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CURRENT MOOD Creating moments of calm

home style

APR/MAY 2019 NZ$10.50 INC GST

Style a bedroom that’s not a snooze 9 421022 130017

Good chats with creative ladies

A nostalgic stay for your next road trip


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CONTENTS

90

78

Contents

April/May

HOMES

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Magical mystery There’s so much more to this home than meets the eye — come inside as we discover its secrets.

78

I got a feeling Intuition and an amazing backyard saw this house snapped up at first sight.

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Sea & the city It’s unexpectedly urban for being by the beach, but this home proves you can have it all.

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Character study We could all learn a thing or two from this about what constitutes a good amount of quirk.

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Take on any project with Dulux Colour Services: Dulux Colour Experts in Bunnings Warehouse and Guthrie Bowron stores every Saturday until Easter*

With Coloours of New Zeealand ®

Dulux Live Chat (10am–10pm, Monday – Saturday) on dulux.co.nz New Colour Inspiration on dulux.co.nz Order Dulux Sample Pots online

dulux.co.nz/findyourcolour *Colour Experts will be in Bunnings Warehouse stores from 10am – 2pm. For Guthrie Bowron, please check store hours at dulux.co.nz/findyourcolour. Dulux and Colours of New Zealand are registered trade marks.


CONTENTS

STYLE 18

Scout Attention, shoppers!

20

Bookmarks Your other favourite reads.

22

Fashion forward In praise of autumn.

24

Kids’ stuff For lion-hearted adventurers.

26

Two ways with Dulux Colours of New Zealand.

30

Bathroom moodboard Which look suits you?

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124

Forever piece Shelve these ideas for now.

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On our radar Some current crushes.

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LIVING

Style your space Your dream bedroom awaits.

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Paint trends

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Well & good Life’s simple pleasures.

You may enter with Resene.

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Small space A Waiheke Island apartment.

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PEOPLE

124

Artist profile

130

Tourists, Massachusetts.

This life Carter Were.

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ETC

Moments at home Ange Dye.

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Last word Alice Lines

Georgina Hoby Scutt.

52

Design destination

Artist profile Alana Wilson.

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Editor’s note

119

Subscribe


Sofa and chaise $6999 as shown in Juke fabric


LOVING THIS ISSUE:

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I’ve always had great admiration for the homeowners who find time in their busy schedules to open their doors to our writers and photographers. After years of politely prying into other people’s places, turning the lens on my own for this issue’s Last Word on page 130 was an interesting exercise. I’ve only shared a few corners, but even that takes a certain amount of preparation, mostly removing rouge toys, hiding unsightly cords and schooling my partner Nick on the best angles for a portrait. And then there’s the emotional psyching up, during which it’s helpful to remember that it’s often our houses’ imperfections that make them home. There’s really no such thing as a finished house, and that’s okay — as the saying goes, it’s the journey, not the destination. That sentiment resonates with me at the moment, because there’s a stash of artwork I’ve been meaning to frame gathering dust in our spare bedroom, shelves that need to go up in my son Ted’s room, and I’m still on the hunt for a sideboard that’s just the right size for our favourite lamp. I’ve promised myself I’ll finally make the framing and shelf-hanging happen this weekend, but I’m actually relishing taking my time to find the ideal sideboard for our living space — I just love the thrill of the hunt. With the environmental impact of fast fashion and homeware a paramount concern, I believe it’s so important to be mindful not to shop impulsively to fill the gaps in our décor with the first things we can find. At the height of the Marie Kondo decluttering craze, charity shops are being forced to turn away people’s castoffs due to oversupply — a sure sign we need to be much more thoughtful about the purchasing decisions we’re making. So I’m taking a step back before filling the gap at my place, and hope the interior inspiration on the following pages will help you find pieces you too can live with for a lifetime.

Alice Lines, @alice.lines

Portrait: Simon Wilson. Alice wears: Alice blouse and Ashley pants, juliettehogan.com. Juliet Hoop earrings, meadowlark.co.nz

EDITOR’S NOTE


Clockwise: 01 ––

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–– 0800 225 5367 –– aptinnovation.co.nz


EDITOR Alice Lines DEPUTY EDITOR Philippa Prentice ART DIRECTOR Juliette Wanty CONTRIBUTORS Monique Balvert-O’Connor Kirsty Dawn Sarah Ell Wendy Fenwick Nicole Franzen Michelle Halford Evie Kemp Holly Marder Nicole Mason Claire McCall Ophelia Mikkelson Larnie Nicolson Natalie Parke Sam van Kan Simon Wilson ADVERTISING & COMMERCIAL PARTNERSHIPS Nicholas Burrowes General Manager nick@homestyle.co.nz +64 21 505 992

PRINTER Image Print DISTRIBUTOR Gordon & Gotch SSN 1177-0015

homestyle is a member of the MPA, and circulation is independently audited under the Audit Bureau of Circulation. Contact us for our latest circulation and readership information.

homestyle is subject to copyright in its entirety. The contents may not be reproduced in any form, either whole or in part, without written permission from the Publisher. All rights reserved in material accepted for publication, unless initially specified otherwise. All letters and other material forwarded to the magazine will be assumed intended for publication unless clearly labelled “not for publication”. No responsibility is accepted for unsolicited material. Paint colours may alter in the printing process.

SUBSCRIPTIONS Online homestyle.co.nz Email subs@homestyle.co.nz Phone 0800 246 637 Int’l phone +64 9 966 0999 PUBLISHER The Pluto Group Ltd Physical 326 New North Road, Kingsland, Auckland 1021 Postal PO Box 911577, Victoria Street West, Auckland 1142 Phone +64 9 300 7544 Email info@homestyle.co.nz

Subscribe to homestyle and save on page 119.

COVER PHOTOGRAPHY Simon Wilson STYLING Juliette Wanty


Ask in store for a copy or visit our website. www.mico.co.nz


STYLE

Style 18

Shop

20

Bookmarks

22

Fashion forward

24

Kids’ stuff

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Two ways with

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Bathroom moodboard

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Forever piece

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On our radar

36

Style your space

44

Paint trends

Quit hogging the covers and start daydreaming about how you can use our ideas on page 36 to make your bedroom the most beautiful it can be.

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STYLE —— Shop

Scout

We’ve been shopping for your home.

JUST QUIETLY Dried florals designer Joanna Gibbs has always been her dad’s favourite florist and she’s fast becoming everyone else’s too. One look at her wistful creations and it’s obvious why, but what they don’t shout from the rooftops is that she started her business as a way to work with him, fusing floristry, engineering and structural design to form pieces that offer “silent joy”. myfathersflorist.co.nz

ABSOLUTE TERRA The latest range of homeware and accessories from Melbourne-based Sage & Clare is earthy, tactile and frightfully desirable. With a fun, effortless and carefree appeal, Terra combines desert colours, folk motifs and ’70s vibes for an effect that’s completely gorgeous. sageandclare.com

Paris brand Sarany works with women in Cambodia to produce products like this great mat, helping to improve their living conditions and yours too. everyday-needs.com

Simon James’ new Kashmir design for Resident is available as a bar stool as well, but we’re here to talk about this handsome chair. It has a dashing tailored backrest that’s nice and supportive and feels kind of like a hug, while the stitched detail on the upholstery provides a subtle sense of modern craftsmanship. simonjamesdesign.com

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Words: Philippa Prentice

IT TAKES A VILLAGE

THIS LITTLE GUY


DAM GIRL That Kristina Dam is one talented woman and some more of her beautiful pieces have just been delivered from Copenhagen to the team at Capricho. Our picks include this Dome vase and hardwood Sphere object, which is actually two bowls that fit together to form a perfect circle. capricho.co.nz

SETTLE DOWN Emma Hayes’ recent restful addition to her collection of dreamy mural-style wallpapers, Sediment, was inspired by the way our rivers carve through the landscape, creating patterns as their waters rise and fall. Emma says she has a thing for designs that transition from light to dark — perhaps this one (available in three colourways) will help you to relax as the sun goes down. emmahayes.co.nz

Cherry Plum Linen

Faria Flowers Woodpecker

WHAT YOU SEE IS… All art’s personal in that it’s interpreted through the eyes of the beholder, but these artworklike mirrors take that to the next level — you can literally see yourself in them. The Vitrail collection by Inga Sempé for Magis references classic Venetian mirrors and comprises eight versions of four shapes that can be hung vertically, horizontally and diagonally. ecc.co.nz

Cancun Velvet Sage


STYLE —— Bookmarks

Top shelf

Your other favourite reads.

John Scott Works by David Straight, published by Massey University Press, $70.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP Martin Bach, Hokitika, 1974-75; Scott/ Wheeler House, Haumoana, 1987-90; Werry House, Greytown, 1978-79.

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Words: Philippa Prentice

Don’t feel silly if you don’t know much about John Scott, he’s one of New Zealand’s least well-documented architects — though why is anyone’s guess, when his work is so influential and culturally significant. Of Maori, English, Irish and Scottish descent, John spent most of his life in Hawke’s Bay and died too soon at 68. He was a prolific creative whose 200-plus projects encompassed private homes, public buildings, schools and churches, and this exhibition project by renowned photographer David Straight documents more than 40 of them. A bit of a character variously described as wild-haired, barefooted and soft-hearted, John “designed spaces with people at the heart,” says David. “His architecture is not about the monumental or the ego, but rather about people and how they experience the spaces they occupy.” With this elegant, enthralling book, you can at last get clued up — and experience some of those spaces for yourself.


ABOVE Martin House, Bridge Pa, 1969-70 — one of John’s best-known and most-loved residences.

IN BRIEF Homemade by Eleanor Ozich, published by Penguin Random House, $38. Never not treating our bodies and homes as temples, we’ve been enjoying Kiwi Eleanor’s latest recipe book, which will make you question why you buy so many grocery basics when they’re easy and fun to make. You’ll also learn how to whip up products for your home, like air freshener and waxed food wrap. Neo Tarot by Jerico Mandybur, published by Hardie Grant, $45. Editorial director, writer, podcaster, legally ordained minister, reiki practitioner, cool girl and “boss witch” Jerico Mandybur is interesting to say the least, and here she provides an equally intriguing dose of modern woo-woo in the form of a self-care tool with a beautifully illustrated card deck. Bon Voyage, published by Gestalten, $88. How to uphold your values when you’re travelling in two easy steps. One: flick through this, and two: make reservations at any number of the boutique stays profiled, whether the zero-waste hotel, the minimal-impact glampsite, the sustainable island resort, or the villas using their profits to educate local teens. Pacific Natural by Jenni Kayne, published by Rizzoli, $100. One to watch since age 19, when she started her eponymous California-based fashion label, Jenni Kayne has gained a loyal clientele of celebs while extending her brand to include homeware. Adding to her repertoire is this Martha Stewartendorsed manual, which channels her laidback-luxe look into ideas for hosting.


STYLE —— Fashion forward

Harvest moon

An ode to autumn, when wardrobees ne. and interiors dance to the same tun 1

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THE LOOK Boyfriend top, $199; Classic shirt, $189; Lounge Tie pants, $169, kowtowclothing.com. CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT 1 Twist pendant light, from $490, monmouthglassstudio.com. 2 Bellini Bucket bag, $370, georgiajay.com. 3 Ring bowls by Renée Boyd, $39 each, sundayhomestore.co.nz. 4 Raukura Turei x EDN artwork, $415, everyday-needs.com. 5 Linen cushion, $150, achomestore.co.nz. 6 Velvet Round cushion, $150, achomestore.co.nz. 7 Rock serving board by Tom Dixon, $320, simonjamesdesign.com. 8 Naervaer side table by &tradition, $919, dawsonandco.nz. 9 Mr Olsen lounge chair by Warm Nordic, $3950, goodform.co.nz. 10 Oslo planter, $24, sundayhomestore.co.nz. Rubber tree, $42, plantandpot.nz. 11 Mojoo lacquered boxes, from $109 each, cittadesign.com. 12 Open candelabra by Muuto, $182, bauhaus.co.nz.

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STYLE —— Kids’ stuff

Acts of courage

Let them play at being brave in the comfort of their bedroom and backyard. 1 3

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT 1 Foldable crate by Aykasa, $22, littlewhimsy.co.nz. 2 Rainbow Garland bunting by Nobodinoz, $49, littlewhimsy.co.nz. 3 Hanging Canvas world map, from $339, paperplanestore.com. 4 Lion rug by Oyoy, $150, dappermrbear.com. 5 Ch hild swing by Solvej, $170, littlewhimsy.co.nz. 6 Mini Mod chair by HomeDay, $239, dappermrbear.com. 7 Bashful Bunny toy, $45, littlewhimsy.co.nz. 8 Blue Tigers pencil case by Petit Monkey, $30, littlewhimsy.co.nz. 9 First Go balance bike by Banwood, $330, dappermrbear.com. 10 Raschel Comfort blanket, $69, cittadesign.com. 11 Circus Bunting canopy by Numero 74, $270, concreteblush.com. 12 Tomorrow I’ll Be Brave book by Jessica Hische, $37, littlewhimsy.co.nz. 13 Classic helmet by Banwood, $80, dappermrbear.com.

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Different strokes

Simplifying the art of combining paint colours, two stylists break out their brushes to share their take on how to live your best life with the DuluxÂŽ Colours of New ZealandÂŽ collection.

PH OTO G R APHY Wendy Fenwick


Two ways with —— DULUX

The stylist Dulux colour ambassador Michelle Halford This Dulux colour palette provides a warm, soothing starting point for a calm, sophisticated sanctuary. The neutral hues are carried through to the sofa and chair, the soft curves and velvet of which lend a luxe feel to the space. They’re offset by the clean lines of the travertine coffee table, which blends in beautifully and introduces additional texture. Sculptural extras in wood, ceramic and brass form elegant finishing touches.

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BACKDROP Front wall and skirting in Dulux Marton; rear wall and skirting in Dulux Haast Half; floor in Dulux Knuckle Point; plinth in Dulux Southern Alps, dulux.co.nz. OPPOSITE, FROM FRONT LEFT Malawi rug by Armadillo & Co, from $1895, theivy house.co.nz. Elle Block coffee table by Globe West, $3196, sorenliv.com. Desk sculptures by Kristina Dam, $285/set of four, capricho.co.nz. Moon Jar vase by Walk in the Park, $253, tessuti.co.nz. Stay sofa by Gubi, $9580, cultdesign.co.nz. Iggy cushion cover, $60, cittadesign.com. Decoration Circle sculpture by Kristina Dam, $260, capricho.co.nz. Bestlite BL35 floor lamp by Gubi, $1813, cultdesign.co.nz. Lobby chair by Wendelbo, $1879, dawsonandco.nz. Agara print by Somée, $147, theposterclub.com (frame stylist’s own). Turn side table, $1080, doublasandbec.com. Bloom table lamp by Resident, $640, simonjamesdesign.com. Weeping fig, $115; Bianca Cylinder pot, $92, plantandpot.co.nz. Bowl by K&R Ceramics and books stylist’s own. TOP RIGHT Bowl by Astier de Villatte, $145, tessuti.co.nz. Books stylist’s own. >

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Two ways with —— DULUX

The stylist Dulux colour ambassador Evie Kemp

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Dulux and Dulux Colours of New Zealand are registered trademarks of DuluxGroup (Australia) Pty Ltd. Always confirm your colour choice with Dulux sample pots or large colour swatches

When styling a space with several bold shades, choose colours that share depth and intensity — it’s an exciting way to pick paints that can make even the most unexpected combination work harmoniously. Here, the furnishings, homeware and artwork echo the paint, creating balance and stopping any one colour from dominating. Gold is used as an accent to highlight key pieces and lighten things up.

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BACKDROP Walls in (left to right) Dulux Tokatoka, Dulux Tanemahuta and Dulux Makaka Bay; floor in Dulux Narrow Neck, dulux.co.nz. OPPOSITE, FROM FRONT LEFT Arguto rug, from $795, stacksfurniture.co.nz. JH7 Palette table by &tradition, $3639, dawsonandco.nz. Ceramics by Bronwyn Mason, POA, @juneblune. Frederick sofa, $3400, achomestore.co.nz. Paint cushion by Tom Dixon, $175, ecc.co.nz. Grid wool throw, $249; Cotton Velvet cushion cover, $50, cittadesign. com. Bangalow palm, $65, plantandpot.nz. Auburn Gauze linen fabric (used as curtain), $56/m, marthas.co.nz. Archie buffet, $3701, sorenliv.com. Little Ripper artwork by Annie Sandano, $1200, seedgallery.co.nz. Ceramic vases, POA, formantics.co.nz. Molly floor lamp by Tooy, $2170, ecc.co.nz. Otto chair, $1845, timwebberdesign.com.

Buy Dulux sample pots or order free large colour swatches online at dulux.co.nz; visit the paint counter at Bunnings Warehouse or Guthrie Bowron to purchase your Dulux paint; and see more inspiration from Michelle and Evie at dulux.co.nz/inspiration. homest yle 29


MICO —— Bathroom moodboard

Come clean

Essentials checklist Dante mirror cabinet by St Michel, from $889, mico.co.nz.

Frankly, we’d be chuffed with a bathroom with either of these chic aesthetics, but be honest, which feels the most ‘you’?

Toi wall-mounted basin mixer by Phoenix, $819, mico.co.nz. Ladena under-counter basin by Kohler, from $289, mico.co.nz. Urban column shower by Adesso, $899, mico.co.nz. Toi bath spout by Phoenix, $245, mico.co.nz. Patio drop-in bath by Kohler, from $589, mico.co.nz.

‘Luxury Brutalism’ rendered in travertine, this look requires restraint. Use a single material for your backdrop and keep your fittings as pared back as can be.

ALSO ABOVE, FROM LEFT Trav Navona Bianco 60 tiles, $85/m2, tilespace.co.nz. RD stool, $350, douglasandbec.com. Cotton Waffle towel, $59, mavisandosborn.com.

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Prices valid March 1, 2019

ONE ON ONE


Bathroom moodboard —— MICO

Essentials checklist York freestanding bath by Adesso, $1499, mico.co.nz. Axis bath taps by Raynor, $145/pair, mico.co.nz.

CLASS ACT

Birillo Young shower column by Paffoni, $1279, mico.co.nz.

Traditional doesn’t have to mean predictable. For timeless style with a twist, embellish the room with restful colours and patterned tiles, then add classic fixtures.

Magnification mirror by Trendy, $105, mico.co.nz. Edwardian wall-hung basin by Burlington*, $235, mico.co.nz.

Prices valid March 1, 2019

* Tapware and bottle trap not included.

ALSO ABOVE, FROM LEFT Walls in Resene Dusted Blue, resene.co.nz. Demel Multicolor 20 tiles, $75/m2, tilespace.co.nz. Cloud Nine shower curtain, $30, briscoes.co.nz. Olympia Arch mirror, $495, sundaymade.com. Turn 01 wall light, $980, douglasandbec.com.

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STYLE —— Forever piece

MAIN IMAGES Bond modular shelving system by Fogia, from $1463, fredinternational.com.au. ABOVE, FROM TOP Modular shelving system by String, $365/set of three shelves, bobandfriends. co.nz. Panton Wire shelf by Montana Furniture, $630, cultdesign.co.nz. Show cabinet (a component of Montana’s system), $895, cultdesign.co.nz. Tilt 2 High modular shelves, $1190, cittadesign.com.

Growing up Flexible furniture that evolves with you has a certain maturity that’s ideal for adulting. Some pieces of furniture we simply outgrow, but the beauty of modular shelving is that it ages gracefully right along with you. An investment item you can add to or subtract from as your needs dictate and budget allows, whether you’re looking to maximise your space and storage or take visual interest to new heights, it can be configured and reconfigured for life. We’re enamoured by the beautiful lines of Swedish brand Fogia’s first foray into modular shelving, Bond (pictured), which recently featured at Stockholm Design Week. Designed by Main, the slender rod-and-shelf structure can be hung from the ceiling, mounted on the wall or stood on the floor. Buy it now, use it forever — such designs never go out of style, as you can change what you’re displaying as often as you like. 32 homest yle


The stunning Ayana rug in Rose Gold from the Deconstructed collection by Artisan. Auckland Christchurch artisancollective.co.nz/rugs


STYLE —— On our radar

Just saying

Our heads have been turned by a trio of interior possibilities that we think you should know about. ST YLIN G Juliet te Want y

In vanes Is it a blind, is it a curtain? As far as we’re concerned, sheer vertical blinds are the best of both. When you prefer blinds but want to cover large windows (or a door), options such as Luxaflex’s Luminette Privacy Sheers set a serene mood. Their translucent fabric vanes create soft, diffused light and we love the elegance of the lines repeated en masse.

Nail polish Also piquing our interest right now is the temptingly tactile polish of super-clean lacquered pieces, high-gloss materials like glass, and virtually seamless upholstered seating. Get it right by adding a bit of grit to the mix with organic art and raw ceramics that nix any clinical connotations.

At your feet St id hard h d flooring fl i — we’ve ’ been b Step aside, captivated by the use of colourful carpet in international projects, and it’s easy to find your ideal hue with clever clogs like Sallée, who make bespoke 100% New Zealand wool carpets in any colour you like. Neutral furniture will let your shade shine while maintaining visual harmony.

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Luminette Privacy Sheers blinds, POA, luxaflex.co.nz. Two Ways print by Anna Johansson, from $80, theposterclub.com. Dulux Mt Aspiring Quarter paint, dulux.co.nz. Handwoven cushion by Neeru Kumar, $159, tessuti.co.nz. Seventies egg lamp by Laurel, $600, babelogue.shop. Escape Velour carpet in Lotti by Sallée, $139/m2, awardcarpets.co.nz. Lato LN8 side table by &tradition, $1279, dawsonandco.nz. Beak vase, $75, babelogue. shop. Crown chair by Massproductions, from $1972, simonjamesdesign.com.


CITTÀ —— Style your space

Love the way you lie If anyone should have a bedroom they adore, it’s you, so we’re about to show you how to style the sleep space of your dreams.

WO RDS & ST YLIN G Alice Lines & Sam van Kan

PH OTO G R APHY Simon Wilson


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Style your space —— CITTÀ

Silent nights -

Make your bedroom a true sanctuary by including only soothing colours and textures. If you prefer not to stick to one scheme year-round, pick a neutral shade for your duvet cover, then simply change your pillowcases, cushions and throws when the mood takes you.

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Choose a palette of up to five colours in tones of different depths so the effect doesn’t overwhelm the senses. Here, the midtones of the rug and throw provide a restful visual bridge between the pale bedding and the richly hued pillowcases and cushions.

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Create a dreamy floral arrangement for your wall by first foraging for long sticks that will bend and not break. Remove any leaves, then use one stick to form a circle as your base. Secure with floristry wire, then wrap additional sticks around the circle, tucking in the ends as much as possible (you can cut off any overhang later if necessary). Weave dried foliage into the wreath from a single focal point, allowing it to extend in different directions for an organic look and securing it with floristry wire. Now tie in flowers, keeping the biggest blooms closest to your focal point. >

BACKDROP Walls (throughout) in Resene Settlement, resene.co.nz. Florals (throughout), POA, feelgoodwithflowers.co.nz. ABOVE, FROM LEFT Dusk bed with upholstered frame, $4910/queen; Sove linen pillowcases (navy and white), $69.90/pair; Inku cotton linen pillowcase (patterned), $49.90/pair; cotton velvet cushion covers, $49.90 each; Linea linen cotton fitted sheet and flat sheet, $169/queen each; Sove linen duvet cover, $289/queen; Washed Velvet Square Stitch quilted throw, $179; Ribbed wool rug by Nodi, from $1900; Compound bedside cabinet, $1590 (painted with Resene Just Right, resene.co.nz); La:Bruket hand cream, $29.90; Torre night bottle and glass, $59.90; Oku storage lids/trays, from $29.90; Arc free-standing mirror, $690, cittadesign.com. (Also on bedside table) Diptyque Eau des Sens fragrance, $190; Josie Maran Whipped Argan Oil face butter, $63; Josie Maran 100% Pure argan oil, $76, meccabeauty.co.nz. All other items stylists’ own. LEFT, FROM LEFT Radial Round side table, $490; Marble bowl, $16.90; Café mug, $29.90; Type 75 Mini desk lamp by Anglepoise, $390, cittadesign.com. All other items stylists’ own. PREVIOUS PAGES, FROM LEFT Aspen upholstered lounge chair, from $945; Florence tote, $199, cittadesign.com. Nude Gauze linen fabric (used as curtain), $110/m, marthas.co.nz. Sneakers by Garment Project, $250, fatherrabbit.com.

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CITTÀ —— Style your space

Earthy pleasures

- Texture is a great way to bring comfort into the equation, and it comes into play here from the ground up with a nubby woollen rug, a linen duvet, a woven throw and velvet cushions. When selecting a rug, ensure a balanced composition by opting for one that’s big enough to extend either side of the bed by at least 40cm. Keep the head of your bed a rug-free zone, so your bedside table and/or standing lamp rest on the floor, and if you have a bench or an ottoman at the end of your bed, pull out the rug as far as needed to allow their feet to stand on it. - There are no rules about the number of pillows and cushions a bed should be topped with, but do aim to combine different sizes to enhance the overall structure of the scene. Updating the formal feel of two pairs of pillows, an asymmetric effect is always inviting. Stack a couple of pillows on one side of the bed and just one on the other, with two cushions leaned against it. Or stand a single euro pillow against your headboard with a small rectangular cushion or two arranged in front of it.

- Treat styling your bedside table as an opportunity to enhance your evening self-care routine and make bedtime even better. Choose products that look as good as they feel — a lovely face oil or hand cream, linen spray or a facial spritz — and display them within easy reach. All will allow your bedroom to become part of your wind-down ritual while upping your chances of falling asleep. >

d stylists t row thr ? Get the look by folding your blanket i a triangle, drapin it with the point at the end of the ed, then ussing it p a bit for a relaxe finish.


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CITTÀ —— Style your space

PREVIOUS PAGES (& RIGHT), FROM LEFT Noughts Weave wool rug by Nodi, from $3000; Linear two-tier sofa table, $660; toolbox by Vitra, $69.90; Scala Tall glass, $12.90; Sove linen euro pillowcase, $39.90; Sove linen pillowcases (pale and raisin), $69.90/pair; cotton velvet cushion covers, from $49.90; Grid linen pillowcase (patterned), $69.90/pair; Grid linen duvet cover, $289/queen; Lazo woven throw, $149; Sove linen valance, $179/queen; Tide ottoman, from $1085; Cila jug with handle, $59.90; Original 1227 floor lamp by Anglepoise, $790; Bella women’s linen dressing gown, $159; Sari ladder, $89.90; Dixon handbag, $159, cittadesign.com. Latte linen fabric (used as curtain), $48/m, marthas.co.nz. Sandals, $180, birkenstock.co.nz. All other items stylists’ own. BELOW, FROM TOP LEFT Embroidered artwork by Sam van Kan, POA, @samlillianvankan. Print by Hein Studio, $114, theposterclub.com. Yuki lowboy, $2990; Natura glass candle with soy wax, $39.90; Finch dipping bowl, $9.90, cittadesign.com. All other items stylists’ own.

- Another key to successfully styling a bedroom is to introduce interest at different levels. Move some of the focus away from your bed by standing a floor lamp beside it or leaning a ladder against the wall. The latter will also provide a storage solution to help you avoid the dreaded floordrobe.

- Take a curated approach to the top of your chest of drawers and decorate it with a chic vignette. Choose a theme, then objects that share that common thread — we were loosely inspired by Japanese craft. Lay your collection on the ground first to find the most pleasing arrangement. Consider using taller items and artwork to extend your vignette up onto the wall, and offset the lot with an organic element, such as a vase filled with sculptural dried foliage (we used muehlenbeckia) for a perfectly imperfect wabi-sabi effect. Visit homestyle.co.nz for step-by-step videos on how to style these scenes.

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x

Style

your space WORKSHOP SERIES: BEDROOMS Join homestyle editor Alice Lines and Città stylists for an evening of demonstrations, at which you’ll learn how to revamp your bedroom for the cooler months. All ticket holders will receive 20% off their purchases at Città on the night. (Terms and conditions apply.)

TICKETS

AUCKLAND, WELLINGTON, CHRISTCHURCH

To book, visit cittadesign.com/styling-workshops.

$40


RESENE —— Paint trends

Make

an

entrance

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Turn an everyday thoroughfare into a home highlight for an arrival that will not go unnoticed. ST YLIN G

PH OTO G R APHY

Juliet te Want y

Wendy Fenwick


Paint trends —— RESENE

BACKDROP Living area wall in Resene SpaceCote Low Sheen in Resene Shabby Chic; hallway wall Resene SpaceCote Low Sheen in Resene Earthen; archway in Resene Family Tree; floor in Resene Enamacryl gloss in Resene Waiouru, resene.co.nz. OPPOSITE, FROM LEFT Loafer lounge chair by Space Copenhagen for &tradition, $4359, dawsonandco.nz. Turn floor lamp, $1330, douglasandbec.com. Herringbone Tile console table by Charlotte Høncke for Warm Nordic, $1995, goodform.co.nz. Ceramic container by Artesanía de Galicia, $159; Moon jar by Walk in the Park, $253, tessuti. co.nz. Ada bag, $330, georgiajay.com. Pedestal, $400, babelogue.shop. Vintage vase in Resene Rice Cake, resene.co.nz. Mosaic Tile dish by John Crichton, $550, mrbigglesworthy.co.nz.

Get the look -

-

-

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Painting a doorway (arched or rectangular) is an elegant way to add detail to a simple space — and it’s as easy as pie. This works best in a room that’s painted a pale colour because it ensures a bold contrast (or vice versa). You might like to let your Resene paint choices be informed by hero homeware items or artwork in the room. Our palette was inspired by the velvet of the chair and the tiled top of the console table in the hallway. Mask and paint an 18cm band around the door frame, then paint the interior of the frame the same shade. We continued the band around the room to create a skirting-board effect. Now’s a fine opportunity to also make yourself a new object of interest. Keep an eye out in op shops for an intriguingly shaped vase, then use a Resene testpot in a favourite shade to instantly bring it u did

Resene Shabby Chic

Resene Family Tree

Resene Earthen

Resene Waiouru

Resene Rice Cake k

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PEOPLE

People 48

Artist profile

52

This life

56

Moments at home

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Artist profile

Flip the page and we’ll lead you into the Nelson home and studio of Georgina Hoby Scutt of Belle Hawk, whose paintings really grab you.

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PEOPLE —— Artist profile

Nelson artist Georgina Hoby Scutt says her distinctive style is guided by her “creative compass”. Whatever this sorcery, it’s completely bewitched us — her acrylic, oil and chalk-pastel artworks on linen, canvas and plywood are so compelling we just can’t look away.

Rare bird

Georgina Hoby Scutt of Belle Hawk has a magnetically singular style. INTERVIE W

PH OTO G R APHY

Alice Lines

L arnie Nicolson

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Georgie, you’ve been creative for as long as you can remember — what was your journey to Belle Hawk? I completed a BA and BCom at university, then began working in graphic design as an account manager and freelancing as a designer. When I moved to London, I jumped into some wonderful classes in textile and print design at Central Saint Martins, Chelsea College of Arts and Camberwell College of Arts, then later headed to Barcelona, Spain, where I forged a career as a freelance printed-textile designer. Back home in New Zealand with three young children [Ivy, Willoughby and Lilly, now nine, seven and five], I felt a growing desire to be creative again, and particularly to pick up a paintbrush, but there never seemed to be time. In 2016, when my youngest child was three and at preschool for a few hours each week, I finally did it, and it was a big moment for me — a watershed and a huge release of emotion and energy in the most wonderful way. I was hooked. My sister Bee Brosnan and I came up with the name Belle Hawk — it basically means ‘beautiful and powerful’. Where do you work? Painting and screen-printing on the kitchen table probably wasn’t going to work longterm, so in 2015 my husband Johnson [Scutt] and I extended our house and added a garage and studio. It’s a small space but it’s full of wonderful natural light and looks out onto our garden. We put in a huge sliding door so I can close off my mess from our living space, which is lucky as there’s now paint on the floor and my canvases are everywhere. I adore my time in there. >


WORLD VISIONS In the design world, Georgie’s inspired by “interiors and fashion; in the art world, it’s the Fauves, abstract expressionists and some local legends such as Toss Woollaston; and in the natural world, it’s the beautiful Nelson landscape around me.”


PEOPLE —— Artist profile

“I’ll often walk into the studio and realise that the crazy needs to be reined in somehow! Each work takes a lot of layering and finessing.”

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Artist profile —— PEOPLE

Do you have dedicated days in the studio? Finding time has become easier now that all three children are at school. I used to work hard late at night and whenever I could grab a few hours. Now that my work is selling and I feel justified in pursuing painting as a career, I usually work four or five days a week during school hours. After Johnson takes the children to school, I do a quick tidy, make a pot of coffee and I’m in. Creatively, some days I’m ‘on’ and humming, and other days I’m not. Those days are for admin. What’s your typical painting practice? I’m pretty energetic and intuitive. The link for me is always colour, so I decide on a set of colours and form a collection based on that. I’m inspired by so many things that I usually can’t wait to put my energy and thoughts down on canvas. I sketch out a composition, decide on my palette and dive in. I’ll often walk into the studio the next morning and realise that the crazy needs to be reined in or reworked somehow! Each work take a lot of layering and finessing to achieve the final piece. Let’s talk more about those beautiful colours — how exactly do you choose your palettes? My colour palettes are intuitive. They do evolve with fashion, moods and trends, as I absorb the design world around me, but my trademark is warm, earthy and autumnal shades. It’s an endless source of inspiration and an ongoing challenge to harmonise a colour palette. One colour group can inspire and underpin an entire body of work. What do you enjoy most about painting? The freedom, expression and delight in colour, and creating something that sparks joy in someone else. That’s often surprising to me, and thrilling. What’s on the horizon for you? Right now I’m working on some new designled sketches and limited-edition screen-prints that will be available via my website, in May I’ll be exhibiting my work at the wonderful Red Art Gallery in Nelson, and I have an Auckland show planned for autumn. bellehawk.com

ABOVE Hillside Dwellings, acrylic on canvas. OPPOSITE Georgie’s working on this painting as part of a series of big landscapes on linen. “The bold, bright under-painting is a new approach for me,” she says. “It means that even when I tone down the colours and pare them back to a particular palette, they still sing from beneath, giving a wonderful warmth and depth.” The still-life studies pictured on the shelf are works in progress and the abstract landscape on the wall in the vignette below is titled Driving Home.

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PEOPLE —— This life

Back to nature

Carter Were has traded the city for a farm in Byron Bay’s hinterland, and on that farm she has some chickens. INTERVIE W

PH OTO G R APHY

Alice Lines

Ophelia Mikkelson

In 2017 — much to the disappointment of her loyal fans — Carter Were, maker of some of the best toast and toppings in town, closed her shop in Auckland’s Grey Lynn. She’d been selling her wares and handmade gifts alongside florist Sophie Wolanski of Muck Floral and they’d simply outgrown the space. Not wanting to take on anything bigger, Carter decided to go travelling, and wound up in Byron Bay. So, Carter, where are you living these days? My partner Jack [Crowther, a musician in the band Babe Rainbow] and I live on a 60-acre block owned by his parents in a town called Federal, in the hills a 25-minute drive from Byron Bay. We have 85 chooks, five cows, a goanna, an owl and a few snakes hanging around at the moment. What’s the main thing you did to make this house your home? I brought my things over from New Zealand, and every time I visit I bring back a little bit more — mainly kitchen stuff.

ABOVE Carter spends many happy hours in the kitchen of her and Jack’s country cottage, recipe testing for her upcoming cookbook and whipping up down-to-earth yet enviable meals using their homegrown produce and eggs collected from their chooks.

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What do you guys get up to on a regular day on the farm? Practically too much to say! But the chickens are fed each morning, the cows are checked, the gardens are tended and there’s always something going wrong, so that gets fixed… I mostly stay inside and cook, though, and look after our four-monthold daughter, Patience. >


This life —— PEOPLE

ABOVE The house is filled with an amazing array of handmade and pre-loved finds that come together to form an inimitable treasure trove. TOP, MIDDLE As well as their vege patch, the pair are cultivating a market garden in which Carter says they plan to grow “everything we can. Jack’s into permaculture, and everything we grow here is organic.” To get the most out of each season’s harvest and avoid waste, as well as eating fresh, they also preserve and ferment.

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PEOPLE —— This life

“I’m getting used to the slower pace and not being able to do so much yet having to do so much more.” Has the pace of life changed much since she came into the picture? Definitely. What used to take me an hour now takes me all day. I’m getting used to the slower pace and not being able to do so much yet having to do so much more. Washing, cleaning, cooking, feeding — my days and weeks go by so fast. What everyday rituals do you enjoy as a family? We go to the beach when the sun’s out and there are good waves for Jack to go surfing, preferably early in the morning or in the late arvo when there’s less traffic and the sun isn’t so intense. We also like going for walks on our property together to check out the cows, the fruit trees and the garden. Before you left Auckland, you had a great little store selling organic sprouted bread, preserves and stuff — are you still baking? I’ve just started again since having Patience, but only for myself and some special orders. I’d like to have a market stall serving what I used to at my shop, but getting into the markets here is proving to be tricky. Jack and I were selling larder boxes before Patience was born [online at honeybreeze.co], so we might start them up again, and I’d also like to do postpartum meal deliveries for mamas in the area. What was included in the larder boxes? They changed each time depending on what was seasonally available, but bread, butter, pickles, labneh, lemon curd, fruit, veges, avos and cookies. What seasonal produce are you looking forward to harvesting in the next few months? Guavas, pecans, dragon fruit and star fruit. My favourite thing to cook in autumn is star fruit cake.

TOP In the study is an impressive record collection befitting the home of a musician. ABOVE LEFT Baby Patience sleeps beside the couple’s bed in a vintage bassinet. ABOVE RIGHT The property is accessed via a long driveway lined with tall trees that cast beautiful shadows.

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What other projects do you have on the go? My twin sister Harry and I are busy writing a cookbook. It’ll be so good to have something printed that I’ve worked on with her because we never get to work together! @werebros


PEOPLE —— Moments at home

You’re welcome

The home of interior stylist Ange Dye reflects her impeccable taste, but she also likes it to feel lived in, and here she tells us why. INTERVIE W Alice Lines

PH OTO G R APHY Ange Dye


Moments at home —— PEOPLE

LEFT “Our kitchen is light and bright, even in winter, and the kitchen table overlooks the backyard, which is surrounded by trees and so peaceful.” BELOW “My office is actually our guest bedroom. I’ve decorated it with things that reference places and moments that have inspired me, including a lamp by Warm Nordic and vase by Dryburgh Pottery Studio.” OPPOSITE “I had hanging cupboards installed in the dining room as extra storage. I change out the books and objects on top fairly regularly, but the photographic print by Nastia Cloutier-Ignatiev stays.”

I live in Auckland with my 16-year-old son Jacob and IT technician partner David Foo, a few minutes’ walk from Ponsonby Road. My favourite thing about our home would have to be its location. This is followed closely by the fact that it’s a pretty villa that’s had some quirky tweaks made to it by previous owners, which I think add character. Home should be a place where you feel relaxed and welcome, so I try to make ours as inviting as possible. It’s not about having everything perfect, though, so I don’t mind an unmade bed. Our house is filled with a mix of modern and mid-century pieces that sit really nicely together. I really like mid-century glass, earthenware and lighting, and have some restoration projects on the go right now. The décor here is constantly changing. I only buy things I love, but I buy quite consistently and really enjoy wacky, unique pieces. Sometimes a client might see something in my home that they’d like for themselves, so I’ll sell it to them and replace it with something else. When the boys are at home, we have family meals together at the kitchen table or outside on the deck, usually followed by a movie or documentary in the living room. We always eat meals together. It’s a great opportunity to catch up on what’s happening. I love the evenings here when everyone’s relaxed — it’s when the best conversations take place. Plans are made and changed, we talk about the past and the future, and there are always lots of laughs. the-untrained-eye.co.nz homest yle 57


PEOPLE —— Artist profile

The kinship Alana Wilson’s deep connection to the natural world is infused into her work.

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INTERVIE W

PH OTO G R APHY

Alice Lines

Ophelia Mikkelson


Artist profile —— PEOPLE

LEFT A vessel from Alana’s II series of functional art objects sits in her kitchen window. TOP A titanium and rose-dipped tea bowl. RIGHT Finished works in the studio. OPPOSITE Alana (wearing Georgia Alice) with the small collection of vessels she keeps at home. Each has special meaning; the one she’s holding is a 13thcentury Korean bowl she found on a trip overseas.

A resident of Manly with a studio in Curl Curl, ceramicist Alana Wilson spends her days in Sydney’s Northern Beaches. Finding herself more in awe of Mother Nature’s work than of anything in the man-made world, she’s in or near the water every day, which she says has an undeniable effect on her practice. So Alana, when did you know you wanted to be a ceramic artist? There wasn’t an exact moment of knowing — it was more of an accumulation of moments that kept leading me down the path to where I am today. I was always very creative as a kid, and having spent most of my childhood in New Zealand, I spent a lot of time out and about in nature. I first experienced ceramics at National Art School in Sydney, where I did my Bachelor of Fine Art, and I loved it from day one. In hindsight, I think these environments of creative experimentation and vast natural landscapes were formative. How would you describe your work? I feel that any works I create — whether ceramic, sculptural, photographic, film

or furniture — centre around values or things I believe are important. I want my work to always stay truthful to the materials and processes I use, which means embracing imperfection and faults a lot of the time. There also needs to be a sense of connection to nature, as well as a valid place in society or daily life that’s relevant to our time. The imagination has no limits, but the physical world does. It’s important for the work to exist in both. Have you always created pieces in the style you’re known for today, or has your aesthetic evolved? Equal amounts of experimentation and reflection are necessary to move forward, but I think the questions and ideas I’m interested in are still the same. I’ve only had a studio practice for six or seven years, which is quite short in the scheme of things, but I feel I’m constantly circling the essence of the things I started out being interested in. What’s involved in making a single piece? My initial thoughts and sketches lead to making forms that are then

dried, bisque fired, glazed and fired again at a higher temperature, and then sometimes I’ll reglaze and/or refire a piece if it feels unfinished. Throughout this process, I also start to pull together ideas for shooting and exhibiting the works. By the time they’re completed, there’s often a clear path for how they need to be documented and shown to convey the ideas behind them most truthfully. How long does it take from lump of clay to final object? It could be anywhere from a week to a month. The actual hands-on time per piece is probably three to five hours, plus 24 hours of firing time. I tend to work in a cyclical nature in the studio, so several pieces will be drying, waiting to be fired or glazed, or in progress at any one time, making the timeframe a bit slower. As well as being an art form, there’s a certain science to creating ceramics — can you tell us about some of the research and investigation involved in your practice? I feel like ceramics is more technical and scientific than > homest yle 59


PEOPLE —— Artist profile

artistic in many ways. There are several ways in which the medium can be mistreated, so in order to succeed it’s important to have some knowledge of firing processes and the material limitations — both clay and glaze. I believe it’s important to honour the medium like this, and continue to research, experiment and learn as much as possible about the materials and processes I use. Glazes are my main focus of experimentation. I often test multiple variations of glazes I regularly use, adding different oxides in different percentages to create colour variations, or layering two or three glazes with oxide additives to produce texture, or adding destructive ingredients that decay during the firing process and affect the vessels’ surface. The chemical structure of some glazes can change over time when stored in liquid form, so consistent testing is important too. Every single piece I make is considered a test, and every piece is documented with photos and notes so I can look back on the processes. It’s never-ending. 60 homest yle

What’s a typical workday like for you? My days can really vary, depending on what the studio focus is for the week or month. Lately I’ve been making a lot of new work for upcoming shows, which has meant arriving at the studio early and getting stuck into making and sketching and lost in a bubble of ideas. I know my energy levels are best in the morning for creative and spontaneous work, so I tend to get into that as soon as possible. At other times, it may be more about glaze testing, which is quite methodical and time-consuming, or photographing works. Preparing for a show requires reflection and observational time, and of course, I make time to keep on top of communications. When you’re not in the studio, where do you look for inspiration? I don’t believe inspiration is chased — I think a certain perspective allows you to find potential inspiration in everything, and across all the senses, not just visually. More often for me, it’s the world around me and the reality of it. Travel is usually a great catalyst; being

out of my routine and environment allows a more open mind — a beginner’s mind, in some ways. As well as your solo practice, you sometimes work on collaborative projects too… I love collaborating and find it really rewarding in terms of the perspective it gives you of your own work, the engagement with other ideas and processes, and the shared dialogue. I recently spent some time in Tairua with artists Ophelia Mikkelson and Ryder Jones. We created a series of bells and small sound sculptures that we documented among the rocks and waves of their local beach. Our aim was to capture the relationship between the natural movements of wind and water, and how this transferred into sound and movement in the pieces we made. What have you got coming up? I’m currently finalising several vessels for a group show at Melbourne’s Sophie Gannon Gallery in March, and ceramic works for the Australian Ceramics Triennale in Tasmania in May. alanawilson.com


Artist profile —— PEOPLE

TOP, CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE This small cobalt bowl was shot near the Fairy Bower ocean pool, one of Alana’s regular swimming spots; a flared titanium bowl; Black Bronze Brutalist vessels. LEFT Created in collaboration with Ryder Jones, this piece is a finalist for Victoria’s 2019 Gippsland Sculpture Prize. BELOW Beach Bells, shot in Tairua. OPPOSITE Scenes from Alana’s home, with her own pieces and those made by friends (including the metal sculpture by Ryder Jones on the windowsill) on display.

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HOMES

Homes 64

Magical mystery

78

I got a feeling

90

Sea & the city

102

Character study

What’s behind this intriguing exterior detail with a view of the Mount’s main beach? Find out on page 90, where we tour a new build that was a challenge, but a fun one.

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HOMES

There’s so much more to this home than meets the eye — come inside as we discover its secrets.

Mag ical mystery

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WO RDS

PH OTO G R APHY

Philippa Prentice

Simon Wilson


HOMES

Estelle Martin loves how different her Point Wells home is to the others around here. “Neighbours call it the Mystery House because it doesn’t reveal itself from the street,” she says. “There’s always a ‘Wow’ when I show people around.” This exceptional home was one of the first to be built in a new subdivision in the area an hour north of Auckland that Estelle and her family have lived and vacationed in for more than 25 years. Its design was a collaboration between mother and son — Estelle and her architect offspring Antony, director of Melbourne’s MRTN Architects. Some say you should never work with family, but the process was a treat for them both. “Antony came over from Melbourne every four to six weeks during the build, so I really enjoyed spending that time with him and watching him doing what he’s good at,” says Estelle. Ditto, says Antony. “Working on the house together was a wonderful learning experience. Obviously I was very aware of my mother as a person, but to see her as a client and grow into that, and see the pleasure she received from the construction process, was lovely. I’m thrilled that she loves living here.” Antony’s work is known for its material-driven approach, and here he’s expertly used shadow as a design material. “A significant element is the heavy overhanging roof,” he says. “There’s an obvious reason for this — to keep water away >

THE PROJECT Semi-retired accountant Estelle Martin built this three-bedroom home in Point Wells with the help of her architect son Antony Martin.

EXTERIOR The use of black for the roof is intended to make the material read as part form, part shadow, while the cast-in-place concrete wall was formed up using the cedar lining boards, so it appears as a concrete version of the timber cladding. “Another advantage of working for family is that you get to see the home in various lights, weather and seasons, and I love how it feels better each time I visit,” says Antony. “I think it’s a really lovely, quiet presence in the subdivision; it doesn’t scream for attention. The front has a lack of windows as it’s south-facing; however, it’s single-storey when many are two, it’s respectful to the street and it generously offers space and garden to the public realm.”

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KITCHEN Teamed with grey custom-ordered tiles from Middle Earth Tiles and American oak flooring, the cabinets are in stained oak veneer; the flitches were batch-mixed, so the panels look more like solid timber. The homeware items on the shelf and bench include a teapot from Babelogue, jug by Stelton from Everday Needs and fruit bowl by Gidon Bing. The chopping board, glasses and stools are from CittĂ . The appliances are Fisher & Paykel.


HOMES

“THE lightly stained CEDAR Gives the house warmth — a softness that greets me when I’ve been away from it.”

from the house — but I also love its calming and protective nature, which is very important when designing for your mother. The dark extended eaves embrace the house under shadow and accentuate the surrounding greenery.” Antony’s lifelong experience of the climate here was another prime driver of the architecture. “I was well aware of the importance of cross ventilation, and the need to shelter from the region’s heavy downpours while still being open to the outside,” he says. “We were also conscious about providing various locations around the house where you could be outdoors yet out of the wind, which often changes direction over the course of the day. We addressed this through a complexity in the perimeter of the plan. By creating a lot of movement at the edge, we were able to provide places of refuge and screened views from inside. These nooks and crannies also allowed us to bring the landscape into the house. We wanted Estelle to lose sight of the fact she’s in a subdivision and rather feel like she’s located on an island of green.” A cast-in-place concrete wall screens the home’s entry, with cedar framing the composition on each side. This exterior cladding continues to become the interior wall lining, complemented by locally made glazed tiles — part of a pared-back colour palette (with differing textures for interest) that doesn’t >

ABOVE “Estelle was fairly specific about her space requirements and how she saw herself using the house,” says Antony. “It became clear to me that she saw the kitchen not solely as a cooking space but rather a space where she ate, read and socialised too. She was comfortable basing herself in it, so we designed it to incorporate cooking, dining and living areas.” The window seat has a lowered ceiling, so it feels as if you’re sitting in a separate box. “I spend most of my evenings in it,” says Estelle. “I have a TV on the wall [pictured on page 65], which Antony felt spoilt the view from the front door, but I insisted on it.” The Western red cedar cladding inside and out is from Rosenfeld Kidson.

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HOMES

ABOVE The home is filled with spots that have become Estelle’s favourite places. “I love the terrace off my lounge,” she says. “In summer, I start the day by pulling the doors right back to open up the lounge and dining area. I often have breakfast out there and tend to return there for lunch and if friends drop by. I also love the glazed link [pictured on page 67]. I have rocks and pebbles on each side of it and there’s a Japanese feel, so I’m trying to grow a few bonsai trees.” The décor pictured here includes a Silhouette wall light by Ross Gardam and a Velvet Round cushion from A&C Homestore (top), plus cushions from Babelogue and a throw from Città in the outdoor area.

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DINING Other special features make themselves known gradually. For example, says Estelle, “there are repeating themes, such as the black metal trim on the floating step in the glazed link and then as a detail in the kitchen. I love walking in the front door and seeing the large kitchen window and the garden beyond that. The house doesn’t give any indication of it from the street, so it’s another surprise.”


HOMES

“I have peat soil, so everything grows well — in fact, some things grow too well and I have to keep cutting them back.”

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HOMES

EXTERIOR The living and dining area opens onto gardens and a flat lawn. “I wanted to have a mix of natives and tropical plants so I felt like I was on holiday,” says Estelle, adding that the landscaper, Bill Holden, taught Antony at primary school. “It was an interesting situation for both of them with Antony issuing the directives in this case.”

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LIVING “The 1000m2 site is very flat, so creating various floor levels as you move from the front of the house to the rear garden helps create a sense of topography and varies the view,� says Antony. A change in materials subtly announces the transition between spaces.


HOMES

“I’ve chosen not to hang my art on the cedar walls as I don’t want to break up the feel of them.”

compete with Estelle’s art collection and ensures the garden views remain an emphasis. The interior’s split-gable form divides the floor plan into two wings connected by a glazed link, with Estelle’s living quarters and office at one end and a guest wing at the other; when it’s not in use, Estelle can shut off this part of the house completely. A glass hallway runs the length of the dwelling, stepping down towards the back wall, which opens to the north-facing garden. “The scale of the house is fascinating,” says Antony. “It appears relatively small, but keeps opening up as you move through it. By the time you’re in the garden looking back, it’s hard to believe it’s the same home you saw from the street.” “There’s a lot of added interest that doesn’t reveal itself immediately,” says Estelle. “For example, the house has three different ceiling heights and the hallway has several different widths. The bottom of the hall cupboard extends to become a seat, and the bottom of the bathroom vanity extends to become a seat or shelf. “The element of surprise and originality of the design make it my special place,” she says. “This project has taught me that it is possible to build a quality home within budget, that it can be fun and rewarding, and that your children know a whole lot more than you think they do!”

ABOVE LEFT Both bathrooms were designed not with shower screens but as a series of connected chambers. The minimal material palette in each features timber, stone and glazed tiles, the latter selected for their bronze pearlescent finish, which reflects the light and surrounding colours, creating a constantly changing impression of the true hue of each room. The tapware throughout the house is by Vola and the architectural lighting is from Inlite. ABOVE RIGHT The décor in Estelle’s bedroom includes bed linen by Cultiver from Father Rabbit, pillowcases from Città, a cushion from A&C Homestore and a Bloom table lamp from Simon James Design.

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HOMES

EXTERIOR In contrast to the home’s dark envelope, the use of openings is optimised and permeates the interior spaces with natural light. The cushion seen here on the outdoor chair is from Babelogue.

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DESIGN DETAILS CLOCK KWISE FROM TOP LEFT Nastur tiums (fourteen) artwork by Kirstin Carlin, $4000, melanieroger y.com. Compact sideboard, gallery 0, thevintageshop.co.nz. Jug, $3000 $45, babelogue.shop. Silhouette light by Ross Gardam, $419, rossgardam. com.au. Bloom table lamp by Tim e for Resident, $640, simonjames Rundle design.com. Vintage Afghan cushion, $195, b babelogue.shop. Ovum vase, Belleville $170, gidonbingceramics.com. g by Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec, chair b $590, cittadesign.com.

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Intuition and an amazing backyard saw this ripe-for-a-revamp house snapped up at first sight.

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ABOVE LEFT The structured front garden designed by Topia Garden Design’s Brett Maclennan enjoys all-day sun. ABOVE RIGHT In the hallway, a vintage French poster from Smyth Galleries sits opposite a smattering of Muuto Dots, Skygarden pendant lights by Flos hang above a hopscotch game created one rainy day on a whim, and at the far end is a trio of Lens artworks by Di Ffrench. OPPOSITE The dining table by Ercol is decorated with a floral arrangement by Blush in a vase from Flotsam & Jetsam. It sits with cane dining chairs by Thonet on a rug from Mary Kelly Kilims. Above the bench seat custom-made by Douglas and Bec is a landscape by Nigel Brown.

What is it about some dwellings that draws you in, gets under your skin and worms its way into your heart? Although it’s different for everyone, when you’re on the hunt for a home base for your family, it can often come down to a gut feeling. When Amy and Tim Gillespie first walked into this house in the Auckland suburb of Westmere, it instantly felt like home. The similarity (on a grander scale) of the layout of its living and dining space to that in the house their family cherished but had outgrown immediately captured their imagination — and then they saw the back garden. Gigantic, with a gently sloping lawn, native bush and a path meandering down to a stream, it was a very exciting prospect. The house itself had an unexpected layout, with the master suite in a more central position than in many homes. “But it has actually worked really well having the master bedroom in the middle, because the walk-through wardrobe can be used as a thoroughfare,” says interior designer Amy. “When 80 homest yle

Goldie was a baby, it meant Tim and I could shoot out and go through or round the back of the kitchen without waking up Oscar and Florence.” With its new owners at the helm, a largely cosmetic revamp got underway that included calming down the ’90s colour scheme of beige, lime green and red with Porter’s Paints shades Quarter Watermark and Dark Watermark. “I felt that the living spaces needed to be pale because there was a lot going on with all the windows and details,” says Amy. “White neutralised all that, balancing everything out.” The bedrooms also received a fresh coat — Dulux Ashville for the master, Dulux Quarter Ashville for Oscar and Florence’s room, and Dulux Green Tea for Goldie’s — as did the bathrooms, using lime-based plaster finish Rockcote Velvetina. The kitchen was redesigned with a marble bench in mind. Understatedly elegant, the Italian Stone Tundra Grey material with a leathered finish is hardworking and forgiving, its soft >


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THE PROJECT Interior designer Amy Gillespie and her COO husband Tim renovated this four-bedroom home in Auckland’s Westmere for themselves and their children Oscar (9), Florence (7) and Goldie (3).

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LIVING Amy’s favourite Coco chair (“which has an industrialstrength swivel that lets the kids have hours of fun spinning in it”) is lit by a pair of Derry pendant lights from Murano Plus. They’re complemented by a Form teapot by Tom Dixon on a side table by Douglas and Bec, above which is an artwork by Kim Pieters. The ceramic mug is by Andrew Killick of Waihi’s Laughing Pottery.

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LIVING A tight edit of special items sits on the built-in shelves between the dining and living areas, including (from top) ceramics by Tony Sly, a curved candleholder from Everyday Needs, candlesticks from Tessuti, an artwork by Sally Austad and a pair of heirloom preserving pots that once belonged to Amy’s nana. The brass floor lamp was sourced from LA by Uno Design.

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ABOVE Wide doors in the living area connect it to the front garden. A restored pendant, one of the home’s original fixtures, shines light on a rug by Uno Design, an artwork (left) by Danielle Thomson and prayer beads (right) by Marissa Healey of I Love Inc Studio. The Base floor lamp (top right) is by Tom Dixon. OPPOSITE Continuing the monochrome approach, an Arnold Circus stool by Martino Gamper punctuates the pale bathroom, which includes Reverso tiles from The Tile People, Paini tapware and a Happy D.2 basin from Metrix, and a Stanza Casa vanity by Progetto from Plumbline.

shade offsetting its cool white surrounds. The different strengths of the wall colour tie into its hues, adding interest and depth to the cabinetry and island bench, all in keeping with the renovation’s underlying themes of serenity and harmony. With three kids and busy jobs, creating a sense of peace was an important focus for the couple, and the art of ‘considered curation’ is also evident in their choices. Rather than being trend-driven and disposable, virtually every item is of enduring quality and special to its owners in some way. An example of this is the Ercol dining table Amy and Tim found at Mr Bigglesworthy. “We spent years looking for the right table,” says Amy. “I love that this one is wide and extendable and has a simple mid-century design. My other favourite piece is our Coco lounge chair from Uno Design. I inherited some money from my oma’s estate when she died, and I was really close to her, so I wanted to use it for something I’d have forever. I’d seen the chair in the shop window numerous times, so I rocked in 84 homest yle

there and ordered one — and Kathleen Haimes entered my life. “Extremely practical and smart about the way a family home should work, but not in a cookie-cutter way”, Uno’s owner Kathleen became an integral part of Amy’s design process, supplying custom-made pieces and helping her to choose new lighting, a fabulous rug, and Amy’s favourite ’60s brass lamp, found in a shop in LA. More than simply providing their family with a beautiful home, the renovation sparked Amy’s interest in studying to become an interior designer, and she qualified last year. Ironically, as much as she and Tim champion things that will last a lifetime and adore living in this home they’ve made their own, change, as we know, is the only constant. After five happy years here, the promise of even more space has lead them to make a tough decision — to move to Hawke’s Bay, near to where they both grew up. For their next home, rather than renovating, they plan to start from scratch, and see where their intuition leads them.


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ABOVE LEFT Oscar and Florence’s shared bedroom features a Silvia pendant light from Lightness, bedding by Kip & Co and a desk custom-made by Uno Design. ABOVE RIGHT The soft green and pinks in Goldie’s room are enhanced by a Goldie print by Penny Stotter from The Poi Room. The Comback rocking chair by Kartell is made more comfy by a sheepskin from Classic Sheepskins. OPPOSITE On the Joe bed by St Clements in the master bedroom, linen sheets and pillowcases from A&C Homestore combine with a throw by Society Limonta. The artwork from The Poi Room is complemented by a Hydrangea cushion from Thread Design.

“I inherited some money from my oma and wanted to use it for something I’d have forever.”

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EXTERIOR The kids’ fort at the rear of the property was a gift from friends that was reassembled on site. The lush native bush surrounding it means they can play here for hours in the dappled shade.

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DESIGN DETAILS CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT Originals bar stool by Ercol, $595, goodform.co.nz. Bash tray by Tom Dixon, $470, ecc.co.nz. Say That The Leaf Of The Rose Is A Heaven artwork by Kim Pieters, $5200, kimpietersstudio.com. Ildhane candle holder by Anderssen & Voll, $115, everyday-needs.com. Base lamp by Tom Dixon, $2610, ecc.co.nz. Romana dining table by Ercol, from $3750, goodform.co.nz. Arnold Circus stool by Martino Gamper, $250, paperplane store.com. Hoffmann chair, $804, thonet.co.nz.

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It’s unexpectedly urban for being by the beach, but this home proves you can have it all.

Sea & the city

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Monique Balvert- O’Connor

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Building “on a pinhead” is less than ideal, but in the case of Milly and Brent Stewart’s home, the result is more than satisfactory. Admittedly, the duo was well equipped to deal with the difficulties of building a 302m 2 house on 269m2 of land — as owners of Stewart Construction, they’re practised at working with small sites, and in fact, they enjoy the challenge. The couple’s two-storey home is on Mount Maunganui’s coveted Marine Parade. There may be minimal land surrounding it, but the beach across the road isn’t too shabby a front yard. It’s where the kids, Rocco and Tulsi, head straight after school on summer days. “We don’t have to pack drink bottles, shoes or even towels,” says Milly. “And there’s no sand in the car!” The Stewarts’ home is familiar to many locals, thanks to the distinctive ‘curtain’ that covers the facade outside the master bedroom. Suggested by their award-winning architectural designer Adam Taylor, the bronze-coloured screen made of interlocking plastic rings came with a hefty price tag but was well worth it, says Brent. “It’s a standout design feature, but also we’re right on the footpath, so it means we can get a full view of everything that’s going on outside, but people can’t look in.” The screen isn’t the only thing about this dwelling that veers from the norm. Brick and weatherboard homes tend to see the bricks at the base and the boards on top, but Brent made the call to flip that on its head. “It was just about being a bit different. No one really does it, but we liked it,” he says. The couple’s initial plans were to paint the upper-storey bricks, but when laid they looked great as is. With the making of that decision, the house underwent a bit of a >

EXTERIOR Brent says pairing brick cladding with blackstained larch weatherboards was a good call given the home’s proximity to the ocean. “Houses along the beach get destroyed quickly, so we’re already ahead as we have something that will look better with age. It’s really lowmaintenance — we only have to sweep away the cobwebs.”

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THE PROJECT Stewart Construction owners Milly and Brent Stewart built this three-bedroom home in Mt Maunganui for themselves and their children Rocco (10) and Tulsi (7).

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personality change, says Brent. “It was going to be white Miami cool, but we ended up with New York industrial instead.” True to this aesthetic, the home features a black steel staircase and concrete in the entryway and kitchen — though not concrete as you know it. Smooth and warm underfoot, it’s created from a floor-levelling compound finished with a concrete sealer. Although Milly and Brent have built and renovated many homes, they were happy to give Adam free rein to focus his architectural skills on evolving their initial concept. What the three came up with was a layout that sees a second living room, the children’s bedrooms, the bathroom and the laundry on the ground floor with a double garage and jet-ski parking space. Upstairs houses the main living areas, master suite and powder room. A full-length French oak slider can be used to divide the dining room from the rest of the open-plan living space. The dining room includes a bar, so the ability to close it off for use as a zone where the grown-ups can get out the whisky and turn on the mood lighting is a boon. To provide an uninterrupted view of the ocean, the main living area’s northeastfacing wall is entirely glass, with stacker doors framing the vista and connecting to the deck, which at 11m is big enough to house Brent’s must-have outdoor kitchen. The splendour of the outlook meant the interior was best kept clean and Resene Quarter White Pointer provides a chic neutral backdrop throughout. The Stewarts are very comfortable in their home, but it probably won’t be theirs forever, says Milly ruefully. “Brent gets itchy feet, so we haven’t managed to stay still yet — although it’d be very hard to leave.”

TOP & OPPOSITE Milly and Brent wanted a minimal kitchen with clean lines. They also entertain a lot, so a large island and a bar fridge were essentials in the brief they gave to designers and makers Di Rosa Cabinetry & Furniture. The positioning of the stairwell with glass balustrading between the kitchen and lounge brings a sense of volume to the main living space. RIGHT The stairs themselves are made of black steel in a honeycomb-like pattern, and Milly says she loves the way light shining through the filigree throws shadows onto the concrete floor at night.

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“We don’t have to pack drinks, shoes or even towels — And there’s no sand in the car!”


TOP LEFT The family’s dining room table and chairs were designed by David Shaw and purchased from favourite Mt Maunganui haunt The Design Depot. Overhead is a pendant light by Simon James. ABOVE Tulsi and Rocco sit on a modular Hamilton sofa from Freedom alongside a Bronx coffee table and Harlem side table decorated with vases and pots — all from The Design Depot. LEFT Huge floor-to-ceiling doors connect the kitchen to the mahogany deck. OPPOSITE A textural vignette is formed in the living area from a teak side table, an armchair from Freedom, and artwork and objects from The Design Depot and Style X Lab.

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“It was just about being a bit different. No one really does it, but we liked it.”


ABOVE A freestanding Egg bath by Progetto is a luxe addition to the couple’s ensuite. TOP RIGHT The powder room is petite but packs a visual punch. “I wanted the walls to be dark, so our painter blended several Dulux colours together to suit,” says Milly. The aged-brass Buddy tapware and Thin Round Vessel basin are both by Plumbline, the mirror is from MCF Interiors and the vintage glass tray is from The Design Depot. RIGHT & OPPOSITE A super-sized walk-through wardrobe with a circular skylight links the master bedroom and ensuite. The three spaces were designed to work together like an executive suite and they’re Milly’s favourite spots in the house. Decorative elements here include an ottoman by David Shaw and a crystal water carafe (opposite), both from The Design Depot, a cane bag bought back from a trip to Bali and a Hydrangea cushion and throw by Thread Design.

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TOP Rocco’s room includes a duvet and pillows by Wallace Cotton and a mustard throw by MM Linen from Cabbages & Kings. The bedside table is from Mocka and the Zambia stool at the end of the bed is from Freedom. ABOVE Tulsi’s pretty pink Numero 74 bunting and fluffy swan from Concrete Blush are anchored by charcoal linen from Jamie Kay. LEFT As with the kitchen and bathrooms, the cabinetry in the laundry was crafted by Matamata-based Di Rosa Cabinetry & Furniture. Milly chose the hexagonal Timeless Charcoal mosaic tiles from The Tile Depot to match the staircase’s honeycomb detail.

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DES SIGN DET TAILS

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Vintage chair, $18 83, thedesigndepot.co.nz. Hex 750 p pendant light by Resident, $2500, simonjamesdesign.com. Extra Fruity Monstera plant and pot, $190, silllife.co.nz. Linear Grid side table, $440, cittadesign.com. Chester Pin Tuck ottoman, $995, meandmytrend. com. Hydrangea cushion, $135, threaddesign co nz Painted Surface threaddesign.co.nz. print by Berit Mogensen Lopez, $309, paperplanestore.com. Deni plant stand, $90, and pot, $109, countryroad.co.nz. Green Snake plant, $27, plantandpot.nz.

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We could all learn a thing or two from this house about what constitutes a good amount of quirk.

Character Study WO RDS & PH OTO G R APHY Holly Marder

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Hedda Pier and Michiel Lenstra bought their 1930s Netherlands row house at a time when the Dutch property market was at a low. They’d been looking to downsize from their home in the centre of the Hague into family-friendly Wassenaar not far away, and were hoping for something near a school for their kids. This property fit the bill, but had been on the market for more than a year; it belonged to an elderly woman who hadn’t done any maintenance or redecorated since the ’70s. With a serious subsidence problem at the back, rotten window frames, no central heating, and orange and green tiles in the kitchen, it was in a bit of a state and practically unsellable, and yet… Unbeknown to Hedda and Michiel, a property developer had been to see the home the same week as they had, putting in an offer for the same amount on the same day. He had the finances already lined up, so the house went to him. “I was gutted,” says Hedda. “I saw its potential and really wanted it for our family, so I called around and found out who the developer was, and within days convinced him to sell it to us — for a decent profit — in its existing state. It was the flip of a lifetime for him, but worth it to us.” > 104 homest yle

ABOVE Hedda sits on the Ikea sofa (with a linen cover from Bemz) in the living area below a walnut picture rail custom-made by her studio’s go-to joiners DVB Design. The art on it includes (from left) an etching by her sister Anine Pier, two original etches by late Russian artist Ossip Zadkine, a painting bought at an Amsterdam gallery and a small graphic piece given to Michiel when his grandmother passed away. To their right (pictured on page 103) is a black Triplex wall light by Mackapär — a rare find as it didn’t make it into production after the first batch was made.


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THE PROJECT Interior designer Hedda Pier and her investment consultant husband Michiel Lenstra renovated this three-bedroom home in Wassenaar, Netherlands for themselves and their children Stella (8) and Finn (5).

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LIVING The couple had their wooden deck chairs — bought by Hedda’s father in Ghana in the ’70s and originally from a cruise ship — reupholstered in an animal-print fabric by Swedish design company Sandberg. Next to them on the coffee table custom-made by a local metal workshop is a metal sculpture Michiel inherited from his grandmother.


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ABOVE Many of the three-storey home’s original fixtures were retained, including some stained-glass sliding doors in the living area, which have proved particularly handy on cold Sunday afternoons when the family watches movies on the sofa with the fire blazing. Above the bench seat is an artwork by the Hague artist and friend Rob van Hemert, who regularly visits Hedda’s studio with new work.

After happily taking possession, the couple added an extension to the rear of the house to make room for a large kitchen and dining area, and removed a partition wall on the ground floor to maximise the floor space. They stripped the house and added new wiring, double glazing and central heating, but kept most of the original character features, including the doors, stairs and 1930s terrazzo tiles in the entry and groundfloor hallway, the latter a welcome surprise when they were found hiding under carpet tiles and layers of glue. On the second floor, they took out every single wall, then redesigned the space to include bedrooms for the children and a bathroom/ utility room, with plenty of storage space in the attic above. Hedda is a partner at boutique interior design business Avenue Design Studio and has bought and renovated numerous homes. Of this one she says, “One of my biggest design challenges was keeping the base very neutral. We were moving from the city and didn’t know if we were going to like it enough to stay long-term. The idea was that if we wanted to, we could rent it out in a few years’ time, which meant I couldn’t make the interior design too personal or outspoken.” > homest yle 107


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LEFT Hedda chose Farrow & Ball’s Blackened to create a neutral base on the walls throughout the living areas, which in the hallway picks up on the pale flecks in the original terrazzo flooring. BELOW The open-plan kitchen and dining area is housed in a new extension at the back of the house.

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DINING The family spends a lot of quality time together at their oak dining table designed by Hedda and made by DVB Design. CH26 chairs by Hans J Wegner for Carl Hansen chairs complete the space, giving it a casual- contemporary vibe. The Fluid pendant light is by Muuto.

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MASTER BEDROOM The couple made their headboard years ago and have had it reupholstered several times. Their bed linen is from By Mölle, and the throw is a Liberty fabric from Hedda’s extensive collection. “When I see a fabric I love, I buy 3m of it,” she says. “I have this idea that I might one day make it all into tablecloths for an amazing second house in the country.” Also in this space are tables by Kartell, lamps by Lightyears and a pendant light by Foscarini.

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ABOVE Against the master bedroom wall painted in Farrow & Ball Dimpse is an antique British colonial cabinet bought in India — a wedding gift from Michiel’s parents. Above it is a large print by photographer Brooke Holm, a favourite of the couple, who both have a strong connection to the ocean.

A calm, warm canvas overlaid with tactile materials and a selection of wonderful furniture and art is an Avenue Design Studio trademark, and this aesthetic is reflected throughout. Although it’s carefully curated and full of wonderful finds, however, this is a family home — and that means dents in the table and fingerprints on the walls. But the couple don’t believe having children is a reason to avoid buying special pieces, and instead aim to teach their kids to appreciate nice things. “I like homes that have character,” says Hedda. “I like to experiment and I’m also a bit of a collector. I love art, fabrics, patterns, colour, books… I like so many things that I sometimes need to rein myself in to avoid making it all a bit too crazy! I have so many chairs that I’ve loaned many of them to family.” Hedda has learned that it takes years to build up a collection and advises her clients to have patience. She credits her father for her appreciation of all things beautiful. “Throughout my childhood, he’d come home with a leaf or feather from the forest, a bangle from a market or a painting from an auction, always with the same enthusiasm, as if it was the first time he’d found a treasure.” homest yle 111


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FINN’S ROOM Here, the high-rise bed from Ikea was painted with Farrow & Ball colour Worsted — a restful complement to the Farrow & Ball Parma Gray on the walls. Hedda also added leather handles to the ladder for safety. Upholstered mattresses are stored under the bed for use when friends come to play, and in the corner of the room sits a battered leather club chair that’s been used as a nursing and reading chair for both children — and as a scratching post by the family’s cats.

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STELLA’S ROOM Hedda likes kids’ rooms to have a bit of colour, and in her daughter’s room she really took that to heart, opting for Little Greene paints Angie and Marigold. The mini gallery on the wall above the bed includes a floral pen drawing by Stella’s great grandmother, a botanist. The bed and bedding is by Ikea.

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DESIGN N DETAILS S CLOCKWISE FROM RIGHT Chouchin 1 pendant light by Ionna Vautrin for Foscarini, $1395, ecc.co.nz. Skin print by Jenna Smith x Sunday, from $149, sundayhomestore.co.nz. Mosslanda picture ledge by Ikea, $45, shutthe frontdoor.co.nz. Marseille footstool, $2399, boconcept.co.nz. Duo sofa, $5990, cittadesign.com. Orkanen cushion cover, $54, and Varvunraita cushion cover, $94, by Marimekko, boltofcloth.com. Angled Bottle vase by Walk in the Park, $200, precinct35.co.nz. Caravaggio wall light by Cecilie Manz for Lightyears, $515, cultdesign.co.nz. Aztec cushion by Madam Stoltz, $175, indiehomecollective.com.

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T H E L E A D I N G A U ST R A L I A N A R C H I T EC T U R E & D E S I G N T R A D E S H O W.

MELBOURNE | 20 — 22 JUNE 2019 M E L BO U R N E CO N V E N T I O N A N D E X H I B I T I O N C E N T R E In 2019, DENFAIR launches a dedicated workspace sector. This hub will feature a

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Last word

If you’re in the market for a road trip, have we got accommodation for you. Sixties motor lodge meets boutique inn at this artsy new stay in the Berkshires on page 124.

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LIVING —— Shop

Well & good

Little things that make life more liveable.

OIL TELL YOU WHAT Here’s a plan: how about we all make an effort to support businesses that are doing good? You could start by making Aluan your coconut oil of choice. Made by Kiwis, it’s certified organic, raw-pressed, traceable to sustainable planations on Simeulue Island in Indonesia and also consciously produced there with a goal of zero production waste, while giving back by supporting workers and protecting endangered turtles. aluan.co

GREAT COMBO Combine manuka honey’s skills as a humectant with oils from fruit, veges, nuts, seeds, herbs and flowers and what have you got? A natural, nourishing hair oil that’s miraculously not greasy. Comb can be applied to towel-dried tresses, added to hair masks, smoothed onto dry locks as an overnight treatment, and used when styling to add shine and tame flyaways. thisiscomb.com

Bird feeder or nesting box? You decide! This Tudor-esque find is by Wildlife Garden and intended for either-or, depending on the season. The Swedish company designs products to help people create ‘living’ gardens filled with all kinds of creatures. Their squirrel feeders are of little use to you, but this, on the other hand, could be a very sweet addition to your backyard. In store at Mag Nation; magnation.co.nz

BULY FOR YOU Yay for us all, in fact — thanks to Mecca we’ve now got local access to chic Parisian brand Buly. L’Officine Universelle Buly opened its first store in France in 1803 and today the classic formulations of its beauty products and fragrances are upgraded with modern innovations yet steadfastly sans nasties like parabens, phenoxyethanol and silicon. meccabeauty.co.nz

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Words: Philippa Prentice

TWEET AS


SAY HEJ With a name that’s a Danish greeting, a catalogue of garments made mostly out of linen and an online-only retail presence, Hej Hej (pronounced “Hey Hey”) isn’t your average New Zealandborn fashion label, and we think their faux-pearl-dotted Big Clipper hair accessory is pretty special as well. It’s one of two the brand’s founders Alice Isles and Kiki Judd have added to their offering — stop by the website to acquaint yourself with it. h jh j hej-hej.co

CUTIE PIE Overcome the compulsion to talk to Breville’s smallest-ever espresso machine in a baby voice and you’ll become firm friends. Despite its size, s the itty-bitty Bambino Plus is big on good looks and flavour, and delivers barista-quality bre ews in short order, heating up in a mere three seconds. breville.com

YOU’RE SOAKING IN IT It’s not just sea life that’s surrounded by bobbing plastic, you know — the majority of teabags contain it too. Get it out of your life, your body and the environment by buying these biodegradable handmade muslin ones by Storm & India instead. A selection of the Kiwi brand’s certified organic wellness teas are available in them for brewing hot or cold. stormandindia.com


Top secrets

Look closely and you’ll see all sorts of clever hideyholes in this apartment, which also fools onlookers into thinking it’s just another beach house. WO RD S

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Claire McCall

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Small space —— LIVING

ABOVE & OPPOSITE “It’s like designing a boat — the smallest space has to be carefully thought through,” says Peta. In the kitchen, the benchtop in Dekton Trilium by Cosentino and dark cabinetry are offset by bronze mirrors from Image Glass that bounce light into the room. TOP RIGHT The only storage in the bathroom is behind the mirror, but the cupboard is deeper than the standard stud. Peta found the vintage-style tiles at Tile Warehouse. ABOVE RIGHT The copper-look kitchen tapware is Nivito Rhythm from Paterson.

Tidying tutor Marie Kondo might know how to precision-pack a suitcase, but she says nothing about where to keep the darned thing. She’d doubtless find joy in the secret-squirrel storage space above the bed in this 50m2 studio. Accessed by a metal ladder with a detachable shelf that’s used as a bedside table, the loft also accommodates the hot-water cylinder out of sight. Genius. Interior designer Peta Davy of Yellowfox felt justified in pushing her clients — her mum Shelley Brockliss and Shelley’s partner Mike Coghlan — out of their comfort zones when they downsized to this apartment on the north-facing edge of a converted hall

on Waiheke Island. For one thing, Shelley had always loved white-on-white schemes, “but when she presented me with swatches of a rusted-looking benchtop material, copper mosaics and brick as part of her brief, I knew I had to talk her into dark walls,” says Peta. With a vaulted ceiling, exposed rafters and matai floors, the above-andbelow design strategy was obvious. All that was left was to put the filling in the sandwich. The floorplan is rectangular, so Peta made the decision to stretch the cabinetry the length of one wall, with the kitchen, a bar, a TV zone, a wardrobe and storage all incorporated. “I had a bit of a battle with Mike, who’s

the cook, as he was adamant he wanted an island,” she says, but she was equally insistent that there wasn’t enough space. A cantilevered breakfast bar kept them both content. Kitchen designer Leonie Metge of Cube Dentro took the industrial-style palette and fleshed out the accents using a thin-profile benchtop with a rusticated finish; the ‘handles’ are a negative detail backed by a powdercoated copper strip that glows the same colour as the timber floor. Mike’s beloved coffee machine is integrated above the oven and warmer drawer, while the TV in the bar area all but disappears against the charcoal backdrop. > homest yle 121


bed

entr y kitchen

b ath

laundr y

Small space —— LIVING

living

dining

ABOVE Although the glass doors that partition off the bedroom look as if they have steel frames, they’re actually a ‘cheat’ version that uses aluminium beading. Punches of colour in the bedding ping against the walls in Resene Bokara Grey. The Alumi Tube pendant light is by Eunice Taylor. OPPOSITE When the grandkids come to stay, they sleep on the pull-out sofa bed in the living room. The other furniture here, including the velvet armchair and coffee table, is light on its feet to create a feeling of spaciousness.

On the opposite wall — decorated with trompe l’oeil tiles that look like bricks — a small bathroom backs a bedroom that’s sectioned off not by solid partitioning, which would have closed in the space, but by metal joinery. When black steel proved too expensive, the mother-daughter duo agreed on aluminium instead. The bed lifts up on hydraulics, so out-of-season outfits can be stored underneath. Vintage-style tiles line the floor in the bathroom, where storage is disguised behind the mirror and the washer/drier is hidden behind a honeycomb blind. “We didn’t

have space for a sliding door, so that was our solution,” says Peta. Living in this small apartment was initially a challenge, but Shelley and Mike have quickly grown to love their island home. That said, the petite wardrobe has taken some getting used to. “I really want half of Mike’s side,” confesses Shelley, who has trimmed her options down to some key staples. The couple are revelling in the dichotomy of the urbane sophistication of this New York-style pad (which doubles as a showroom for Yellowfox, allowing clients and associates to view beautiful new products) against the casual beach vibe of its Oneroa location.

They have plans to construct an outdoor room so they can entertain in the sun, but for the immediate future, their dial is set firmly to ‘travel’. Peta’s pleased with how the studio functions, but what she enjoys most is the way the aesthetic is such a surprise inside the home’s typical white weatherboard shell. The way the light bounces up into the ceiling to achieve a sense of spaciousness, then off the chocolatey walls and bronzed mirrors in a sophisticated turn, is artistry in action. Now, if the occupants would only free their suitcases from their hidden perch and head off on their adventures, she might be able to move in for a spell. homest yle 123


Call me by your name This new stay in Massachusetts spells out who its audience is in no uncertain terms, while putting a contemporary eco spin on the region’s tourism history. WO RD S

PH OTO G R APHY

Philippa Prentice

Nicole Franzen


Design destination —— LIVING

STAY COOL Enhancing the sense of modern simplicity, a nostalgic spirit pervades Tourists’ entire property and the connection to nature is paramount. The exterior cladding of the gable-roofed guest accommodation is locally sourced, untreated white oak planks that were chosen to reflect the surrounding vegetation, as were the newly planted apple trees, sugar maples and sumac that dot the grounds. Inside, the combination of high-vaulted ceilings, New England white oak walls, hardwood floors and rustic furniture is a triumph of country chic.

When meandering US highway the Mohawk Trail opened in 1914, local eateries, accommodation and attractions along the route advertised their hospitality to visitors with signs bearing a single word: Tourists. Just over a century later, a new eco-lodge on that very road in North Adams, Massachusetts, is doing the same. In the leafy northern Berkshires, Tourists has taken the classic American motor lodge for a modern-day scenic drive, bringing back the best bits to combine with contemporary, environmentally conscious design. The team led by Ben Svenson of design/ development company Broder (with creatives including Wilco bassist John Stirratt, Brooklyn magazine founder

Scott Stedman, architect Hank Scollard and interior designer Julie Pearson) turned the site’s existing 19th-century rooming house and one-star midcentury motel into distinctly modern accommodation, its pared-back linear architecture honouring the ’60s motor lodge vibe, and overlaid with the aesthetic of a folksy boutique inn. Tourists’ 48 units open onto a classic communal courtyard, but at the back of each, picture windows provide views of the Hoosic River, forest and mountains. Inside, the aesthetic is ‘austere luxury’. Each room has a built-in king-size bed and daybed, and some also have lofted bunks. All connect to patios or private decks with outdoor showers; use your bathroom inside instead and you’ll step > homest yle 125


LIVING —— Design destination

THIS PAGE & OPPOSITE, BOTTOM The pervasive palette in each unit is blond wood and white, the cabin-like mood offset by up-to-the-minute tech, including Apple TV and Tourists’ own short-wave radio station. Room service can also be arranged. Antique black and white prints in every room provide a connection to the Berkshires’ rich history. OPPOSITE, TOP The fireplace makes the lodge ultra inviting. Next to this heritage building is a courtyard that overlooks a heated saltwater swimming pool, a nature reserve and wetlands fed by rainwater collected off the roof.

onto concrete flooring, turn on Dornbracht taps and wash your paws with hand-milled soap over a custom-made sink. The property’s 1962 ranch house has been reimagined as a central lodge, where you can cosy up with a book or order hearty, wholesome food. Follow the path outside to the 1813 farmhouse that’s now a restaurant and cocktail lounge that hosts live music. Reed Hilderbrand considers landscape architecture “an act of purposeful transformation”, and here, in an area of the US long considered a destination for holidays and healthful recuperation, they’ve made a proper Berkshires nature experience of this 55-acre riverside 126 homest yle

retreat. Highlights include sculptural installations, a boardwalk connecting to a viewing platform overlooking the river, and a suspension bridge dreamed up by aerial adventure park designer Gerhard Komenda, which links to walking trails and spaces for exploring and outdoor concerts. As well as being a stone’s throw from the Appalachian hiking trail and ski and snowboard mountain Jiminy Peak, this is also ‘art country’, where you can put galleries including the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art and events like the Williamstown Theatre Festival on your itinerary. Sunny in summer, snow-dusted in winter, we reckon it’s got your name written all over it. touristswelcome.com


GET THE LOOK

CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE River organic teak coffee table, $499, designwarehouse.co.nz. Malboro flat leather chair, $810, williamsroad. co.nz. Full Moon frosted pendant, $150, achomestore.co.nz.

homest yle 127


CATALOG

ART ASSOCIATES —— Artwork

THE IVY HOUSE —— Rugs

ESCEA —— Heating

With a vast selection of original contemporary artwork from established and emerging artists based locally and around the globe, Art Associates offers paintings, works on paper, sculpture and photography for sale or lease. They’ll work with you, your interior designer or your architect to find the perfect piece for your home or business.

The depth and detail that’s a hallmark of the handmade is evident in every Armadillo & Co rug, bringing a thoughtful and honest beauty to your home. This well-loved Savannah rug has a plush wool pile that restores a sense of calm and comfort, inviting you to carve out a haven of tranquility amid the bustle of modern life. To experience Armadillo & Co’s artistry, visit The Ivy House’s Parnell showroom.

Escea’s latest release, the DS Series of gas fireplaces, gives you less of everything to offer more than ever before. Less unnecessary detail places a greater focus on the flames; less wasted heat means a higher efficiency rating; and less depth results in a sleek look with a small footprint. The DS series is available in both single- and double-sided designs.

info@artassociates.co.nz artassociates.co.nz

hello@theivyhouse.co.nz theivyhouse.co.nz

escea.com/ds-series

CHAIN GANG —— Homeware

APT —— Tapware & surfaces

BLACKBIRD GOODS —— Homeware

Chain Gang’s ultra-chunky knit throws, bed runners and scarves will keep you snug and warm this winter. Handmade in Christchurch, they’re crafted from beautifully soft, 100% New Zealand merino wool, and bespoke knits are also available. Plus, all New Zealand customers receive free shipping.

Architectural Products & Technologies are stockists of Italian-made iB Rubinetti tapware, including the Industria collection designed by Andrea Bregoli. Available in nine finishes, such as black chrome, rose gold and natural brass, this range allows you to mix and match levers, taps and bases to create objects with strong and unique personalities.

Blackbird Goods is the creation of interior stylist Gemma Adams and her husband Nathan Speeden. The home for handpicked, ethically sourced goods from makers and artisans around New Zealand and abroad, its emphasis is on quality, beauty and everyday practicality — treasures for him, for her and for the home.

aptinnovation.co.nz

blackbirdgoods.co.nz

hello@chaingangstore.co.nz chaingangstore.co.nz

128 homest yle


CATALOG

BOCONCEPT —— Interior design

MULTITAP —— Kitchen solutions

AFD STORE —— Homeware

BoConcept are experts at making design, furniture and colour come together in your home. If you need someone to bounce ideas off, their interior decorators are on hand to help you complete any scheme — single rooms, small apartments, big houses or corporate spaces. Book a free consultation with one of BoConcept’s interior decorators today.

Introducing the MultiTap from InSinkErator. This sophisticated Italian designed and made tap marries modern elegance with multifunctional convenience in a mixer that delivers filtered near-boiling water, standard hot water and filtered cold water — all from the same tap.

AFD (Alex Fulton Design) Store sells design, pushes colour and peddles function from New Zealand and abroad. Alex is obsessed with objects of colour and things that stand out from the crowd. The portal to new worlds of design, local and overseas, AFD is the rebel of retail, encouraging people to think differently, shop with their hearts and style like no one’s watching.

info@boconcept.co.nz boconcept.co.nz

multitap.co.nz

afdstore@alexfultondesign.co.nz afdstore.co.nz

BOHZALI —— Homeware

CAPRICHO —— Homeware

HOMESTYLE —— Content creation

Bohzali is passionate about artisan-created homeware and accessories from around the world. Specialising in new and vintage rugs and homeware from Morocco, they lovingly handpick each piece with the desire to add colour and texture to your home.

Head online or to the store to shop Capricho’s complete range of homeware, lighting, textiles and furniture, including innovative, functional, beautifully made pieces by Danish brand Woud. You’ll find Capricho at 106 Hurstmere Road, Takapuna, Auckland.

At homestyle, we’re specialists in working with brands to create innovative, integrated, bespoke home and lifestyle content. From initial concept to polished finish, our clients benefit from our in-depth understanding of these categories and our expert design, styling and editorial advice. Gain exposure across multiple channels, including print and online. Contact us to learn how to further the reach of your next campaign.

bohzali.co.nz

capricho.co.nz

09 300 7544 nick@homestyle.co.nz

If you’d like your business to be featured in the homestyle Catalog, please email us at advertising@homestyle.co.nz. homest yle 129


LAST WORD

“We’ve made a discovery tray with a rotating selection of finds for Ted to investigate at the table.”

Home time

It’s the thought that counts for homestyle editor Alice Lines at her abode by the beach. My partner Nick Burrowes and I moved into our home in Auckland’s Pt Chevalier 10 days after our son, Ted, was born. It was hectic to say the least, but when our good friends told us the cottage they were renting by the sea was up for grabs, we just couldn’t pass it up. It’s a funny little place, with wonky floors and a tiny kitchen, but the view over the water to the Waitakeres more than makes up for the quirks, which we’ve actually come to love. The sunsets here are superb, so we enjoy dinner on the deck or in the dining nook most nights, while catching the last rays of the day. Nick is a minimalist and I am not, but what we do share is a mutual appreciation of thoughtful design and objects with provenance, so decisions about new purchases are usually easily made. Pieces picked up on our travels to places like Bolivia and Istanbul live comfortably with others handcrafted in New Zealand workshops — amid the growing collection of shells and rocks collected by Ted on our trips to the beach and bush! When I’m not being an editor and a mum, I indulge my other passion — pottery classes. In the past few years, I’ve replaced all of our plates, bowls and dishes with ones I’ve made myself. @alice.lines 130 homest yle


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