and moral values existing in India. The interaction was followed by prayer and fellowship. 6. CANA organized the monthly prayer day on 30th May at CANA office. Different issues were taken up and prayed for. The staff prayed for founding members, executive directors, board members, former and present CANA staff, funding agencies, churches and individuals who have supported CANA through the past 15 years. The staff also prayed for the different projects that CANA was involved with in the past, the present and the upcoming programs. 7. As CANA is involved with programs and implementing of the same in different regions in the sub-continent, a much needed Project Cycle Management and Facilitation Skills Training and an introduction to Integral Mission was conducted for the CANA staff team from 11th June to 15th June. Rev Sundar Daniel, the previous Asia coordinator of Micah Network was willing to train and share his experiences on program cycle management.

8. CANA staff took part in the felicitation function for the newly inducted union ministers, Hon’ble Oscar Fernandes and Hon’ble J.D Seelan into the Union Ministry of India, at CNI Bhavan on June 27. Members of several Churches and Christian organisations were present in order to felicitate them. A panel discussion on “Scheduled caste status to Dalit Christians and Dalit Muslims: Opportunities and challenges” followed the felicitation program. 9. The Annual General Board meeting was held on 25th July at the chairperson’s residence. On the 26th CANA Board member, Andi Eicher, team leader of Jeevan Sahara Kendra visited CANA to interact with the Director and staff members on the current role of the organisation and what we were looking forward to do in the future. Rev. Sundar Daniel, CANA consultant also visited the team on the same day to share insights on programs and functions that CANA could create and involve in the coming days. 10. A workshop on Church Responses to HIV and related vulnerabilities, for Church leaders was held from 7th August – 9th August at Christian Medical

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Association of India, New Delhi. The workshop was attended by 30 church leaders. Bible Studies were conducted on all the three days on topics such as the body of Christ living with HIV, stigma, discrimination, denial, and self-stigma and full participation of people living with HIV. Pastor Sanjiv Ailawadi, Hub Church delivered the keynote address on Integral

Mission. Mr. Issac Jayakumar, Dean TAFTEE and Mr Sweeharan, World Vision HIV project were key facilitators for the Bible studies which involved interaction with the participants. The workshop ended with the church leaders writing down an action plan on how they will respond to HIV in their church and community.

SCAN is CANA's newsletter for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Transform communities and nationsâ&#x20AC;?. It is designed to create a platform for strengthening the Christian agencies and individuals working for or with those infected and affected by HIV/AIDS. This is done through sharing of resources, best practices, strategies and innovative intervention to facilitate development of the Christian response & voice to combat against the pandemic of HIV/AIDS. Articles, comments or questions from readers are welcome. SCAN available on Subscription. Annual Rs. 100/-; single copy Rs. 40/The Executive Director, CANA, Plot # RZ-61, Palam Vihar, Sector-6, (Near Telephone Exchange), Dwarka, New Delhi - 110 075 <E-mail: cana@cana-india.org, samrajindia@gmail.com> <Tel: 011- 25089302 / 4 / 7 / 9><www.cana-india.org; www.cana-umang.org>


SCAN:CANA News_Sept 2013