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ANNUAL REVIEW 2016


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About us President’s statement Chairman’s statement Chief Executive’s statement Conservation Conservation science Conservation in the field Discovery and Learning RZSS Edinburgh Zoo Our year in numbers RZSS Highland Wildlife Park Development and Membership Communications Our people and resources Financial summary RZSS Edinburgh Zoo inventory RZSS Highland Wildlife Park inventory

Jambi the Sumatran tiger at Edinburgh Zoo, taken by RZSS Photographer in Residence Laurie Campbell


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RZSS has been active in the conservation of the critically endangered Partula snail since 1984


ABOUT US

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Our natural world is a beautiful and precious place where all living things, including humans, are connected. It is also a planet which is warming, crowded and damaged – where the population of wild vertebrates alone has more than halved in just 40 years, where children and young people are increasingly disconnected from nature, where an ever-expanding human population threatens the very future of our planet and the species that call it home.

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RZSS, one of Scotland’s leading conservation charities, is dedicated to protecting threatened species through conservation, research and education – not only those native to Scotland, but also all around the world. Through our two sites, Edinburgh Zoo and the Highland Wildlife Park, we engage with 750,000 visitors per year in the wonders of the natural world, taking care of over 1,000 rare and endangered animals in safe and stimulating surroundings. We are leading innovative conservation programmes both here in Scotland and in 21 countries around the world, from

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1. Reintroducing Partula snails in French Polynesia 2. Releasing a giant armadillo in the Pantanal 3. Blue poison arrow frogs 4. Animal Antics at Edinburgh Zoo 5. Female snow leopard

saving the Scottish wildcat to uncovering the hidden world of the giant armadillo in the Brazilian Pantanal. We carry out groundbreaking research through our dedicated WildGenes genetics laboratory – underpinning our work with robust science – and we inspire the next generation to protect the natural world through a suite of formal, informal and outreach education programmes, engaging over 25,000 people a year. The Royal Zoological Society of Scotland has grown considerably since its inception over a century ago; however, its mission has remained a constant...


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OUR MISSION:

Chilean flamingo at Edinburgh Zoo

To connect people with nature and to safeguard threatened species


PRESIDENT’S STATEMENT

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When I was first approached about the possibility of being the Honorary President of RZSS I couldn’t believe my good fortune. I have always been interested in and concerned about wildlife conservation, am lucky enough to have been able to go on safari in Africa a few times and have been a member of RZSS since we moved to Edinburgh 18 years ago. This role really is the icing on top of that cake.

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Since I took on the role in May last year, I have come to realise that I’m even more fortunate than I originally thought. During my induction process, I have met a number of our team at RZSS and have been so impressed with their dedication, professionalism and commitment.

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“I would like to say a special thank you to my predecessor, John Spence, whose contribution to the Society over many years was enormous.” I have spent time at both Edinburgh Zoo and the Highland Wildlife Park and now have a much clearer understanding of the hard work and dedication that goes into making these world-class visitor attractions function. I have also learned more about our conservation activities both here in Scotland and in over 20 countries around the world, ranging from Brazilian giant armadillos and Partula snails to Scottish wildcats and beavers. The range of activities is impressive and we have a lot to be proud of.

Any organisation, however good its heritage, has to look to the future; and I was pleased to see Barbara Smith appointed as our new Chief Executive. I am looking forward to hearing more about Barbara’s plans for the future, both for our two parks and for the Society as a whole, and am keen to play my part in delivering those plans. Finally, I would like to say a special thank you to my predecessor, John Spence, whose contribution to the Society over many years was enormous. His are big shoes to fill, but I hope that I can be as good a President as he was and that RZSS can continue to build on the momentum developed in the last few years.

Ian Marchant, President

1. Ian Marchant, President 2. Scottish wildcat at the Highland Wildlife Park


CHAIRMAN’S STATEMENT

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2016 was a year of real change for RZSS, most notably with the appointment of Barbara Smith as our new Chief Executive in October and the arrival of Ian Marchant as our President in May. Many of you will be familiar with Barbara from her four years as Managing Director. She brings a real passion for the Society – its staff, members and volunteers – together with clear commercial flair and background in both the visitor attraction and conservation sectors. Ian’s broad-based experience, commitment to conservation and network of contacts, likewise, will add huge value to the Society.

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some 400 years after it was hunted to extinction. This decision is a landmark not only for the Society and its partners but also for Scottish conservation as a whole, and represents the culmination of nearly 20 years’ work. We now turn our attentions to reinforcing the Knapdale population and establishing a clear set of management guidelines for the species, ensuring it has the best possible chance of recolonising across much of its former range.

I am excited about the direction RZSS is heading, underpinned by our new five-year strategy which represents an ambitious but achievable vision of how RZSS can become a global leader in species conservation, cutting-edge research and environmental education.

Last year also saw Roseanna Cunningham MSP, Cabinet Secretary for Environment, Climate Change and Land Reform, open our off-show conservation breeding enclosures for the Scottish wildcat. These facilities at the Highland Wildlife Park, coupled with our management of the wildcat studbook and associated genetics research, will be essential if we are to save Scotland’s – and the UK’s – last remaining native cat species.

There have already been a number of key successes, not least the decision by Scottish Government in November to formally recognise the Eurasian beaver as a native species in Scotland,

Elsewhere at the Park, our groundbreaking polar bear breeding programme began and, whilst we did not have cubs this time around, we have developed a much clearer picture

“I am excited about the direction RZSS is heading, underpinned by our new five-year strategy which represents an ambitious but achievable vision of how RZSS can become a global leader in species conservation, cuttingedge research and environmental education.”

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of Victoria’s behaviour and have a cubbing den that she feels comfortable and secure in. At the Zoo, the disappointment of not having a panda cub was tempered by the news that the species as a whole has been reclassified from endangered to vulnerable on the IUCN Red List, something which we as a Society can be justifiably proud of. I was delighted, too, to be present at the formal opening of Tiger Tracks, our new Sumatran tiger exhibit here at Edinburgh Zoo, which is three times the size of its predecessor and marks a sea change in our approach to enclosure design. Nothing quite prepares you for the sight of a 100kg tiger leaping effortlessly above your head and, if you have not already done so, I would urge you to visit the enclosure soon to experience it for yourself. There is much to do over the coming 12 months; however, I am confident that the foundations are now in place for the Society – and its influence – to grow considerably.

Jeremy A. Peat, Chairman

1. Jeremy A. Peat, Chairman 2. Roseanna Cunningham MSP opens our off-show wildcat breeding facility 3. The polar bear breeding programme begins at the Highland Wildlife Park

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“The promotion ceremony of our king penguin Sir Nils Olav at the Zoo reached an audience of millions across Europe, North America and South East Asia.�


CHIEF EXECUTIVE’S STATEMENT

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Last year we submitted a bid for Heritage Lottery Funding which, if successful, will enable us to transform the visitor experience at the Highland Wildlife Park, helping us build upon record numbers in 2016 and connect an ever-increasing number of people to our animals and the unique landscape of the Cairngorms National Park. Plans are already well

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To this end, we began drafting a new five-year strategy at the end of the year, and this will be accompanied by ambitious but achievable site plans for both Edinburgh Zoo and the Highland Wildlife Park.

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The key now is to harness the huge potential that exists within our staff; our volunteers, members and supporters; our parks and living collections; our conservation and education work, to realise our mission of connecting people with nature and safeguarding threatened species.

Last year also saw a number of major conservation successes both domestically – with species such as the Eurasian beaver, Scottish wildcat and pine hoverfly – and around the world. In September, the team at Edinburgh Zoo transported over 600 critically endangered Partula snails to be reintroduced into their native habitat of French Polynesia, another huge step forward for a species that RZSS has been actively conserving since 1984.

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Having worked for the Society for the past four years, I am well aware of the importance of RZSS as a leading centre for conservation, education and research; and our two parks provide an unrivalled opportunity for us to engage with 750,000 people in the wonders of the natural world.

under way for similar developments at Edinburgh Zoo.

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It was my great pleasure to take over as Chief Executive of RZSS in October, following a year of organisational change, exciting new developments and a host of major achievements.

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Elsewhere, the Giant Armadillo Conservation Project made a huge breakthrough, capturing the birth of a baby giant armadillo for the first time on camera. The footage formed part of a documentary called Hotel Armadillo, narrated by Sir David Attenborough, which aired on the BBC in April. Our educational outreach activity

1. Barbara Smith, Chief Executive 2. Ambitious plans for the future of the Highland Wildlife Park 3. Sir David Attenborough narrated a documentary about our work with giant armadillos

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continued to expand, particularly thanks to the Wild about Scotland and Beyond the Panda programmes. The bus made its way to Orkney and Shetland over the course of the year and has now visited all 32 local authorities in Scotland – a truly fantastic project which is inspiring the next generation of conservationists across the country. We also hosted a number of successful events throughout the year, from our two Pokémon GO nights to the promotion ceremony of our king penguin Sir Nils Olav at the Zoo, which reached an audience of millions across Europe, North America and South East Asia. Plans are afoot for a series of highprofile events this year, too, including the return of Zoo Nights and a spectacular Chinese lantern festival over Christmas and New Year. RZSS continues to work closely with a number of key funders and partners, including People’s Postcode Lottery. In 2016 the charity lottery awarded us an additional £250,000, bringing the total amount donated by players to an amazing £1 million. We remain indebted to the support of our members, supporters and funders, without whom we simply could not achieve many of our conservation priorities. With your help, here’s looking forward to a hugely successful 2017.

Barbara Smith, Chief Executive

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“RZSS can be justly proud of reaching this milestone in the history of UK conservation: the first ever formal reintroduction of a mammal in the UK.�


CONSERVATION

1600s Species restoration is at the heart of our conservation and science activities. Whilst some projects require us to apply our skills to individual species, such as the Scottish wildcat, others require our staff to provide in-the-field training, helping communities and organisations take action for themselves. Working in partnership In 2016, RZSS’s WildGenes laboratory undertook a major capacity-building project in Cambodia in association with WWF, Fauna and Flora International and the Wildlife Conservation Society. Through training and technical development, our lab team supported a team of scientists at the Royal University of Phnom Penh to conduct genetic analysis of over 1,000 dung samples, collected from Asian elephants during field surveys. The genetic results will be crucial for establishing population estimates and understanding individual animal movement and population divisions, all with the aim of improving the protection of Cambodian elephants in the wild. More often than not, our work is undertaken in partnership and the delivery of many projects relies on multiple organisations coming together. Nordens Ark is a Swedish zoo that we have formed a particularly close working relationship with, and we are working together on a number of projects and staff development opportunities. Last year, for example, pine hoverfly larvae were collected in Nordens Ark’s

EcoPark and transported to Edinburgh Zoo. Whilst the species is thriving in Sweden, it is in serious decline in Scotland, so we are learning all we can about the management of the species in captivity to facilitate future conservation of the Scottish population in the wild. RZSS and Nordens Ark are also working in partnership with the Snow Leopard Trust, and in 2016 the partnership established the first global Pallas’s cat conservation project, called the Pallas’s cat International Conservation Alliance (or PICA). £120,000 of funding was secured through Fondation Segré, which will enable PICA to raise the profile of the species and undertake research and conservation activities both in situ and ex situ. Working together with the Pallas’s Cat Working Group, IUCN Cat Specialist Group and several range-country researchers, this project will continue to enhance the global conservation and research efforts for this unique small cat species.

Native species restoration Here in Scotland, Roseanna Cunningham MSP – Cabinet Secretary for Environment, Climate Change and Land Reform – announced in November that beavers, already living wild in Scotland, could remain and would be given protected status under the EU Habitats Directive. Having led the Scottish Beaver Trial alongside our partners the Scottish Wildlife Trust, Scottish Natural Heritage and Forestry Commission Scotland, RZSS can be justly proud of reaching this milestone in the history of UK conservation: the first ever formal

reintroduction of a mammal. Our efforts will now be focused on reinforcing the beaver population in Knapdale through a translocation application to Scottish Natural Heritage (using the Scottish Code for Conservation Translocations) and supporting the development of a comprehensive management plan for the species. As a lead partner in Scottish Wildcat Action, 2016 also saw developments in our genetics and conservation breeding activities in arguably one of the most challenging species conservation projects in Scotland: saving our last remaining wild felid. Our expertise and experience in native species restoration continued to be sought as part of ongoing discussions on rewilding, which aims to create a richer and more ecologically diverse environment for the benefit of nature and people. It also ensured that we continued to play an active part in the National Species Reintroduction Forum, supporting Scottish Government on strategic issues relating to species reintroductions and other types of conservation translocations in Scotland. As you will see from the sections that follow, 2016 was a year of many highlights for RZSS Conservation. Thanks to the continued hard work of our small but expert team, RZSS continues to punch well above its weight both at home and in over 20 countries around the world, providing evidencebased and pragmatic solutions to some of the most pressing conservation issues of the day.

2017 Our conservation efforts saw the Eurasian beaver recognised as a native species in Scotland,

400 years after being hunted to extinction

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“The giant panda was reclassified on the IUCN Red List from endangered to vulnerable – a reason to celebrate, and testament to the immense effort which China and its partners (including RZSS) have put into protecting pandas and their habitat.�


CONSERVATION SCIENCE

WildGenes laboratory

Giant pandas

RZSS WildGenes works on a variety of projects that involve the use of genetic data to improve conservation management decisions for threatened species. 2016 saw the continuation of wildcat genetic work to support the Scottish Wildcat Action partnership. Having taken over the studbook for the species in summer 2015, the team has now screened 100% of the breeding population of UK wildcats in captivity and continues the screening of samples collected from the Scottish Natural Heritage-led trap-neuter-vaccinaterelease (TNVR) programme.

2016 was a significant year in the world of panda conservation. The species was reclassified on the IUCN Red List from endangered to vulnerable – a reason to celebrate, and testament to the immense effort which China and its partners (including RZSS) have put into protecting pandas and their habitat over the last 40 years.

Veterinary research The veterinary team contributed their skills to the majority of RZSS species restoration conservation projects in 2016. RZSS continued to be heavily involved in the reintroduction and

Our partnership with Free the Bears continued to flourish, with the team looking at new, minimally invasive techniques to treat disease. Healthscreening was also carried out on five different species of critically endangered Partula snails (both from RZSS and other collections) prior to their successful release in French Polynesia. A project looking into the incidence of aspergillosis in gentoo penguins, which started in 2012, continued to make progress, with a presentation at the British Veterinary Zoological Society on plasma protein electrophoresis as a diagnostic and prognostic indicator of the diseases. In addition, we were responsible for health-screening the River Otter Eurasian beaver population on behalf of the Devon Wildlife Trust, under licence from DEFRA, and the ongoing healthscreening of Scottish wildcats as part of the RZSS conservation breeding programme. Over the course of the year, a total of 27 scientific publications (peer-reviewed journal papers, proceedings and book chapters) were accepted and/or published.

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WildGenes continued to contribute conservation genetic management advice to the conservation community through our presence on the IUCN Antelope Specialist Group and IUCN Conservation Genetics Specialists Group. Capacity-building is at the core of our work, and in 2016 we supported scientists from Nepal, Cambodia, Oman and Gabon with the development and transfer of genetic tools for the conservation management of threatened fauna in their home countries.

Unfortunately, 2016 was another year in which we did not produce a panda cub. The signs, scientifically, looked positive, but the final result has meant a collective rethink of current scientific doctrine, particularly with respect to the tests which we perform. As in previous years, an independent scientific review was carried out following the breeding season last year, with findings helping shape our approach next time around.

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The lab developed the first ever genetic tools for the endangered Arabian tahr, and these are being used to monitor this unique and threatened species in Oman. We also undertook cuttingedge genomic analysis to support the reintroduction of the critically endangered northern bald ibis, captive management of peacock pheasants and Arabian oryx, alongside the monitoring of the illegal trade in tiger and tortoise. Work conducted as part of the ongoing Himalayan Wolves Project fed into an updated distribution map for the Tibetan fox in Nepal, confirming the presence of the species in regions where it was previously unknown.

New and emerging threats – including climate change and disease – mean that we cannot take our collective eyes off the ball, however; and, with fewer than 2,000 pandas scattered across three provinces in western China, the fight to secure the long-term future of this species is far from over. Many of our own conservation projects, working alongside partners here in Edinburgh, are looking into new possibilities to help mitigate against these emerging threats.

health-screening of water voles and white storks to the UK, and the vet team presented at the European College of Zoological Medicine on a new preventative health programme for Pallas’s cat kittens. The programme has reduced the mortality rate in two collections from 72% to 0% over a twoyear period.

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“Household surveys to determine the impact of the alternative livelihoods scheme on beneficiary communities showed an increase in household incomes from $0.80 to $1.35 per day.�

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CONSERVATION IN THE FIELD

household income in Budongo has risen by $0.80

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Amphibians and herpetology 2016 marked the 10th anniversary of RZSS’s involvement in Cameroon, helping address the global amphibian biodiversity crisis. Working alongside locals and providing training opportunities has resulted in a better understanding of the threats to amphibians and their habitats. Elsewhere in Africa, monitoring in the Budongo Forest, Uganda, was established to help us better understand the status of amphibians and reptiles in the forest.

Budongo Conservation Field Station Budongo saw a growth in the number of research students hosted as a result of increased accommodation facilities and the habituation of a second chimpanzee community. The station also diversified the research agenda to include herpetology and ornithology studies, whilst studies into changes in tree fruiting phenology and its implication on wildlife foraging are continuing. The DARWIN Initiative-funded alternative livelihoods scheme for forest-dependent communities is due to be concluded in early 2017. Over 600 households have been supported through vocational training and improved buffer-zone farming technologies. Household surveys to determine the impact of the project on beneficiary communities showed an increase in household incomes from $0.80 to $1.35 per day. This is in addition to an increased awareness of wildlife conservation. Long-term monitoring of chimpanzee health made good progress over the course of the year, supported by the Arcus Foundation. The veterinary field team also enhanced its capability to conduct rescue operations of snared chimpanzees.

nearly 70% Giant Armadillo Conservation Project Major achievements in 2016 included the capture of five new giant armadillos and the recapture of six to fix a GPS tag, bringing the total number of armadillos captured since 2010 to 26. Fieldwork to map the distribution of giant armadillos in the Cerrado neared completion, with 19 counties visited, 258 watersheds explored and over 500 interviews conducted. In 2017, the project is expanding this work to the Atlantic Forest. Over the course of 2016, the team offered training to 17 Brazilian professionals, engaged 250 science teachers in biodiversity conservation and gave over 40 project presentations. Team members also met with the State governor to discuss conservation issues, giant armadillos in particular. The team were joined by a film crew from Maramedia (makers of Highlands – Scotland’s Wild Heart) later on in the year, with a new documentary called Hotel Armadillo – narrated by Sir David Attenborough – released in April focusing on our work in the Pantanal.

Project Pinnamin 2016 saw the start of Project Pinnamin, which is investigating the rapid decline in northern rockhopper penguin numbers on Tristan da Cunha. RZSS is one of a number of partners undertaking this DARWIN Initiative-funded project that will recognise important marine areas and recommend future conservation actions.

Scottish Beavers Our commitment to monitoring the Knapdale beaver population extended throughout 2016, culminating in the November announcement by Scottish Government that the beaver would receive native species status in Scotland.

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per day A site survey at Knapdale in September showed the population is at risk of dying out unless further action is taken. In December, RZSS and the Scottish Wildlife Trust began a follow-up project to the Scottish Beaver Trial which will involve translocating additional beavers to the lochs and streams of Knapdale. This project will be called Scottish Beavers and aims to secure a long-term future for the beaver population in midArgyll. It is hoped that translocations can begin in autumn 2017.

Scottish Wildcat Action As a leading partner in Scottish Wildcat Action, RZSS continued to make significant progress in the field of conservation breeding for release and wildcat genetics. In summer 2015, we took over management of the Scottish wildcat studbook and associated breeding programme, and as a result of this collected genetic samples from all potential breeding captive wildcats. Following genetic assessment of these samples, we have established that over 90% of captive wildcats pass the criteria for further breeding. Work has now started on compiling a molecular studbook for the wildcat based on these samples, which will significantly enhance the management and future breeding of the captive population. Our wildcat camera trap monitoring surveys continued to unveil potential wildcat locations, whilst new fieldwork developments got under way in the form of wildcat semen banking within priority areas. This is designed to provide further security for the species in the long term.

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“By the end of the year, the Wild about Scotland bus reached its 32nd and final local authority area, with a trip to Shetland marking a significant achievement in the project’s history.”


DISCOVERY AND LEARNING

Whilst 2016 was a transitional year for Discovery and Learning – with an emphasis on consolidating our current education activities and evaluating future opportunities – the year still saw us engage with over 25,000 people of all ages and backgrounds. Formal and informal education The department’s Education Officers continued to provide a first-class service, delivering classes at both Edinburgh Zoo and the Highland Wildlife Park to students ranging from nursery to PhD level. In total, 25,015 students (including our Zoo Environment Skills Training and adult courses) have spent time with the department this year. RZSS has a rich tradition of innovation in Discovery and Learning, and in 2016 new offerings included an advanced adult lecture class, Spring School for P2 to S4 students, Summer Conservation Action Team and the launch of the Zoo Environment Behavioural Research Award (or ZEBRA), a Friday afternoon programme for pupils aged 16 to 18 which began in October. An ongoing review and refresh of our programme of activities will continue into 2017, with a focus on further enhancements through the use of appropriate learning technology. Elements of this already appeared in 2016, including Google Expeditions, the creation of a virtual Edinburgh Zoo using Minecraft (in collaboration with BBC Build IT Scotland), and the delivery of our first ever lesson via Skype Virtual Fieldtrips to a school in New Jersey, USA.

Interpretation The final elements of interpretation at the Highland Wildlife Park were installed in early 2016, thanks to funding from the Heritage Lottery Fund. This included new interpretation at the polar bear viewing shelters, the creation of a native species hub around the Scottish wildcat enclosure, and the launch of a new audio CD for the main drive-through reserve. Interpretation projects delivered at the Zoo included the new Tiger Tracks exhibit, a refreshed Physic Garden and a new Wild about Scotland Garden. In collaboration with the Communications and Events departments, an app-based badge trail was created, as well as a new trail activity to support the screening of Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them. We also prioritised the evaluation of interpretation projects this year, with a host of student placements carrying out research on site as well as new relationships being established with academics in the sector.

Outreach programmes 2016 was an amazing year for RZSS’s outreach programmes: Wild about Scotland (supported by Clydesdale Bank) and Beyond the Panda. The Wild about Scotland team visited over 150 schools across Scotland, and more than 13,000 pupils took part in sessions on Scotland’s amazing biodiversity. 11,000 members of the public also benefited from the team’s involvement in events, where they learned about the wildlife on their doorstep and RZSS’s native conservation projects.

By the end of the year, the Wild about Scotland bus reached its 32nd and final local authority area, with a trip to Shetland marking a significant achievement in the project’s history. The team established a dedicated volunteer group, launched a suite of online resources, attended the opening of the fifth session of the Scottish Parliament, ran a highly successful community day and won a BIAZA silver education award. Beyond the Panda had an equally impressive year, more than doubling engagement with pupils across Scotland through the delivery of 171 sessions to 4,236 children and 831 adults. The Confucius Institute for Scotland (University of Edinburgh) funded the programme, which enabled many new resources to be created and increased the range of the programme from P1 through to Secondary levels. Thanks also go to Arnold Clark for donating a panda vehicle, which helped significantly reduce travel costs.

Volunteering A new Volunteer Coordinator joined the team in August and began work to establish a set of core policies and procedures, as well as undertaking a comprehensive review of activities and training and development opportunities (recommendations will be outlined in early 2017). We remain indebted to our fantastic team of volunteers, who in 2016 provided 11,525 hours – or nearly 500 days – of support and donated £2,290 to the Society through activities such as brass-rubbing and badge-making.

25,015 people engaged in our education programmes in 2016 1. Beyond the Panda reached 4,236 children and 831 adults 2. A new trail was launched to support the screening of Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them 3. Volunteers provided nearly 500 days of support in 2016 4. Science Summer School at Edinburgh Zoo

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The opening of Tiger Tracks, a brand new home for our pair of critically endangered Sumatran tigers, was a particular highlight in 2016, as was the breeding and reintroduction of hundreds of tiny Partula snails to French Polynesia. Our animals

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The team at Edinburgh Zoo has been involved in conserving the critically endangered Partula snail since 1984, receiving the very last captive individual of the Partula taeniata simulans subspecies in 2010. Since that point, we have carefully expanded the population to a safe level of several hundred, and this year we were delighted to ship 671 individuals to their native French Polynesia to be reintroduced into the wild. This was a huge husbandry achievement for the Society and a real testament to the skills and dedication of our staff team. 2016 saw births of several other endangered and vulnerable animals at Edinburgh Zoo. We started early in January with a male grey-legged douroucouli, followed by a Malayan tapir calf in May and a rare Visayan spotted deer calf in October. This is the first time that the species has bred in Edinburgh; and the new arrival was one of only 11 calves born in captivity worldwide. We were also very successful with breeding our Chilean flamingos, which had five chicks, and our gentoo penguins, which had 26. We were very pleased to bring red pandas back into the collection this year, for the first time since 2008. A male arrived at the end of the year and has subsequently been joined by a female

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from the Netherlands. Another returning species was the western grey kangaroo, which was last seen in the collection in 2004. A few species left our collection this year, including lesser kudu, great grey owl and the last North American tree porcupine, which went to Blackpool Zoo. A new breeding male drill arrived from Hanover to replace our young male, which moved on to St-Martinla-Plain in France, who then sent one of their males to Hanover. In this way, valuable genetics were moved around the population to create the most robust captive population possible. Tiger Tracks, our new Sumatran tiger exhibit, opened in September, and the male has spent a lot of time walking over the public viewing tunnel, as can be seen by the amount of muddy footprints he leaves on the glass! We are hopeful of future breeding success with the species; and there has been some interest between the male and the female in recent times.

Estates and gardens We continue to invest in visitor amenities at Edinburgh Zoo, with work on the Penguins Café completed at the beginning of 2016. The extension has doubled the indoor seating capacity and has created additional outdoor seating, with spectacular views out across Penguins Rock. The inside of the café was also refurbished and further modernised. A new Picnic & Play area was also completed in time for Easter, with the former site of Dinosaurs Return! being transformed into a landscaped picnic area and children’s play park,

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with climbing frames, tiger statue and accessible play panels. The Gardens team also recycled much of the planting and rockwork from the dinosaurs exhibit to furnish the new tiger extension. The second phase of the Mansion House refurbishment programme came to an end and has already delivered a substantial increase in revenue. The members’ bar and the Geddes, Gillespie and Macmillan rooms were all redecorated to a high standard, the house was re-carpeted throughout, and repairs were carried out to the entire roof. Elsewhere on site, the former Steller’s sea eagle enclosure was transformed into a new home for our troupe of barbary macaques, including extensive housing renovations, manufacturing climbing structures and platforms, and re-landscaping the entire enclosure. The major focus for 2016, though, was the completion of Tiger Tracks. Our new Sumatran tiger exhibit is more than three times the size of its predecessor and cost in the region of half a million pounds to build. The enclosure features a spectacular ground-level viewing tunnel for visitors, a high-level viewing area, climbing structures and feeding posts, heated rocks, a pond to splash in and new cubbing dens. The Property and Estates team played a leading role in delivering this complex and multi-faceted project, from the initial conceptual stage right through to the construction of the purpose-built house, manufacture of the climbing frames and the landscaping and planting of the enclosure.


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“Our new Sumatran tiger exhibit is more than three times the size of its predecessor and cost in the region of half a million pounds to build.�


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“A particular highlight was Science Night at the Zoo – where our 2,000 guests could, amongst other things, learn to extract the DNA from a strawberry.”


RZSS EDINBURGH ZOO

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Business operations

Events and experiences

2016 saw a strong performance from the conference and events business based within the Mansion House at the Zoo. Wedding bookings alone rose by 58%, with corporate and private events revenue up by 14.4%. The sales team undertook a number of new initiatives to drive this growth and have also added an additional team member.

RZSS again partnered with the Edinburgh International Science Festival in 2016 to deliver a bumper programme of events, spreading the word about the Society’s scientific work. Particular highlights were Science Night at the Zoo – where our 2,000 guests could, amongst other things, learn to extract the DNA from a strawberry – and Feeding Time at the Zoo, where guests travelled across the site visiting different animals and sampling food inspired by their diets.

Whilst visitor numbers to the Zoo as a whole dropped by 8.9% from the previous year to 574,175, a higher average spend per visitor meant there was only a 0.05% drop in total revenue, to £1.82m. This performance was due in part to the performance of the revamped Penguins Café, which has proved very popular. Further developments to the catering business are planned for 2017 to enhance and diversify the current offer. The retail business achieved a total income of £1.5m which, whilst down 1.8% on the previous year, did represent an increase in spend per visitor of 8.2%. Income from Gift Aid remained level with 2015, and the net contribution per visitor was 11%.

Two Pokémon GO nights took place in August, with the Zoo opening its gates after hours for fans of the mobile game to wander around spotting rare and exotic Pokémon. 4,000 people attended in all, and the events raised more than £13,000 towards our conservation efforts. The popular Tribal Elders lecture series continued with two very successful talks by Lee Durrell and David ‘Jonah’ Western, and our long-running Dreamnight event took place in August, where we worked with six local charities to offer 2,000 free tickets to ill, disabled and disadvantaged children.

we raised £197,870 for the Society from 1. Interior of the new Penguins Café 2. Creepy Crawlies in October proved popular with visitors 3. A penguin keeper experience at the Zoo 4. Pokémon GO comes to the Zoo

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Other highlights included the temporary Creepy Crawlies exhibition during the October half-term holiday, a number of film screenings (including Life of Pi with a talk from a tiger keeper), and a magical trail to tie into the release of the new J. K. Rowling movie, Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them. Visitors had to follow a trail to find the fantastic beasts hidden in suitcases around the Zoo, and links were drawn between the beasts in the film and the many threatened animals being looked after at Edinburgh Zoo. Over the course of 2016, we sold 1,619 keeper experience vouchers, representing an income of £197,870 (an increase of 13% on the previous year). We also launched a series of new Spiders: Fight your Phobia workshops, and delivered eight workshops with renowned nature photographer Laurie Campbell.

1,619 keeper experiences

21


OUR YEAR IN NUMBERS

We have engaged with over

700,000 people

J

r o’ G oh n

oat

s

this year from as far afield as Vietnam and New Zealand. If they stood side by side, they would reach all the way from Land’s End to John o’Groats.

1. Online

20 million+ hits

2. Edinburgh Zoo

574,175 visitors

22

3. Highland Wildlife Park 136,843 visitors 4. Membership

25,956 members

5. Education

25,015 engaged

d L an

’s E

nd

1600s

Our conservation efforts saw the Eurasian beaver recognised as a native species in Scotland, 400 years after being hunted to extinction 2017


EN

VU

NT

LC

Our international partnership efforts saw giant pandas reclassified as vulnerable from endangered on the IUCN Red List

Start Our Wild about

Tiger Tracks, the new home for our critically endangered Sumatran tigers, is three times the size of its predecessor

bus Scotland

and

mobile classroom

Our breeding efforts at the Highland Wildlife Park saw a pair of wolverine kits born for the first time in Scotland; only the second UK zoo to achieve this

1st

Our efforts to save the diminutive Partula snail from extinction saw

671 snails

reintroduced to their native Tahiti

Our volunteers dedicated an incredible 500 days to supporting our work

23

has visite

th 32 local au

in S

18 million people saw or read about Sir Nils Olav the king penguin’s promotion ceremony

d all

cotl an

orities

d

Stop

Our commitment to sustainability saw

98% of our waste diverted from landfill


RZSS HIGHLAND WILDLIFE PARK

A record year saw visitor numbers exceed 136,000 and a number of exciting projects commence, from the off-show breeding programme for Amur leopards to a multimillion-pound redevelopment plan for the site. Our animals

24

In 2016, we finished construction of a unique off-show breeding facility for the critically endangered Amur leopard, a pair arriving from Tallinn Zoo in Estonia and Twycross Zoo in the East Midlands. This extensive, natural facility will enable us to produce leopard cubs that are not habituated to humans, meaning they are eligible for a reintroduction project in the Russian Far East. We have been working with the European breeding programme and Russian authorities for a couple of years to improve the protocol for re-establishing the leopard in a key part of its historical range. If it all goes well, we could be moving home-grown leopards out to Russia by mid- to late 2018.

Other important arrivals included new breeding males for our herds of Przewalski’s horses and white-lipped deer, and a new adult male wildcat that has been loaned to us from Aigas Field Centre. A new pair of beavers were brought into the collection and, following Scottish Government’s formal recognition of the species, it is conceivable that they may be used for reintroduction within Scotland.

Highland Wildlife Park is only the second institution in the UK to breed this species, and our female was only the third captive wolverine on record to give birth at only two years old. Because of the secretive nature of the species during breeding season, it was actually a few months before we could confirm the presence of kits.

Two species left the collection in 2016: satyr tragopans, to make space for the eventual return of capercaillie, and the herd of kiang from the entrance reserve, which will be replaced by our herd of white-lipped deer. A number of our wildcats were moved out to different collections, and our lynx and elk offspring from 2015 were all moved on, as were some Temminck’s tragopan, snowy owl, Przewalski’s horse and Bukhara deer offspring from previous years. Our most significant birth during the year was a pair of wolverine kits. The

1.

1. Five bison calves were born in 2016 2. Six wolf pups were born at Wolf Wood 3. Construction finished on a new off-show Amur leopard breeding facility

2.

Other important hatchings and births included a pair of great grey owls (our second successful clutch from this species), four Japanese macaques, three lynx, two Przewalski’s horse foals, twin elk, five bison calves and two litters of Scottish wildcats. The Park welcomed a litter of six wolf pups – the first offspring from our new wolf pair – and three white-lipped deer calves, our best year to date with this species. We also had our first forest reindeer calf; however, following mobility problems brought on by a spinal infection, he had to be euthanased after an extensive programme of treatment failed to improve his situation.

3.


25

“Our most significant birth during the year was a pair of wolverine kits. The Highland Wildlife Park is only the second institution in the UK to breed this species.�


“Numbers remained buoyant all year round and were fairly evenly spread, highlighting the fact that – in spite of its rural location – the Park is no longer a seasonal attraction.”

.08 .08

26


RZSS HIGHLAND WILDLIFE PARK

68,890 visitors in 2006

136,843 visitors in 2016

Business operations The year started with wintry showers which continued well into March; however, as the old saying goes, “it’s an ill wind that blows nobody any good”, and the Park benefited greatly from visitors eager to see polar bears and snow leopards in a snow-covered landscape. Numbers remained buoyant all year round and were fairly evenly spread, highlighting the fact that – in spite of its rural location – the Park is no longer a seasonal attraction. As the Park has grown and developed, our infrastructure has struggled to meet the demands put upon it, and a decision was made early in the year to carry out a feasibility study, which led to a stage-one application to the Heritage Lottery Fund. If we are successful, this would not only transform our facilities

1.

to deal with an ever-increasing number of visitors, but also would give us the opportunity to create a world-class visitor centre showcasing our conservation and educational work both here in Scotland and around the world. We hope to hear more on the progress of this application in the first quarter of 2017.

To meet the demands of our many customers, we have offered additional Land Rover and photography tours, doubled the number of animal talks, maximised our catering offer, and installed additional picnic areas for families to enjoy whilst taking the pressure off our main restaurant facilities.

Our success this year can be attributed to a marketing plan which prioritised quieter months, our focus on local and national media coverage, and the development of lasting partnerships with a host of local businesses and associations. We continue to work with nearby schools on projects and to offer work experience to secondary pupils, and we are grateful to our team of dedicated volunteers who make such a significant difference to life at the Park.

Throughout 2016, the Highland Wildlife Park team worked exceptionally hard to offer a quality product, excellent customer service and value for money, and although we did not bring any new or additional animals to our collection, we achieved our best ever visitor figures of 136,843.

27

2.

3.

1. An early concept for a native species hub at the Park 2. An example from this year’s marketing campaign 3. Additional minibus and Land Rover tours were offered to cope with demand


DEVELOPMENT AND MEMBERSHIP 1.

2016 was a landmark year for RZSS Membership, with numbers reaching a record high of 25,956. In Development, despite an uncertain political and economic climate, we raised £2.52 million thanks to the generous support of our members, supporters and funders. Membership

28

Over the course of the year, two highly successful Member and Adopter events took place, with a record 1,720 people coming along to the Zoo to participate in animal encounters, keeper talks, guided walks and conservation presentations. These events – in addition to developing a new membership CRM database, strengthening our member benefit programme, and trialling new recruitment and retention activity – have certainly kept the team busy. Autumn brought with it the opening of Tiger Tracks which, in addition to providing an exclusive members-only preview event, encouraged a significant number of visitors to become fullyfledged members. Tiger Tracks was also the theme for our member reactivation activity, with an incentivised campaign delivering a return on investment of 5:1. Acting on feedback from our members’ survey in 2015, we extended members’

2.

3.

gate opening hours, opened new play areas at the Zoo, expanded our member events, and offered reciprocal visits to partner zoos based throughout the UK and Europe.

Support from People’s Postcode Lottery in 2016 also helped us begin to undertake a much-needed impact assessment of fundraising efforts and the difference these make to RZSS as a whole.

Development

Our continuing partnership with Clydesdale Bank enabled us to extend the Wild about Scotland programme for another year, supporting the native species education activities we deliver to children across the country. Thanks to Clydesdale’s support, the Wild about Scotland bus has now visited every local authority area in Scotland.

A major focus for RZSS in 2016 was to build the capacity of the Development team, ensuring that we maximise every funding opportunity that arose. Over the course of the year, we appointed a new Head of Development, a focused role of Grants Manager and a new Development Coordinator to join the existing Development Manager, who worked hard to achieve a huge amount without the rest of the team in place. Looking forward to 2017, the team will develop a new strategy for the future, create and follow up on new funding leads, and ensure all our supporters receive the best possible stewardship. We are also working on relaunching our patron and corporate membership schemes to provide greater recognition for the support they give us.

July saw the launch of a new legacy partnership with legal firm Gillespie MacAndrew. This is RZSS’s first partnership in this area and will help raise vital funds for priority conservation and education projects across the world. A series of activities and events are planned that will promote legacy giving and the difference a simple gift in a Will can make for the future of our world and its precious ecosystems.

The Society is grateful for the continued support of players of People’s Postcode Lottery, who have donated over £1 million to our work to date, including a further generous donation in 2016 of £250,000. This funding helped us grow our tailored education programmes, increase capacity within teams and enrich the environment for the animals in our care.

‘The Society is grateful for the continued support of players of People’s Postcode Lottery, who have donated over £1 million to our work to date, including a further generous donation in 2016 of £250,000.”

1. Meerkat Plaza at Edinburgh Zoo 2. Players of People’s Postcode Lottery have donated over £1 million to RZSS to date 3. Family meeting Walker the polar bear at the Highland Wildlife Park


DEVELOPMENT AND MEMBERSHIP

Corporate partners Allied Mobility Arnold Clark Automobiles Limited Arthur J. Gallagher & Co Baillie Gifford & Co Clydesdale Bank Plc Fyffes Plc Hasbro IndigoVision Group Plc Lothian Buses Limited Müller Milk & Ingredients Petroineos Fuels Limited Royal London Serenata Flowers Thomas Tunnock Limited Wester Ross Salmon The Winnock Hotel

Trusts, foundations and other charitable organisations Ancaster Trust Castansa Trust J. & J. R. Wilson Trust Lord Provost Rapid Action Fund Jean & Roger Miller Charitable Trust Cruden Foundation Limited The Binks Trust The Robertson Trust The Balcombe Charitable Trust People’s Postcode Lottery The Ettrick Charitable Trust The Gordon and Ena Baxter Foundation The Russell Trust The Ancaster Trust

Statutory and grant funders Heritage Lottery Fund City of Edinburgh Council Highlands and Islands Enterprise Scottish Enterprise Scottish Government Scottish Natural Heritage

Adopters We are grateful, as ever, to our animal adopters for their generous support of the Royal Zoological Society of Scotland.

Platinum adopters Alan M. Morrison Alun Grassick Bret Maling David Thom John G. R. Crombie Kirsty Maxwell Stuart Lynda Burrill Maria Frizzoni Michelle Fines-Smith

Mr & Mrs George and Margaret Laing Mrs Chris Weir Ms Silvia Michell Roger Miller Ronnie McNab Sylvia and Wellie Victoria and Tim Robinson

Gold adopters Ahroob Jabbar Ailsa Wylie Alix Henderson Ann Downie Anne Dick Anne Rushbrook – Ian Rushbrook – in loving memory Arthur David Lawson Audrey Hughes Beatrice Leigh Blair and Millie McCabe Bruntsfield Primary School Callum Moore Carole Wilson Catherine Gray (neé Falconer) Claire Hayman Claire-Louise Whyte Coco Salvesen Dawn Jones Derek Wilson Dorothy Moffat Dougal Stott Douglas Hutchison Douglas Whittaker Dr Dallas Brodie Eilidh and Ruairidh Grassick Elaine & Larry Eva Isabelle Todd Frances MacQueen Gavin Thomson George & Marie Liston George and Carole Kerr Hazel Ramsay Heather Manning – in loving memory of Eileen Cholerton Helen Armour Hwter Horst Ian and Silvana Park Ian Marchant Irene & Rodger Glenfield J. Browne, C. Devine, S. Leith & J. Moffat Jackie Hutt James Fullaway James S. Fernie – in memory of Mrs Dorothy Fernie James Wheatley Janice Ruth Chambers Jaqueline Wright – in memory of my dearest Peter Falconer Jill Stringer John Fitzgerald John Meikle Joyce Wylie

Katie Batte Katie Logan Anderson Keith Ball Kenneth B. Falconer Kings Manor Hotel Kirsty Stewart Lesley Simmons Maite Gurpegui GarcÍa Margaret Nelson Marjorie Newton Mark G. N. Ferguson Martin Gibson Mary Mackinnon Master Monty Salvesen Maureen Sommerville Michelle Hammond Midge Bett Miss Linda Profeta Miss R. A. E. Firth Mrs Emily Grassick Mrs Kathryn Clark Mrs Pauline Smith Muriel Dickson Nancy S. Roberts Natalie Nickelson Neil Proven Neil Walker Newburgh Primary School Nikki Young P. & K. Holmes – in memory of Jean Barbour Miller Paulette Overton Peter & Barbara Barham Peter Elliot Peter McKenzie Peter Stein Professor Patricia Peattie Rachel Butter Richard & Kate Bradley Robert Chambers Robert Picken Rosemary McBratney Rotary Club of Corstorphine Samantha Dee Dukelow Sandra Ross Sheila J. Guy Silvano Volpi Simon Hunter Stephen, Peter and Sarah Glenfield Sue Thomason Susan M. Jacyna Suzanne Dunsmore The Casm Family Torphichen Kirk Adventurers Victoria Armstrong Walter H. S. Brown William J. Crawford We would also like to thank our 1,125 silver adopters and 663 bronze adopters for their continued support.

29


COMMUNICATIONS

Highland Wildlife Park, only 7 miles from Aviemore #eatsdulldays

AND YOU THOUGHT MURRAYFIELD HAD A FEROCIOUS PACK.

ULL EATS DT FOR U DAYS O FAST BREAK

Buy and give truly unique gifts for the animal lover in your life.

Book online now and save

highlandwildlifepark.org.uk It’s more fun at the Zoo Registered charity number: SC004064

Central to our communications activity in 2016 was the delivery of RZSS’s largest ever programme of market research, which underpinned seven multi-channel campaigns and helped the Zoo and the Highland Wildlife Park engage with over ten million people. Marketing

30

The development and delivery of market research was a key focus for 2016, beginning with a full demographic analysis of visitors, members and event attendees over the last four years. This exercise gave the team tremendous insight into who our visitors are, where they come from and how best to communicate with them. The research also involved mystery shopping at Edinburgh Zoo, an international visitor census, audience segmentation and focus groups with key audiences. A rolling programme of iPadbased visitor surveys was also introduced at both sites, providing direct feedback from visitors regarding their experience and motivations.

Three comprehensive marketing campaigns were delivered for Edinburgh Zoo, with the overarching theme of “It’s more fun at the Zoo”. These campaigns utilised a range of channels known to be popular with our target audiences, from cinema and television to largescale outdoor media, digital and print ads. The centrepiece was the creation of a new television advert, offering a fun, interactive and memorable day out for all the family. The launch of Tiger Tracks was also a key focus, with targeted campaign promotion which utilised stunning HD video footage on large-scale outdoor digital advertising. In October, a unique ticket promotion encouraged families to bring pumpkins with tiger-themed carvings in exchange for a free child ticket. The promotion saw a 23% increase in visitors over the period. At the Highland Wildlife Park, an “Eats Dull Days Out for Breakfast” campaign was developed to run all year round, with a particular focus on growing visitors in the quieter months. Again, the campaign involved multiple elements, including targeted digital, outdoor media, radio and print ads. This was one

of the Park’s most successful campaigns to date, helping deliver our best ever visitor numbers of 136,843. The team ended the year with a “Gifts that give more” Christmas campaign which, whilst operating on a small budget, delivered year-on-year retail sales growth of 18%, online animal adoption growth of 31% and a 21% increase in online membership income.

“In October, a unique ticket promotion encouraged families to bring pumpkins with tiger-themed carvings in exchange for a free child ticket. The promotion saw a 23% increase in visitors over the period.”


COMMUNICATIONS

Digital It was a strong year for RZSS digital activity in 2016. A redevelopment of the RZSS website, which aimed to increase awareness of our charitable aims and conservation work, saw overall traffic increase by 189% to 766,000. Even more significantly, online revenue across all RZSS websites rose by over 11%. Despite these encouraging figures, we are continually looking to improve our online experience. Mobile and tablets users now account for 70% of website traffic, and towards the end of the year an independent audit was carried out on how the experience might be improved on mobile devices. Work is already under way based on the findings from this report. Online channels are forming an increasingly important part of our marketing campaigns, and new routes are being explored to find better ways to enrich the visitor experience, including the launch of a badge trail through the Zoo mobile app. The team have also redesigned and retargeted our e-newsletters, added a new webcam at Tiger Tracks and taken forward a rolling programme of blogs covering activity from across the Society.

Over the course of the year, we experimented successfully with new technologies in an attempt to better connect our audience with our work, including Facebook Live streams and 360 video footage. Several virtual animal experiences are already available through the Zoo’s YouTube channel, but the real hope for this technology is that it will allow visitors to be transported to our conservation projects all around the world. We look forward to sharing more of this content with you early in 2017!

Public relations RZSS’s public profile remained high throughout the year, beginning with polar bear breeding at the Highland Wildlife Park, taking in the launch of new exhibits such as Tiger Tracks and the reclassification of giant pandas, and ending with the landmark decision by Scottish Government to allow beavers to remain in Scotland on a permanent basis. A particular highlight was the visit of the Royal Norwegian Guard in August to bestow a new title on their mascot Sir Nils Olav the king penguin. The ceremony generated news coverage across Europe, America, Canada and Japan, and was also streamed live via Facebook, reaching over 700,000

people. An accompanying YouTube video went viral and was shared by Hollywood actor Ashton Kutcher with his 17 million followers. Over the course of the year, we facilitated a number of filming days at both parks, including a documentary titled The Animal Symphony with Chris Packham. Well-known YouTube celebrities, Alfie Deyes and Zoe Sugg (who between them have over 15 million YouTube followers), visited the Zoo in August and created a vlog of their visit and keeper experience, which reached 800,000 people. Roseanna Cunningham MSP visited the Highland Wildlife Park to formally open the Scottish wildcat conservation breeding enclosures, whilst our coverage of the giant panda reclassification, Partula snail reintroduction and Eurasian beaver announcement generated significant attention for our native and international conservation work. Over in the Pantanal, the team worked closely with production company Maramedia on a new David Attenborough-narrated documentary about giant armadillos, which aired on the BBC in April.

ns

r ou

ig pa

m

ca

ver ed o

h reac

10 million people in total in

2016

31


OUR PEOPLE AND RESOURCES

1.

It was a very busy year for our staff and volunteers, marked by some big changes, including the appointment of a new Chief Executive in October. We are grateful to the whole team in helping deliver our mission: connecting people with nature and safeguarding threatened species. Organisational development

32

The Human Resources and Health and Safety teams’ focus continued to be on supporting culture change across the organisation. Key initiatives were the implementation of our online performance management system, which ensures a more holistic approach to individual and team objectives, and the roll-out of the self-service aspect of the HR system to all employees, which allows them to input holiday requests and view their payslips online. 2016 also saw the launch of our online e-learning system, which all employees can access to undertake mandatory modules. Meanwhile, our Individual Development Award scheme – which encourages individuals to apply for funding for personal projects or

2.

3.

development aligned with our mission – saw five individuals awarded funds over the course of the year. From a Health and Safety perspective, there was one incident requiring reporting under RIDDOR.

Our people From a headcount of 262 at the start of the year, we reached a seasonal peak of 312. Over the year, we undertook 65 recruitment campaigns, including the appointment of a new Chief Executive and a number of other senior management posts.

Sustainability Empowered staff are the fulcrum of sustainability success within RZSS. Their valued contributions to completely new waste-processing mechanisms saw us not only comply with Waste Scotland regulations last year but also achieve the fantastic result of diverting 98% of our waste from landfill. Switching off non-essential electric equipment, making recommendations for resource efficiencies, and contributing to internal communication processes through consultative peer groups and newsletters all helped us achieve this impressive result.

4.

“Our Individual Development Award scheme – which encourages individuals to apply for funding for personal projects or development aligned with our mission – saw five individuals awarded funds over the course of the year.” 1. Keepers at work at the Edinburgh Zoo 2. 98% of our waste was diverted from landfill 3. Two recipients of an Individual Development Award grant 4. Feeding time at the Highland Wildlife Park


OUR PEOPLE AND RESOURCES

President

Patrons

Senior management

John Spence CBE, DL (until May 2016)

Malcolm Bowie

Ian Marchant

Sir Gerald and Lady Elliot

Barbara Smith, Chief Executive Lindsay Macpherson, Director of Human Resources

Board

John Fitzgerald Alun Grassick

Prof Jeremy A. Peat OBE, BA, MSc, FRSE (Chairman)

Jonathan Gray

George Brechin OBE, BSc, CIHM (Vice Chairman)

9 anonymous

Sandy Batho MA, FCIPD Prof Mary Bownes OBE, DPhil, CBiol, FRSB, FRES, FRSE Peter Budd BSc, CEng, MICE, MIStructE, FCIOB Kerry Falconer FIOBS, MBA John Fitzgerald BSc (Hons), FCIPD Dr Karen Blackport BSc, PhD, MBA

Alan Morrison

Darren McGarry, Head of Living Collections (Edinburgh Zoo)

Lady Christine Brown

Douglas Richardson, Head of Living Collections (Highland Wildlife Park)

Sir Ewan Brown CBE Keith Chalmers Watson Sir Gerald Elliot Henry Elliot BA (Hons)

Tessa McGregor MA (deceased Jan 2017)

Dr John Francis ARCS, PhD, DSc, FRSG, FRSE

Prof Natalie Waran BSc (Hons) PhD (until Nov 2016) Prof Roger Wheater OBE, FRSE

Honorary member HRH The Duke of Edinburgh KG, KT

Lady Margaret Elliot MBE, MA

Thomas Huxley Alexander Kerr Dr Andrew Kitchener BSc, PhD James McCarthy BSc (For) Jimmie MacGregor MBE Dr Peter Maitland BSc, PhD, FRSE Prof Aubrey Manning OBE, DPhil RSE Captain Harald Misund John Mitchell MA (Hons), Cbiol Robert Ollason MBE (deceased Oct 2016)

Royal patron

Mary Patterson DipEd

HRH The Princess Royal KG, KT

John Spence CBE, DL

Civic patrons

The Rt Hon the Lord Steel of Aikwood, KT, KBE, DL

The Rt Hon Donald Wilson, Lord Lieutenant and Lord Provost of the City of Edinburgh

Olly Davies, Head of Communications and Membership

Dr Jean Balfour CBE, FIC (FOR), JP, DSc, BSc, FIBiol, FRSA, FRSE

Dr Karen MacEachern BSc, BVMS, PhD, Cert EM (Int Med), MRCWS (from Nov 2016)

Prof Andrea Nolan OBE

Jason Dyer, Head of Development

Professor Ian Aitken OBE

Roy Dennis MBE

Dr Thomas Mitchell CA (Honorary Treasurer)

Iain Valentine, Director of Giant Pandas

Daska Mackintosh, Head of Operations and Visitor Services (Highland Wildlife Park)

Honorary fellows

Dr Deborah Long BA (Hons) PhD, FRSGS

Prof Alan Miller BSc, PhD, CPhys, FRSE, FIEEE, FOSA, FInstP

James Stewart, Director of Finance

Dr Miranda Stevenson OBE Michael Tomkies (deceased Oct 2016) Prof Roger Wheater OBE, FRSE

Bruce Ritchie, Head of Business Operations and Visitor Experience (Edinburgh Zoo) Sarah Robinson, Head of Conservation Programmes and Science Suzanne Scott, Head of Discovery and Learning Gavin Whigham, Head of Property and Estates (Edinburgh Zoo)

33


FINANCIAL SUMMARY

Trustees’ statement The group summary financial statements are not the statutory financial statements but a summary of the information derived from the consolidated statement of financial activities and the consolidated balance sheet. The full Annual Report and consolidated financial statements, which were approved by the trustees on 27 April 2017 and will be submitted to OSCR, received an unqualified audit report from Henderson Loggie. For a fuller understanding of the financial affairs of the Society, the statutory financial statements are available on the Society’s website (rzss.org.uk). Signed on behalf of the trustees by:

This statement, including the opinion, has been prepared for and only for the charity’s members and trustees as a body and for no other purpose. We do not, in giving this opinion, accept or assume responsibility for any other purpose or to any other person to whom this statement is shown or into whose hands it may come, save where expressly agreed by our prior consent in writing.

Basis of opinion Our examination involved agreeing the balances disclosed in the summary financial information to the full annual financial statements. Our audit report on the Society’s full annual financial statements describes the basis of our opinion on those financial statements.

Opinion Jeremy A. Peat, Chairman 34

Independent auditors’ statement to the members of the Royal Zoological Society of Scotland We have examined the summarised financial statements of the Royal Zoological Society of Scotland set out below.

Respective responsibilities of the trustees and the auditors The trustees are responsible for preparing the summarised financial statements in accordance with applicable United Kingdom law and the recommendations of the Charities SORP. Our responsibility is to report to you our opinion on the consistency of the summarised financial statements within the Annual Review with the full annual financial statements and trustees’ Annual Report. We also read the other information contained in the Annual Review and consider the implications for our report if we become aware of any apparent misstatements or material inconsistencies with the summarised financial statements. The other information comprises only the financial summary.

In our opinion, the summarised financial statements are consistent with the full financial statements and the trustees’ Annual Report of the Royal Zoological Society of Scotland for the year ended 31 December 2016. Henderson Loggie Chartered Accountants and Statutory Auditors 27 April 2017

Fundraising practice RZSS is committed to ensuring all fundraising activities are carried out honestly and in compliance with fundraising legislation. The Development team within RZSS, responsible for all elements of fundraising for the organisation, are also individual members of the Institute of Fundraising and therefore adhere to the Code of Fundraising Practice. RZSS trustees and staff remain committed to the highest standards in fundraising and to working in full compliance with Scottish charity law and the Scottish system of self-regulated fundraising through the Independent Panel.

Trading performance Performance in 2016 was impacted by poor summer weather and the laterthan-expected opening of the new tiger exhibit at Edinburgh Zoo. Visitor numbers were 9% down at Edinburgh Zoo, but up by over 10% at the Highland Wildlife Park, which had a record year. Lower levels of donations and legacies adversely affected income by 3%. Costs continued to be well managed in 2016. The decrease in expenditure is largely due to the reduced events expenditure related to the Dinosaurs Return! exhibition in 2015 and the return of conservation expenditure to a more normal level after an exceptional year in 2015. Overall, the Society achieved an operating surplus of £0.4m in 2016 (2015 £0.3m). The net deficit for the year was £0.1m (2015 £0.8m surplus), after taking account of investment gains and adverse movement in the valuation of the pension fund.

Principal income movements (£m) Income 2015 Visitors Other trading Donations and legacies Income 2016

£15.4 -0.2 -0.1 -0.4

Principal expense movements (£m) Expenditure 2015 Events Conservation Expenditure 2016

£15.1 -0.5 -0.3

£14.7

£14.3


FINANCIAL SUMMARY

Consolidated statement of financial activities for the year ended 31 December 2016

Total 2016 (£)

Total 2015 (£)

Income and endowments from: Donations and legacies Charitable activities Other trading activities Investments Other Total income and endowments

771,350 10,417,068 3,059,824 427,605 27,792 14,703,639

1,146,763 10,624,699 3,192,676 424,422 29,682 15,418,242

Expenditure on: Raising funds Charitable activities Total expenditure

2,656,608 11,666,703 14,323,311

2,583,844 12,511,295 15,095,139

358,332 738,660

(21,441) 301,662

(828,000) (4,381) (93,721)

(50,000) 498,000 39,675 789,337

18,200,870 18,107,149

17,411,533 18,200,870

Gains/(losses) on investment assets Net income/expenditure Other recognised gains/losses Gains/(losses) on investment property Actuarial gains/(losses) on defined benefit pension scheme Other gains/(losses) Net movement in funds Reconciliation of funds Total funds brought forward at 1 January 2016 Total funds carried forward at 31 December 2016

35

Consolidated balance sheet for the year ended 31 December 2016

Fixed assets Investments Current assets Stocks Debtors Cash at bank and in hand

Creditors: amounts falling due within one year Net current assets/(liabilities) Total assets less current liabilities Creditors: amounts falling due after one year Defined benefit pension scheme liability Net assets Funds Unrestricted reserves General reserves Revaluation reserve Pension reserve Total unrestricted reserves Restricted funds Endowment funds

Total 2016 (£)

Total 2015 (£)

15,903,005 3,202,335

15,766,155 2,865,946

310,719 905,842 1,824,046 3,040,607

284,305 1,508,380 1,628,169 3,420,854

(2,510,287) 530,320

(2,686,245) 734,609

19,635,660 (729,711) (798,800) 18,107,149

19,366,710 (1,007,040) (158,800) 18,200,870

8,827,222 6,150,000 (798,800) 14,178,422 3,531,606 397,121 18,107,149

8,057,253 6,150,000 (158,800) 14,048,453 3,795,799 356,618 18,200,870


RZSS EDINBURGH ZOO INVENTORY

KEY TO INVENTORY 01/01/16 Births Arrivals D.N.S Deaths Dispose 31/12/16

Number of individuals as at 1 January 2016 Number of births/hatches during 2016 Number of animals acquired from other institutions during 2016 Number of neonate animals dying aged 30 days or less during 2016 Number of deaths of animals aged more than 30 days during 2016 Number of animals moved on to other institutions during 2016 Number of individuals as at 31 December 2016 Animal counts – males, females, unknown sex

ESB EEP ISB * **

Breeding programme category (BPC) European studbook European endangered species programme International studbook Managed by RZSS Of conservation concern in Scotland

EX EW CR EN VU

Extinct Extinct in the wild Critically endangered Endangered Vulnerable

Species under threat

NT LC

Near threatened Least concern

Species not under threat

DD NE -

Data deficient Not evaluated Domestic – not applicable

Threat status unknown

Please note: The Red List category given is, in most cases, for the species and does not specify the threat category for the subspecies.

20 2.1.0

EEP/ISB

RL

BP

C

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D. N

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31

36

Bi

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1/

20

16

16

IUCN Red List (RL) iucnredlist.org An indicator of global threat status

MAMMALIA MARSUPIALIA Phascolarctus cinereus adustus

Koala

3.1.0

Phalanger gymnotis

Ground cuscus

1.0.0

Macropus fuliginosus melanops

Western grey kangaroo

0.0.0

Wallabia bicolor

Swamp wallaby

9.9.1

Lesser hedgehog tenrec

3.1.1

Rock hyrax

2.5.0

Chaetophractus villosus

Large hairy armadillo

2.0.0

Tolypeutes matacus

Southern three-banded armadillo

2.2.0

Myrmecophaga tridactyla

Giant anteater

1.1.0

Eulemur coronatus

Crowned lemur

2.3.0

1.0.0

Eulemur rubriventer

Red-bellied lemur

3.1.0

0.1.0

Lemur catta

Ring-tailed lemur

0.7.0

Callimico goeldii

Goeldi's monkey

6.6.0

Callithrix pygmaea niveiventris

Eastern pygmy marmoset

4.0.0

Saguinus oedipus

Cotton-top tamarin

1.1.0

Sapajus apella apella

Brown capuchin monkey

18.17.0

18.17.0

Sapajus xanthosternos

Yellow-breasted capuchin monkey

4.5.0

4.5.0

1.0.0

1.0.0 1.1.0 0.0.3

1.0.0

0.0.1

LC LC

1.1.0

ESB

LC

4.0.0

6.9.3

ESB

LC

1.0.1

2.1.0

INSECTIVORA Echinops telfairi

LC

HYRACOIDEA Procavia capensis

2.3.0

1.2.0

3.6.0

ESB

LC

XENARTHRA 0.2.0 0.1.0

2.2.0

LC

2.3.0

NT

1.1.0

EEP/ISB

VU

2.3.0

ESB

VU

3.2.0

EEP

VU

5.0.0

ESB

NT

7.7.1

EEP/ISB

VU

EEP/ISB

CR

PRIMATES 1.0.0

5.0.0

0.7.0

1.1.1

4.0.0 0.2.2

0.2.2

1.1.0

LC

LC EEP

CR


20

RL

EEP*

LC

4.4.0

ESB

VU

Pithecia pithecia

White-faced saki monkey

2.1.0

0.1.0

1.2.0

EEP

LC

Cercopithecus diana

Diana monkey

1.1.0

1.1.0

EEP*/ISB*

VU

Cercopithecus lhoesti

L'Hoest's monkey

2.2.0

3.2.0

EEP*

VU

Macaca sylvanus

Barbary macaque

7.11.0

6.11.0

ESB

EN

Mandrillus leucophaeus

Drill

1.2.0

1.0.0

1.0.0

1.2.0

EEP/ISB

EN

Theropithecus gelada

Gelada baboon

9.13.1

2.0.0

6.0.0

5.13.1

EEP/ISB

LC

Nomascus gabriellae x leucogenys hybrid

Gibbon hybrid

0.1.0

0.1.0

Nomascus gabriellae

Buff-cheeked gibbon

3.1.1

3.1.1

EEP

EN

Pan troglodytes

Chimpanzee

4.4.0

4.4.0

EEP

EN

Pan troglodytes troglodytes

Central chimpanzee

0.1.0

0.1.0

EEP

EN

Pan troglodytes verus

Western chimpanzee

5.4.0

0.1.0

5.3.0

EEP

EN

Mus musculus

House mouse

8.16.0

8.16.0

-

Rattus norvegicus domesticus

Brown domestic rat

8.16.2

0.0.2

8.16.3

-

Erethizon dorsatum

North American tree porcupine

1.1.0

0.0.0

LC

Cavia porcellus

Guinea pig

0.2.0

0.2.0

-

Dasyprocta azarae

Azara's agouti

8.6.0

1.0.0

1.0.0 0.0.1

0.0.1

1.0.0

31 6.29.0

1.0.0

D

2.3.0

3.4.0

D

4.26.0

Grey-legged douroucouli

Ar

Common squirrel monkey

Aotus lemurinus griseimembra

Bi

Saimiri sciureus

01

BP

C

2/ /1

se po is

th ea

.S

s

s D. N

r iv al

hs rt

/0

1/

20

16

16

RZSS EDINBURGH ZOO INVENTORY

-

RODENTIA

0.0.3

1.0.0

2.0.0

0.1.0

6.1.0

0.5.0

ESB

DD

37 CARNIVORA Felis silvestris

Scottish wildcat

3.1.0

Leopardus wiedii

Margay

1.1.0

1.1.0

EEP

NT

Panthera leo persica

Asiatic lion

1.1.0

1.1.0

EEP/ISB

EN

Panthera tigris sumatrae

Sumatran tiger

1.1.0

1.1.0

EEP/ISB

CR

Arctictis binturong

Binturong

1.1.0

0.1.0

1.0.0

ESB

VU

Helogale parvula

Dwarf mongoose

2.3.0

0.1.1

0.0.1

1.0.0

1.4.0

Suricata suricatta

Meerkat

8.9.0

0.0.3

0.0.3

1.1.0

7.8.0

Lycaon pictus

Painted hunting dog

2.1.0

0.0.2

0.0.2

1.0.0

1.1.0

EEP/ISB

EN

Ailuropoda melanoleuca

Giant panda

1.1.0

1.1.0

ISB

VU

Helarctos malayanus malayanus

Malayan sun bear

2.0.0

2.0.0

ESB

VU

Aonyx cinerea

Oriental short-clawed otter

0.6.0

0.5.0

ISB

Mephitis mephitis

Striped skunk

1.0.0

Ailurus fulgens fulgens

Red panda

0.0.0

Equus grevyii

Grevy's zebra

2.4.0

Tapirus indicus

Malayan tapir

2.1.0

Rhinoceros unicornis

Greater one-horned rhinoceros

1.0.0

Potamochoerus porcus

Red river hog

2.2.0

2.2.0

0.2.0

Sus cebifrons negrinus

Visayan warty pig

5.3.0

0.0.3

0.0.3

1.0.0

3.1.0

0.1.0

1.0.0

LC**

LC LC

1.0.0 1.0.0

VU LC

1.0.0

EEP/ISB

EN

2.4.0

EEP/ISB

EN

2.1.0

EEP/ISB

EN

1.0.0

EEP/ISB

VU

4.2.0

EEP

LC

0.3.0

EEP

CR

PERISSODACTYLA

1.0.0

1.0.0

ARTIODACTYLA

1.0.0

4.0.0


20

RL

BP

C

2/ /1 31

se po is D

th ea D

D. N

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s

s r iv al Ar

hs rt Bi

01

/0

1/

20

16

16

RZSS EDINBURGH ZOO INVENTORY

Sus scrofa scrofa kunekune

Kunekune pig

2.0.0

2.0.0

Hexaprotodon liberiensis

Pygmy hippopotamus

1.1.0

1.1.0

EEP/ISB

Vicugna vicugna

Vicuna

1.2.0

1.2.0

EEP/ISB

Moschus moschiferus

Siberian musk deer

0.0.0

Pudu puda

Southern pudu

2.0.0

Axis kuhlii

Kuhl's hog deer

2.0.0

Rusa alfredi

Visayan spotted deer

2.1.0

0.1.0

Madoqua kirkii

Kirk's dik-dik

1.2.0

0.2.0

Bos javanicus javanicus

Banteng

3.2.0

1.1.0

Tragelaphus angasii

Lowland nyala

4.5.0

2.1.0

Tragelaphus imberbis

Lesser kudu

1.3.0

Capra hircus

Goat

1.4.0

Naemorhedus griseus arnouxianus

Chinese goral

1.1.0

Kobus megaceros

Nile lechwe

0.0.0

Darwin's rhea

5.4.0

Southern cassowary

1.1.0

Aptenodytes patagonica patagonica

King penguin

7.0.0

1.0.0

Pygoscelis papua papua

Gentoo penguin

32.42.0 14.9.5

6.6.0

Eudyptes moseleyi

Northern rockhopper penguin

13.10.0

3.0.0

Acryllium vulturinum

Vulturine guineafowl

1.2.0

1.0.0

0.2.0

Agriocharis ocellata

Ocellated turkey

1.1.0

Argusianus argus

Great argus pheasant

1.1.0

0.1.0

1.2.0

ESB

NT

Anas bernieri

Madagascar teal

6.3.0

4.3.0

ISB

EN

Anas melleri

Meller's duck

2.1.0

2.1.0

EEP

EN

Aythya baeri

Baer's pochard

2.2.0

2.2.0

ESB

Mergus albellus

Smew

1.1.0

1.1.0

LC

Phoenicopterus chilensis

Chilean flamingo

24.12.0

27.13.0

NT

Ciconia nigra

Black stork

1.1.0

1.1.0

Eudocimus ruber

Scarlet ibis

3.1.0

3.1.0

Geronticus eremita

Waldrapp ibis

5.8.0

Scopus umbretta

Hamerkop

0.1.0

1.0.0

LC

1.0.0 1.0.0

0.1.0

1.0.0

LC VU

EEP/ISB

NT

2.0.0

0.0.0 2.2.0

ESB/ISB

EN

1.0.0

0.3.0

ESB

LC

4.3.0

EEP/ISB

EN

2.1.0

4.5.0

ESB

LC

0.0.0

ESB

NT

0.1.0

1.2.0

CR

1.4.0

1.3.0

EN

0.3.0

-

1.1.0

ESB

VU

1.0.0

EEP

EN

1.1.0

ESB

NT

1.1.0

ESB/ISB

VU

8.0.0

EEP*

LC

44.45.0 ESB*

LC

10.10.0

EN

AVES RHEIIFORMES Rhea pennata pennata

4.3.0

CASUARIIFORMES

38

Casuarius casuarius

SPHENISCIFORMES

1.0.5

3.6.0

4.6.0

EEP

GALLIFORMES LC

1.1.0 0.2.0

NT

ANSERIFORMES 1.0.0

1.0.0

CR

CICONIIFORMES 4.1.1

0.0.1

1.0.0

1.0.0

ESB

LC LC

5.8.0

EEP

CR

1.1.0

ESB

LC


20

RL

4.3.0

BP

0.1.0

C

2/ 31

/1

se po is D

th ea D

.S

s

s D. N

r iv al Ar

hs rt Bi

01

/0

1/

20

16

16

RZSS EDINBURGH ZOO INVENTORY

PELECANIFORMES Pelecanus onocrotalus

Eastern white pelican

4.6.0

0.2.0

LC

Cathartes aura

Turkey vulture

2.0.0

2.0.0

Neophron percnopterus percnopterus

Egyptian vulture

0.2.0

0.2.0

Terathopius ecaudatus

Bateleur eagle

0.1.0

0.1.0

NT

East African crowned crane

1.1.0

0.1.0

0.1.0

1.1.0

EN

Caloenas nicobarica

Nicobar pigeon

3.1.0

0.1.0

1.0.0

2.2.0

NT

Ducula bicolor

Pied imperial pigeon

2.2.0

0.2.0

2.1.0

Gallicolumba crinigera

Mindanao bleeding-heart dove

2.0.0

Goura victoria victoria

Victoria crowned pigeon

2.1.0

Otidiphaps aruensis

White-naped pheasant-pigeon

1.1.0

Zenaida graysoni

Socorro dove

6.1.0

7.5.0

Trichoglossus moluccanus

Rainbow lorikeet

9.8.0

2.0.2

Ara ararauna

Blue-and-gold macaw

0.2.0

0.2.0

Ara rubrogenys

Red-fronted macaw

1.1.0

1.1.0

Cacatua sulphurea

Lesser sulphur-crested cockatoo

0.1.0

0.1.0

CR

Tyto alba

Common barn owl

0.0.0

1.1.0

LC

Bubo bengalensis

Bengal eagle owl

0.0.1

0.0.1

LC

Bubo bubo

Eurasian eagle owl

0.1.0

0.1.0

LC

Bubo scandiacus

Snowy owl

1.1.0

1.1.0

LC

Ptilopsis leucotis

Northern white-faced scops owl

0.1.0

0.1.0

LC

Strix aluco

Tawny owl

0.1.0

0.1.0

LC

Strix nebulosa

Great grey owl

0.1.0

0.0.0

LC

Coracias caudatus

Lilac-breasted roller

0.1.0

0.1.0

LC

Bucorvus leadbeateri

Southern ground hornbill

1.0.0

1.0.0

Leucopsar rothschildi

Bali starling

1.3.0

Zoothera dohertyi

Chestnut-backed thrush

3.3.0

Dryonastes courtoisi

Blue-crowned laughingthrush

5.0.0

Lonchura oryzivora

Java sparrow

0.0.18

Icterus oberi

Montserrat oriole

1.1.0

FALCONIFORMES LC EEP

EN

GRUIFORMES Balearica regulorum gibbericeps

COLUMBIFORMES

0.1.0

0.1.0

1.0.0

0.1.0

0.1.0

1.1.0

3.0.0

LC

2.0.0

ESB

VU

1.2.0

ESB

VU

1.1.0

ESB

VU

9.5.0

EEP

EW

PSITTACIFORMES 1.0.0

10.8.2

LC LC EEP*

EN

STRIGIFORMES 1.1.0

0.1.0

CORACIIFORMES

ESB

VU

PASSERIFORMES 1.3.0

EEP

CR

2.2.0

ESB

NT

1.0.0

5.0.0

ESB/ISB

0.0.10

0.0.8

VU

0.1.0

1.0.0

VU

0.1.0 1.0.0

1.0.0

CR

39


20

RL

BP

/1 31

C

2/

se D

is

po

th ea D

D. N

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s

s r iv al

hs rt

Ar

REPTILIA

Bi

01

/0

1/

20

16

16

RZSS EDINBURGH ZOO INVENTORY

CHELONIA Geochelone denticulata

Yellow-footed tortoise

2.3.0

2.3.0

Malacochersus tornieri

Pancake tortoise

1.2.0

1.2.0

Pogona vitticeps

Bearded dragon

1.3.0

Eublepharis macularius

Leopard gecko

0.2.0

Tiliqua scincoides

Blue-tongued skink

0.0.2

Python regius

Royal python

1.1.1

Dasypeltis atra

Egg-eating snake

0.1.2

Elaphe guttata

Cornsnake

6.2.0

Orthriophis taeniurus friesi

Taiwan beauty snake

Lampropeltis getula californiae

California kingsnake

Lampropeltis triangulum nelsoni

VU ESB

VU

SQUAMATA SAURIA 1.0.0

0.0.1

2.3.0

NE

0.2.0

NE

0.0.1

NE

1.1.1

LC

SQUAMATA SERPENTES

0.1.2

NE

5.2.0

LC

1.0.0

1.0.0

NE

1.2.0

1.2.0

NE

Nelson's milksnake

2.0.0

2.0.0

NE

Axolotl

0.0.2

0.0.2

CR

Dendrobates tinctorius 'azureus'

Blue poison dart frog

1.3.9

1.1.9

LC

Epipedobates tricolor

Phantasmal poison arrow frog

0.0.5

0.0.5

EN

Litoria caerulea

White's tree frog

0.0.5

0.0.1

0.0.4

LC

Cyprinus carpio carpio

Common carp

51

12

39

VU

Astyanax mexicanum

Mexican blind cavefish

11

11

NE

Poecilia latipinna

Sailfin molly

45

20

25

LC

Toxotes jaculatrix

Banded archerfish

4

4

LC

Periophthalmus

Mudskipper

2

2

LC

Tetraodon biocellatus

Figure eight pufferfish

8

4

LC

Tetraodon nigroviridis

Green spotted pufferfish

2

2

NE

Heterometrus

Scorpion

0

6

6

NE

Brachypelma albopilosum

Curlyhair tarantula

0

1

1

NE

Brachypelma boehmei

Mexican fireleg tarantula

1

1

NE

Grammostola rosea

Chilean rose tarantula

1

2

NE

Lasiodora parahybana

Salmon-pink bird-eating tarantula

1

0

NE

1.0.0

AMPHIBIA CAECILIIDAE Ambystoma mexicanum

DENDROBATIDAE

40

0.0.9

0.0.2

0.1.0

0.1.7

PISCES

4

INVERTEBRATA ARACHNIDA

1 1


20

RL

C BP

/1 31

D

is

po

2/

se

s th ea D

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r iv al Ar

hs rt Bi

01

/0

1/

s

20

16

16

RZSS EDINBURGH ZOO INVENTORY

CRUSTACEA Coenobita clypeatus

Land hermit crab

1

1

NE

Gromphadorhina portentosa

Madagascar hissing cockroach

68

30

NE

Blaberus craniifer

Death's head cockroach

421

40

NE

Pholeogryllus geertsi

Cave cricket

87

60

NE

Extatosoma tiaratum

Macleay's spectre

6

85

NE

Eurycantha calcarata

Spiny stick insect

34

35

NE

Heteropteryx dilatata

Jungle nymph

3

43

NE

Tirochoidea jianfenglingensis

Giant Asian walkingstick

1

4

NE

Mecynorrhina polyphemus

Polyphemus flower beetle

46

Pachnoda marginata

Sun beetle

0

Pachnoda trimaculata

Ornate sun beetle

2

Smaragdesthes africana oertzeni

Purple jewel beetle

3

Polposipus herculeanus

Fregate Island giant beetle

34

Blera fallax

Pine hoverfly

18

Atta cephalotes

Leaf-cutter ant

5,000

Tanzanian red-legged millipede

0

Partula affinis

Partula snail

256

Partula faba

Partula snail

Partula mooreana

Partula snail

Partula suturalis vexillum Partula taeniata simulans

INSECTA

15

1

9

NE

5

10

NE

2

0

NE

3

1

NE

25 172

EEP

VU

140

NE

5,000

NE

147

NE

DIPLOPODA Epibolus pulchripes

8

GASTROPODA 332

0

12

153

201

222

EEP/ISB

CR

1

0

0

279

236

0

5

1

0

0

EEP/ISB

EW

111

326

73

EEP/ISB

EW

Partula snail

279

470

0

Partula snail

208

323

0

17

181

243

308

EEP/ISB

EW

7

237

67

220

EEP/ISB

CR

Partula tohiveana

Partula snail

267

204

0

25

Achatina fulica

Giant African land snail

438

0

0

0

339

107

EEP/ISB

0

38

COLLECTION SUMMARY INDIVIDUALS

TAXA

Start of year

End of year

Start of year

End of year

Mammalia

415

400

63

64

Aves

301

304

45

45

Reptilia

36

35

11

11

Amphibia

25

22

4

4

Pisces

123

87

7

7

Invertebrata

7,455

6,608

24

25

TOTAL

8,355

7,456

154

156

EW NE

41


RZSS HIGHLAND WILDLIFE PARK INVENTORY

KEY TO INVENTORY 01/01/16 Births Arrivals D.N.S Deaths Dispose 31/12/16

Number of individuals as at 1 January 2016 Number of births/hatches during 2016 Number of animals acquired from other institutions during 2016 Number of neonate animals dying aged 30 days or less during 2016 Number of deaths of animals aged more than 30 days during 2016 Number of animals moved on to other institutions during 2016 Number of individuals as at 31 December 2016 Animal counts – males, females, unknown sex

ESB EEP ISB * **

Breeding programme category (BPC) European studbook European endangered species programme International studbook Managed by RZSS Of conservation concern in Scotland

EX EW CR EN VU

Extinct Extinct in the wild Critically endangered Endangered Vulnerable

Species under threat

NT LC

Near threatened Least concern

Species not under threat

DD NE -

Data deficient Not evaluated Domestic – not applicable

Threat status unknown

Please note: The Red List category given is, in most cases, for the species and does not specify the threat category for the subspecies.

20 12.14.0

ISB

RL

BP

C

2/ /1 31

se po is D

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hs rt Bi

01

/0

1/

20

16

16

IUCN Red List (RL) iucnredlist.org An indicator of global threat status

MAMMALIA PRIMATA Macaca fuscata

Japanese macaque

10.13.0

3.1.0

1.0.0

LC

European beaver

0.0.0

Felis manul manul

Pallas’s cat

1.1.0

Felis silvestris

Scottish wildcat

4.5.0

3.4.0

Lynx lynx lynx

Northern lynx

4.3.0

1.2.0

Panthera pardus orientalis

Amur leopard

0.0.0

Panthera tigris altaica

Amur tiger

1.1.0

Uncia uncia

Snow leopard

1.1.0

Canis lupus lupus

European grey wolf

1.1.0

Vulpes lagopus

Arctic fox

1.1.0

1.1.0

Ursus maritimus

Polar bear

2.1.0

2.1.0

EEP/ISB

VU

Gulo gulo gulo

Wolverine

1.1.0

1.1.2

EEP

VU

Ailurus fulgens fulgens

Red panda

1.1.0

1.1.0

EEP/ISB

EN

Przewalski's horse

2.7.0

4.6.0

EEP/ISB

EN

42 RODENTIA Castor fiber

1.1.0

1.1.0

LC**

CARNIVORA 0.1.0 2.3.0

0.2.0

1.0.0

EEP*/ISB*

NT

5.3.0

4.7.0

ESB

LC**

3.2.0

2.3.0

ESB

LC**

1.1.0

EEP

CR

1.1.0

EEP/ISB

EN

1.1.0

EEP/ISB

1.1.0

2.4.0

3.5.0

0.0.2

EN LC** LC

PERISSODACTYLA Equus caballus przewalskii

2.0.0

1.0.0

1.1.0


20 0.0.0

ISB

LC

6.0.0

EEP/ISB

LC

2.0.0

0.3.0

0.2.0

0.1.0

1.1.0

0.3.0

1.0.0

1.1.0

0.2.0

15.23.3

0.0.13

7.5.3

8.18.13

Bukhara deer

4.2.0

1.0.0

White-lipped deer

1.4.0

2.1.0

RL

BP

/1

C

2/

se is

po

s D

th ea D

.S D. N

r iv al Ar

rt

31

Equus kiang holdereri

Bi

01

/0

hs

1/

s

20

16

16

RZSS HIGHLAND WILDLIFE PARK INVENTORY

Eastern kiang

2.3.0

Vicugna vicugna

Vicuna

6.0.0

Alces alces alces

European elk

2.2.0

Rangifer tarandus fennecus

Forest reindeer

Cervus elaphus

Red deer

Cervus elaphus bactrianus Przewalskium albirostris Bison bonasus

European bison (Lowland-Caucasian line) 5.16.0

Bos grunniens

Domestic yak

3.4.0

0.1.0

Budorcas taxicolor taxicolor

Mishmi takin

1.5.0

0.1.0

1.4.0

ESB*

VU

Capra falconeri heptneri

Turkmenian markhor

8.7.0

2.1.0

6.6.0

EEP

EN

Hemitragus jemlahicus

Himalayan tahr

3.7.0

1.1.0

5.8.0

Ovibos moschatus

Muskox

2.1.0

2.1.0

Common crane

2.0.0

2.0.0

LC**

Tragopan satyra

Satyr tragopan

2.2.0

2.2.0

0.0.0

NT

Tragopan temminckii

Temminck's tragopan

1.3.0

1.1.0

1.3.0

LC

Bubo bubo

Eurasian eagle owl

2.0.0

2.0.0

LC

Bubo scandiacus

Snowy owl

1.2.0

1.1.0

0.1.0

1.2.0

LC

Strix nebulosa lapponica

Great grey owl

1.1.0

1.1.0

1.0.0

1.2.0

LC

ARTIODACTYLA

2.0.0 1.0.0

1.0.0

1.1.0

4.1.1

0.1.0

3.2.1

0.0.1

1.0.0

1.2.0

LC** ESB

LC LC

2.2.0

ESB

LC

3.4.0

ESB

VU

9.16.1

EEP*/ISB

2.3.0

VU -

NT EEP/ISB

LC

AVES GRUIFORMES Grus grus

GALLIFORMES

1.1.0

STRIGIFORMES

1.0.0

COLLECTION SUMMARY INDIVIDUALS

TAXA

Start of year

End of year

Start of year

End of year

Mammalia

200

208

26

27

Aves

17

14

6

5

TOTAL

217

222

32

32

43


Designed and produced by Hamlin Daniels www.hamlindaniels.co.uk

“Our new fiveyear strategy represents an ambitious but achievable vision of how RZSS can become a global leader in species conservation.� (Jeremy A. Peat, Chairman)

Photography credits:

rzss.org.uk edinburghzoo.org.uk highlandwildlifepark.org.uk

Laurie Campbell Jamie Grant Rachel Hein Mat Larkin Rob McDougall Jan Morse Jon-Paul Orsi Katie Paton Philip Price Alex Riddell Sandie Robb Kevin Schafer

Profile for RZSS

RZSS Annual Review 2016  

The Royal Zoological Society of Scotland's Annual Review 2016

RZSS Annual Review 2016  

The Royal Zoological Society of Scotland's Annual Review 2016

Profile for rzss