Page 1

TA I L O R E D S PA C E S

Our picks from the Milan Furniture Fair David Mitchell s last house 17 pages of kitchens and bathrooms Kowtow s new store by Rufus Knight

Made to measure Heritage makeovers, bespoke new builds and an enduring Wanaka classic


Beatrix by Ritzwell


Milan Release M

Beatrix armchair & Jabara sideboard designed by Shinsaku Miyamoto with OS tables designed by Ritzwell.


AT L / H O M E 1 7 / 5 D P S


The International The Ultimate in Penthouse Luxury

9 Princes St, Auckland theinternational.co.nz 0800 20 20 90


The International is rapidly becoming New Zealand’s most iconic premium lifestyle residence. Behind the original Grand Hotel façade, Dominion Construction is building 90 freehold apartments over 17 levels, including 6 expansive, exceptionally designed penthouse apartments offering floor areas from 263m2 to 328m2 and 3.2m ceilings. With breathtaking views, three bedrooms and bathrooms, Boffi kitchens and wardrobes, Sub-Zero fridges, electric blinds, priority lift and two carparks, these dwellings offer world class luxury in the heart of Auckland’s CBD. Amenities also include a private dining room, cinema, library, basement wine cellar and storage facilities. Call our sales team today. Ross Hawkins +64 27 472 0577 ross.hawkins@sothebysrealty.com Jason Gaddes +64 21 994 921 jason.gaddes@sothebysrealty.com

Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated. Browns Real Estate Limited (licensed under the REAA 2008) MREINZ. nzsothebysrealty.com/NZE10526


Contents MADE TO MEASURE 90. Moving mountains A bold and striking family compound in central Queenstown designed by Assembly Architects

51. Boats, hats and buildings We farewell beloved Auckland architect David Mitchell 60. Party out the front Andrew Meiring adds to a heritage Devonport villa with a thoughtful mix of stone, wood, concrete and glass

104. Down by the river New Zealand-born architect Giles Reid breathes light and air into a London apartment conversion on the hames

76. More than an elegant shed A new home by David Mitchell in Christchurch’s Moncks Bay is both playful and functional

118. A passage of time A controversial Wanaka farmhouse designed by Ashley Muir in 1973 has stood the test of time

60

76

90

104

118

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

9


Art & Design 17. Basic instinct Natural materials and organic forms 22. Roll credits We preview the annual Resene Architecture & Design Film Festival

17

28

24. Double shot Two brothers combine their talents in a new Auckland eatery and bar 28. Fashion forward Kowtow’s sleek new Wellington store

30. Surplus energy Tony de Lautour’s retrospective at the Christchurch Art Gallery 33. Full circle Normann Copenhagen’s new range arrives at Backhouse 34. hen and now Reflect on the past for present inspiration 52. Requiem for a dream An iconic 1950s Auckland building faces demolition

Milan Report 2018 36. Off Site Take a tour of our off-venue favourites 30

36

44. Artisinal luxury Michelle Backhouse reflects on minimalisim and handcrafted textures

38. Living legend New Zealand designers collaborate on the reopening of a 1940s masterpiece

46. Finding favourites Studio Italia’s Valeria Carbonaro-Laws finds inspiration aplenty at the fair 48. Classically contemporary Alan Bertenshaw of Matisse on three leading designers

42. On safari Mike horburn from ECC reports on releases by Moooi and Paola Lenti

Kitchens & Bathrooms 38

52

131. Six clever designs Architects and designers create beautiful spaces in new and heritage homes

Friends of HOME 156. Design forecast A day on the road with enthusiasts and experts

131

10

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

162

158. Design Awards 2018 Entries are now open for our annual awards, in association with Fisher & Paykel

160. Suits you Douglas Lloyd Jenkins ponders the vernacular of measurements and quality 162. Favourite building Blair Jackson admires the Christchurch home/studio of the late Bill Suton


Get the latest online homemagazine.co.nz @homenewzealand facebook.com/homenewzealand @homenewzealand

Photography / David Straight

Editor’s leter

Top let Andrew Meiring cleverly adds an extension to a heritage villa in Devonport (p.60).

Top right Assembly Architects designs twin family retreats in Queenstown (p.90).

Above let A historic converted pub on the hames in London gets a makeover (p.104).

Above right Half a century later, a unique home in Wanaka still has the power to impress (p.118).

Not so long ago, I sat in on a session in which the inimitable Caroline Montague of Matisse advised a group of design aficionados to forget about trends when buying new furniture and think more about things you love: heirlooms, collections... and one ‘wrong’ thing that sets off everything else. It made me feel a lot beter about my own decidedly ‘eclectic’ house. We have too many books and an odd-ball collection of vintage pieces – a table by Parker Furniture picked up on Trade Me, a set of Ligna bentwood chairs found on the side of the road and restored – along with ceramics and glassware, inherited and collected. We have a minor addiction to armchairs, including a ‘Safari’ chair by Kaare Klint for Carl Hansen, which was a wedding present from my mum. And our ‘wrong’ thing? A USM sideboard in a vivid shade of ‘USM Green’ that was also a wedding present from my wife Hannah’s parents, which sits nicely below a haunting landscape of post-quake Christchurch by David Straight. It also got me thinking about the cover home for this issue: a thoughtful design by Andrew Meiring in stone and black-stained shingles that’s been added to a white wooden house in Devonport, Auckland. Faced with a heritage villa, the architect has knitted the needs of a modern household around the bones of an old house. It’s contemporary, but it’s not austere: it lets the owners inhabit it as they want to. See, most residential architecture is bespoke but not all of it is as personal as the homes in this issue. hey are wonderful expressions of their owners’ needs: occasionally offbeat, and sometimes even odd. hey are not houses where you have to throw everything out before you move in. In short, they all have at least one ‘wrong’ thing. And that’s what makes them work. —Simon Farrell-Green

In our report on Milan Design Week, we delve into what took place this year at the world’s biggest and most important industry event. See Design Forecast (p.35) for expert commentary from Mike horburn of ECC, Studio Italia’s Valeria CarbonaroLaws, Michelle Backhouse of Backhouse and Alan Bertenshaw from Matisse, along with reports on off-site shows. Finally, our annual Design Awards, sponsored by Fisher & Paykel, celebrate the very best in local talent and innovation. In this issue, we call for entries to the awards, which close on August 13. he winner will receive $3000 worth of product from Fisher & Paykel and will be revealed in our October/November issue. See p.158 for information on how to enter.

Subscribe HOME has a new e-newsleter and we’d love to be in touch more oten. To sign up, head over to homemagazine.co.nz/signup

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

13


Contributors Tom Morris

Jessica-Belle Greer

For this issue, the author and former design editor of Monocle magazine visited an apartment on the river hames, where Kiwi architect Giles Reid has worked his magic (p.104).

HOME’s staff writer explored the fascinating past of a landmark villa on Devonport’s North Head for our cover story on a clever renovation by Andrew Meiring (p.60).

What did you like most about visiting the London apartment? he position was incredible, right on the bend of the river looking east and west to quaint bridges in either direction. he atention to detail in the home was also quite spectacular, especially with the Japanese touches.

What’s your earliest architectural memory? I was very young, visiting the construction site of what was soon to be my own family’s home, designed by architect and friend Ken Crosson. I remember climbing the interior wall frames and trying to imagine what the home would look like. I think it’s really unique that architects can create places that come to hold such special memories.

Tell us about your book New Wave Clay: Ceramic Design, Art and Architecture. It looks at a fresh generation that's reinvigorating an age-old art. Focussing mainly on the design world, it’s a global survey of some of the most interesting things being done with ceramics at the moment – furniture, decorative arts, vessels, murals, 3D printing etc. here has been a huge craft revival in recent years – New Wave Clay tries to make sense of it, establish best practice and work out where it will go next. You recently atended Salone del Mobile in Milan, Italy – what caught your eye at the fair this year? he re-opening of the 1940s masterpiece Villa Borsani was a highlight. his was without doubt a perfect house, but I most enjoyed how it had been brought to life for the week by the magical yet simple touches of stylist Katie Lockhart and florist Sophie Wolanski. You really sensed their absolute thrill at being let loose on the place. Otherwise, in terms of trends, the maximalist aesthetic still reigns. As something of a purist, I am hoping that will blow over soon. So when are going to visit New Zealand? Imminently, I hope! I was last there when I was on staff at Monocle magazine for a press trip seven or eight years ago and have been dreaming of geting back ever since.

www.peterfell.co.nz

Tell us a bit about visiting the Devonport renovation by Andrew Meiring. It’s not often that I cover a villa renovation that is so bold and upfront. I loved exploring the history of the home while seeing new stories unfolding in the form of a contemporary extension made for modern family life. You also interviewed the people behind the new Kowtow store in Wellington? I really respect Kowtow as a brand for paving the way for ethical business, not just in New Zealand but internationally. I knew sustainable design would form the basis of their store brief but to see it translated so smoothly and in a way that’s so unique to their aesthetic is inspiring. You’ve writen a lot about fashion – are there parallels with architecture and design? Despite their obvious differences, I think architecture and fashion are similar in that there’s a lot more to the designs than having a roof over your head or coat to keep you warm. It’s about being useful, but also building a story about ourselves and creating room to explore new ideas.


Auckland 19 Earle Street Parnell 09 309 0500 auckland@backhouse.co.nz

Wellington 12 Kaiwharawhara Road Kaiwharawhara 04 499 8847 wellington@backhouse.co.nz

backhouse.co.nz


Editor Simon Farrell-Green Art Director Arch MacDonnell Inhouse Design Senior Designer/Stylist Sara Black Designer Alex Turner Inhouse Design Designer Raphael Roake Inhouse Design Copy Editor/Writer Jo Bates On the cover he extension by Andrew Meiring to a home in Devonport, Auckland, features ‘Hee’ chairs by Hay from Cult, and ‘Arnold Circus’ stool by Martino Gamper. Photograph by Jackie Meiring; art direction by Arch MacDonnell and Raphael Roake; styling by Catherine Wilkinson. For more, turn to p.60.

Writer Jessica-Belle Greer Head of Digital Michael Fuyala Digital Editor Lakshmi Beresford Digital Content Producer Caitlin Beck Digital Content Producer Kate Milliken Video Editor Lana Byrne Editorial Office Bauer Media Group Shed 12, City Works Depot 90 Wellesley St Auckland, New Zealand homenewzealand@ bauermedia.co.nz +64 9 308 2700

Contributors Susanne Baldwin Jenny Farrell Jeremy Hansen Amelia Holmes Douglas Lloyd Jenkins Tom Morris Mat Philp Steve Philp Giles Reid Sarah Wall Catherine Wilkinson

Photographers Kate Claridge Simon Devit Lucas K Doolan Mary Gaudin Sam Hartnet Jackie Meiring David Straight Simon Wilson Postal address HOME magazine Bauer Media Group Private Bag 92512 Wellesley Street Auckland 1141 New Zealand

Managing Director Brendon Hill

Advertising Sydney Rachel McLean rmclean@bauermedia.co.nz +64 9 308 2760

General Manager – Publishing and Insights Tanya Walshe

Printer Webstar

Editorial Director Shelley Ferguson

Distributor Gordon & Gotch

Chief Executive Officer Paul Dykzeul

Commercial Director Kaylene Hurley Group Sales Director Premium Lifestyle Titles Stuart Dick Commercial Brand Manager Alice Harwood aharwood@bauermedia.co.nz Assistant Commercial Brand Manager Amelia Murray amurray@bauermedia.co.nz Advertising Account Manager Nicola Saunders nsaunders@bauermedia.co.nz +64 9 366 5345

HOME is subject to copyright in its entirety and the contents may not be reproduced in any form, either in whole or in part, without writen permission of the publisher. All rights reserved in material accepted for publication, unless initially specified otherwise. All leters and other material forwarded to the magazine will be assumed intended for publication unless clearly labeled “not for publication”. We welcome submissions of homes that architects or owners would like to be considered for publication. Opinions expressed in HOME New Zealand are those of the contributors and not necessarily those of Bauer Media Group. No responsibility is accepted for unsolicited material. ABC average net circulation, October 16 – September 17: 13,001 copies. ISSN 1178-4148.

Advertising Co-ordinator Alexandra Cuadros acuadros@bauermedia.co.nz

Subscription Enquiries magshop.co.nz/home 0800 MAGSHOP or 0800 624 746 magshop@magshop.co.nz +64 9 308 2721 (tel)

Classified Advertising Kim Chapman classifieds@xtra.co.nz +64 7 578 3646

Bulk/Corporate Subscriptions corporates@magshop.co.nz +64 9 308 2700

Marketing & Circulation Manager Martine Skinner Brand Manager Lauren Dyke Business Manager Esha Lingam Production Co-ordinator Lorne Kay

Digital Shower Mixers coming soon to Home Ideas Centre, Parnell For more information, contact our product specialist Vicki Bishop at vickib@felton.co.nz


Design— Beautiful pieces for the home, food for the mind and new spaces that will enliven your senses.

D:01

BASIC INSTINCT Natural materials and organic forms result in stylish simplicity. Styling Amelia Holmes Photography Simon Wilson

From let Vintage table by Kartell, $85 from Babelogue, babelogue.shop; porcelain planter by Hasami, $132 from Everyday Needs, everyday-needs.com; LED paper lantern by Michiyuki-Tou, $135 from Everyday Needs, everyday-needs.com.


D:02

From let Suede bag by he Goods, $395 from he Shelter, theshelteronline.com; ‘Stonework’ tray by Rodolfo Dordoni for KnIndustrie, $358 from Tessuti, shop.tessuti.co.nz; African stool, $250 from Babelogue, babelogue.shop.


DAW S O N & C O .


D:03

From let (botom) Brass tray, $45 from Babelogue, babelogue.shop; ‘Crusoe’ side table by Hawthorne Group, $476.48 from Indie Home Collective, indiehomecollective. com; vase by Margi Nutall, $450 from Casa Doran, doran-and-doran.com; ‘Bump’ vase by Tom Dixon, $305 from Simon James Concept Store, simonjamesdesign.com


Exquisite hand knotted rugs by Australian designer, Tammy Kanat, exclusively available at Artisan. Auckland Christchurch artisancollective.co.nz


D:04

ROLL CREDITS German furniture and product designer Konstantin Grcic is the subject of Design is Work, a study of his method, from sketches to the finished product.

The annual Resene Architecture & Design Film Festival explores themes of humanity, reconstruction and renovation.

June officially marks the beginning of winter: what beter time to kick back and enjoy explorations of design and architecture on the big screen? he annual Resene Architecture & Design Film Festival runs throughout the country, with screenings in Christchurch and Dunedin scheduled for June and July.

Serious work also goes into spending six decades in architecture: It’s all a Plan looks back on the life and work of Pritzker Prize-winning architect Paulo Mendes da Rocha, in a series of interviews with his daughter Joana. he 88-year-old Brazilian talks frankly and fascinatingly about his trademark Brutalist buildings, as well as everything from urbanism to humanity.

Making your way through the entire programme might require a few days of annual leave; you can reflect on how strong your work ethic is during Konstantin Grcic: Design is Work. he documentary follows Grcic (creator of the ‘Chair_One’ for Magis and widely regarded as one of the most innovative contemporary designers) for a year, providing the proof for his statement that, “Design is… hard work, serious work.”

he humanity theme continues in A Test of Faith, a documentary tracing the four-year process of painstakingly deconstructing and resurrecting Wellington’s St Mary of the Angels church. he historic church was closed after being assessed as an earthquake risk; the film brings a sensitive viewpoint to the passion and dedication of those involved in giving the building a new lease of life.

22

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

And from reconstruction to renovation, Die Neue Nationalgalerie chronicles the history and renovation of the Berlin art gallery. he Neue Nationalgalerie was the last building designed by Mies van der Rohe and the film expertly blends archival interviews and footage with contemporary commentary, looking both at the gallery’s beginnings and towards its future.

Resene Architecture & Design Film Festival Dunedin: June 14-24 Christchurch: June 28-July 11 resene.co.nz/filmfestival


Ottawa Table by Karim Rashid

MAKE THE MOST OUT OF YOUR SPACE | BOCONCEPT.COM Auckland | Wellington | Christchurch


D:05

DOUBLE SHOT Two inventive brothers open an elegant new all-day eatery near the water in central Auckland.

Brothers Charles and Patrick Williams recently opened Williams, an elegantly spare all-day eatery in a new building designed by Architectus in Wynyard Quarter, Auckland. “We came into the space wanting to strip it back,” says Charles of the new project. “We wanted something timeless.” Simplicity aside, what motivated your design objectives? CHARLES WILLIAMS We worked with Gerrick Numan of Millé design to draw up the space. We wanted it to be an oasis from the busy urban life in Wynyard Quarter. It was designed to be a breath of fresh air, where people can slow down and enjoy good food and drink with company or solo. You previously established Ceremony café in Graton, Auckland – is there any of its DNA in Williams? We loved the casual and fun atmosphere we created at Ceremony and I feel we’ve carried that over. Tell us about those beautiful light fitings. We collaborated with Monmouth Glass to create a family of pendants for the space. Using different methods, they were able to create a diverse range of bulbs for the different areas within the eatery. You’re running Williams with your brother Patrick. Who does what? We both run the front of house, Patrick runs the day-to-day service of the eatery and I take a more general manager role, helping out with the kitchen and implementing systems.

Photography David Straight

Williams Eatery 85 Daldy St, Wynyard Quarter, Auckland williamseatery.co.nz

24

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

Above Monmouth Glass Studio created a series of pendants to define different spaces in the café. Above and let he all-day café serves breakfast, coffee, lunch and dinner, as well as food from the counter cabinet.


6HHLWH[SHULHQFHLW %OXP·V VWXQQLQJ VKRZURRPV LQ $XFNODQG DQG &KULVWFKXUFK DUH VXUH WR VSDUN LQVSLUDWLRQ IRU \RXU RZQ NLWFKHQ SURMHFW 'LVFRYHU %OXP·V UHYROXWLRQDU\ UDQJH RI $XVWULDQPDGH NLWFKHQKDUGZDUHILUVWKDQGRQHIDVFLQDWLQJFDELQHWVROXWLRQDIWHUDQRWKHU

ZZZEOXPFRP


Subscribe to HOME and receive a free BLUNT umbrella, worth $99! $99 for 12 issues Two-year subscription Save 25% off cover price Already a subscriber? Extend or renew your subscription for an additional two years with this offer.

BENEFITS OF SUBSCRIBING: 1

Free delivery to your home

2

Never pay cover price again

3

4

Enjoy two years of inspiring architecture and design Receive a black BLUNT ‘Metro’ worth $99

BLUNT Umbrellas are available to purchase from www.bluntumbrellas.com and selected retail stockists.

Subscribe online: www.magshop.co.nz/home/M186HAE Or phone: 0800 MAGSHOP (0800 624 746) and quote M186HAE Offer ends 9 August, 2018

26

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

Terms and conditions apply. Offer valid for delivery in New Zealand for subscriptions ordered on or before 9 August, 2018. Offer is not available in conjunction with any other offer. Subscription rates are available for delivery to New Zealand addresses only. By subscribing for two years, subscribers will receive one black BLUNT Metro umbrella worth $99. For existing subscribers, subscriptions will commence at end of current term. For full terms and conditions and overseas rates, visit magshop.co.nz.


Innovative and forward-thinking, BLUNT Umbrellas is making a splash worldwide with its revolutionary and stylish range of umbrellas. he global umbrella company was founded in 2009 by New Zealand design engineer Greig Brebner, and has since made a name for itself as the world’s best umbrella company. At the centre of the company’s philosophy is a desire to move away from the throwaway culture associated with traditional umbrellas, instead turning the humble brolly into a coveted and durable item. As part of this philosophy, Blunt proactively collaborates with like-minded brands, artists and companies that have a strong creative and design aesthetic. Recent collaborations include fashion designer Karen Walker, as well as artists Dick Frizzell and Flox.


D:06

FASHION FORWARD A new store for clothing label Kowtow flies the flag for sustainability and sleek design.

When Gosia Piatek launched her fashion label Kowtow more than a decade ago, ethical and sustainable values were her foundation. he brand’s new flagship store in Te Aro, Wellington, continues the theme of conscious fashion and considered design. Working with interior architect Rufus Knight, Piatek has realised a simple yet generous aesthetic with large storefront windows and gallery-like spaces. “he store opening is an opportunity to bring the Kowtow ethos into a physical space,” says Piatek. “Every detail was considered – from the recycled nylon rugs to the New Zealand-grown and milled timber.” Why did you open the store? GOSIA PIATEK We wanted to give Kowtow a physical home, somewhere we could show our customers what a Kowtow space looks like. We wanted it to be an extension of the brand – minimal, beautifully crafted and sustainably made. What are the main design influences here? I love the mixture of a Scandinavian and Japanese aesthetic, which is the same for our clothing design. We wanted a space that wouldn’t compete with our clothing, a gallery-like space with a minimal yet warm feeling, made with the most sustainable materials New Zealand has to offer. From the get go, Rufus suggested that we bring in a hand-crafted element and we approached ceramic artist Gidon

28

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

Bing, who we’ve collaborated with in the past, to create hundreds of crackle-glaze tiles for our counter top and shelving. It was important for the space to feel crafted, which has been achieved with joinery by Wellington’s Makers Fabrication [part of Makers of Architecture], who physically brought the space to life. Your brand has ethical and sustainable values at its core – how did this influence design decisions? I think this was the most exciting aspect of the entire project and Rufus was very clever in approaching Makers of Architecture, who are also

Above Ceramic tiles by Gidon Bing top a side board, with two ‘Flask’ vases, also by Gidon Bing.


H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

29


Top Picture windows at street level look directly into the gallery-like space designed by Rufus Knight. Above An ‘Offset’ stool by Philippe Malouin for Resident sits in a changing room. Right ‘Hotaru Buoy’ pendants by Ozeki for Barber & Osgerby hang above a recycled nylon hall rug.

deeply rooted in sustainable values, to execute the project. Working with like-minded individuals made the project very easy as they were passionate about showing us only sustainable options. he woodwork is striking. Rufus gave us traditional Japanese inspiration for woodwork in his original mood board, which we fell in love with. he shelving and racking was difficult to design. We needed something substantial to fill the large space, yet for it to still feel minimal and beautifully executed. For the back wall area we wanted a modular feeling, so the shelves and racks can be interchanged depending on what stock we want to showcase. here’s a lot of woodwork in the store, yet there are no visible nails. It really is so beautiful and simple, yet it took a lot of working out to get to this point. It’s my favourite part of the store.

Kowtow 29 College Street, Te Aro, Wellington kowtowclothing.com

Text Jessica-Belle Greer Photography Simon Wilson

30

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D


H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

31


D:07

SURPLUS ENERGY Tony de Lautour’s retrospective charts 30 years of creative output.

Painter, ceramicist, sculptor and provocateur Tony de Lautour’s first major retrospective, Us V hem takes in work from the past three decades. A new body of large-scale paintings has been completed especially for the exhibition, on at Christchurch Art Gallery until September 9. De Lautour first came to national prominence in 1994 with an exhibition entitled Bad White Art. Consisting of a series of thickly worked paintings – deliberately naive, even crude – it included imagery that drew on the seedier aspects of gang and prison life: spiders’ webs, guns, knives, teardrops, chains, lighting bolts and syringes. he artist continued to draw on popular culture throughout the 1990s and 2000s. Memorably, a series of paintings was inspired by corporate logos, which were subtly reinvented as landscapes featuring the Southern Alps. His art during this time was funny and dark – it nodded and winked, it was serious and silly. “He portrayed a seedy, antagonistic side of New Zealand,” says curator Peter Vangioni, “with his unique take on Aotearoa identity and colonial history.” However, since the Christchurch earthquakes of 2010 and 2011, De Lautour’s work has moved more into abstraction; colourful geometric shapes jostle for position, at times full of energy, elsewhere sparser, more delicate and somehow even beautiful. “After the earthquakes I found figurative work a litle... facile,” says de Lautour. “I just wanted to deal with shapes. Shapes seemed more real; like objects.”

32

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

From top ‘Waterfall II’ (2011); ‘Untitled’ (2004). Both paintings are displayed in Us V hem, a Tony de Lautour retrospective at Christchurch Art Gallery.

Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū Cnr Worcester Boulevard & Montreal Street, Christchurch christchurchartgallery.org.nz


D:08

FULL CIRCLE Streamlined new pieces from Danish design company Normann Copenhagen have arrived at Backhouse.

Above he recently released collection includes ‘Herit’ chairs by Simon Legald for Normann Copenhagen.

he new range by Normann Copenhagen at Backhouse includes cherry-picked releases from Milan Design Week. Pieces by the Danish design company, founded in 1999 by Jan Andersen and Poul Madsen, add to the carefully selected international designers represented at Backhouse and reflect the New Zealand company’s aesthetic roots.

include the curved lines of ‘Sum’ armchairs and sofas; the minimal, brass-footed ‘Union’ table collection; and the ‘Herit’ chair series, all of which are designed by Simon Legald. Short for heritage, ‘Herit’ pieces traverse classic and contemporary setings and are available with or without armrests, and with upholstered or plastic seats.

“It’s full circle for us,” says Michelle Backhouse. When founder Joe Backhouse visited Denmark in the 1960s, he became completely obsessed with Danish design, she says. Normann Copenhagen produces furniture, lighting and textiles, with pieces characterised by their streamlined forms and timeless appeal: classic Scandinavian design. “For the Danes it’s all about craftsmanship – they produce such elegant, timeless pieces,” says Michelle. “hey’re similar to New Zealanders in their desire to keep things simple.” he Milan Design Week release represents Normann Copenhagen’s most comprehensive launch to date. Highlights

12 Kaiwharawhara Rd, Wellington, and 19 Earle St, Parnell, Auckland backhousenz.com

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

33


1

D:09 2

3

THEN AND NOW Turn back time and reflect on the past for present inspiration.

7

6 4

5

9

8

10

1—‘Namasté’ serving set by Jean-Marie Massaud for Kartell, $320 from Backhouse, backhousenz.com 2—‘Fifties’ chair by Calligaris, $599 from Dawson & Co, dawsonandco.nz 3—‘Amp Lamp’ pendants by Simon Legald for Normann Copenhagen, $265 each from Backhouse, backhousenz.com 4—‘Cog’ keyring by Tom Dixon, $74 from Simon James Design, simonjamesdesign.com 5—‘Air du Temps’ clock by Eugeni Quitllet for Kartell, $280 from Backhouse, backhousenz.com 6—‘Untitled 3’ by Mark Alsweiler, $1100 from Precinct 35, precinct35. co.nz 7—‘Pine’ table by Simon Legald for Normann Copenhagen, from $1055 from Backhouse, backhousenz.com 8—‘Lightoread P’ floor lamp by Jaime Hayon for Parachilna, $3155 from ECC, ecc.co.nz 9—‘Fat Tulip’ sofa by Adam Goodrum for Nau, from $11,563 from Cult, cultdesign.co.nz 10—‘Home Hotel’ benches by Jean-Marie Massaud for Poliform, from $7100 each from Studio Italia, studioitalia.co.nz 11—‘Compact 02’ wall light by Douglas & Bec, $620 from Douglas & Bec, douglasandbec.com Edited by Sara Black.

34

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

11


Milan 2018 By the time you read this, the impact of Milan Design Week 2018 will already be filtering through to New Zealand. The owners of New Zealand’s foremost design studios and retailers have returned home – in the case of the retailers, to anxiously await the furniture they’ve ordered for the following year, in the case of the designers and manufacturers, to mull over what they’ve seen and the lessons learned. Make no mistake: the chances are, if something trends at Salone del Mobile in April, it’ll make its way to a store, website or living room near you over the following 12 months. It’s not the world’s only design fair – and trends don’t change yearly, of course, so don’t panic – but it’s by far and away the most influential event, mainly because so many design-minded professionals (media, retailers, designers and manufacturers) atend. Read on for all the design inspiration you need for 2018.


Off site hey call it ‘Milan’, because it’s bigger than just a furniture fair. For one week, design takes over the city proper – here are our favourite off-site shows from 2018.

More than a pop-up he show that had everyone talking was he Diner, a celebration of the 25th birthday of Surface magazine. A collaboration between the magazine, David Rockwell and design studio 2x4, he Diner was a pop-up restaurant, bar and event space in a barrel-vaulted abandoned warehouse under Milan Central Station. Billed as a ‘coast-to-coast journey through the United States’, four spaces were inspired by a roadside diner, an East Coast luncheonete, a Midwest diner and a West Coast diner. On the menu? Burgers and deli classics provided by cult New York artisan food retailer, Murray’s Cheese. he space featured events – designer karaoke, anyone? – and talks during the day, and transformed into a cocktail bar by night. Partner support, naturally, was evident with furniture sourced from Design

36

Within Reach, while the 14m central bar was provided by Silestone; table tops came from Dekton. No word on how much dancing they endured. Sound and vision While Hay showed at the main Salone, we loved its collaboration at Palazzo Clerici with Sonos and WeWork, an American design company specialising in shared workspaces. he idea? To present a shared vision for the future of design, collaboration and living spaces – in essence, uniting design with lighting, furniture and sound in a heritage space. he Palazzo is a lavish neoclassical residence, all gilt and tapestries, which worked surprisingly well as a backdrop for Hay’s collection of clean-lined designs in its signature flat, slightly dirty greys, reds and greens across new designs from Ronan & Erwan

Above and below he Diner, a restaurant and bar, was a hugely popular pop-up in an abandoned warehouse under Milan Central Station.


Let ‘Dapper’ by Doshi Levien for Hay. Above A ‘Sonos One’ speaker by Hay for Sonos. Botom let Vitra’s exhibition of iconic furniture appeared toy-like when viewed from above.

Bouroullec, Stefan Diez, GamFratesi, Shane Schneck and many others. A highlight was the ‘Élémentaire’ chair by Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec for Hay, a “plastic chair that does not look like a plastic chair”. hose in need of a rest, meanwhile, could take a break in the leafy courtyard furnished with the very lovely ‘Palissade’ outdoor furniture collection by the Bouroullec brothers for Hay. here were also smaller objects to covet, such as the new ‘Sonos One’ speakers by Hay for Sonos, in a range of classic Hay colours. Chairs through time Along with its typically impressive offering at the fair proper, Swiss manufacturer Vitra also staged Typecasting – an exhibition of ‘iconic, forgoten and new Vitra characters’ at La Pelota, a former sports stadium not far from central Milan. Against the white concrete institutional backdrop, Vitra installed a huge, elliptical yellow stage, on which the Vitra characters were beautifully placed: design geeks will spot the ‘Wiggle’ chair by Frank Gehry, and more than a few Eames. he effect was almost toy-like – an impression emphasised by a black steel platform which allowed viewers to look down on the collection. he exhibition was more than just a prety effect, though. Designer Robert Sadler, curator of the exhibition, sought to emphasise the social role of furniture – and of chairs in particular – as a key theme. His reasoning: that there are few things finer than a chair, and few things more personal.

37


Living legend New Zealand designers collaborate to reinvigorate a significant home in Milan by an almost-forgoten architect. Text Tom Morris Photography Mary Gaudin

For a festival that prides itself on showing the very best contemporary design, it was an interesting slight that the word on everyone’s lips at this April’s edition of the annual Salone del Mobile in Milan was a 70-year-old house that has been empty for a decade. Villa Borsani is a residence designed by Osvaldo Borsani – an Italian architect, designer and founder of furniture manufacturer Tecno – and built between 1939 and 1945. It was a labour of love, with Borsani roping in numerous peers (Lucio Fontana on a fireplace, Arnaldo Pomodoro on a brass headboard, Adriano Spilimbergo on a bathroom mosaic) to create a home for his brother’s family. It was

38

located next to the workshop first set up by Borsani’s father, which eventually became the Tecno factory. hree generations lived there until 2008, when it was closed up. A decade later, the villa temporarily re-opened as Casa Libera – a living, breathing open house curated by London-based design consultant Ambra Medda. “he house was pure perfection, so there wasn’t really a lot for me to do,” she says. Medda worked closely with Auckland-based stylist Katie Lockhart on jumpstarting the space. his was no simple mater of dusting off old curtains, nor just restoring furniture, although both happened. Santa Maria Novella soap was placed in the bathrooms next

Above ‘Arnold Circus’ stools by Martino Gamper are upturned and filled with blooms in the loggia. Right he staircase is a remarkable statement and achievement in white marble and Murano glass.


39


Let he villa was closed up for a decade from 2008, with much of its original furniture and features left intact.

40

Above Monmouth Glass Studio created some of the vases for the oral displays. Below he ďŹ replace in the living room was designed by Lucio Fontana.


to new, handwoven towels, and a soundtrack of lounge music was played throughout the home. “I didn’t want to meddle with perfection. he idea was to just breathe a bit of life into it and make sure people felt welcome,” says Medda. Medda and Lockhart flew over New Zealanders Sophie Wolanski, founder of florist Muck Floral in Auckland, and designer Harry Were, to help invigorate the space. “I regularly collaborate with both Sophie and Harry for my work; it was a natural progression that they help with this project and fill it with their wonderful energy,” says Lockhart. he link with New Zealand was more coincidental than conceptual, but invigorating nonetheless. “I had never stepped into a place like it – the ingenuity and atention to detail,” says Wolanski. “It was like a time capsule, good and bad.” he first sign of her hand was revealed on entering the militantly architectural arches that frame the loggia. here, two upturned and suspended ‘Arnold Circus’ stools by Martino Gamper were filled with blooms. “It was the first hint of a new energy in the house,” says Wolanski. Arrangements were placed throughout the two-storey home – a huge display under the marble and Murano glass staircase; more rustic floral bunches next to beds and on tabletops. Wolanski also commissioned Auckland’s Monmouth Glass Studio to create vases for her displays, arriving ahead of Salone del Mobile to source and order flowers. he collaborators’ joy at the chance to reinvigorate this architecturally significant space was palpable – and certainly timely. Borsani died in 1985 and despite his peers being all the major Milanese modern masters, such as Gio Ponti and Carlo Scarpa, Borsani’s name is not as prominent

in the history books. his exhibit and a retrospective at La Triennale di Milano over the summer, curated by Norman Foster, aims to correct that. All those learning about Borsani’s work are set to be astounded – whether from near or far. As Lockhart says: “It’s amazing for us as New Zealanders to work within such a space as Villa Borsani – there really isn’t any architectural equivalent from this era here to experience.”

Top A loose display of tulips by Sophie Wolanski. Above Handwoven towels hang against a mosaic bathroom wall.

41


On safari Mike horburn from ECC reports on Moooi’s animal-influenced show and outdoor furniture from Paola Lenti.

I’ve always suggested to people who like design that Milan is an incredibly worthwhile fair to go to. It’s the biggest furniture fair in the world and you get a really rounded view on what’s available. Moooi Moooi and Marcel Wanders were in full form – they are a bit offbeat and push the boundaries. heir theme this year was extinct animals and their exhibition was geared around walking down a long hallway at the end of which was an incredibly realistic image of a big bison looking at you. Wool rugs and fur – Moooi has done rugs for a few years but this year they focused on primordial animal prints, which are made with New Zealand wool. hey are soft and luxurious. As well as lamb’s wool, there was quite a bit of fur. I really liked the ‘Smoke’ armchairs by Moooi, which were only done for the show – they’ve done these beautiful burnt armchairs for years and this year they were covered in yak, making it a bit luxurious. Lighting – About 70 or 80 pieces make up the ‘Mega’ chandelier; it’s enormous and we’ve sold one already. he piece is an eclectic range of chandeliers put together in one on a big ceiling scape – amazing! Paola Lenti his brand is another favourite. hey didn’t show at the fairgrounds but at an old warehouse and it was very beautifully done. heir range of outdoor furniture is made from rope in a kaleidoscope of colours including peppermint greens, yellows and pinks. hey had a spectacular marble table too in a bold, contrasting patern – a style in marble we saw repeated in other collections at Milan this year.

42

Above ‘Meshmatics’ chandelier by Rick Tegelaar for Moooi.


Above right ‘Perch’ light by Umut Yamac for Moooi is a family of striking, sculptural lamps and pendants. Above let he ‘Jackson’ chair in animal print by Marcel Wanders for Moooi. Let Mike horburn in the ‘O’ rocking chair at Moooi.

43


Artisanal luxury Michelle Backhouse of Backhouse reflects on maximalism and handcrafted textures, including a decidedly retro shift.

We love how the fiera has transitioned into an exhibition that encompasses the whole of Milan – brands that can’t afford to exhibit bring in trucks and open the doors. For us, it’s about geting out and seeing what people are doing. It feeds the soul. Rossana Orlandi We make a beeline there because we applaud her endeavours in helping young designers get their products out to the world. She’s been instrumental in helping some really successful designers on their way, including Stellar Works and PET Lamp. PET Lamp hey craft castoff plastic botles into beautiful lamps. Last year they did a huge project with an Aboriginal community in Northern Australia, which was on show. It’s an exciting company to be working with because there’s integrity in what they do – they really respect the maker. Artisans For two or three years now we’ve noticed a move back to handmade. Even with big global brands and industrialisation and technology, there’s still this heartfelt journey that a lot of young artisans are using their own backgrounds and stories to inform their designs. 1970s here was a move this year towards more dramatic, energising paletes. Lots of yellow, red and orange and clashing paterns – terracota was really big and so was chocolate, even rich blues. Kartell collaborated with JJ Martin who runs a business selling vintage fabrics. It’s really fun and gorgeous – we’ve ordered it all!

44

Maximalism and texture here’s a lot of chat about this trend and its imbued with a litle luxury. We saw big, soft, undulating sofas. Velvet is still really strong – those rich, tactile fabrics. Jens Risom did a beautiful chair for Stellar Works, which we’ve ordered, in an orange fabric designed in the 1960s. And Space Copenhagen collaborated with Stellar Works on a new sofa called ‘Infinity’, in the most luxurious and tactile blush velvet.

Above Michelle Backhouse in the garden at Rosanna Orlandi’s store, a converted umbrella factory where she regularly launches new designers.


Let ‘Ramingining 2’ by PET Lamp, a gigantic installation produced in conjunction with weavers from the Northern Territories of Australia.

Above and below Familiar pieces from the Kartell collection have been given a twist in ‘La Double J’, a collaboration between JJ Martin and Kartell.

45


Finding favourites Two decades on, Valeria Carbonaro-Laws, owner and director of Studio Italia, continues to find inspiration at the fair.

I love going to Salone del Mobile. Seeing it, feeling it, smelling it, being there among so many people. I’ve been going to the fair for 22 years – my goodness! – and every time I step onto a stand it’s exciting to see what the designers have come up with. Material drama I’ve been working with Poliform for 18 years and in the last few, I’ve noticed that they really keep pushing that boundary – they keep coming out with materials we haven’t been seen before, or used in new handcrafted ways. hey’ve started using smoky glass, it’s not a new thing but I’ve never seen it on a side table or a dining table like this before. he new marble is ‘Sahara’. It’s very black and dramatic and I absolutely love it. Jean Marie Massaud he star of Poliform’s showcase, Massaud has created a number of new designs, my favourite being the ‘Creek’ dining table. It has a metal frame, to which you add either a marble, wood or glass top. Just beautiful. Hand-finished his year I went to see Poliform’s factory and saw that so much is still finished by hand. Really, every single piece is different, with its own character. At their amazing factory, they have the capacity to produce to a certain level, which is why good designers tend to team up with them, including Massaud, Carlo Colombo and Emmanuel Gallina. he designs are both contemporary and timeless, pieces that you love a litle bit more every day. New and old In the last few years, there has been a boom of creativity and excitement in how furniture is displayed. he showroom of Poltrona Frau in Milan almost made me cry. I was expecting a normal showroom, but instead it

46

showed contemporary furniture in a building with antique frescoes on the walls and high ceilings – it was amazing seeing how an old house can take beautiful modern furniture. Organic and crated In the colour spectrum, we noticed forest green and burgundy coming through. We’re seeing a move to smoother shapes – with arched corners and curves, everything is softer. With the celebration of craftsmanship, there’s also a lot more atention to detail coming through.

Above ‘Park Uno’ bed by Carlo Colombo for Poliform. At its side is the ‘Soori’ coffee table by Soo Chan and the ‘Ilda’ tables by Jean-Marie Massaud for Poliform.


Above ‘Creek’ side table by Jean-Marie Massaud for Poliform.

Right Studio Italia director Valeria Carbonaro-Laws sits on ‘Jane Large’ chair by Emmanuel Gallina for Poliform. Below ‘Quid’ wall unit and sideboard by R&D Poliform.

47


Classically contemporary Alan Bertenshaw, co-owner of Matisse, finds inspiration in three designers close by each other on Via Durini.

his year was probably the biggest crowd we’ve ever seen, with people queuing to get on stands. I’ve never seen that in all the 31 years we’ve been going. here was also a lot going on in the city and the three showrooms that stood out for us – B&B Italia, Arclinea and Cassina – were all within a few yards of each other on Via Durini. his litle design hub was sensational for me. Antonio Citterio he products at B&B Italia are all designed and curated by Antonio Citerio, who is our god of design. he ‘Atoll’ sofa system stood out for me – it blew me away and I think it will become a classic. He also designed the ‘Modus’ tri-fold door system for wardrobes with a mechanism that stacks beautifully. He’s an absolute genius at designing things like this. Citerio is also the art director for Arclinea, our main kitchen supplier, which also featured the door system. he company showed a new idea for a kitchen that can be completely closed off or opened up. Patricia Urquiola Another highlight was the revamp of the Cassina showroom, designed by new art director Patricia Urquiola. She did an outstanding job of the redesign, opening it up to a beautiful entertaining area on the roof. Classics and innovation When I’m at the fair, I look for what’s going to become a classic. I saw a lot of tan leather being combined with dark timber, such as the ‘Atoll’ sofa, but there was a general lack of trend due to the range of new ideas – a lot of innovation.

48

Material richness Intricate marble was a strong feature, with browns and reds and deep paterning. here were some really interesting stone-like textures and a resurgence of solid wood, such as Reva and Team 7’s textured timbers. Purples and greens were predominant in fabrics; everything looked a lot richer. here was a lot of optimism at the fair – it was a wonderful experience.

Above Alan Bertenshaw of Matisse at the B&B Italia store. Behind him is the ‘Eda-Mame’ sofa by Piero Lissoni for B&B Italia.


Let ‘Atoll’ sofa by Antonio Citerio for B&B Italia. Below Organic shapes form the ‘Colosseo’ stools by Antonio Citerio for B&B Italia. hey sit in front of the ‘Harbor’ sofa by Naoto Fukasawa for B&B Italia.

Above Dark timber, tan leather and moody, earthy textures were a distinct feature at Milan this year.

49


Leading edge his year, for the first time, Fisher & Paykel took its design innovation – including a suite of new products – to EuroCucina, the world’s biggest kitchen fair.

Fisher & Paykel took more than new products to its stand at EuroCucina, the world’s biggest kitchen fair and part of Milan Design Week: it also took a group of its New Zealand-based designers to tell the story. “Designers and architects are a significant audience for us globally,” says Fisher & Paykel general manager of design, Mark Elmore. “It gave us the opportunity to showcase our unique New Zealand-inspired design story on a global stage.” Why this year? For us it’s perfect timing – we’re in the process of launching appliances such as Column Refrigeration, Companion Cooking products and our Integrated Insert Rangehood, which have all been developed in close consultation with the design community. As well as hosting designers from Australasia, North America and Asia, we’ve made new connections with premium designers and specifiers in the European design community. Why is the New Zealand design story so important for you? New Zealand is at the heart of our heritage and design philosophy and our provenance is something totally unique in the appliance world – it’s something we’re immensely proud of. It’s a perspective that customers outside New Zealand really want to hear about. What did you learn? he European customers are really responsive to our brand story and product portfolio and this has really reinforced that we’re on the right track. As New Zealand designers with a unique perspective, this builds the confidence to continue taking our design solutions to the world. Also, there are more than 500 satellite events that take place across Milan, so across the team we gained lots of new perspectives and insights. It seems like kitchens are increasingly presented as furniture. his trend is driven by the kitchen and living room in a single space – it’s shared,

50

so designers and architects want a more uniform, liveable, high-quality design solution. What material trends did you notice? Richness in materials, texture, colour, warmth. Lots of darker, deeper timber, and texture – showing the grain, dark-tinted stainless steel, copper, brass and stone. It’s very much a move to a softer, more natural feel. here was also marble everywhere. hat’s playing to luxury but also quality and longevity. What’s coming next from Fisher & Paykel? We’re particularly excited about our Column products launching this year. hey are a range of refrigerators and freezers that provide true personalisation with independent variable temperature zones, as well as the ability to mix and match different sized columns together or separately. It’s next-level design freedom, with seamless integration options. Mark Elmore joins HOME to judge our Design Awards in August – see p.158 for details on how to enter.

Top and above he hero kitchen on Fisher & Paykel’s Eurocucina stand, featuring integrated Column Refrigeration and an Atlantic honed granite countertop with a series of flush fited cooktops; Mark Elmore, Fisher & Paykel’s general manager of design, discusses the brand’s new range.


Boats, hats and buildings

Photograph Patrick Reynolds

We farewell David Mitchell.

David Mitchell, wearing one of his signature hats, is surrounded by Julian and Miro Mitchell, Rhonda Stout, and Julie Stout with Amalea Mitchell, at his home in Narrow Neck, 2008, soon after completion.

A few days after architect David Mitchell died at dawn on April 26, his new business cards arrived in the post. His son – and fellow architect at Mitchell Stout Dodd – Julian Mitchell put them on the shelf above his sunlit drawing board beside the window in their Devonport studio. And there, Julian told David’s packed funeral, is where they’ll stay. David was an acute observer of the ways we occupy space and his response was to create buildings that were rigorous, challenging, colourful, fun and dramatic. hey included the University of Auckland’s music school, Te Uru Waitakere Contemporary Gallery in Titirangi and numerous private houses, including a ground-breaking design for the Gibbs family in Parnell, and a number of our Home of the Year winners. Also in Auckland, he and Julie Stout, his partner of 37 years, designed two houses for themselves. he first was an effortlessly casual home in Heke Street, Freemans Bay, a true Pacific house with beautifully layered spaces on a tight site. In 2009, they moved to Narrow Neck and a playful house combining a studio and two apartments. “I’m not really concerned about whether people like it or not,” he told HOME, “because there are a lot of their houses that I don’t like.” David was a big personality, but not an arrogant one. He was warm, a teller of stories with a deep sense of humour. “I’m fucked Rog,” he told his old friend, the director Roger Donaldson the last time he saw him. “I’m fucked!” And he followed this up with a gigantic belly laugh.

David was born in Auckland, raised in Morrinsville and educated in Hamilton and Auckland before starting work as an architect – first with Fletchers, then in partnership with Jack Manning. For most of his career he shutled between teaching – having a profound effect on at least two generations of architects – and private practice; in 2014 he curated New Zealand’s first outing at the Venice Biennale of Architecture. H e liked hats – black in winter, white in summer – and he liked boats, sailing around the world in a small yacht with Julie before setling briefly in Hong Kong. David elegantly transferred his humour and charm to his writing and oratory skills. In 1984 he wrote he Elegant Shed, which became a television series – it was accessible, enjoyable and smart all at the same time, and still makes for great watching. Two decades later, he gave a lecture in which he reviewed the state of New Zealand architecture. “House architecture remains the preserve of the privileged classes, who are confident and wealthy enough to give architects room to run,” he said. “And so it will continue, I’m sure. We’ll wrestle with multi-car garages, benchtops, bathroomware and barbecues, all for the right to manipulate mass and space – the ancient ritual that is at the heart of our great art.” He finished on a positive note, a sort of challenge in hindsight. “Making the elegant shed has been a fine indulgence, but making the elegant city is now our great task.”

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

51


1

Requiem for a dream An iconic mid-century Auckland social housing block is to be razed rather than refurbished. Does it have to be this way? Text Jeremy Hansen

hey wanted to sanitise a place they labelled a slum, but ended up slowly re-creating one. Early last century, Auckland’s Grey Street (later renamed Greys Avenue) was the heart of a bustling Chinese quarter, a place that caused authorities to fret about prostitutes, gamblers and opium dens. heir motives were likely tinged with racism – a Chinese neighbourhood in the central city wasn’t universally regarded as desirable – but the city council and the Labour government of the time nevertheless decided to tidy it all up. heir ambitions were enormous: Julia Gatley’s book Long Live the Modern describes how the initial plan was to acquire and raze every property on the street and erect more than 450 flats in their place. By the late 1940s, a rise in building costs meant they setled for erecting four blocks containing a total of 50 units on the western side of the boulevard instead. hese buildings were designed in sleek European modernist

52

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

style by architects at the Housing Division of the Ministry of Works under the leadership of Gordon Wilson. hey are now classified as a Category Two Historic Place. Less than a decade later, Wilson and his team again turned their atention to Greys Avenue, this time up the hill on the southern end of the street. hey designed a slender nine-floor building containing 86 flats, most of them compact two-storey ‘maisonetes’ with two bedrooms and a bathroom above a simple living area and kitchen. Completed in 1958, the Upper Greys Avenue Flats were for lower- or middle-income singletons or couples who desired a life in the city. he building presents a slab-like face lined with walkways to the street, while the northern elevation, with its intricate arrangements of windows and litle inset balconies, has a more human scale. A separate lift tower adds a dramatic flourish. he building is


Photograph Sam Hartnet

a beautifully monumental piece of architecture, social housing on a scale that this country hasn’t seen since. But there’s a problem. Housing New Zealand, which owns and manages the building, now plans to demolish it. In some ways, it’s not hard to see why. I visited the flats in mid-April with Housing New Zealand’s regional manager Neil Adams, advisor Scot Foley, and communications advisor Sarcha Hayter. he building still has great bones, but looks tired and neglected. Foley gave us a depressing health and safety briefing in the Housing New Zealand office on the ground floor, where a security guard is stationed outside and banks of monitors relay feeds from cameras all over the building. We were told to watch out for objects like shopping carts falling from the open-air walkways, and to be wary of residents who might become distressed or aggressive if they saw us. In recent years, police have sometimes been called to the building more than 60 times a month, although new security measures such as a fence around the property have reduced this number. here has been a machete atack (the person who was atacked survived). Another person was injured after jumping from a balcony when being threatened by someone else in the building. he original architects probably didn’t anticipate any of this. he flats, Adams says, “weren’t designed for this level of complexity”.

2

1. An archival shot of the Upper Greys Avenue Flats designed by the Housing Division of the Ministry of Works under Gordon Wilson, photographed soon after their completion in 1958. 2. he building’s street frontage on Greys Avenue shows the open-air walkways. 3. he glass stairwell at the southern end of the building.

3

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

53


54

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

Historic shots Sir George Grey Special Collections, Auckland Libraries

Housing New Zealand now wants to demolish the building to erect something bigger: a brand-new development with 250 to 300 apartments, three times the number the current building holds. But it isn’t just the size that maters. Adams and Foley say the current flats are no longer fit for purpose. he two-level units aren’t suitable for aging tenants who find it difficult to climb the stairs from the living area every time they need to use the bathroom. he long open-air walkways that connect the apartments on each floor mean the influence of disruptive tenants spreads quickly, making some residents afraid of leaving their homes. he two-bedroom configuration of most of the flats can be problematic: some tenants who moved to Greys Avenue to escape toxic living environments are pressured by friends and family members to allow them to use their spare bedrooms, which means the problems they are trying to leave behind follow them to their new homes. hese issues aren’t unique to this building. Modernist housing blocks like it have had terrible global press, but it’s too simplistic to say their design is soley responsible for the ills that have befallen them. Yes, many of them had insufficient consideration for the varied needs of the residents who would occupy them. But many of them were also poorly managed. Rather than creating mixed communities for residents from different backgrounds and income levels, these buildings often became isolated monocultures. People were given poorly maintained apartments, insufficient social support and, in many cases, inadequate educational or employment opportunities. he results of this neglect – of an austere, short-sighted approach to social welfare – are abundantly evident in Upper Greys Avenue today. Adams and Foley say the new building that’s been planned for Greys Avenue, for which renderings aren’t yet available, will follow best practice internationally. It will be designed by Mode, an Australian firm with offices in Vietnam, India and Auckland. It will house a variety of Housing New Zealand tenants – old and young, high-needs and independent. (Housing New Zealand has been consulting current residents about rehousing them while construction of the new building takes place). Support services such as a medical clinic and other facilities will be located on site. he new units will mean an existing partnership with Housing First, a successful pilot programme which rehouses homeless people and provides them with wraparound support services, can be expanded. It’s important to remember that restoring the building wouldn’t be an impossible task. he Lower Greys Avenue Flats and Wellington’s Centennial Flats in Berhampore (1939-40, now a Category One Historic Place, and also designed by Gordon Wilson’s team) have been successfully renovated in recent years for Housing New Zealand tenants. Collectively, these buildings reveal a history of medium-density social housing in this country, an important

4

4. Archival image of the building showing the separate lift tower.

counterpoint to the dominant cotage-in-a-garden narrative of the stand-alone state house. But the Upper Greys Avenue Flats are that awkward age where they haven’t been granted heritage protection. he way the building is sited offers few opportunities to densify around it without compromising light, sun and access to the existing flats. And now Auckland’s acute housing crisis means trying to save the building looks like bourgeois indulgence. It could be gentrified, for example, with refurbished apartments sold at market rates. But this would be an expensive exercise for a private developer, and insisting on the retention of the building would depress the value of the site if Housing New Zealand chose to sell it, diminishing the number of new homes the organisation could create elsewhere. he flats could be renovated to contain a mix of market rate and social housing units, but this still means losing the opportunity a new building offers to provide much more accommodation for people in need. Which brings us to an uncomfortable either/ or situation: arguing for the retention of an architecturally important building means you are standing in the way of the provision of more social housing, which is something I would never want to do. So I find myself reluctantly assenting to the demolition of a building that feels like an old friend, a structure I appreciate every time I walk by. I wish we were a culture that embraced more nuance; that we were able to avoid the stupidity of constantly forcing ourselves into these needlessly binary situations. Above all, I hope we’ve learned from history, and that these contemporary clean-slate aspirations don’t result in the same mistakes our predecessors made. he last thing we want is to create yet another mess for future generations to clean up.


Park Hill, Sheffield Designed in the early 1960s by architects Jack Lynn and Ivor Smith (under the supervision of Lewis Womersley, Sheffield’s city architect), this 13-storey Brutalist development started as an aspirational home for council tenants but turned into a symbol of social decay. It remained this way until architects Hawkins/Brown and Studio Egret West completed a refurbishment that was shortlisted for Britain’s Stirling Prize for architecture in 2013. he architects expanded the flats into the external walkways, doubled the size of windows, and peppered the exterior with brightly coloured panels. But the developers also moved out most of the council tenants in order to sell the majority of the apartments to private owners, leading to accusations of “class cleansing” (30 percent of the building remains social housing). Others thought the council was simply being smart by selling off a building that wasn’t working for them and reinvesting the money in other council housing.

5

Architect Hawkins\Brown; Photograph Daniel Hopkinson

H OW T WO B R I T I S H B R U T E S E M B R AC E D A N E W E R A

6

Photograph iStock / Claudio Divizia

Trellick Tower, London his 31-storey icon of Brutalism in London’s Noting Hill was designed in the late 1960s by Erno Goldfinger to replace Victorian social housing. It quickly became the locus of a cocktail of social problems – crime, vandalism, prostitution and drug-peddling – that led to it being labelled as “he Tower of Terror” (it is also thought to be the building that inspired JG Ballard’s 1975 book High Rise). In the 1980s, in the wake of right-to-buy schemes that allowed several flats to be purchased by their residents, a residents’ association was established that improved security there and made other improvements. he building is now a Category 2 listed structure, and is still predominantly occupied by social housing tenants.

5 & 6. he extensive refurbishment of Park Hill, in Sheffield, was shortlisted for Britain’s Stirling Prize for architecture in 2013. 7. Trellick Tower in London’s Noting Hill was built in the 1960s and is now a Category 2 listed structure.

7

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

55


THE OTHER SIDE OF SLEEP Sleepyhead collaborates with Allbirds designer Jamie McLellan to build a bed for smart living and every season.

“We’re always looking for new ways to create the perfect bed,” says Sleepyhead’s marketing manager Warren Roach. “We’ve been providing Kiwis with beds for more than 80 years and in that time, life has changed – and so has the way we use our beds.” Enter the ‘Mezzo’ bed, a collaboration between Sleepyhead and New Zealand product designer Jamie McLellan, featuring clean, minimalist lines and a clever approach to comfort. Everything about the ‘Mezzo’ is carefully considered: it can be put together in only 10 minutes; features an ash-and-ply headboard and adjustable headrest; optional built-in bedside cabinets; and a lasercut base for ventilation. McClellan’s approach to the matress is smart in its simplicity – there’s a ‘winter’ side and a ‘summer’ side. Winter features wavequilted Tencel fabric, wool for warmth and latex for comfort; the ‘summer’ side has straight-quilted firm-feel air-flow fabric and ‘FusionGel’ for cooling. Sleepyhead found McLellan through his work with Allbirds, the innovative, awardwinning runners made with New Zealand wool. he parallels are obvious. “We run busy lives, but still value our down-time,” says Roach. “Everything about our Mezzo bed is carefully considered and designed for the kind of lives we are living now.” ‘Mezzo’ by Sleepyhead is priced from $3799 and is exclusively available from Smiths City.

smithscity.co.nz/mezzo 0800 233 7787

56

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D


HOME + SLEEPYHEAD

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

57


Photograph David Straight

Find us online.

Like what you’re seeing in the magazine? Find us online for daily inspiration and New Zealand’s best homes.

H O M E M AG A Z I N E .C O.N Z @HOMENEWZEALAND FAC E B O O K .C O M / H O M E N E W Z E A L A N D H O M E M AG A Z I N E .C O.N Z /S I G N U P


Homes —— Five homes tailored perfectly to the way their owners live and the pieces they collect. Andrew Meiring knits a modern house around the bones of an old villa in Devonport, Auckland — page 60. At Moncks Bay, David Mitchell’s last design is both playful and rational — page 76. Assembly Architects designs a family compound in central Queenstown — page 90. New Zealander Giles Reid slips a restrained design into an old pub on the hames in London — page 104. And the shadowy, almost medieval home of Lois and Rolfe Mills by Ashley Muir has only become beter with age — page 118.

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

59


Below he living area is clad in shingles that visually connect with the roof of the original villa. he artwork at the entrance is by Rob Tucker. Right A basalt wall faces the street and shelters the pool, bedding the home into its site.


Andrew Meiring adds to a heritage-listed Devonport villa with a playful assemblage of stone, wood, glass and concrete.

T E X T — Jessica-Belle Greer P H O T O G R A P H Y — Jackie Meiring


Let he boardwalk inside the gate leads past the pool and living areas to the front door. Below he living area and terrace in the extension look onto the lawn and pool.

“Historically, we’ve completely contained the original form, although it now has all this stuff around it.”

62

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D


In faded 1880s photographs of North Head Maungauika, Devonport, a white villa with a playful turret sits high on the hill. he house faces the township below and a farm track runs up its side. he history of the villa is as faded as the photographs, but it’s believed to have been a rental in one of Auckland’s earliest setlements. “It was an enterprising chap who bought the sections,” says the owner. “It would have been a beautiful view before it was built up.” For the owners and their three teenage children, this historic home is a place to put down roots, having returned to Auckland after years in Hong Kong. With a family connection to Devonport, they setled on the suburb for its character, community and connection to the sea. “We lived on an island in Hong Kong and really liked that feeling of having a water boundary.”

Andrew Meiring of Andrew Meiring Architects was enlisted for an extension forming a kitchen and siting room area. While it’s rare for historic homes to find room at the front, this home was locked in its position at the back of the section – the only way out was through the front. From the council’s perspective, one of the most important things to preserve for a category-one listed home is street frontage. However, a 1960s Vernon Brown extension already compromised this. A driveway and carport in front of the extension also detracted from the romance of the historic home. Now, three cuboid structures – a garage, terrace and living room – replace the drive and carport. “Historically, we’ve completely contained the original form, although it now has all this stuff around it,” says Meiring.

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

63


64

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D


he living area and terrace lend an easybreezy aspect to the villa. he terrace door leads to the garage. Basalt surrounds the ďŹ replace, which works in well with rocks on the neighbouring property.

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

65


Above ‘Hee’ chairs by Hee Welling for Hay from Cult Design. Above right Original floorboards at the entrance lead onto stone paving that covers the living area and boardwalk. Facing page he renovation includes a new kitchen in the original villa. he stools at the kitchen island were purchased in China. he artwork in the hall is by Roy Good.

66

A gate at the street is flanked by stone walls that contain the garage to the left and pool at right. hrough the gate, visitors walk the length of the living areas, past a slim pond where fish, papyrus and lilies thrive, before reaching the front door. This elegant boardwalk sits a few steps above the pool and lawn to the right. Once inside, steps lead right to a contemporary kitchen, which replaces the late architect’s renovation, then through to the original villa. he living area and terrace peel off to the left. “It’s typical to glaze the connection point,” says Meiring of the glassy entry, which sits between the villa and the extension, “but I had to change heights and get a new form in front of the entrance, to start introducing a more contemporary context.” At the same time, Meiring was careful to keep the long axial link from the street to the front door;

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

the white-painted timber of the pergola links right through to the existing villa, stitching the various parts together in particularly elegant fashion. Meiring was pleasantly surprised that Auckland Council met his alteration plans with an open mind. “It was quite unusual that they let us do a forward extension and one of this kind,” he says, “but they went for it straight away and were unobstructive.” Materiality acts as a common thread. he garage and pool walls are made with Auckland basalt and give the update a time-honoured, handcrafted feel. Basalt pavers line the walkway, while honed pavers inside subtly mute the light. Black shingles cover the roof of the kitchen and encase the living area, providing a textural connection between old and new. “he idea is not to try to connect the structures in terms of form but materially,” says Meiring.


67


68

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D


Above he sculpture hanging on the wall in the main bedroom is by Jay Lloyd. Let he turret was built as a folly and now serves as an ensuite.

Facing page A ‘Nelson Ball Bubble’ by George Nelson for Herman Miller hangs above a dining table that the owners had custom made in Hong Kong.

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

69


Below Alexander and Amelia sit poolside.

Opposite Architect Andrew Meiring and Helen Jones on the villa terrace. he fruitladen avocado tree is a feature of the yard.

The family has made it a mission to unveil the home’s layers of history, stripping back walls to reveal original kauri boards.

In the villa, restoration and the addition of two bathrooms were the focus. he turret, a former folly accessed from the verandah, now contains the en suite. Stripped back to its bones, light floods the space and the owners can admire its structure while they bathe. While the house is on the flat, its position on North Head means it’s surrounded by slopes. The extension looks up the hill and major earthworks were required to cut into the bank and gain space. “The idea was to make the garage subterranean so it sat like a landscaping element,” says Meiring. “We wanted it further towards the street and needed more function for the other structures, so we just had to gain a bit more space.” A retaining wall backing the length of the living areas allows for a coat room, laundry and garage access. It’s all tucked in by a bank where seven-metre piles secure the site and the neighbouring villa that was creating surcharge weight on the hill. “It looked like roadworks, like the Waterview Tunnel was coming through,” jokes Meiring. Pieces collected from the owners’ time in Hong Kong and New Zealand art dress the house. here are custom-made details, such as mosaic bathroom tiles and a powder-coated handrail on the stairs that lead to the kitchen. “We didn’t want to just go and buy. We wanted a handmade quality,” says the owner. Outside, density has been thinned from the exotic trees in the yard to make way for the pool and lawn, where an avocado tree drops its heavy fruit. A large flame tree, with a seasonal show of red flowers, remains front and centre of the villa. The family cat has the run on the place and has made an extravagant water bowl of the pond. he family has made it a mission to unveil the home’s layers of history, stripping walls back to reveal original kauri boards that match the raw, oiled floors. The previous owner lived here for 55 years and remembers his mother teaching him how to play cricket down the hallway. Dents from the continuous whacking of cricket balls into the walls haven’t been glossed over. “hat’s a building’s history,” says the owner. “I don’t think you should cover it all up and make it look perfect.”.

70

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D


H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

71


10

12

10

13

14

11

15

10 1 2

8 10

9

9

3

4

5 7

1. Entry 2. Living 3. Terrace 4. Garage 5. Office 6. Coat room 7. Laundry 8. Kitchen 9. Bathroom 10. Bedroom 11. En suite 12. Reading room 13. Dining 14. Pool 15. Pool terrace

6

Ground floor

Design notebook Q&A with Andrew Meiring of Andrew Meiring Architects

You’re more accustomed to new builds – what did you enjoy about this renovation? Although this project had the scale of a new-build it was structurally and programmatically more complex than most new builds. When dealing with alterations, one spends a lot of time and energy documenting the existing in reverse, but it’s the design complexities of stitching old and new that are so rewarding. I love the old villa, but it was having client and council’s backing to do something contemporary out front that opened up exciting design options. Talk us through the restoration and modernisation of the villa. A lot of time was spent exposing and restoring original timber panel linings that had been long covered over. Although there was some space reallocation, much of the villa layout is original. he majority of change was done around the bathrooms and turret. he original turret was externally accessed, had no practical function, and was essentially designed as a folly. Incorporating the turret into the function of the villa was key.

72

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

One of the first things you worked on was the original villa roof – what where you trying to achieve visually, and how complicated was it technically? We knew we weren’t going to change the original roof form, so it was decided to re-slate before we even started to put pen to paper. he only early intervention was a skylight that straddles the passage, bringing light to both the passage and dining room. he chimney work formed part of the later building project and was an engineering feat in itself. For earthquake safety, the fireplace and chimney was demolished up to the roof line. he chimney exterior was then supported by a latice steel structure that runs down to a massive concrete pad at ground level. It all seemed rather extreme at the time, but I think this villa deserves the effort. What was the most rewarding part of the extension out the front? I really enjoyed working with stone again and, in this case, relied on it to make the extension feel like a landscaping element rather than a building. he garage was cut into the North Head slope to achieve this and to retain a clear view of the villa. I am very pleased with the way that neither the old nor the new dominate each other, but rather seem to sit quite comfortably together.


New Zealanders love opening their home to friends, family and the magnificent outdoors. That’s why Altus designed sills that do away with the usual level change for a totally flush transition between indoor and outdoor spaces. The result? A trip-free meeting point for uninterrupted living. Find out more at altuswindows.co.nz

Made exclusively by: ALT015/HOME


HOME + JAMES HARDIE

POINT OF VIEW Project Walter’s Bluff House Designer Tony Karsten Location Nelson Brief A new home designed to maximise spectacular sea views

1

he bolthole of a busy couple in Walter’s Bluff, Nelson, this seaview home features large windows to lap up the vista, an enclosed deck for drinks, and an exterior hardy enough to weather the breeze. “Every room had to have views if we could,” says the designer, Tony Karsten of Karsten Architectural Design he home is comprised of two stories, but four split-levels. he garage makes up the ground floor, with two bedrooms, a laundry and bathroom set slightly above this. he upstairs features the open-plan kitchen and dining area, while the lounge area and master bedroom (complete with ensuite and walk-in wardrobe) inhabit the top split-level, soaking up the evening sun. Every view has been optimised thanks to north- and west-facing clerestory windows and a carefully cantilevered roof. A covered sundeck in the west corner of the living room opens the interiors further to the elements, with bi-folding doors set into the floor. “You haven’t really got a lawn so you’ve got to add outdoor living somehow,” says Karsten. Faced with a steep site, Karsten’s design called for a hefty concrete retaining wall to retain the bank and create a flat

74

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

building platform; the concrete blocks of the retaining wall then carry on around the base of the house, which contrasts with the upstairs exterior of dark James Hardie Stria Cladding and smooth white plaster recesses. “One thing I always like to do is create a contrast of materials to add some interest,” he says. Given Nelson’s high sunshine hours and the salty breezes of the location, materials had to be particularly durable. he Stria Cladding, painted in Resene Ironsand, has the tactility of a wood grain but is sturdier than typical timbers, says Karsten. he boards have been fixed vertically to the upper floors, with the house’s windows and openings designed specifically to match up with the ends of the panels. “here aren’t many claddings that allow you to do a vertical profile like that. It makes everything simpler and cleaner.” he James Hardie ‘Villaboard Soffit’ lining is used most noticeably on the ceiling of the covered sundeck. “It can be plastered to achieve a smooth finish.” With living as easy as this, the owners love their Nelson home, says Karsten. “hey say it’s a good place for a glass of wine on a Friday night too.”

1 —he upper section of the home is clad with Stria Cladding by James Hardie. 2 —he cladding is painted in Resene Ironsand. 3 —Dark Stria Cladding by James Hardie contrasts with other materials in the home, including white plaster and concrete block.

xx


3

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

75


he design condenses a lot of living into a tricky space on a narrow section with tight boundary restrictions.


At Moncks Bay in Christchurch, the last house designed by the late David Mitchell is both playful and rational.

TEXT

— Mat Philp — Lucas K Doolan

PHOTOGR APHY


Alongside all that obvious architectural charisma, the house evinces an almost Japanese deftness with limited space.

he narrow building is sheathed in an origami exercise of pitched, vertical and horizontal rooflines with deep soffits in ‘Cream Can’ by Resene, which is carried through indoors.

he welcome mat at Olle and Clare Enberg’s seaside Christchurch home hints at a couple of things to expect beyond the front door. Woven, improbably, from 46 metres of rope into an endless Turk’s Head knot, it’s a nod to the subtle maritime theme of this 18-month-old house, the last designed by the late David Mitchell, of Auckland-based Mitchell Stout Dodd Architects. It’s also not a bad metaphor for the masterful way the architect has condensed so much living into such a tricky space – a pinched 312 square metre section between the road and Moncks Bay, with close neighbours and tight height-to-boundary restrictions. Step inside, jag right, and there – through a large awning window that you open using a rope resembling a sailboat’s mainsheet – is the fast-flowing estuary. People like to say of a house built close to the water: ‘You could catch a fish from the deck’. In the Enbergs’ case, that’s a statement of fact – they routinely observe people casting a line from the narrow grass strip that separates their boundary from the water’s edge. Before the Canterbury earthquakes, Olle, a master mariner and marine surveyor, and Clare, a Montessori teacher, owned a house on the heights between Moncks Bay and Sumner. When that was red-stickered, they bought a ramshackle fisherman’s cotage on this section and drew up plans to renovate. hree days before they were due to sign a building contract, water from broken infrastructure across the road flooded the place. hey decided to bulldoze and build anew. hey’d seen David Mitchell’s work in magazines, enjoyed his inventiveness, intriguing angles and the mix of materials, and spied immediately the nautical motif in several of his houses. Later, they learned that the architect had done plenty of ocean adventuring, a point he had in common with Swedish expat Olle.

he Enbergs visited some of David’s Auckland houses, including two celebrated buildings that he and partner Julie Stout had designed for themselves: an early small, Pacific- and Asian-influenced timber house on a tight site in Heke Street, Freemans Bay, and later, a boundary-pushing concrete and corrugated fibreglass house near Narrow Neck Beach. he Engbergs took away not only a sense of reassurance that they had the right man for the job, but also inspiration: a signature David Mitchell fish pond they saw at Narrow Neck was immediately added to plans for the entrance. “David also came down and spent a day with us,” says Clare. “he whole process took about a year, and there was a lot of dialogue. We’ve built before, but this was the most pleasurable.” According to David’s son and architectural partner Julian Mitchell, the Enbergs’ response to David’s initial design was to ask for something even bolder. “hey were unusual in that they wanted a building with a very definite, distinctive style,” says Julian. he Moncks Bay house and a contemporaneous build at neighbouring Mt Pleasant are the practice’s only work in the city. “here’s a very Christchurchian quality to this house: it’s David Mitchell being flamboyant in Christchurch.” he inventiveness here is achieved as a consequence of, rather than despite, the demanding site. To accommodate the stringent recession planes without compromising a sense of height and light, David split the pitched roofline at the ocean end, scooping out a long, hull-like void to give the upstairs bedroom an unimpeded view of the estuary. When you’re in the kitchen and living area, this floats above your head like the botom of a ship, painted a cheerful yellow.

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

79


A Danish mid-century teak sideboard sits between the kitchen and living area. An ‘Eames’ lounge chair by Charles and Ray Eames for Herman Miller sits next to a Danish mid-century teak coffee table. he daybed is by Danish designers Orla Mølgaard-Nielsen and Peter Hvidt. he artwork above the early 20th-century revolving bookshelf is by Andrew Barber.

he ‘Katatsumuri’ pendant (foreground) and ‘Hakofugu’ pendant by Issey Miyake for Artemide are from ECC, through KS Lighting. A ‘Tolomeo’ wall light by Michele De Lucchi and Giancarlo Fassina for Artemide from ECC, through KS Lighting, hangs beneath the bulkhead.

“It’s not just a case of two levels that blast right through the house,” says Julian. “Instead, the upper floor is almost slung into the lower one, dropping into the space below in a way that’s slightly reminiscent of Heke Street, although they’re completely different buildings.” At the roadside, meanwhile, the initial impression is of a much narrower structure, just one room wide, sheathed in an origami exercise of pitched, vertical and horizontal rooflines, the deep soffits all painted that same yellow. “David would always try to get something particular going, to animate a building with things that push out, like the upturned hull in this house. here’s that DNA of David in this building, a quirky energy. It also has that fairly classic Mitchell manoeuvre, a timber pergola structure out front where the sun is, and a window that flips up to the view.” Alongside all that obvious architectural charisma, the house evinces an almost Japanese deftness with limited space. “We had to give David measurements for almost everything,” says Clare. “Chairs, table, our stove, our coffee machine.” From the stepped bookshelf under the stairway, to a ‘walk through’ wardrobe occupying the space between the bedroom and upstairs siting room, the design squeezes the last pips. “I think it was fairly testing for him to fit in as much as we wanted,” says Clare, “but he did a wonderful job of it.” It’s also a house of considered details – or, as Julian says: “It’s quite restrained in doing a lot of things in small, simple ways.” he sliding wall between the bedroom and the top of the stairs, for instance, which the Enbergs can close for privacy when they have house guests; or the pivot door used for the upstairs living room to maintain an uninterrupted line; or the unexpected low-set window in the kitchen wall; or the palete, which sets reds, sea greens and yellows against oiled cedar cladding and a lichen-coloured aluminium roof. hat balance of bold gesture and meticulousness suggests an architect at the top of his game. he Enbergs say they were particularly taken by David’s practice of hand-drawing plans. “He’d do a sketch: ‘his is how it will look from the stairs’,” says Olle.

80

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D


H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

81


82

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D


Irish terrier Gus at the botom of the Tasmanian oak stairs, which feature jarrah-edge detailing and are supported by hooppine shelving.

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

83


84

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D


Above he awning window provides a superb view of the estuary. he ‘Heracleum’ chandelier by Bertjan Pot for Moooi is from ECC through KS Lighting. he mid-century rosewood dining table and chairs are Norwegian designed.

Let A Danish midcentury brass pendant hangs in the stairwell. he artwork in the landing is by Philip Trustrum.

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

85


86

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D


Above A generous awning shelters the entrance, its tiered decking fringed by a pond.

Let he yellow structure floats overhead like the hull of a ship. A bronze sculpture by Llew Summers sits on an early 20th-century Chinese table.

“Builders loved his drawings because they were incredibly clear to read,” says Julian, who says it wasn’t particularly unusual for practitioners of David’s vintage. “But, then, he was one of the last architects of that generation still working.” his project is a fiting final act – a clever house, animated by that trademark “quirky energy”, and built about as close as you can get to the sea. Olle, who tends to rise early, has developed a habit of taking his coffee by the estuary-facing window to watch the sun rise. “We moved in and we’ve lived happily ever since,” he says.

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

87


1. Entry 2. Deck 3. Living 4. Dining 5. Kitchen 6. Bathroom 7. Bedroom

7

3 6

First floor

2

3

2

1

7

2 6

5

4

Ground floor

Design notebook Q&A with Julian Mitchell of Mitchell Stout Dodd Architects

Both owner and architect were sailors. How did that influence the design? Well, they got on really well for a start! While there are some nautical aspects to the house – such as the boat hull form over the main living space, the use of ropes and pulleys to haul in the big awning window, and the relaxed openness of the house – it is perhaps the way the house sits on the banks of the bay, bow to the sea, eagerly anticipating a lift in the wind that is the strongest thing about it. his was David’s last house. What did it share with his previous work? It exemplifies David’s usual atention to detail using relatively run-of-the-mill materials to produce well formed, rich and delightful spaces designed around human habitation and activity. Colours and forms are strong, clear and uplifting and the plan is economical in its proportion, but never tight.

88

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

He only designed two houses in Christchurch, and those toward the end of his career – why is that? Christchurch is a hard nut to crack and it was only after the earthquake that we found work there, despite being keen to do it. here’s a distinct Christchurch style that is generally more restrained than David’s fairly idiosyncratic work. However, in this case it was what atracted the clients to him. he owners’ response to the initial design was to ask for something bolder. Do you remember what David said? He’d really struggled fiting the house in, given the tight height restrictions and a new requirement to lift the floor up a metre above the flood plain; he had to work it hard to shoehorn it in. When the clients came back wanting more he said something like: “Gee, sounds like I’ve undercooked it. I’d beter give it a few more revs!”


The Harry & Penelope Seidler House — Sydney, Australia, 1967

rialto.co.nz AUCKLAND Rialto Cinemas May 3–20

WELLINGTON Embassy Theatre May 24–June 10

DUNEDIN Rialto Cinemas June 14–24

CHRISTCHURCH Academy Cinemas June 28–July 11

NEW PLYMOUTH Event Cinemas June 15–17

TAURANGA Event Cinemas June 22–24

HAVELOCK NORTH Event Cinemas June 29–July 1

PALMERSTON NORTH Event Cinemas July 6– 8


Below Two townhouses place their backs to the mountain, with twin viewfinders capturing Queenstown centre and Lake Wakatipu. Right A pine-clad mountain flanks the townhouses.


Assembly Architects designs a family compound in central Queenstown.

TEXT

— Simon Farrell-Green — Simon Devit

PHOTOGR APHY


92

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D


Lido Wright (left) and Orla Cox enter the house, while architect Louise Wright (left) and interior designer Nikki Wilson stand on the deck above.

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

93


94

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D


Above he townhouse has been dug into the site, which required extensive excavation and retaining. Let Wilson responded to the owners’ love of colour by implementing a scheme with Porter’s Paints – including ‘Ochre’ in the bunk room – that respond well to the region’s saturated light.

If you live in Queenstown, the house on these pages will be distinctly familiar. Located on a busy back street used by locals to scoot around all that heady tourism in downtown Queenstown proper, it occupies a prominent corner a few blocks from the centre, its twin viewfinder decks creating a friendly façade. Sometimes, it’s compared to E.T., sometimes binoculars; its giant numbers are hard to miss and it’s the first multi-storey development in the area thanks to recent changes in the district plan. “I don’t think we’ve ever done anything as graphic as this,” says architect Louise Wright of Assembly Architects. “It really strikes people.” I say house, but it’s actually two three-storey townhouses on one site, a compound owned and used by one extended family. Owners Paddy and Brian Stafford-Bush live in Auckland but visit Queenstown almost monthly, where they ski, run, cycle and enjoy the glorious outdoors of the Lakes District by day, and its restaurants and big-litle-town buzz by night. Their son Sam – a ski instructor – lives in Queenstown six months of the year, while daughter Mia and her family live in neighbouring Arrowtown. Ater owning a holiday home nearby for years, the family bought the site – complete with a cold 1960s fibre-cement bungalow designed for summer occupation – and asked Assembly, who have worked with the family on a number of development projects in recent years, to look at what could be built. “We really wanted to be able to walk into Queenstown,” says Paddy, a keen mountain biker, “to be absorbed in the town, rather than be adjacent to it.”

While they wanted room for family, they were unclear as to how that would look – and whether they might sell or rent part of the development – and they wanted their son-in-law James Bennie of Bennie Builders to build it. “It was a lot of loose ideas and a loose concept,” says Paddy, “but it has come together fantastically well.” Louise and husband Justin, who run Assembly, looked at various options for the site, but quickly settled on a duplex: two skinny mirror-image townhouses with living areas on the top floor, taking in stunning views of Lake Wakatipu in one direction and sheltered courtyards connected by a gate at the back. The Stafford-Bushes agreed, eventually deciding to keep both homes, setling on the west-facing townhouse for themselves, thanks to the great aternoon light, and renting the place next door to their son. “The longer it went on, the more value they saw in keeping both,” says Wright. From very early on, the scheme envisaged two tall, narrow structures, dug back into the steep hillside with garaging on the ground floor, bedrooms and bathrooms on the second and open-plan living areas up top. In Sam’s townhouse, there are four bedrooms and two bathrooms downstairs; in Paddy and Brian’s, there’s a long bunk room for grandkids and one bathroom; the couple decided they needed a walk-in wardrobe for ski and cycling gear more than an en suite. The living areas were always designated for the top floor. The view sweeps over downtown Queenstown and Lake Wakatipu. On both sides, the living areas run down to a covered balcony – the lenses

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

95


Previous page, let Wright at the full-height sliding doors. Wilson designed the oak dining table, furnished with ‘Tangerine’ chairs by Resident. he pendants are by Katie Brown Glass and the rug is by Artisan Flooring. ‘Bayleaf’ by Porter’s Paints is on the walls and ceilng. Previous page, right he view of Lake Wakatipu and an ‘Aspen’ chair by Cintesi.

“The sun comes across the honed block work and it’s like an artwork in itself. It’s sculptural and gorgeous.” 98

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

Below Wilson designed the oak light above the kitchen island. Right he skylight above the stairwell drops shafts of light against the concrete block wall.


100

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D


of the ‘binoculars’, the ceiling sloping gently overhead to telescope down to the view. North is behind them, over the hill, and throughout, there are small moments designed to grab sun and light. The kitchen and dining area slot around a light well cut into the floor plan – a district plan requirement, it gives an opportunity for a litle window seat in the kitchen, while floor-to-ceiling glazing drenches the dining area with light. A narrow skylight, meanwhile, runs the full length of both houses, dropping light down the stairwell into the very depths of the house. You come in under a solid concrete lintel to a dark, low-ceilinged entrance, then, as you ascend the stairs, light beams down the walls. “At various times of the day, the sun comes across the honed block and it’s like an artwork in itself,” says Paddy. “It’s so sculptural, it’s gorgeous.” Built from solid concrete – block walls, poured concrete floors (even on the second and third floor), with hydraulic heating set into the floor plates for much needed thermal mass – the building process could be described as tortuous. “It took so long to build,” says Wright. “What’s tricky is you can’t just dig out one big cut on a site like this.” Instead, they cut the terraces at the back, retained, then dug out the next layer down, and then the next layer down again. “It took a really long time to get out of the ground.” As the process evolved, the Stafford-Bushes brought in interior designer Nikki Wilson. Paddy loves colour: her Auckland home is filled with it, and she wanted to achieve the same thing down south, only here the light presents unique challenges. “The light is so harsh,” says Wilson, whose own home in Gibbston Valley was designed by Assembly and featured in the August/ September 2016 issue of HOME. “A lot of film people will tell you the light is blue – and if you use bright colour, it gets very abrasive. So we had to tone it down but still get that vibrancy.” Together, Assembly and Wilson brought in textures and sotly muted colours to create a rich interior, which has been beautifully crated by Bennie. Wilson setled on warm, slightly greyed-off colours from the Porter’s range, which ties in with Assembly’s palete of steel, cedar and concrete. She designed fitings throughout the house, including a steel firebox, the bunks in the kids’ bedroom and steel bathroom fitings. The delight is both visual and olfactory: there’s cedar and beeswax and colours that reflect the shades of the lake and pine-covered hillside in the distance. The compound works perfectly for the family. Sam delights in comfortable accommodation close to town and James and Mia use the place as a getaway with their children. When Paddy and Brian are in residence, there’s room for the whole family to be together. “Every space is usable,” says Paddy. “We’ve had lots of people staying and no one feels like they’re living on top of each other. If you want a quiet spot you can just go and sit on the window seat with a book, and feel as if you’re in your own litle world.”

Above Black ‘AJ’ wall lights by Arne Jacobsen for Louis Poulson contrast against the concrete block wall in the main bedroom. Opposite A ‘Saucer Bubble’ pendant by George Nelson for Herman Miller hangs in the main bedroom. he artwork is by Paddy Stafford-Bush.

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

101


12 10

1. Entry 2. Garage 3. Storage 4. Laundry 5. Bedroom 6. En suite 7. Bathroom 8. Bunkroom 9. Hall 10. Balcony 11. Living 12. Kitchen 13. Dining 14. Patio

11 14 13

13 10

14

11 12

Second floor

5

6

7

8

9

3

2 5

4 1 1

9

4

5

5 6 7

2 8

3

First floor

Ground floor

Design notebook Q&A with Louise Wright of Assembly Architects

Your first job was to work out what was possible on the site – how did the brief evolve? he district plan enabled increased unit density on the site, so in the first instance the clients were keen to maximise the unit capability. However, the associated parking requirements couldn’t be met on the site without resulting in big compromises – in the end, quality won over quantity. here’s not a lot of sun. How did you respond? here’s a big difference between summer and winter sun in Queenstown. We positioned rooflights above each stairwell to cast light down the full three stories – even on a dull day the extra daylight helps, and in full sun it’s delightful. he northern-most apartment obviously has beter sun, but both houses are equal in their views.

102

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

It’s downtown but it’s a holiday house. How did that affect requirements? Room for toys and clean up is the difference. he single garage is used for bikes and sports equipment instead of cars, and the adjacent mud room-drying-room-laundry is the convenient wash room, as well as functioning as the second bathroom. What’s it like passing your design on to an interior architect? We have a proven history working with Nikki and we know her design sensibility, so handing over was done with trust.


Originality, quality and craftsmanship. Discover the Porter’s difference.

PAINT AND SPECIALITY FINISHES Visit www.porterspaints.com[VL_WSVYLJVSV\YZHUKÄUPZOLZÄUKHZ[VYLÄUKHWHPU[LYVY]PL^º/V^;V»]PKLVZ Featured: Porter’s Paints Fresco in ‘Shell Grey.’


Below Architect Giles Reid designed the renovation of this third-oor apartment in a Victorian building on the hames’ shore. Right he living area faces the river through a bank of windows.


A New Zealand architect in London inserts a crisp apartment into an historic converted pub on the hames.

T E X T — Tom Morris PHOTOGR APHY

— Mary Gaudin


Right Oak boards line the floors and stairwell walls, with a return that creates a nook for storing firewood. Facing page An artwork by Jeea Mirza (2015) sits on a shelf in the crisply designed kitchen.

hat on a good day, you can look due east to the city with glimpses of the Shard from this property in southwest London is a strange twist of poetry. New Zealand architect Giles Reid devoted seven years of his life to the UK’s tallest building, while working as part of Renzo Piano’s team. After such a mammoth task, Reid took on a slightly different riverside property 16 kilometres downstream: the renovation of this third-floor apartment in a Victorian building for owners Alan Southan, his partner Pala and their seven-year-old daughter. Positioned on a quiet bend of the Thames with the yelps of rowers the only interruption, the peaceful property could not be more different from the steel-and-glass behemoth further up the river. “It was quite a scale shift,” says Reid, deadpan. he scale and tricky layout of the space were actually why Alan and Pala drafted Reid in for help. he edifice, originally built as a pub, had lain unused after World War II before being turned into flats in the 1980s. he couple’s apartment was largely open plan with all rooms enjoying the view, but it didn’t work for a young family. he bedrooms were positioned off the main living area, so Alan and Pala had to tiptoe around after their daughter had gone to bed. “We had a flat that was 140 square metres and we were really only using 55 square metres of it. It felt like we were always on a corridor to somewhere,” says Southan. he bathroom was off the glazed entrance lobby, which felt exposed to the street. “We never really setled – and then Giles came along.” Reid was immediately taken by the riverside gem. “My first impression was to do with the building as a whole, which is this cubic, solid brick palazzo siting with its feet in the river. It felt then – and still does now – a very romantic response to the site,” says the architect. Reid moved the main bedroom to the side and installed an internal hallway with bedrooms and bathrooms coming off it. he corridor leads through to the main living area, which opens out across the entire riverside façade of the building. It was a simple and straightforward decision. “It has transformed the way we live,” says Southan. The couple purchased the property following six years living in Japan and their sojourn there is immediately apparent as you enter the home. Furniture, for now, is sparse and highly practical. Doors slide open. Oak skirting boards are recessed, a device inspired by architect Kazuo Shinohara’s ‘House in White’. From the chalky exposed brick fireplace to the stone kitchen bench, natural materials reign.

106

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

»Bm Æfgh ]adfYgg]cb kUg hc Xc k]h\ h\Y Vi]`X]b[ Ug U k\c`Y! k\]W\ ]g h\]g WiV]W! gc`]X Vf]W_ dU`Unnc g]hh]b[ k]h\ ]hg ZYYh ]bçh\YçkUhYf#¼


H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

107


108

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D


he extruded aluminium ‘Table B’ dining table is by Konstantin Grcic for BD Barcelona and is paired with ‘Eames DAW’ chairs by Charles & Ray Eames for Vitra. he ‘Acorn’ pendant lights above are by Atle Tveit for Northern Lighting.

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

109


he living room is furnished with a midcentury antique chair from Japan and one from Cassina. he two floor seats are from Wise-Wise in Tokyo. he brickwork on the fireplace is finished with a lime render.

110

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D


H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

111


112

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D


From the entrance, Reid devised a hallway that leads to bedrooms and bathrooms, and ultimately the riverfacing living area, where ‘Green Shadow’ etchings by Anish Kapoor hang.

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

113


114

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D


“One of the things we liked about living in Japan was the tremendous craft used there, especially in the use of wood,” says Southan. “We tried to use natural materials where possible and hopefully it will age properly because of that. It will mark and eventually arrive at something that’s taken on a lot of character.” he Japanese simplicity of the interior and neutral palete seem necessary in the pallid, north-facing space (meaning it receives no direct sunlight in this hemisphere). he view is left to speak for itself. Across the river is Dukes Meadows park, one of the last protected patches of open land before one hits the main conurbation of the city and its swathes of apartment blocks. To the west is Chiswick Bridge, a 1930s arched Portland Stone number, and to the east is the listed wrought-iron Barnes Bridge. It’s an overwhelmingly beautiful seting and yet this stunning view is approached with modesty and subtlety; two elements that are quintessential of both Reid’s persona and portfolio. “he view is there if you want it, but you’re not sucked into it,” says Reid. Southan agrees: “When we first moved in we tried to work with the outside more obviously. We chose things that picked up the green of the trees and it was a massive mistake. It fought with the outside.”

he minimal appearance is deceptive and enormously clever. he kitchen is a perfect example of a highly successful vehicle for warm, and perhaps, scruffy family life. Two tall cupboards open to reveal a well-furnished pantry. A team of dog-eared cookbooks is stored in a hidden alcove. he hob is placed on the stone island and kited out with a down drafter to avoid an extractor fan obstructing the view for the chef. But don’t be fooled, it is very much a room for entertaining. Upstairs there’s a cosy den, which is variously used as a studio, playroom, office or TV cubbyhole. he balcony is the place to drink wine while watching events such as the famous Oxford and Cambridge boat race, which takes place every spring and finishes in the stretch of river just below. he original conundrum was how to turn this space into a harmonious family home. Reid has quietly responded with clarity and simplicity. In atmosphere, scale and aspect, it’s a million miles away from the Shard. “When the rowers are out very early in the morning, even three floors up you hear everything. You feel so connected to the river,” says Reid. “his gives the apartment an acoustic and a rhythm that I doubt you get in many other parts of London, or perhaps the world.”

Let A wood-block print by Seiko Takeuchi hangs in the main bedroom, and a screenprint by Sato Junichi hangs in the hallway. Right A giant willow in front of the building dips into the hames.

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

115


2

3

7

1. Entry 2. Bedroom 3. Kitchen 4. Dining 5. Living 6. En suite 7. Sun room 8. Terrace

4

1

6

2

8

5

First level

Second level

Design notebook Q&A with Giles Reid of Giles Reid Architects

How do you feel the minimal style contrasts or compliments the existing building? I suppose I don’t altogether think that the work is that minimal. I felt a good response to this warehouse-like space was making a few elements, such as oak skirting and floorboards, go a long way. he idea was not to overlay the space with too much more and that would hopefully allow the river beyond to enter into the atmosphere. A lot of effort was spent resolving all the junctions of these few elements. Perhaps it has these things in common with minimalism. his stretch of river is one of historical importance. How much did you relish the chance to develop such a historical British building? I’ve been in London quite a bit of my professional life and have worked on a fair few historic buildings of different ages: Georgian, Edwardian, pre and post war. Some have been listed but, more

116

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

often, they have been slightly anonymous, robust brick buildings that prove endlessly adaptable. In this way alone, they are to my mind far more ecological than the buildings erected today with 30-year built-in lifespans, laminated glass you can’t recycle and clad in plastic insulation. Were there lessons from the Shard that you brought over to this project? I think the deeper lessons come from the experience of working in the office in Paris, which was very enjoyable, though hard. You had to produce! We all made model after model, juniors and directors. Even now, I think you can learn so much more from a simple paper and card model than from a computer render. his seems a much more European way of working, Japanese too, compared with how it’s done in the UK.


Speak your mind and be in to win

$1000 cash

Have your opinions and thoughts heard and influence change. Simply sign up and you’re in the draw to win $1000 cash! SIGN UP NOW AT his-call.co.nz

SHARE YOUR THOUGHTS | BE HEARD | WIN BROUGHT TO YOU BY


Below Like a rampart, a butress surrounds the Mills’ home on a hill at Rippon, on the western shores of Lake Wanaka. Right A terracota-topped stone wall picks up on rust-coloured leaves.


In 1973, Ashley Muir designed a shadowy, almost medieval house for wine pioneers Rolfe and Lois Mills. Four decades on, it’s no less powerful.

TEXT

— Mat Philp — Simon Devit

PHOTOGR APHY


he house caused controversy when it was built; the architectural industry deeming it unworthy of inclusion in an NZIA competition.

120

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D


Farmhouses rarely excite architectural controversy – at least, not at the level occasioned by this home, built 45-odd years ago at Rippon, on the western shore of Lake Wanaka, for the pioneering winemaking Mills family. Anchored to the brow of a steep – and at the time, mostly bare – escarpment by medieval-style raked butresses, the mud-brick building came as “a bit of a shock to some people”, says architect Ashley Muir, of Dunedin-based firm Mason & Wales. The NZIA judging panel didn’t even make it to the front door. “A couple of jurors said that a house should never have been allowed there; they drove straight out of Wanaka.” Half a century later, it’s difficult to understand the consternation. Both structure and site have sotened and fused; vines now climb the butresses, which seem less like foundations, more an outgrowth of the land. During the same period, Rippon has been transformed into an internationally recognised piece of wine country, while the house has been a home for two generations of winemakers. Muir was in his third year of architectural practice in 1973 when Rolfe and Lois Mills invited him to help them design a house – and that really is the best way to describe the process. “We wanted our personality to be foremost,” says Lois Mills. “We felt the best way to do that was to find a talented young architect who listened. That’s exactly what Ashley did: listened, interpreted and made our ideas exciting.” The trio spent three days together at the Mills’ Christchurch villa, discussing how they wanted the house to work, the number and type of rooms, and how the budding family would live in it. “These were two interested, knowledgeable, sensitive, thoughtful people who were keenly involved in puting it all together,” says Muir. “When you’re in a conversation like that, you conjure up a picture of a house even before you begin the design.” Underpinning the

“We wanted our personality to be foremost... the best way to Xc h\Uh kUg hc ÆbX U hU`YbhYX young architect who listened.”

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

121


Let he front door was milled from a felled oak on the property. Right he owners’ intention was for their home to reect their personalities; the result has become more layered and textured over time.

122

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D


It’s a house of unusual angles, of shadowed areas that give way to more open UbXç`][\h"Æ``YXçgdUWYg#


Above and let When their children were young, the Mills spent a year in France, testing out the viticulturalists’ life. Despite the house plans preceding their trip, there’s a feel of southern Europe that resonates both inside and outside the home.

deliberation was Rolfe’s deep affinity with this piece of land. He’d grown up on Wanaka Station when it was owned by his maternal grandfather, the Dunedin merchant Sir Percy Sargood. Rolfe spent hours on the site playing as a boy, then as a young man envisioning how it could be developed. A trip through Portugal on the way home from war seeded the idea of viticulture, although he didn’t plant the first grapes at Rippon until 1975, ater the house was built. Until then, he commercially farmed angora goats. “Rolfe had always said that if he ever got the opportunity, he wanted to build on that hill,” says Lois. “It was the view, and he loved the topography.” Winemakers talk about terroir, the concept that wine expresses the unique qualities of a site. The same thinking informed the Mills’ house. The front door and mantlepieces were milled from an oak felled on the property, and the sundried bricks were handmade from the surrounding earth by a couple of med students during their university holidays. The north-facing site was “relentlessly sloping”, says Muir, and highly exposed to the prevailing northerly wind.

The solution was to “drape the rooms like a necklace around the contours at the edge”, creating a large sheltered terrace at the back for a swimming pool and extended outdoor living. Rather than an expanse of glazing, as you might expect to see in a contemporary lakeside house, windows were deployed judiciously to frame selected views. “Lois and Rolfe talked a lot about rooms, and a room in my book is very hard to define if it has a wall of glass,” says Muir. “What we did was to take on the view and challenge it, rather than being totally overwhelmed by it.” Internally, it’s a house of unusual angles, of shadowed areas that give way to more open and light-filled spaces, with unexpected circuits between rooms. You encounter curtained archways where you anticipate doors, and doors when you’re anticipating a wall. You can see why Lois’ six grandchildren love the place: it’s a journey, complete with looping side trails. Yet when Muir was designing the home, his thinking was prety elemental. “One of the things I was reading about at that time was the idea that

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

125


126

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D


Let As well as openplan living, smaller rooms provide a welcome retreat from the elements. Below Heavy fabric cloaks an archway in the passage. Right Carefully placed windows reveal particular views: here, tall windows frame Ruby Island below the house.

if you break a house down to its essential parts there are really only two: one is the threshold, where you greet a person and either reject them or invite them in, and the other is the hearth. We expressed that in the Mills house with the oak front door, followed by a process of decompression before you get to the living room, with its odd-shaped fireplace welcoming you. When you’re in that house, you feel really secure – and in every weather.” Before establishing Rippon as a winery, the Mills and their children spent a year in France, seeing if they could live as a viticultural family. Although the design of the house predated that trip, there’s a clear debt to southern Europe in the butressed foundations, the orange clay roof tiles and deeply recessed windows, as well as the interior. “They were all elements we decided were appropriate for their house, but it wasn’t a pastiche,” says Muir. “They’re all cohesive and have a reason for being. The word I’d use for the house now is ‘legitimate’. It passes every test of legitimacy for a piece of land with a building. Rolfe and Lois knew what was right – they were masters of it.”

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

127


Muir revisited Rippon five years ago. What did he think? “That it has stood the test of time. These things we design are built to serve people over decades – that’s a driving force of much of the architecture of this office. With that comes a patina, a sense of it being used. This house shows its life, it talks to you, rather than being some pristine thing that a fingerprint would destroy.” For Lois, it’s a house that “belongs to where it is”. “It has been a big part of my life,” she says. Rolfe died in 2000; she has never entertained any thought of leaving. “I’ve been here nearly 50 years, and it has the most amazing memories. And the first one of those was Ashley – he just listened.”

128

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

Above he home has had more than four decades to setle into the landscape, with vines weaving their way across its exterior. Right he Mills planted the first grapes in Rippon in 1975; it has since become an internationally renowned winegrowing area.


4

1 6

7

2 5 3 8

9

1. Garage 2. Entry 3. Bathroom 4. Dining 5. Kitchen 6. Living 7. Study 8. Bedroom 9. Sauna 10. Laundry

8

8 3 10 8

3

Design notebook Q&A with Ashley Muir of Mason & Wales Architects

Lois and Rolfe Mills were keen on a “young architect who listened”. How many houses did you have under your belt before this one? Lois and Rolfe, and another couple, provided the ultimate gift to a newly graduated architect – they commissioned me to design a building. I instantly realised the huge trust that they had placed in me. I needed to listen. his was a serious undertaking and Rolfe and Lois needed the utmost respect, insight and thoughtfulness in the work that I did for them, and for all of my other clients since. You spent a lot of time talking about the house before you started designing. How did that influence your practice on subsequent projects? Conversations with the client – whether for a house or a commercial building – provide all sorts of insights into what a client really wants. I was once engaged to design a warehouse

130

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

with a budget of $25 million and what the client told me, in two meetings, indicated to me that they didn’t need a warehouse at all – they simply needed to load their products into a container for transport to the customer. hey didn’t build the warehouse. he house atracted a bit of local consternation at the time – have you experienced anything similar since? Now the public conversations are different. he fixation is with size or cost. What are you working on these days? I’ve always been a general practitioner so I am working with clients on many houses all over New Zealand and on a handful of large commercial buildings, hotels and apartment buildings.


Clever Kitchens & Beautiful Bathrooms — Six rooms in houses old and new. Christopher Wood effortlessly places a contemporary kitchen in a pre-1900s house — page 132. In the mid-century home of a young family, Mike Hartley creates a command station — page 136. Small but delightful moves by Mary Daish yield wonderful results in Lyall Bay, Wellington — page 138. On Waiheke, Herbst Architects create a resort-like oasis — page 142. Kristina Pickford refits her classic Auckland apartment — page 144. Playing with painterly light and marble in a bathroom by Guy Tarrant — page 146.


1

2

3

Project Mount Eden kitchen

K–01

Architect Christopher Wood Architects

CLASSICAL STUDIES Text — Jo Bates Photography — Simon Wilson

132

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

Location Mt Eden, Auckland Brief To update the kitchen in this family home, ensuring it connects with the dining, living and outdoor areas.


1 —he kitchen is centred around two islands designed with timber legs and no toe kicks to resemble freestanding furniture. 2 —he brief was to update the kitchen in keeping with the home’s traditional 19th-century character. 3 —Windows wrap around seating and open up to a wall of greenery. 4 —Christopher Wood Architects designed the dining table, which was made by Powersurge and David White. he ‘Brass 95/96’ pendant by Paola Navone for Gervasoni is from ECC. 5 —he brass clashing and handles on the cabinetry are by Powersurge. 6 —On entry, there’s a glimpse of the rooms opening on to each other and the sunroom at the rear.

5

4

he kitchen design is part of an alteration and restoration to a pre-1900s Georgianstyle home. he brief requested that the new space be in keeping with the home’s traditional character, while also providing a contemporary, functional design. Tell us about the space. CHRISTOPHER WOOD he kitchen shares the same area as the sunroom; the later retains the more traditional aesthetic of the living and dining room. I wanted the kitchen/sunroom to provoke the appearance of a living space rather than a kitchen. To evoke this idea, the space is centred around two kitchen islands with expressed timber legs and no toe kicks, so they resemble pieces of freestanding furniture, rather than fixed islands. Kitchen utilities

and the scullery are hidden behind bespoke plastered cupboard doors with a finish that would be more commonly found in a living space than a kitchen area. How does the kitchen operate in context with the rest of the home? Central to the concept is the existing entry hall, from which the living area and dining room are accessed. On entry and when moving through the hallway, there’s a glimpse of each room opening onto one another, then onto the kitchen and sunroom at the rear. Each room connects to a north-facing verandah, which wraps the house. We designed the kitchen cabinetry, material palete and fitings in a contemporary style while maintaining a traditional aesthetic with the island.

6

Why did you decide on the Ambitec plaster finish? It lends itself to a beautiful, subtle texture, which I really liked. When viewed from afar, the plaster appears more like a painted surface. In close proximity, the finish is full of character and textural quality, due to its slight indentations. As a finished surface, the plaster was sealed for protection. Talk us through the detail on the doors and other bespoke pieces. he cabinetry doors are clashed with brass that’s been given an aged finish. Powersurge made the clashing and door handles. We designed the dining room table, which was made by Powersurge and David White. It has a brass frame and a kauri top; the wood was salvaged during the renovation.

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

133


7

7 —Kitchen utilities and the scullery are hidden behind cabinetry finished with Ambitec plaster in ‘Suave’. he floors are the villa’s original kauri and are finished with white Woca ‘Diamond Oil’.

1. Living 2. Dining 3. Kitchen 4. Sunroom

4

1

134

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

Benchtop ‘Macaubas’ granite by SCE Stone & Design. Cabinetry Ambitec in ‘Suave’. Downdrat extract Wolf. Flooring Existing kauri floors with Woca ‘Diamond Oil’ in White. Fridge Concealed integrated by Miele. Lights Brightgreen curvetrack lights and recessed spots from ECC; ‘Brass 95/96’ pendant by Paola Navone for Gervasoni from ECC. Ovens Gaggenau. Sink Blanco by Hafele. Stovetop Wolf. Tapware Vola.


Project Castor Bay kitchen

K–02

Architect Mike Hartley, Lloyd Hartley Architects

CENTRAL STATION Text — Jo Bates Photography — Jackie Meiring

Location Castor Bay, Auckland Brief To create an open-plan, light-filled living, dining and kitchen area for a young family.

Mike Hartley was asked to create an openplan, light-filled living, dining and kitchen area, upgrade its flow to an outdoor deck, and also create welcoming access to the home. All this for clients who are family, which brought “all the satisfaction and drama it possibly could to the project”, says the architect. Despite the area’s open-plan nature, Hartley’s use of steel-grey stone creates an intimate space that owns its territory in the scheme. It’s stylish yet robust, designed to serve the demands of family life with three young children. How would you describe the design and mood it creates? MIKE HARTLEY Part of the brief was to engage with the dense native bush that populates the road bank margin of the site, and to provide a resonance with the depth and tones of the bush through materiality in the kitchen. With the view to the bush, the whole area offers a feeling of peace and relaxation. Talk us through the context of the kitchen in the home and how it works in terms of flow and practicality. he kitchen was designed as a sort of command centre. While preparing food, it was a must for Brad and Diane to be able to engage with the children in their various areas and states of play. By placing the long line of cabinetry against the southern wall, we were able to disguise just how low the ceiling gets in this location (less than two metres) while providing a solid, functional and comforting backdrop to the main space. he stone sets the scene – how did it come to be an important part of the equation? We really liked the stone right from the outset; the steely grey with large graphite flecks had the right level of depth and luxury. I feel that a stone benchtop in a kitchen like this not only needs to work in with other materials – in this case the black ply and existing timber floors – but it also needs to work in with the people occupying the space. In this case, I knew Diane (my wife Sarah’s twin sister) owned a silverysteel grey dress, so I was prety confident it would be a winner. We continued the waterfall edge at the end of the bench up the wall to provide consistency and an engaging material backdrop. his strategy was also used in the cooktop area. What did you use for the cabinetry? he cabinetry fronts are made from a black high-pressure laminate on birch plywood; a robust material. By chamfering the top edges of the drawer front we created a discreet pull handle. he exposed plywood edges were finished with Osmo oil and we love the way that these golden edges provide depth and relief to the panel faces.

1

136

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D


2

1 —he kitchen’s dark palete creates a sense of retreat and intimacy. 2 —Black pendant task lights by Cita contribute to the moody vibe. 3 —Pull handles were created by chamfering the tops of the drawers.

1. Living 2. Dining 3. Kitchen

3

1

3

1

2

Benchtop ‘Steel Grey Granite’ from Italian Stone. Cabinetry Cabinet maker Simon Burden for Marton Lee. Cookware Miele. Extractor In-wall down draft by Parmco. Flooring Original rimu floorboards. Lighting Task lights from Cita. Panels HPL on birch plywood substrate by Prime Panels. Sink ‘Metra 9 Silgranit’ in Anthracite by Blanco from he Kitchen Hub. Tapware Astra Walker from he Kitchen Hub.

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

137


Project Lyall Bay kitchen

K–03

2

3

Architect Mary Daish Architect

BAY DREAM

Location Lyall Bay, Wellington Brief Rework the kitchen in a 1920s bungalow as part of a renovation of the house.

Text — Simon Farrell-Green Photography — Paul McCredie

1

4

10

5

9 6

8

“he owners cook a lot, so it’s a working kitchen,” says Wellington architect Mary Daish of the space she refited in a 1920s bungalow in Lyall Bay. “It’s utilitarian in nature, but hopefully there are some moments where they can express themselves and their objects.” he project was part of a renovation in which Daish neatly reworked three small bedrooms and an oversized bathroom into two bedrooms with a dressing room and a redesigned laundry. he kitchen sits in the middle of the home, looking through the living area to the beach across the road. It’s also linked to a sheltered backyard through a new glass door and window seat that ushers light and warmth into the house. “Just that one litle move can make all the difference to how you use your house.”

of the existing detailing and not make it feel like a UFO that’s landed in the house. How did you stop it from feeling busy? he upper cupboard doors and walls are painted in ‘Tirau’ by Dulux; below bench they’re Futura ply. It’s about making it sit nicely; not introducing too many materials. My mum [food writer Lois Daish] always reckoned you should never have more than three ingredients on your plate – and I’ve taken that as a bit of a design check. hree materials in a kitchen is about right.

It’s a small space, how did you get more elbow room? MARY DAISH he kitchen is where it was originally and we didn’t move the hob or sink, but it had a weird triangle-shaped bench. We straightened it up, put a stainless steel bench on and got the storage working well. We got rid of an awkward appliance garage with bifold doors, so now it wraps around into a U. We took the shelves up to the ceiling above the bench and built drawers below the bench – there’s also a skinny pantry with a ‘SpaceTower’ unit by Blum and triangle drawers in the corner. Tell us about the cabinetry. We wanted to express the joinery carcass by pulling through and framing the drawers, so you get frames of ash ply. It makes it feel a bit more like a piece of furniture rather than a modern homogeneous kitchen where the drawer fronts are all the same. We were trying to be respectful of some

138

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

1

7

1. Entry 2. Bedroom 3. Living 4. Dining 5. Kitchen 6. Laundry 7. Bathroom 8. Siting 9. Bedroom 10. Dressing

Cabinetry Laminated Plywood Futura in Porcelain from Plytech. Extractor Falmec. Fridge Fisher & Paykel. Handles ‘In 350’ from Katalog. Hardware Antaro and Orga-line from Blum. Lighting LED lighting from Moth Light. Oven, hobs, dishwasher Bosch. Sink ‘SK1 Riva’ from Mercer. Spout and spray rinse ‘Oberon U’ by Perrin & Rowe from In Residence. Tapware Perrin & Rowe. Tiles ‘Liverpool’ in Portland from Tile Space.


2

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

139


1

2

3

K&B

MAKING A SPLASH Fresh finds to inspire renovations and updates.

4

6

5

7

8

1—‘Mike Pro’ basin mixer, $415 from Bath Co, bathco.co.nz 2—‘Calin’ handles by Viefe, $35.65 each from Katalog, katalog.co.nz 3—‘Tiger Bronze’ gooseneck mixer by Meir, $599 from he Kitchen Hub, thekitchenhub.co.nz 4—‘Closer’ shower head by Diego Grandi for Zuccheti.Kos, $4575 from Robertson, robertson.co.nz 5—‘Yaki’ tile, from $152.19 from Gallery4, gallery4.co.nz 6—‘Open Sesame’ botle opener by Eric Ericson for Skultuna, $124 from Simon James Design, simonjamesdesign.com 7—‘Form Clearstone’ basin, $400 from Bath Co, bathco.co.nz 8—‘Wave’ trivet by Noidoi for Menu, $98 from Simon James Design, simonjamesdesign.com 9—‘Como’ knobs by Viefe, $12.10 each from Katalog, katalog.co.nz Edited by Sara Black.

146

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

9


HOME + BLUM

HANDLE WITH CARE A sleek, streamlined look was key when it came to updating this 1970s kitchen.

‘Form follows function’ is a maxim that has inspired many. But what does it mean when 21st century ideas about kitchen design meet a semi-iconic 1970s home? he 70s saw some classic homes built in New Zealand. More than 40 years later, some of them are receiving a facelift. Architectural designers such as Richard Furze have been tasked with preserving the outstanding features of these iconic homes, while also sensitively updating elements. In this particular house, Richard saw the potential to refresh the kitchen space with a new approach to cabinetry. “I like the kitchen and other associated joinery to have more of a furniture feel, and to create a seamless flow between the working, cooking and small office spaces that often are incorporated near the

kitchen. Sculleries are common but I like to create the ability to hide these from the main area. his promotes the feeling of exploration and surprise while still providing very usable and practical areas.” he trend towards streamlined cabinetry without handles complements the classical minimalism of the 1970s, as well as modern client preferences. As Richard says, “I think people are becoming bored with the standard look of handles. New Blum hardware allows beter options to achieve a handle-less look.”

they are to spend time in the kitchen. From there you can look at the ages of the family members, to help select materials best suited to them and the longevity of the house, to make it easy to maintain. he other important element to think about is the flow of the kitchen to the outdoor areas, and how to create the best use of the space when you have a number of people around.” he remaining drawer and cupboard layout follows form, to create the look and feel that the overall project is trying to achieve.

As always, the best solutions are found when one interrogates the individual habits and preferences of the client: “he first thing is to understand the client’s cooking techniques, abilities and how keen

blum.com 09 820 5051

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

141


Project ‘Lantern House’ bathroom

B–01

Architect Herbst Architects

ISLAND RETREAT Text — Simon Farrell-Green Photography — Jackie Meiring

When it came to designing their house at Onetangi on Waiheke Island, Andrew Glenn and Jonathan Rutherfurd Best took inspiration from bathrooms in hotels by architect Kerry Hill. “We wanted to recreate that peaceful serenity in our home,” says Glen. “We often travel to Bali and wanted a feeling of intimate luxury, to create an oasis.” What was the biggest challenge with this bathroom? ANDREW GLENN Geting the layout right as we wanted an enclosed toilet. he Crital screen was an amendment which we all agree was fantastic. he sea view from the bath must be stunning. It certainly is, and the bird life is also incredible, so we are doubly blessed. How have you dealt with storage? he medicine cabinet can store so much and we love that it’s hidden. We also have plenty of storage in all the wardrobes and walk-in wardrobe.

Medicine cabinet Restoration Hardware. Shower and WC enclosure Crital Arnold. Tapware Astra Walker. Tiles Artedomus.

142

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

Location Onetangi, Waiheke Island Brief Create an elegant, intimate bathroom that takes advantage of the sea view.


EDGE VANITY

/WHERE BATHROOMS & LAUNDRIES COME TOGETHER BEAUTIFULLY/ BATHCO.CO.NZ

AUCKLAND / 4-8 Ace Place, Kingsland 09 309 9109 CHRISTCHURCH / 86 Wigram Road, Wigram 03 343 0969


3

2

4

5

6

9

8

7

1

Project Dilworth apartment bathroom

B–02

DOUBLE BILLING Text — Simon Farrell-Green Photography — Sam Hartnet

When designer Kristina Pickford refited her apartment in the historic Dilworth building, the bathroom changed completely, along with the rest of the 94-square-metre space. “It’s loosely in the same position, but we made it long, changed the entry points, and raised the ceiling,” she says. “We pulled out all the walls and rebuilt it.” It’s definitely modern, but it suits the heritage feel of the Dilworth building – what were you trying to achieve? KRISTINA PICKFORD I wanted something that wasn’t too 2010s – I didn’t want you to look at it and date it. So there’s a steel cavity slider to match those throughout the apartment, and 150mm x 150mm tiles – they probably would [originally] have had 100mm x 100mm, and not too many. I wanted it to be timeless. How hard is it to do such a wholesale renovation of a space like this in an apartment? [Laughs] I think the worst thing is that it’s on Custom Street – you’ve got no parking and a lift, and contractors don’t want to work in the city. But we got there.

144

1. Entry 2. Laundry 3. Bathroom 4. Bedroom 5. Study 6. Dining 7. Living 8. Kitchen 9. Hall

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

Designer Kristina Pickford Design Location Auckland CBD Brief Rework the bathroom in an Auckland heritage apartment.

As both en suite and guest WC, how does the space function? We incorporated the guest toilet into the bathroom, so it acts as both. here are now two doors between us and the bathroom – personally I’m not big on en suites, I like a bit of separation. And the hallway becomes our wardrobe – in a way it’s a dressing room when we’re there on our own, but it’s also separate from the living area when we have guests. How did you deal with storage? here’s shallow storage behind the mirrors and more under the vanity, behind the aluminium powder-coated doors. here’s also a vintage Polish medical cabinet from the Vitrine. Tell us about the countertop. It’s Caesarstone – I wanted something that could form the whole thing. It’s neutral and looks stony, but I didn’t want a big lump of marble. It would have felt too slick.

Basin and countertop Integrated Caeserstone in ‘Raw Concrete’. Tapware Vola. Shower head Paini. Hand-held shower Almar. WC ‘Senso Wash’ by Philippe Starck for Duravit. Free-standing cabinet 1940s Polish piece from Vitrine.


MICO11057


Project Mt Eden bathroom

B–03

Architect Guy Tarrant Architects

A DIFFERENT SLANT Text — Simon Farrell-Green Photography — Jackie Meiring

Location Mt Eden, Auckland Brief Fit a bathroom under the eaves of a raking gabled roof.

Guy Tarrant had many constraints in designing this Mt Eden home, not least fiting three bedrooms and two bathrooms under the eaves of a gabled roof. “I was trying to play with light in a painterly way,” he says of this space, which is ventilated and lit by a skylight above the shower. “he amount of top light provides a wonderful luminous quality of light, which pervades the entire space.” Were you worried it would feel cramped? GUY TARRANT While certain areas in the space are low, I was confident that the combination of volume and compression within the room would result in an overall feeling of generosity. his is the lovely thing about working with raking roof forms – they provide the opportunity for spatial contrast. hat’s quite a special shower. Detailing within the shower focused on maximising the drama of the glass ceiling, so wall linings run directly into the skylight frame. We used a 30mm solid marble slab for the partition between the shower and bathroom, partly to save space, but mainly to allow the material to really shine. Light penetrates the slab from behind, which results in extra richness. How did you deal with storage? Space behind the exterior wall and the bathroom wall was utilised to form recessed storage niches. he niche in the bathroom space is lined in oak and screened with a backlit timber-framed glass sliding door, again providing an opportunity for luminosity. A similar but open, tiled niche in the shower provides additional storage.

Basin Duravit. Cabinetry Form Design. Lighting Plaster box recessed downlights from Prolux. Partition Marble from Artedomus. Tapware and wall spout Paini from Metrix. Tiles ‘Antila’ 100 x 100mm porcelain tiles in light blue; and ‘Alarti’ 600 x 300mm honed marble floor tiles from Artedomus. WC Duravit.

146

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D


HOME + EVOLUTION OF SURFACES

HEROES ON SHOW Director at Evolution of Surfaces, Nicky Duggan reports on her observations from Milan Design Week. 1

Milan certainly put it on for Design Week this year – balmy weather, sunny days, spring flowers – and one of the best displays of design in years. From Fiera Milano (which includes the massive exhibition halls of EuroCucina and EuroBagno) to Brera, Tortona and the central city, the quality was simply outstanding. Without doubt, from a surfaces perspective, the hero product was Fenix. his innovative product, made using nano-technology, is manufactured by Arpa Industriale, just outside Milan. Fenix featured heavily in the best kitchen and furniture displays, including the stand-out Elle Décor Millennials at Home exhibition. While also available in lighter shades, the product’s intense dark colour range supports the continuing trend for deeper tones. ‘Anomorphix’, the Fenix display in Brera, cleverly demonstrated that materials are not the same, even if they look similar. With low light reflectivity, Fenix is extremely mat and beautifully soft to touch. As well as being antifingerprint, it’s also resistant to scratches and abrasion, with the ability to thermally heal superficial micro-scratches. Fenix demonstrated its wide application appeal, appearing in bathroom cabinet displays at EuroBagno, as well as specialised bathroom retailers in Milan. On the bathroom tapware front, iB Rubineti (Rubineti is Italian for taps and iB are the initials of Ilio Bregoli, the company’s founder) delivered yet more stand-out ranges. Two years ago the family business, which is located

2

3

in Brescia, close to Milan, launched the stunning ‘Marmo’ collection for bathrooms. ‘Marmo’ is a sophisticated marble range, available in either white Cararra or black Marquina. his year, iB Rubineti introduced the ‘Bold’ collection, a combination of metropolitan and industrial design aesthetics, which will provide an outstanding design element for bathrooms and kitchens. To include Fenix surfaces and iB Rubinetti tapware in your project, please talk to your architect or designer, or call Evolution of Surfaces on 0800 225 5367. evolutionofsurfaces.com

4

1&2 —he iB Rubineti ‘Bold’ collection, designed by Federico Castelli and Antonio Gardoni. 3 —Fenix tables at Elle Decor restaurant at Milan Design Week. 4 —Fenix sideboard by Next125.

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

147


ADVERTISING PROMOTION

DESIGNER INTERIOR OBJECTS SHOWCASE

WARMINGTON FIRES

MAKER DESIGN STUDIO

ESCEA

Designed here in New Zealand for our unique conditions, the Southern Series range of woodburners from Warmington can be used for heating and cooking, with the option of a wetback for hot water at any time.

iO² is the squared development of the original iO lighting range. This new form gives a different effect and feel while adding versatility. The interlocking sections of the iO2 range allowing almost limitless size variations. To start you off we’ve developed six standard sizes that will suit an array of situations.

Less is More

09 271 0891 sales@warmington.co.nz www.warmington.co.nz

0211 889 040 www.makerdesignstudio.co.nz to find out more

Escea’s latest release, the DS Series, gives you less of everything to give you more than ever before. Less frame and unnecessary detail for more focus on the flames. Less wasted heat with a higher efficiency rating. And less depth to give you a minimalist and sleek gas fireplace that uses a small footprint in the home. The DS Series is available both single and double sided in three different widths. A range of frame and fuelbed options allows you to customise your fireplace to suit your home.

www.escea.com/ds-series

FORMA FURNITURE Proudly designed and made in New Zealand. Lincoln Sofa

DAVID TRUBRIDGE New table lamp options from David Trubridge mean Koura 500 and Coral & Floral 400 lights can now be attached to a standard table lamp base. Just choose a light and colour, then source a table lamp base from your local lighting outlet - or use your own!

www.davidtrubridge.com

The Lincoln sofa has a high density foam seat and feather back cushions creating a contemporary timeless look with a luxurious feel. The base frame is powder coated steel in matte black . The Lincoln sofa is available in a variety of sizes, configurations and fabric of your choice. All manufactured at our factory in New Zealand. Fleur Sofa The Fleur sofa offers sleek fine lines combined with luxurious feather comfort offering a clean look with a laid back feel. Available as a standalone sofa or as a corner configuration in your choice of fabric. Proudly manufactured at our factory in New Zealand.

51-53 The Strand, Parnell Phone 368 7694 www.forma.co.nz www.facebook.com/formafurniturenz

MELISSA LOVELOCK TEXTILES A desire to bring the beauty of nature inside sees New Zealand artist and designer, Melissa Lovelock give new life to her paintings in the form of vibrant, printed cushions. These unique designs result in a variety of eye-catching florals that will brighten any decor. Turning paint into petals and art into cushions.

Facebook/Instagram: @melissalovelocktextiles www.melissalovelock.com

To advertise here contact Kim Chapman, phone: (07) 578 3646, mobile: 021 673 133, email: classifieds@xtra.co.nz


ADVERTISING PROMOTION

INTERIORS, KITCHEN & BATHROOM SHOWCASE BIG BRANDS ONLINE Stylish, durable and timeless. This beautifully distinctive, 90cm dual fuel cookmaster has a spacious five-burner gas hob, programmable timers, a dedicated grill compartment, and generously sized fan forced twin ovens. Now you can celebrate your inner foodie and make cooking an effortless pleasure by creating your side dishes in one oven and your main dish in the other. Removable glass doors and cook clean catalytic liners make cleaning effortless. Available in black or cream to add real class to your kitchen. Enjoy one-to-one customer service from Big Brands Online, a 2-year warranty and free shipping to main NZ centres.

TRISTONE Solid Surface Benchtops Selecting the ideal benchtop can be a daunting task, and your choice is usually a trade-off between style, practicality and cost. But with TriStone solid surface benchtops, there’s no need to compromise! Made from 100% acrylic resin and natural minerals, TriStone is beautiful, hard-wearing, low maintenance, and very reasonably priced. TriStone is one of the few benchtop materials with seamless joins, which means it can be fabricated to almost any size, shape and thickness. Its non-porous surface is also stain-resistant, hygienic and repairable. Visit the TriStone website to view the colour range and order free samples.

www.tristone.co.nz info@tristone.co.nz

Phone 0800 67 33 77. www.bigbrandsonline.co.nz

DI ROSA – PRESSED TIN PANELS

QUEENSTOWN | WANAKA INTERIORS

Pressed tin panels are a lovely alternative to use for a kitchen splashback, feature wall, ceiling, front of kitchen island or shop bar, up to dado height in a hallway or bathroom. For a modern or traditional look, use Pressed Tin Panels to make a statement.

Luxury interior design at its best. Design | Procurement | Installation

NICOLA MANNING DESIGN We work with you to create beautiful and functional spaces, tailored specifically to you. Whether you are looking to make small changes, a substantial renovation or build a new home, NM Design can work with you to create a space which reflects you and is a pleasure to live and work in. Using an interior designer will save you time and money and will “help you get it right the first time”. Nicola and Katherine from NM Design provide a complete interior design service including Kitchen, Laundry and Bathroom design, full design drawings, colours, soft furnishings, furniture, accessories and project implementation. We would love to hear from you.

Shop 13, The Landing 5 Hawthorne Drive, Queenstown 59 Brownston Street, Wanaka Ph 07 888 9900 www.dirosa.co.nz

Ph Julia 0274 750 510 (Queenstown) or Janine 027 202 9246 (Wanaka) www.queenstowninteriors.com

Ph 09 523 0108, 027 440 5091 nicola@nmdesign.co.nz www.nmdesign.co.nz

To advertise here contact Kim Chapman, phone: (07) 578 3646, mobile: 021 673 133, email: classifieds@xtra.co.nz


ADVERTISING PROMOTION

ART SHOWCASE

DESIGNERS CANDY The Designer Boys Art Collection has one of the largest and most diverse collections of artwork available in New Zealand offering an extraordinary range of gallery quality canvas artworks, giclee prints and hand embellished artworks.

OLIVIA BEZETT Art prints, original works and commissioned pieces of animals with surreal twists, drawn in colored pencils by artist Olivia Bezett.

With 250+ collections containing over 2500 artworks suitable for both commercial and residential use there is something for everyone. Available exclusively in NZ through Designers Candy.

www.designerscandy.co.nz

Ph: 022 341 1326 oliviabezett@gmail.com oliviabezettartist.com www.facebook.com/ OliviaBezettart/

CAZ NOVAK

ARTITEQ

Caz Novak's work is known for its vibrant colour and richly textured surfaces. Her popular Opulence Series sculpts impasto paint and explores Floriography - the language of flowers.

As a specialist in hanging systems, we develop flexible hanging systems for pictures and other wall decorations.

Preview and purchase new paintings from the Opulence Series by joining her website mailing list.

caz@caznovak.co.nz www.caznovak.co.nz

A picture hanging system consists of a hanging rail with hanging wires and hooks. There are many ways to hang art and decorate your walls. Artiteq guarantees a safe yet flexible way to hang pictures and wall decorations.

Ph: 0800 820 840 info@artiteq.co.nz www.artiteq.co.nz

HĂ–GLUND ART GLASS LAVA GLASS

VULL Vull Design, based in Dunedin, are stockists of Love Warriors of Sweden fine art photographic prints. The Love Warriors collaborate with notable international photographers to produce a stunning range of images with a Scandi vibe. Prints come with clips to hang casually cool. Available online. Luna - 100cm x 70cm.

Lava Glass is the home of the Lynden Over art glass collection. Lynden uses a unique technique of trailing coloured glass in layers, creating rich, painterly looks which are inspired by the dramatic landscapes of New Zealand. At Lava Glass in Taupo you can watch the mesmerising art of glass blowing in action and visit the spectacular and nationally recognised sculpture garden.

SARAH C DESIGN Sarah C artworks are a diverse range of pieces guaranteed to add colour and create atmosphere in any space.

World-renowned blown glass made by artists Ola and Marie HĂśglund and their family. The timeless collections are unique and created by hand to be welcome in any home.

Various and diverse mediums, from corrugated iron, and aluminium gloss panels to canvas, card and art blocks. Wall art for your space!

NELSON 52 Lansdowne Road, Richmond

shiree@vulldesign.co.nz www.vulldesign.co.nz

lavaglass.co.nz

Free Phone 0800 72 72 42 www.sarahc.co.nz sarah@sarahcdesign.co.nz

CENTRAL OTAGO 1767 Luggate-Cromwell Rd 50 mins from Queenstown between Cromwell and Wanaka www.hoglundartglass.com

To advertise here contact Kim Chapman, phone: (07) 578 3646, mobile: 021 673 133, email: classifieds@xtra.co.nz


SOURCE

"King Fisher" MIN KIM

Online lighting specialists Viewing by appointment only – see calendar on homepage

www.mrralph.co.nz 2a Seymour Street, Paeroa

NEW KITCHEN? HOW ABOUT A MAKEOVER INSTEAD...

Call us TODAY to find out more! Ambiance Interiors (94) Ltd 16 Railway Street, Newmarket, Auckland Tel: (09) 523 2240

w w w. a m b h o m e . c o m

SAME KITCHEN BEFORE

mykitchenmakeover.co.nz 0800 696 253

To advertise here contact Kim Chapman, phone: (07) 578 3646, mobile: 021 673 133, email: classifieds@xtra.co.nz

THE SOURCE


SOURCE sundancespas.co.nz

 

   ! Visit our display kitchen at:

 -3  %+1%." '-,%    222$.-,(,)(0$'%,/$-,5

155 The Strand, Parnell.

Stoked woodfired hot tubs, hand-made in New Zealand from stainless steel and cedar. No electricity, pumps, filters or chemicals, just fresh hot water!

www.stokedstainless.com

50 Lunn Ave, Mt Wellington, Auckland | 09 215 8736

Baywicks wine cellars

                    

BEDDING

|

FURNITURE

|

GIFTS

|

HOME WARE

                    

'    6 +"(* #"42($)/2(,%/0-."&%$-,5 www.baywicks.com

FREE nationwide shipping on orders over $199. Shop online or in store Auckland and Tauranga.

THE SOURCE

PHONE 0 9 3 6 0 1 3 6 1 . S H O P O N L I N E AT t h r e a d d e s i g n . co . n z O P E N S E V E N D AY S 2 7 4 a Ri c hm ond Rd , G re y Ly nn , A u ck l a n d 1021

To advertise here contact Kim Chapman, phone: (07) 578 3646, mobile: 021 673 133, email: classifieds@xtra.co.nz


Welcome HOME Subscribe to HOME, save on the cover price and have every issue delivered to your door.

155 From the editor Simon Farrell-Green is inspired by trend reports from Milan’s Salone del Mobile, and anticipates HOME’s annual Design Awards.

156 Design Forecast A group of design enthusiasts spent a day with industry experts finding out about international trends and new releases from Milan.

158 Design Awards We’re calling for entries for our annual Design Awards, sponsored by Fisher & Paykel.

160 Douglas Lloyd Jenkins Our columnist reflects on the very personal nature of how we measure quality and design.

162 My favourite building Christchurch Art Gallery director Blair Jackson has personal ties to those who created and lived in his favourite building.

Friends of HOME

FRIENDS OF HOME

154


FRIENDS OF HOME

SUBSCRIPTION OFFER

$8 AN ISSUE

Subscribe to HOME and save Receive issue ater issue of inspiring architecture and design.

$24 every 3 issues Just $8 an issue (via direct debit)

$52 for 6 issues (1 year) Save 21% off cover price Already a subscriber? Extend or renew your subscription with this offer

NEVER MISS AN ISSUE NEVER PAY COVER PRICE AGAIN A GREAT GIFT FOR FAMILY AND FRIENDS FREE DELIVERY TO YOUR HOME

Offer ends 8 August, 2018

SUBSCRIBE ONLINE:

www.magshop.co.nz/home/M1805HAE Or phone 0800 MAGSHOP (0800 624 746) and quote M1805HAE

Terms and conditions apply. Offer valid for delivery in New Zealand for subscriptions ordered on or before 8 August, 2018. Offer is not available in conjunction with any other offer. Subscriptions on Direct Debit renew automatically and will continue until we are advised of cancellation. Direct Debits may be cancelled at any time, simply by calling 0800 624 746 during business hours. Subscription rates are available for delivery to New Zealand addresses only. For existing subscribers, subscriptions will commence at end of current term. For full terms and conditions and overseas rates, visit magshop.co.nz.


FRIENDS OF HOME

INTRODUCTION

Calendar of Events JUNE

• June/July issue on sale • Design Awards call to entry AU G U S T

• Aug/Sep issue on sale • Design Awards winner and finalists announced SEPTEMBER

• NZIA Festival of Architecture O CTO B E R

• Oct/Nov issue on sale • Home of the Year 2019 call to entry N OV E M B E R

• HOME Tour, Auckland D EC E M B E R

• Dec/Jan issue on sale • Home of the Year entries close F E B R UA RY

• Feb/March issue on sale • Home of the Year judging • Home of the Year talks in Auckland and Wellington

You might have noticed this issue dedicates a fair bit of space to design – most of it coming from Milan and the Salone del Mobile, the world’s biggest celebration of design and an event from which many directions for the next year become apparent. We were lucky enough to have a small group of industry experts reporting from the Salone this year: be sure to check in on our Milan Report 2018, p.35.

M A RC H

• Home of the Year finalists announced APRIL

• April/May issue on sale • Home of the Year announced in Auckland

he Salone ran in early April: not long afterwards, in mid-May, we held our first Design Forecast event, in which our Salone del Mobile correspondents discussed their findings and inspirations for the year ahead at a day-long event in central Auckland. You can read more on p.156.

And, finally, we are of course just as interested in New Zealand design directions as international: we’re calling for entries into our annual Design Awards, again sponsored by Fisher & Paykel. We’ll be judging in August and will announce the winners in the October/November issue. Read more on p.158.

homemagazine.co.nz

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

155


FRIENDS OF HOME

1. Caroline Montague takes centre stage at Matisse to discuss new releases at the store. 2. he goodie bags at ECC were given to everyone on the tour. 3. A living area display at the Studio Italia showroom. 4. ‘Carousel’ pendants by Lee Broom at ECC. 5. Maitre d’ Jeremy Turner greets guests at Cibo.

1

156

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

2

3

4

5


FRIENDS OF HOME

HOME EVENTS

Design Forecast On a crisp Friday morning in late May, we gathered at Matisse’s Auckland showroom to kick off a day of high design, inspired by the Milan Furniture Fair. Our guest experts had recently returned from Milan, filled with design finds for the year ahead; our readers were hungry for inspiration. Our youngest atendee, meanwhile, was an enthusiastic 11-yearold – proof positive that you can never be too young to care about design. If there’s a theme, it was of the renaissance of classics rather than trends; the power of things well-made. At Matisse, Caroline Montague advised us to only buy things we love, allowing for collections and heirlooms: the best things, she advised, don’t change from season to season. hen it was on to Backhouse, where Michelle, Gary and Oliver Backhouse showed us recent purchases and trends from Milan, which included a distinctly retro vibe.

6

After lunch at Euro – champagne, whitebait, hapuku – it was on to the beautiful apartment of Kristina Pickford in the Dilworth Building, with a fantastic collection of designer pieces by Knoll and USM. hen, we headed to ECC to be inspired by Debbie Quy’s tales of parties at Minoti, animal-inspired design from Moooi and organic shapes to come by. Finally, it was on to drinks and cheese at Studio Italia, where Valeria Carbonaro-Laws spoke of updates to classics, including Knoll tables. hank you everyone for coming, and thank you to our partners, without whom we couldn’t have staged the day. If you haven’t already read it, turn to our expert coverage at Milan Report 2018, p.35.

6. We broke the day of design with lunch at Cibo. 7. A display of PET lamps at Backhouse – the lighting combines artisan crafting with the re-use of plastic botles.

7

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

157


FRIENDS OF HOME

DESIGN AWARDS 2018

Call for entries Design Awards 2018

Calling all designers: HOME and Fisher & Paykel are looking for the country’s best new design for the 2018 Design Awards. Our annual awards celebrate new and innovative design across furniture, textiles, ceramics and lighting – clever pieces that go in or around the home.

Judged by HOME editor Simon Farrell-Green and Fisher & Paykel general manager of design Mark Elmore, the awards are open to New Zealand designers, both established and new, along with artists, whose designs are intended for sale. he winner will receive $3000 in Fisher & Paykel products. We are interested in designs that solve problems, both new and familiar, with elegance and simplicity. he awards will be judged in August and announced in our October/ November issue.

Entries close: Monday August 13, 2018 For an entry form or more information, please email homenewzealand@bauermedia.co.nz with ‘Design Awards’ in the subject line.

158

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D


FRIENDS OF HOME

Above he 2017 Design Awards were won by Hayden Maunsell and Alan Neilson for ‘Newton’ espresso, a beautifully simple solution to an everyday need. Right he ‘Raft’ shelf by Tim Webber was a finalist in the awards.

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

159


FRIENDS OF HOME

DOUGLAS LLOYD JENKINS

Suit yourself Douglas Lloyd Jenkins sizes up the very personal nature of measurements.

Open a weekend newspaper or a magazine and it won’t be long before you come across an article in which you are being corralled into one of those social groups based on behaviour. here is, it seems, a new label for each new generation or part thereof. It all started once the Baby Boomers had done their thing. Suddenly there was a term for each new batch – X-Generation, Y-Generation, Millennials, Digital Natives, Snowflakes… Annoying as it can be to be parcelled up in this way, we can take solace that even from inside one of these groups, there is still room to claim some individuality. here are, it seems, always moments in which you can process a shared experience differently from most of your peer group. One such occurrence that stands out for me was when New Zealand decided to convert from imperial to metric measurements. here has been no recent nationwide conversion that is comparable – except perhaps abandoning a rather strange left turn road rule, which was always counterintuitive. It’s hard to think what might happen today that would have the same impact; a compulsory and immediate conversion to Te Reo, perhaps (it happens – in the 1920s, Mustafa Kemal Atatürk gave Turkish people three months to learn an entirely new alphabet). However, to me at least, nationwide change today never seems quite as sweeping or as immediate as the conversion to the metric system in the mid-1970s. Back at my intermediate school, teachers, who were perhaps still struggling with the change from pounds, shillings and pence five years earlier, were completely confused by the new system. he way I remember it is that they simply decided not to teach measurements at all. Rather than learning a sort of measurement bilingualism, the end result for me has been a sort of confused interchangeability that expresses itself in measurements such as one yard, six millimetres. Still uncertain about the fractions of an inch, I’ll use millimetres for any small measurement. I like both feet and yards for their immediately understandable humanist values. I think of a mile and a kilometre as being much the same (both are distances I don’t want to be made to walk in the rain). I know a pint is 600ml because they kept the same milk botles even when plastic came along. Clearly others of my generation were not so affected – I hear people of my age talking confidently in pure metrics – but I’ve ended up with my own internal system of measurement, which works for me.

160

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

When navigating the world of design, and in particular interiors and architecture, a few personal systems of measurement can be helpful. he most difficult one to perfect is a system, or even simply a language, to measure quality. he words we use for quality are always under threat from advertisers, who like to claim superiority for very run-of-the-mill products in order to beter sell them. If you go back 50 years or so, New Zealanders had two measures of quality that were largely unassailable. ‘English’ could be used to denote the quality of china, glass and textiles. For the rest, the fallback term was ‘old’ – old, or antique, meant of a quality that had stood the test of time. In a contemporary world, however, announcing product as either ‘English’ or ‘antique’ is no longer a universally winning formula. We live in a time in which many of the materials encountered in a design project will be new; often products of technological innovations that have taken place a very long way from our friends in Brexitland. It is ironic, then, that some of the terms now in frequent use for quality come from the very heart of England – London’s Savile Row. Made-to-measure is a term that originated in the process of making men’s suits. Smart and all as it sounds, it is the middle of three options. Most suits are off-the-peg – you buy them in the shop and hope they fit (they seldom do), perhaps having the trousers or sleeves altered to suit. Madeto-measure suits are those that come from an existing standard patern, which is tweaked prior to assembly to reflect the customer’s measurements. And at the top end are bespoke suits. hese are tailored to your body from the ground up – super stylish and super expensive, they take seemingly forever to make, but are worth the wait. Most welldressed men (and no doubt a number of women) yearn to own at least one bespoke suit in a lifetime. he thing about suits – and the explanation of their longevity as the staple of the male wardrobe – is that a good one hides a multitude of sins, and may appear to be of higher quality than it really is. Off-the-peg can look made-to-measure, and if the planets align, either can pass for bespoke. Here the flexibility of language and the flexibility of appearance aligns with our current age. he range of suit-making terms gives us a way of measuring quality that we can adapt for ourselves; to fit our own personal needs, for our own personal satisfaction. And after all, this is exactly what a personal measurement system – even one as confusing as one yard, six millimetres – should do.

Right Whether a suit or your own personal space, measuring quality is a very personal thing. Photograph Samuel Hartnet


FRIENDS OF HOME

ME

W ZE EA AL AN D

1


Photograph Kate Claridge

FRIENDS OF HOME

LAST WORD

My favourite building New Christchurch Art Gallery director Blair Jackson is delighted that the home and studio of the late Bill Suton is to be restored and gited to the city.

162

H O M E N E W ZE AL AN D

“I pass the Suton House each day on my walk to work. I’d known about Bill’s house for a long time. I’d often heard people talk about it, and I knew about its history – I’d met Bill quite a few times and I worked with Neil Roberts, the owner of the house after Bill. But it wasn’t until early 2016 that I first saw the building when my wife, Kim, and I were house-hunting in the neighbourhood. he modest yet beautifully designed house sits in a fantastic rambling garden and looks out to the surrounding Port Hills. he house now stands alone; the last remaining property in this part of the residential red zone. It’s nice to think of Bill working there, painting images of the hills he so loved. However, what really draws me to this place is that it was designed in 1961 by Bill’s friend Tom Taylor, who was also an artist. Tom was one of my lecturers at the University of Canterbury’s School of Fine Arts. He scared the shit out of me in my first year. He might have been one of the reasons

I went into the painting department rather than studying sculpture. I did take sculpture as a minor subject, though, and spent a day a week over the course of my degree working with Tom. I grew to like him a lot and, looking back, he might have taught me a thing or two. I’m pleased that Bill’s house is going to be saved and given to the city, and I’m grateful to everyone who has helped make this happen. It’s an exceptional building in a unique location. Looking at the house’s lovely details, I hear Tom’s voice saying, ‘form follows function’. What’s important now is that its future function suits its perfect form.”


POWERSURGE.CO.NZ


Home new zealand june 01 2018  
Home new zealand june 01 2018  
Advertisement